Collection Title: Carmarthen weekly reporter

Provider: Llyfrgell Genedlaethol Cymru

Hawliau: Nid yw statws neu berchnogaeth hawlfraint yr adnodd hwn yn hysbys.

Gwylio manylion cyfan

Llun 1 o 4 Nesaf Olaf
Full Screen
7 erthygl ar y dudalen hon
Advertising

PLEASE CALL TO SEE OUR STOCK OF AGRICULTURAL MACHINERY. 1 Js'lZ TEE LIGHTEST BINDER EVER MADE. SOME POINTS- RIGID MAIN FRAME. STRONG DRIVE CHAIN. STEEL PLATFORM. WIDE RANGE OF ADJUSTMENT FLOATING FLEVATOR, l!1" SIMPLE KNOTTER. THE M^Oo^imok A4ade to pass through ordinary k7 gatewavs, Easy in Action. Light in Draught. W. ™1A¥~& SOlt IHDNUONSEBS, HOUSE FMISHERS. AID m am ME AGRICULTURAL ENGINEERS, c Ironmongery—10 Hall Street and 9 Priory Street. Bedstead Showrooms-5, St Mary Street. Furniture Showrooms-i St Mary Streei. Farm Implements—Market Place, Carmarthen, Llanelly, Llandyssul, and Llanybyther. Telegrams-" Thomasg Ironmongers, Carmarthen." Telephone—No. 19. EORGES t I L E G RNEL | PILLS A ARVELLOUS REMEDY. _>- For upwards of Forrty Years these Pills have held the first place in the World as a Remedy for PILES and GRAVEL, and all the common disorders of the Bowels, Stomach, Liver, and Kidneys; and there is no civilized Nation under the Sun that has not experienced their Healing Virtues. THE THBEE t URMS OF THIS REMEDY; No. ] -Ge0rge's Pile and Gravel Pills, v No. 2 -George's Gravel Pills. No. 3- George's Pills for the Piles, Sold everywhere in Boxes. 1/3 & 3/- each. By Post, 1/4 & 3/2. ¥U)PIUE(OB-I. E. EOBGE, 8S.R.P#&» HIFWAIM, ABERDARK. #" r. _r PRINTING1JRINTING! GOOD CHEAP AND EXPEDITIOUS PRINTING EXECUTED AT THE t- 

