Collection Title: Brecon county times, Neath gazette and general advertiser

Provider: Llyfrgell Genedlaethol Cymru

Hawliau: Nid yw statws neu berchnogaeth hawlfraint yr adnodd hwn yn hysbys.

Gwylio manylion cyfan

Cyntaf Cynt Llun 3 o 8 Nesaf Olaf
Full Screen
13 erthygl ar y dudalen hon
GERMANY AND FOOD DUTIES

GERMANY AND FOOD DUTIES. A COBDENITE BOGEY. Free Traders, especially the few remaining stalwarts of the Cobrk-n Club, are chortling over the fact that Germany, since the war broke out, has seen fit to suspend the duty ordinarily levied on imported wheat. They profess to discern in this action the break- down ot Protection. "See they exclaim, "the great Power in whose policy food pro- tection has been an established principle for a generation is at this supreme crisis found incapable of feeding itself adequately by its own produce In their eagerness to score a point they do not pause to consider that it is precisely because of the "supreme crisis"— a crisis which has rendered every economic condition abnormal—that the difficulty of feeding the whole of Germany with her own produce has arisen. The land has been denuded of its workers, while the demands of a huge army as well as of the civilian population have to be met. The home supply of wheat and rye has, consequently, been inadequate, and prices, as in this country, have gone up to a startling extent. Under these circumstances it became imperative for the German Government to take steps to increase the supply in order to keep down the price of bread, and the sus- pension of the duty of lis lOd per quarter on wheat was obviously the first step to take. GERMANY'S AGRICULTURAL POLICY. It should be remembered that the deliberate policy of German statesmen for many years has been to maintain the prices of corn at such a level as to protect and encourage agriculture. At the present time a duty is not necessary in order to attain that object, as the agriculturist is enjoying the protection afforded by increased demands and shorter supplies. Such conditions, how- ever, will end with the war. Although Germany has made great strides as a manu- facturing nation, one-third of her population is still engaged in agricultural pursuits. It is of vital importance to her, as a great inland nation with but few seaports, to encourage the production of foodstuffs within her own borders, and in this she has been entirely successful. She produces annually about five million tons of wheat, 11 millions of rye, eight millions of oats, four millions of barley, and 50 millions of potatoes. This, it will be admitted, goes a long way towards feeding her population of 68 millions. Had Germany neglected to protect her agriculture, and been obliged to rely upon outside sources for her food supply, it might have been a good thing for ourselves and our Allies, but where would Germany be to-day. THE STIMULATING EFFECT OF A TARIFF. It is one of the stock assertions of Free Traders that Protection has a paralysing effect upon the industries protected. It is quite evident that this is not true as regards Manufacturing industries, as our keenest competitors in the markets of the world —Germany and the United States—are both highly protected countries* Neither is it true with regard to the great industry of agriculture. The writer of an interesting review of the progress of German agriculture during the last twenty-ire years, which appeared in the "Times" of April 12th, says "Farmers have not stood on the defensive behind their tariff wall. On the contrary they have been alert, prompt to receive new ideas, ready to prow by new discoveries. High protective duties have net paralysed energy. On the contrary they stimulated enterprise by securing a stable return for the outlay of capital and labour. Without their help German agriotttwrists could not have secured such great results, in the face of competition with newer agricultural eountries which operated, with cheap and virgin soil and cheap labour, and at times threw their products in enormous quantities and at ruinously low prioes on the European markets." Whatever may be said for or against the protective agricultural policy of Germany, there can be no doubt it has attained its object. BRITISH Y. GERMAN POLICY. We need hardly say that a policy aimed at raising prices, even in the interests of the millions employed upon the land, is not the policy of any party in this country. The object rather is to stimulate the production of duty-free wheat within the British Empire, and thus to ensure a cheap and plentiful food supply independent of foreign sources. There is, therefore, a vital difference between Germany's policy and that advocated by Tariff Reformers for this eountry. The latter policy, it is clear, would tend to reduce rather than to increase the price of the loaf, while Germany's policy is deliberately framed with the object of maintaining high prices. It is, therefore, as absurdly untrue to say, as Gobdenites are now saying, that Tariff Reformers are urging the British people to adopt German policy as it is to suggest that Germany has found her policy a failure. The British public, we are convinced, will neither be fooled nor frightened by the feeble fulminations of the Oobden Club.

