Collection Title: Glamorgan Gazette

Provider: Llyfrgell Genedlaethol Cymru

Hawliau: Nid yw statws neu berchnogaeth hawlfraint yr adnodd hwn yn hysbys.

Gwylio manylion cyfan

Cyntaf Cynt Llun 4 o 4
Full Screen
17 erthygl ar y dudalen hon
I BRIDGEND POLICE COURT II ik

I BRIDGEND POLICE COURT. I ik SATURDAY.-Before Alderman Win. Llewellyn (chairman), Messrs. J. Rees, T. E. Hopkins, W. Powell, Reef John, and Evan David. Drunk and Disorderly. Morgan Evans. coilier, Pantygog, W U'j charged with being drunk and disorderly in Oxford Street, Pontycymmar, on April 26th, aud the facts having been proved, defendant was fined JE1. ■' Blind Leading the Blind.M-rs. Catherine Kerry and Airb. Margaret Whittaker were charged with being drunk and disorderly in North Street on Saturday, April 28tli.-P.C. Corn^liu< Hurley gave evidence. He was cor- roborated by Sergt. Loveluck, who, when asked by the Chairman whether it was not a fact that Whittaker was taking Kerry home, replied that it was "a ca-,o of the blind leading the blind. The Clerk. (Mr. Walter Hughes) ,aid there was a long list against Whittaker!—The Chairiu-uu This i", very disgraceful conduct, particularly in these day-!i. You, Whittaker, have a bad record, and will be fined = £ 1, and Kerry 15s. indecent Language. Robert Bruckshaw (dealer), Aberkenfig, was convicted of using in- decent language at Colwinstone on Thursday, April 26th, and was fined £1.- For, a similar offence, in Nolton Street, on April 27th, James Burke, a Bridgend tinsmith, on the evidence of P.C. Ivor Davies, was ordered to pay 15s.—John Brown, 'collier, Bridgend, was charged with using improper language, within the hearing of people ambld in Queen Street, Bridgend, on April 28th. -P.C. Ivor Davies deposed that at 10 o'clock on Saturday night he saw defendant in Lord's Dining-room, Queen Street. He was quarrelling witii a wounded soldier, and witness remonstrating, used. the language (on the paper handed in), and said it was all the fault of the wounded soldier. Evidence was also given by Inspector Rees Davies. Befendant denied the language, and alleged that the wounded soldier was the aggressor. He also explained that he and his friend* had "adjourned" to Lord's for a "bit or supper, 'and he couian t scick cue wounded warrior's swank.—15s. was the penalty. » Running a Risk.—William Larsons, collier, Blackmill, was charged with playing with- cards in the open place at the rear of Llangeinor Ter- race, on Aporil 29th. P.C. Ingram s-tated that at 4 p.m. he kept defendant and several others under observation for half an hour, and subse- quently took name and addresses. Witness was emphatic that he saw Parsons put money on the cards.—Defendant: I have never playeq a game of cards in my life, sir. The others ran away; I didn't. I had no Reed to.—The Chair- man Well, we have some doubt about it; and we will give you the benefit of the doubt.—The Clerk (Mr. Walter Hughes) Don't be seen with others who are playing; you run a risk. Dangerous. Stanley Short, collier, Kenng Hill, was summoned for driving a motor cycle in Commercial Street, in a manner supposed to be dangerous, on April 20th. P.S. Morgan proved that the rate of speed was 30 to 40 miles an hour, and al;so said people were scattered in all directions. Signalled to stand still, defen- dant said he was very sorry, but he had lost control of the machine. Fined > £ 1.—William Roberts, haulier, Aberkenfig, was summoned for furious driving in Market Street, Bridgend, on April 27th. P.C. Spencer (who proved the case) said Roberts drove his horse and vehicle at such rate that children had to run on to the pave- ment. On being spoken to defendant said he could not hold the horse. Fined .£1.-Morgan Waters, coal merchant, Maesteg, was summoned for driving furiously at Aberkenfig on April 24th. The animal (attached to a vehicle) was said to be galloping, and when called upon by a constable to stop, defendant took no notice. Later, defendant was founa in an hostelry, and said he didn't stop because" he didn't think there was any cause to." He was conveyed to the Police Station, where he said "Send for a vet." The horse (according to the policeman) was "in a bath of perspiration and lather." Defendant had been drinking. He was fined £1. —Albert Davies, a Maesteg school teacher, was summoned for driving a horse and cart without "8. light in Llwydarth Road, Maesteg, on April 29th. Defendant had one side light, and no rear light. He was fined 10s. An Unlicensed Dog.—Thomas Paget, collier, Court Colman, who, it was stated, has since taken out a licence, was fined 5s. for keeping a dog without a license, on April 25th. > Milk Case.—Rees Llewellyn, Tynyrheol Farm, Kenfig Hill, and Gwendoline Lane, milk vendor, Bridge Street, Kenfig Hill, were summoned- Llewellyn for selling to Lane milk contaminated with water, and Lane for selling milk which was not of the nature, substance, and quality demanded. Only Rees Llewellyn, who is uncle of the other defendant,- was in attendance.— Inspector Rees Davies said on March 15th, he purchased a pint of milk for 2d. from Miss Lane at Kenfig Hill, and told her the sample was for analysis. The analyst's certificate re- ceived on March 27th pointed to 4 per cent. of added water. In the case of Rees Llewellyn (the inspector said), the sample taken on April 17th contained 14 per cent. of added water.