AgriculturaliProblems in Carmarthenshire

AgriculturaliProblems in Carmarthenshire. SOLDIERS AND CONSCIENTIOUS OBJECTORS FOR THE LAND. A meeting of the Carmarthenshire War Agri cultural Committee was held at the County Offices, Carmarthen, on Saturday, Mr William Griffiths, Llanelly, presiding. There were also present Mr W. Harries, Dryslwyn; Mr Barret Evans, Glyn Llanstephan; Mr Him. Williams, Abergwili; and Mr J. Griffiths, Ardwywn; and the Secretary (Mr Daniel John, B.Sc. Capt. E. R. Pryse attended the meeting to explain the programme made in getting mili- tary labour on farms. He had received 254 applications for soldiers to help in the har- vest, and out of those 254 applications were for able bodied men and four for convalescents. The total number of men asked for was 261 able bodied and 4 convalescents, and the total number of soldiers released up-to-date had been 149 able-bodied and two convalescents. He anticipated that when the scheme was com- pleted over 60 per cent. of the applications for soldiers would be granted. The chief reason for the refusals was that farmers had asked for the release of particular men—their sons and ex-workmen—and it had not always been possible to release the men. Let them, for instance, take the Pembroke Yeomanry which was largely recruited from this neighbourhood. They were only allowed to release a certain percentage of men at one time, and he was putting in applications at the present time. He anticipated that at least 50 per cent. of them would be granted. He had received a memorandum from the Board of Agriculture asking how it was proposed to deal with the labour necessary for the corn harvest. lie had seen Mi Daniel Johns and the manager of the Labour Exchange on the matter, and the three of them had come to the conclusion that if they had a squad of 50 sent down to the dis- trict to camp, they would be able to deal promptly with any applications for labour that might bereceived in addition to any applica- tions that might be made for particular men. That would meet the labour question on farms so far as the corn harvest went. Farmers would be able to come to him and take the men away for one or two .days or more. Mr Barrett Evans said it would be an advan. tage if farmers could get the particular men they wanted, such as sons and servants. Capt. Pr yse I quitp agree, and everything el possible is being done. Capt. Pryse added that on the whole the scheme to get military labour on farms had worked very well this year. They must have skilled men to work a binder on a farm, and he suggested that the squadof 50 already men- 119 tioned should be sent from a regiment like the Pembrokeshire Yeomanry which was recruited from this area. It would be of great benefit sending them men who understood farming. He understood that there had been more applications from darrnarthenshire for the assistance of soldiers for the harvest than from any other county. Mr W. Harris, Drysllwyn, said this year he was very lucky in getting two soldiers to assist him. They were very useful, and he was per- fectly satisfied with them. Other members spoke favourably of the scheme to get solders on the land, and Mr W. Harris remarked. "The scheme was a great deal more successful than the scheme to get women labour" (laughter). AUSTRJAS AND TURKS NOT WANTED. The Board of Agriculture wrote suggesting the employment of selected Austrians and Turkish prisoners of war on farms to meet the shortage of labour. The Committee took no action in the matter, Mr Barrett Evans and Mr Wm. Williams remarking that they would not like to employ any of them. NO GOOD FOR THE LAND. The Committee of Work of National Im- portance wrote recommending that farmers should apply to them for conscientious objec- tors for employment on farms), who had been exempted on condition that they undertook work of national importance. The Secretary: I am afraid most of them are shopkeepers and others. The Chairman No it is theological students we have met with mostly. Mr AY m. Williams: Put them at the front. Nothing was done in the matter. A FARMER'S APPEAL. The Committee decided to strongly support the appeal of Mr John Thomas. Pantyrhyn, Llangunnor, to the Board of Agriculture for the discharge of his son from the Army in order to work on the farm. Mr Thomas said he was 66 years of age.- The acreage of the farm was 88, "and there were 14 cows and six horses, and he had only his wife and a servant girl to help him. FARM COLONY. The question of establishing a farm colony in Carmarthenshire for the employment of the soldiers was considered. Mr Barrett Evans referred to a number of adjoining farms near St. Clears which the com- mittee thought would serve admirably as a colony. The whole of the farms comprised from 1,5000 to 2.000 acres, and the Secretary was directed to recommend it to the respon- sible authorities.

OUR ARMYS FELLOWSHIP WITH FRANCE

OUR ARMY'S FELLOWSHIP WITH FRANCE. Many interesting points are brought out in a lavishly illustrated article on "Our Army's Fellowship with France," in the August num- ber of the "AVindsor Magazine." and the pic- ture given of the perfect unity and brother- hood in arms of the Anglo-French Forces on the Western Front form a sympathetic and even genial subect for the opening war article of this holiday number. In the course of his narrative the author, Mr John F. Rendall, sayS "We have many army bases in France. One famous town is almost entirely British, and overflows with men who work the complicated machinery of supply and transport, ambulance and hospitals. In the cathedral here the khaki uniform is conducted to the front seat. And so it is in another old city, with its vast camps on the hills, and Tommy's care-free laughter brightening the cafes of the R.ue de la Re- publique. "Now, here is a situation calling for tact and delicate perception of ways and customs wholly different from onr own. Note what happens when a French poilu salutes a group of officers All return the salute, instead of the senior officer only, as the etiquette is. where the salut- ing soldier British instead of French. It is by 'V' such aparently trivial courtesies as this that we daily demonstrate to our Allies that we are also their guests. "All the lead thus given by the officers is followed by our men. No Frenchwomen need draw water from the village well whilst a. British regiment is in billets there. On the hot interminable roads of Artois old folk now look for a lift on our Army Service lorries, and our magical motor workshop will halt by the wayside for good-natured repairs to a French farm cart. "It is trifles like these which have blown away the ancient traditions of the French stage and cosic papers. To many of our Allies the British soldier was a lank fellow in a tight shell jacket, with a bull-dog pipe between his protruding teeth-a fearsome barbarian in huge boots, lacking the merest elements of good manners. But Tommy has conquered France with his kindly 'Cheer 0!' his passion for washing, his love for the children, and in- veterate gaiety. France knows our High- landers now—have not the grands couturiers taken fashion hints from their 'beribboned bonnets and dancing-girls' petticoats' ?" The August "Windsor," a notably attractive issue, also contains a paper on "The Work of Sniping in the War." and a survey of the not. able activities of the Maharajas, Rajas and Nawobs who are actually in person at the Front, fighting for the Empire. The work of the Women Police Force is also described. The fiction of the number includes character- istic stories by such well-known authors as Haiti well Sutcliffe. Edgar Wallace, Orme I Angus, Ethel Turner. Charles G. D. Roberts, Ralph Stock. Fred M. White. Theodore Good- ridge Roberts. The wealth of illustrations accompanying this varied programme includes the work of sundry distinguished artists among them G. C. AAilmhurst, Fred Pegram. Harold Copping and Maurice Greiffenhagen. Altoge- ther this is a number notable for the import- ance and variety of its contents.