Advertising

nTLADIES] JPI UDTWI ■NN we M *■ trnteif raff ewer tm »—rte Jrr I M H*r tm f) 1 9afe,ftMBa»4%MiF. Wlee,eBd«i I

BRECON CHILDRENS CONCERT

BRECON CHILDREN'S CONCERT. Distribution of Tonic Sol-fa Awards. On Wednesday evening last week a highly successful children's concert, with competi- tions, took place at the Guild Hall, Brecon, in connection with the Ploogh Chapel Tonic Sol-fa Class, which was established at thE, beginning of the winter. The gathering was presided over by the Mayor (Councillor G. T. Jones), and there was a fairly good attend- ance. Io cpellir;g the concert, the Mayor said that nothing appealed to him more forcibly than the art; of music and dooutioo. It waa as important as reading; and writing, beoaose it waa a universal laugaage. It was the language, which rernaJiHd unchanged in the confusion of Babe!, and from what be was told lately by a Boldif.r who had returned from the Front, nothing appealed so much to the tired warriors as the old Welsh tones after their return from the fray. He understood they were indebted for the institution of the Plough Tonic Sol-fa Class to thy veteran tradesman, Mr David Morgan. Mr Morgan wus a man of many parte, but there was one thing h6 had fought shy of cp to the present and that was the Brecon Town Council. (Laughter.) He hoped the Tonic Sol-fa Class, which had proved successful during the past session, would be resumed at the commencement of the next winter. (Applause.) Principal T. Lewis, of the Memorial Oollege, distributed the medal and certificates won by the pupils of the Tonic Sol-fa Class, and read out portions of the report of the examiner (Mr W. T. Davits, Talgarth). This stated that with one exception the candidates did remark. ably well, reflecting great credit, not only upon themselves, but upon the teaching they bad received. Had it not been for nervousness, the test would have been perfectly rendered. Continuing, Principal Lewis said be hoped the class would be continued 60 as to popularise the art of music in the town. He presented the certificates as follows:—1, Bessie Middle ton (Plough) (and medal presented by Messrs J. Hando, Ltd.) 2, Margaret Price (Watergate Chapel) 8, Doris Telling (Watergate) and Ieuan Evans (Plough) (equal). Certifiates were also presented to the following :-Etsis Lloyd, (Glamorgan street), Elsie Vaughan (Church of England), Mary Price (Watergate), Herrmann Lewis (Glamorgan street) Emily Lewis (Llan- faes W.), Elsie Pierce (Plough), Trevor Williams (Plough), and Willie Price (Water- gate). Principal Lewis added a few words of 000- gratulation both to the class and teaoher (Mr Rbys Jones), whom he described as an excellent choir trainer in every respect. He also congratulated the originator of the class (Mr David Morgan), and the ladies who had instituted the violin class in the town. There was nothing better than membership of a ohoir to cultivate the spirit of obedience or discipline. Membership of a choir would do as much for boys and girls as the drill sergeant did in the army, and Mr Rbys Jones was an excellent drill sergeant. (Applause.) He appealed to the boys and girls to continue their membership of the Tonic Sol-fa Class next winter, as it. would be an excellent means of elevating and instructing I their moral obaracter. (Applause.) The programme was as follows :-Pianoforte sole, Miss 'Stella Price dramatic chorus, Casabianca," (Tom Price) Childron's Choir recitation, The Sentinel, or Who's there ? (Yogi) Mies Alwyne Rowlands song, Clang of. the Wooden Shoon," (Molloy), Miss Dora Eernick song and chorus, Blue Eyes," (Nicbolls) Herrmann Lewis part song, The Stream and the Flower," (T. Price) Children's Choir song, Where my Caravan has rested," Mies Elsie M illett recitation, "The Eve of Waterloo," Miss Lizzie Prosser; song, Miss Dorothy Davies; duett. "Spriiag's Delight," (Muller) Misses Elsie Millett and Bessie Middleton song, Roses," (Stopben Adams) Misa Eira Adams duett, Prin. Lewis and Mr Evan Evans song, II When I leave the world behind," (Irving Berlin), Miss Annie Powell; quartette, Principal Lewis, Messrs Rhys Jones, Bvan Evans, and W. T. Jones song, Break, break, break," (Lewis Carey), Miss Eira Evans part song, 0 Hush tbee, my Babie," (Sullivan), Children's Choir. The following were the results of the compe- UtiollB :-SJlo under 12 (open), If The Miller of the Dee,"—1, Herrmann Lewis 2, Doris Telling. Solo, under 16 (open), Robin Adair,"—1, Elsie Lewis 2, Margaret Price. Mr Oscar Watbin was the adjudicator. The Children's Choir was under the able con- duciorship of Mr Rbys Jones, while the aooompaniBts were Mrs Bodman and Mr R W Musk. The sooretarial duties both in connec- tion with the class and concert were carried on by Mr Tom Jenkins, Conway terrace.