— Llewellyn now said it was a "pure accident," his man having inadvertently left some water in the bottom of the an after washing it out.—Inspec- tor Rees Davies, in reply to the Bench, said the two samples previously taken from Miss Lane had been genuine. None had before been taken from the other defendant.—The Chairman: It may be an accident, but it is rather extraordin- ary that it should be on different dates. At any rate, you are responsible.—Llewellyn was fined .£5, and Gwendoline Lane £ 2. Woman and Police Constable.—Mrs. Elizabeth A. Wilkins, 56 Railway Crescent, Abercregan, was summoned for assaulting P.C. Harford Ewingtou in the execution of his duty, on April 23rd.-The constable said defendant became vio- lent, and dealt him blows on the face and head, and also kicked him on the leg. On the way to the Police Station she several times laid oa the road, and started to kick and scream.— Fined 15s. for drunkenness, and £ 1 for the assault. ▼ Dangerous.—David Price, collier, 56 Gelli St., Caerau, was charged with carrying up a piece of timber in the cage, at C aer au Colliery, to the danger of other people, the property of- North's Navigation Collieries Co., on April 3rd.-The works officer (P.C. Culleton) stated the facts.— Defendant: What's the matter with a piece of timber like this in my pocket?—The Chairman: It is not what's the matter; it is the danger. You will have to pay the costs-5s.-and there will he no conviction. Affi liation.Michael O'Neal, collier, Garn Road, Maesteg, was summoned by Bridget Ryan, and admitting paternity, was ordered to pay 5s. a week (and costs) towards the support of her illegitimate child, born in Bridgend Work- house. On the Common.—-John Matthews, Victoria Road, Kenfig Hill, collier, was convicted of stealing a window sash, value 3s., the property of Alfred Chess, from the, rear of 14 Victoria Street, on. April 1st.—Defendant: I saw the sash on the common, and picked it up.-The Chair- man You are Em*d ii. MONDAY.-Before: Mr. D. H. Lloyd and Dr. E. J. Parry. Tempted by a Scarf.—Celia Parry (14) was charged with stealing a scarf, value 6/11, from Hermon Road, Caerau, the property of Sarah South, on May 1st.—Mrs. South, who is the wife of John South, said defendant had latterly been in her service as a "day girl."—P.C. Jabez Thomas, who was the next witness, said the little girl admitted to him taking the scarf from Mrs. Sbuth's bedroom.—Defendant, in reply to the charge, now had nothing to say, except that she wanted to take the scarf home to show her mother, and hadn't time to return it.—Inspec- tor Rees Davies: I think she is rather a wicked girl. We have had complaints, but she has not been before the Court.—Bound over for six months. Colliers and Timber.—John Bowen, collier, Bridgend Road, Maesteg, was charged with stealing a quantity of timber, value Is., the pro- perty of Messrs. North's Navigation Collieries Co., Ltd.—Works Constable Culleton deposed that on April 13th he saw defendant taking away from the colliery two pieces of timber, fres? ly cut with a hatchet at both ends. Asked why he took new timber, defendant said they were pieces he had found. The manager (who was then seen) described the timber as new, and said he must put a stop to the practice, especi- ally at a time when timber was so scarce.— Fined S.I.-Williani Howells, -collier, Caerau, was charged (also by Culleton) with stealing 1/6 worth of timber, the property of MessfrS. North's Navigation Collieries Co., on April 2Srd. De- fendant was a-ot in attendance.—The Chairman You must bring him here.—Richard John Stratton, collier, Nantyffvllon, was fined -tt for taking a piece of new timber, value 6d., from the Ce^aaiiL C-jlliery.—Several other similar cases were disposed of, and in a case of non- appearance, a warrant was ordc-red to issue. EUESDAY.efOre Mr. D. H. Lloyd and Dr. E. J. Parry. Drunk and Disorderly. Gomer Thomas, collier, 16 Brynbedw Terrace, Blaengarw, was charged with being drunk and disorderly in Caroline Street, Bridgend, at 10 o'clock on the previous evening.—P.C. Ivor Davies gave evi- dence, and a fine of 15s. was imposed. Bedlinog Sergeant's Holiday Engagement.— Two colliers, John Taylor (Pyle) and Harold Taylor (Kenfig Hill), were charged with having imbibed too freely, and also with assaulting P.S. Walter Sparkes in the execution of his dnty" in Bryndu Street, Kenfig Hill.—The ser- geant deposed that at 9 o'clock on the previous evening he heard a police whistle, and proceed- ing in the direction indicated, aaw a large crowd of people, and amongst them the two prisoners, who were stripped to the waist, and issued a general challenge to fight. Witness spoke to them, and advised them to go away, but they refused. In a struggle, John Taylor kicked him on the legs. The other man then rushed at him (the sergeant), and tried to take John Taylor out of his custody. Police-Sergeant John Gill (Bedlinog), who happened to be oa leave at Kenfig Hill, arrived oil the scene most opportunely, and jurt when Harold Taylor, with a large stick in his hand, was about to strike Sparkes a blow on the head. Sergt. Gill van- quished Harold, and captured the stick, and with the assistance of a civlian, took the man to Kenfig Hill Police Station. Sergt. Sparkes re-arrested John Tavlor.—Both admitted drunk- enness, but denied the assault. They were fined £ 1 each for drinking to excess, and £2 for the assault, the Bench warmly thanking P.S. Gill for his prompt assistance whilst on leave in the locality.