The UnestioD of Health

The UnestioD of Health The question of health is a matter which It jure to concern us at one time or anothet when Influenza is so prevalent as it if jnct now, so it iswou to know what to e to ward off an attack of this ra-wt weakening disease, this epidemic catarrh or cold of an aggravating kind, to combat it whilst under its baneful influence, and particularly aitec no attack, for then the system ia so lowered as to be liable to the most dangerous of oom- plaints. Gwilym EvaM' Quinine Bitten it acknowledged by ail who have given it a fair trial to be the best specific remedy d««lint with lofluenea in all its various stages, a Preparation skilfully prepared with Quinine and accompanied with other blood purifying and enriching agents, suitable for the lirer, digestion, and all those ailments reqniii- tonic strengthening and nerve increat properties. It is invaluable for thoee suffer- ing from colds, pneumonia, or any serious ill. ness, or prostration caused by sloeplemem, or worry of any kind, when the body has a general feeling of weaknesa or Inasitnde. Send for a copy of the pamphlet of t4wti. monial- which carefully read and consider well, then buy a bottle (sold in two Met, 2a 9d and 48 6d) at your nearest Chemist or Stores, but when purchasing see that the namo "Gwilym Evans" is on the label, stamp And bottle, for withoot which sane are genuine. Sole Proprietor*: Qoinin*. Bitten Manufacturing Company, I/imited, 1 South Wales.

Censor and Letters

Censor and Letters. EMPHATIC OFFICAL ORDER. The following Army Order is published:— There is reason to believe information con- cerning operations is being conveyed by officers and men of the British Army in the field to their relatives at home, either personally, or by letter or telegram, and that in some cases a code has been elaborated to facilitate com- munication of information which would other- wise be stopped by the censors. It is to be regretted that at this stage of the war it is necessary to explain to all ranks that the sole object of the field censorship, and 1 of all other steps taken to prevent the leakage of military information, is to seoure substan- tial gains with the least possible loss. Each officer or man who privately transmits information, even to those on whose discretion he may have the most complete reliance, in- evitably facilitates the task of the enemy's agents and indirectly sacrifices the lives of his comrades. | This tact should be impressed upon all | officers and men. so that alt ranks may co- operate to ensure that the progress of the Army is not imperilled or rendered more costly by the criminal folly of a few individuals, who, if discovered. will be severely dealt with. A footnote states a copy of this order willi be issued to every officer, who will bring it continually to the notice of those under him.

Advertising

FOR OLD AND YOUNG MORTIMER'S I COUGH MIXTURE FOR COUGHS, COLDS, WHOOPING COUGH, ETC., ETC. J O'VER 70 YEIRS REPUTATION IN THIS DISTRICT. THIS CELEBRATED WELSH REMEDY j Is now put up in cartons securely packed for transmission to all parts of the world j and contains a Pamphlet, written by an eminent Medical Authority, dealing with J the various beneficial uses of this specific i Price Is lid and 2s 9d per bottle, Tit 4 larger bottle is ly Jar the cheapest. <

f LOCAL FAIRS FOR AuGUST

f LOCAL FAIRS FOR AuGUST. 2. Llandovery. 3-4. Kidwelly. 6. Llanboidy. 7. Llanybyther. j 12-14. Carmarthen. I 15. Lampeter, Haverfordwest. J 16. Narberth. 21.Newcastle Emlyn and Adpa-r, Cayo, and Letterston. t 22. Oayo. Letterston. 23. Llaiidilo. j j 28. Whitland. 29. Pontardulais.