Advertising

"TIZ" for Sore, Tired Feet—Ah! "Sueh a Relief I How my sore, puffed-up, perspiring feet ached for TIZ." "11, Joitnay, Pmwlf." Ah I what relief. No more tired feet; no more burning feet no more swollen, perspiring feet. No more soreness in corns, hard skin, bunions, chilblains. No matter what ails your feet or what under the sun you've tried without getting relief, just use TIE. TIZ is the only remedy that draws out all the poisonous exudations which puft up the feet. TIZ cures your foot trouble so that you'll never limp or draw up your face in pain. Your shoes won't seem tight and your feet will never, never hurt or get sore and swollen. Think of it, no more foot misery, no more agony from corns, hard skin, or bunions. Get a 1/1! box at any chemist's or stores and get instant relief. Wear smaller shoes. Just once try TIZ. Get.a whole year's foot comfort for only Ill" Think of it!

BRECON GUARDIANS

BRECON GUARDIANS. The Estimate County Call Less. The annual meeting of the Brecon, Board of Guardians was held on Thursday when those present were Miss Adelaide Williams, the Revs. T. Griffiths, A. Garnons Williams, and T. C. Richards, Messrs Owen Price, E. T. Hyde, Jones(Llandefalle), Wm. Morgan (Llan- frynach), J. G. Jones, John Price, Tom Morgan, John Jones (Battle), John Jones (Glyn), J. James Williams, Thomas Williams, Torn Morgan, J. P. Williams, Rees Williams, Evan Jones, Edgar Morgan, David Davies, O. T. Harrys Howells, John Phillips, W. C. Davies, Daniel Watkins, Jenkin Williams, A A. Mitchell, John Thomas, David Thomas, Wm. Morgan (Glyntawe), David Thomas, John Smith, J. F. Ricketts, John Powell, John Jones (Llanfihangel-nantbran), W. Wactyn Williams. < ELECTION OF CHAIRMAN AND VICE-CHAIRMAN. At the outset the Deputy Clerk (Mr E. J. Hill) took the chair and.on the proposition of Mr A. A. Mitchell, seconded by the Rev. A. Garnons Williams, Mr Owen Price was re- elected chairman for the ensuing year. Having returned thanks for the honour conferred on him, Mr Owen Price said he thought the Brecon Guardians had pulled together in the past as well as, if not better than many boards in the Principality. He was very glad to inform them that the rates would be down to some extent during the coming half-year. He did not think the Board had been extravagant in the past, but it was their duty at the present time to cur- tail expenditure and to be as economical as possible. He hoped that practice would be continued. He did not think the paupers had suffered in any way by the action of the Board, on the contrary, on the whole the amount which they had received had in- creased during the last two or three years. In that respect the Guardians had done their duty in an equitable manner. On the proposition of the Rev. A. Garnons Williams, seconded by Mr John Jones (Battle), Mr John Jones (Llanfihangel- nantbran) was re-elected vice-chairman. VAGRANTS AND INMATES. The number of .vagrants relieved during the past fortnight was 89, being a decrease of 42 as compared with the corresponding period last year. According to the Master's report there were 56 persons in the house at the end of the last fortnight, being the same number as on the corresponding date last year. THE BOARDING-OUT COMMITTEE. The Rev. T. Griffiths asked when the Boarding-Out Committee met, as he had not received a notice of it for some time. The Clerk It meets every three months. Mr Griffiths: I thought it was run by one or two members. The Clerk said they had had no time lately to hold the meetings. The Rev. T. C. Richards asked what had become of a committee which was appointed recently to consider the question of economis- ing at the House. The Rev. T. Griffiths said that committee had met and it was most satisfactory to find that they had economised. THE ESTIMATE. The Deputy Clerk presented the estimate for the ensuing half-year, and said he had increased the expenditure by J6134 which went towards maintenance, cost of lunatics, salaries, etc., which had gone up. The Union rate worked out Id higher than it was in the corresponding period last year, namely 4ld in the A. That was due to the increased cost of food. There was a reduction of L697 in the county call which was equal to a lid rate. With the balance in hand of f,578 the total rate required would be 2s 2d in the E. Mr John Smith asked why was there an increase in the amount for salaries. The Deputy Clerk said he was afraid the amount asked for last year was a little bit too low. There bad been a small increase in the salaries. The Rev. T. Griffiths said they had increased the salaries of the two nurses. The Deputy Clerk Yes. The Chairman, in proposing the adoption of the estimate, said if they referred to the estimates of previous years, they would find that they had been a bit low, so they were obliged to increase it slightly now. The present rate was id in the £ less than for the corresponding period last year. It was not a very large reduction, but it was in the right direction. It was due to the reduction iR the county call and they trusted that the County Council would be able to curtail their expenditure further in the near future. As far as the Guardians were concerned the rates had been normal for the past six years. Mr John Jones (vice-chairman) seconded and said they were glad that there was a reduction in the rate. It was unfortunate that some means could not be found to redace the county and education calls further. He thought the Education Com- mittee had its hands tied to a certain extent, but he did not know how it was in the' case of the County Council. If they looked at the District Council rates they would see that there was a considerable reduction. The estimate was adopted. VAGRANTS OF MILITARY AGE. A communication was read from the Local Government Board stating that the attention of Mr Walter Long (the president) J had been called to the fact that single men of military age were receiving relief in the casual wards and requesting that Boards of Guardians, when such men came to a work- house, should instruct their Masters to communicate immediately with the nearest recruiting officer. The Clerk said the Master would under- take to do that. Mr John Smith It is only right to do so. LITERATURE AND BOOKS FOR TRAMPS. The Deputy Clerk read a letter stating that a parcel of books had been sent to the Workhouse from the Tramp Mission for the use of the tramps. Mr Hill added that the books had not yet arrived.

Advertising

HORTON'S BENEDICT PILLS. FREE TO LADIES. In a few days correct all irregularities and remove all obstructions; also cure Anaemia, and oause no injury; to the married or single are invaluable. By post under cover 1/3 or 3/ from Horton & Co., Chemists (Chief Dispenser from the late Birmingham Lying-in Hospital), (Dept. 85), ASTON MANOR, BIRMING- HAM. Sold over 50 years. SUPPLIED DIRECT ONLY. SELDOM EVER FAIL. All ladies should send penny stamp for free sample of pills and booklet.

Boughrood Bridge and Road Adjoining

Boughrood Bridge and Road Adjoining. To the Editor of the County Times. SIR,—I have eften wondered if any part of this road belonged to any one at all-lit is between the main road at the Bridge End and the road that runs straight up to Boughrood Station just beyond Boughrood Post Office)- as it seems to have to .take care of itself, except just at the gate, where one is expected to pay every time one passes. I have known this road for over two years, and I do not think it has ever been scraped or cleaned in that time, and a road cannot be kept in proper repair without. The persons responsible may may there is a lot of traffic there; so much the more reason why it should have more money spent on it for repairs, as the more traffic the more money taken at the toll-gate. I have never seen the road in a more disgraceful state than it is at present, and one pays for tba privilege of wading through the mud every time one wants to po to the Station or Post Office. It is quite time all suoh toll bridges were taken over by the Counties adjoining. I should have thought someone on the spot oould have been instructed to see that the road was at least scraped andcleaued sometimes, for a small sum of money a year. I have known eeveral persons who have been obliged to carry their clean boots with them and wear their dirty onee and change at the Station. Yours, etc., NOT A NATIVE OF BOUGHROOD.

RHEUMATISMKIDNEY TROUBLE

RHEUMATISM-KIDNEY TROUBLE. FREE TREATMENT. Rheumatism is due to urio aoid crystals in the joints and musoles, the result of excessive urio acid in the system that the kidneys failed to remove as natnre intended, to which every qualified physician agrees, and this acid is also the cause of backache, lumbago, sciatica, gout, urinary trouble, stone, gravel, and dropsy. The sucoess of Estora Tablets, for the treatment of rheumatism and other forms of kidney trouble, is doe to the fact that they restore the kidneys to healthy action and thereby remove the cause of the trouble, which necessarily removes the ill-efieots that spring from it, and have cured numberless cases after the failure of other remedies, which accounts for them fast superseding out- of-date medicines that are sold at a price beyond all but the wealthy and so often fall short of the wonderful claims made that oonfidenoe has been lost in them. To prove Estora Tablets fully warrant their deBoription-an honest remedy at an honest price-one fall box of 40 tablets will be sent to readers of the "Brecon County Times" as a free sample on receipt of this notice and 3d in stamps to cover postage, packing, etc. Sold by chemists, 1/8 per box of 40 tablets, or 6 boxes for 6/9. For full box sample address Estora Co., 132, Cbaring Cross Road, London, W.C. Brecon Agent.- WALTER GWILLIM, M.P.S., Medical Hall. Builtb Wells Agent.—T. A. COLTMAM, M.P.S., The Pharmacy.

CATHEDINE

CATHEDINE. A LINK WITJl vHz TRux(mise.-Two interest- ing letters recently came to Catbedine straight from the trenches in France as the result of the kind thoughtfulness of one of the school- children. Edward Rbys Hadley, son of Mrs Hadley, of Cwmsbenkin, has been knitting soarves for soldiers in his leisure time, and one of these was sent to Itance-Corporal J. N. Gilbert, South Wales Borderers, son of an Aberyskir friend of Mrs Hadley's. Writing to the young knitter to thank him for the scarf, Lance Corpora! Gilbert says It has been very nice for me through this snow to have something to put round my ears and neck to keep them warm. We have fur ooats dished oot to os, but they only cover our shoulders and baok, and the-scarves are very nice for the top parts. I dare say you have heard by now that I have been wounded. That is why I have not written to you before. I have been wounded in two plaoes, in the shoulder and in the middle of:tbe back, but I am going on allright and I think I will soon be back in the trenches again. They are vpry kind and patient with us here in hospital, and they have a lot of nasty wounds to dress sometimes."—In a letter sent to Mrs Hadley, to thank her for some chocolates, Lance-Corporal Gibert said he expected to be out of hospital soon, as bis wounds were healing splendidly. The scarf sent by her little was one of the most useful things that could be sent, a thing the soldiers wanted worse than anything except socks.

Advertising

| Puritan Pictures No. 1. />•}/, 1- I i < I I I I' I I r L-' THE LITTLE PURITAN The Story of the Picture II In the great oak pew the little Puritan girl listens to the somewhat lengthy ministra- tions of the old divine. The sunshine lalls on her fair hair and reveals her a I] little sleepy—already indeed in a waking dreamland. The reproduction of costume is noteworthy and reminds us that for all its severity the costume of the Puritan days was far from unattractive. Shis picture illustrates what thousands of women know to be true: that | PURITAN SOAP is pure by name and pure by nature # A L TO..JtIlTO

SAD SUICIDE EAR BRECON

SAD SUICIDE EAR BRECON I t Girl's Mind Unhinged by Grief. I Uoi I A sad story was told at an inquest held at Argoedlwyd Farm, Libanus, near Brecon, on Saturday morning, before Mr WJonee-Williams, who acted in the absence of Dr W R Jones (the district coroner), who is from home owing to indisposition. The icqniry was into the eiroomstanoeB attending the death of Mary Gweo Jones, daughter of Mr John Jones, Argoedlwyd farm, who was found dead in the house on Thursday afternoon. Mr Jones stated that ths deceased was 17 years of age. She had been working at home with him for some time. He bad another daughter, who bad died aboat a month ago. and this had affected Mary's health, and tobe bad told her brother that; she h eonld not live long without Maggie." She bad never threatened to take her own life, however. Decea&ed was in her usual health on Thursday morning. Witness rptorned from Brecon market about 12 o'clock that day, so that be could take her over to Trephilip for a little change. After lunch be went out to get the pony into the trap, and then beard a noise in the house. Going back to the door be called deceased by name, and getting no answer be went to the back kitchen and found her lying on her back. There was a gun by h^r aide with the gun pointing towards her head. He kept the gun in the Louse, but it was never left loaded. The cartridges were kept in a cupboard, but the deceased knew where they were kept. She bad never uesd a gun. He examined the gun and found a a empty cartridge in it. Deceased was not quite dead at the time, so they carried her to bed and sent the boy for a doctor. Gwilym Jones, son of the last witness, spoke as to a conversation be bad with the deceased on Thursday morning after bis father had gone to town. She then told-him tbt she "could cot live long without Maggie." She was crying at the time. She was depressed on Fridays. She never talked to hitn 'about the gun. Dr G P Francis said be was called to Argoed- lwyd on Thursday afternoon, and was shown the spot where deceased hot hut- found no traces of blood. The girl was dead on his arrival, and on examination be fonr d (j'J the left bide of her corset a hole, rather la.tEJ in size, and two or thrse long. T[i, re was a wound in the abdomen, and is was such rh one would expect to find fiqai a Lt;n sbos wqund with the barrei very close to tiia iiotfj. Deceased died from shock and in' > u^! he- morrbage caused by shot from a gon. Fron: i.hk, J conclusions witness drew, in all probability deceased laid the gun on a bench which was in the back kitchen, placed the barrel against lrar stomach, and bent over to poll the trigger. The jary returned a verdict that death WM dne to a gun shot wound self-idiiioted, whilst deoeased WSR of unsound mind. A vote of sympathy and condolence was passed with the family in their sad bereave- ment.

Record Salmon Catch in the Wye

Record Salmon Catch in the Wye. There has been good sport with the Wye, salmon this month (after a bad opening of the season owing to the severity of the weather) particularly in the neighbourhood of Herefori. Mr J. Arthur Button has made a record catib at Hampton Bishop, landing 35 salmon in nine consecutive days. The total weight WM 7011 it' giving an average weight of aOMw. Tbe tteavi, st fish killed weighed 32 The and there were 20 of 20 lbs and over. In his report on the Wye salmon fishing ill 1915 and rewultjs of scale-reading for the pad seven years, Mr J. Arthur Hutton states that it is imposnible to resist the conclusion that Wye sahuou are undoubtedly adopting so earlier habit b:J!b of migration and spawniag. "A@ to the. cuase of this change in tbeir babitfl," he writes, "one can, I am afraid, only speculate. We have uow bad a series of exceptional! mild winters, *nd this may possible have ha# some t ff ot on tbeir habits, though I doaM whether the < ffjot of oold or mild winters would baVb uiaab effect on the temperature of the 8ea except la tbe coastal waters. It would, howevt-r, b" most interesting to ascertaia whether any similar tendency to earlier habits has notici d on other rivers. The question naturally >me. as to whether this change is ooly t.ro¡;¡r!Jf'Y and whether the fish will revert to thfir former babits, or whether they will bsoo" earlier both in approaching and entering the river. If the latter is the case it is undoubtedly a very strong argument, for bhfi D' c- s-ity of an earlier termination of the finhinu s-aeon. On the Wye the olose season comm-nc^s on October 16th, and it is an undou^'ftf} fact that a considerable numbec of fish bav-i commenoed to spawn before that date."

Advertising

CAPTURE GERMAN TitÅDK r taPMtom, Manafaotamn and Marahanta aboold oouiiw the naooroaa of Canada'* lazgMt Proyiaaa QUEBEC gm MINING INDUSXBT proridea tha zaw mabow P Bany British industrial. Haidwaia, Xnanalwaaa ■! Woodwara, Paper and Pulp offer anailant iiiinn IIIIIWM JtSHlCXJI/rURAL PRODUCTS TOieat, (Ma fMatoci, and other Field Grope. Other prodoots instate Batter, Cheese, Apple*, Tobaooo, Lire Stock, fa, QUEBEC OFFERS UNIQUE OPPORTUNITIES FOR TRB PROFITABLE EMPLOYMENT OF BRITISH OAPIT&Ii, Forpartiealanapply: Lt.-Col.theP.IELITETM*. Ageat-Qeaetal tor Qaebec, M, Ktagaway, London^JVXX