I OGMORE VALE AMENITIES

I OGMORE VALE AMENITIES. Head Mistress Fined—And Shocked." n 'I 11 vvitn nerce invective ana dramatic gestures, a little party of women, who love one another (or the reverse); on Saturday for some time kept the Bridgend Police Court enlivened and enter- tained. Mrs. Mary Williams and Mrs. Helena 'W oolacott, soldiers' wives, of John Street, Ogmore Vale, summoned Miss Emily Jane Craig, headmistress of the Aber Council School, Ogmore Vale, for using abusive language to- wards them with intent to put them in fear.— Mrs. Williams, wife of Edward Williams, said on April 25th, in the afternoon, she was in John Street, and saw Miss Craig returning from school, and asked her what complaint she had to make against her children, as the police ser- geant had spoken to witness upon the subject. "I asked her," witness went on, "if she had any complaint, why she didn't come and make it to me?" Miss Craig, instead of giving a satisfac- tory answer, went inside, and shut .the gate after her. I told her she was "no woman," or else she would have come to me, and not continually send for the police; and, furthermore, she wanted to know why she constantly beat lier (witness's) little girl. Miss Craig then turned round and said, "You are a bad, wicked woman; you are paid by the Government, but you neg- lect your children, and they are dirty and half- starved." Witness then told Miss Craig she would make her prove her words, upon which defendant said she "would do it again." Wit- ness, who seemed to feel her position keenly, said that whilst their father was at the front, she alone was left to protect the children, and she would do it to the best of her ability. Miss Craig turned round, and said, "You, and Mrs. Woolacott." She put us both on the same footing," added witness. "I have a letter from the doctor to prove that my children are not dirty, and are not neglected." (The letter was handed up to their Worships.)—Mr. J. T. Howell (who defended): You say your husband is a soldier, and gets a military allowance? Yes.—You have summoned Miss Craig for using abusive and threatening language? Yes; she threatens my little children.—She is head mis- tress of the Aber Council School? Yes.—For a large number of years? Yes.—Do you swear she- used the words? Yes, she did use thetn.-Are they abusive? I think so, when my husband is away.—Would the words have been abusive if your husband had been at home? She would have known better than to have said it then. (Laughter.)—Will you complain if the summons is dismissed? No, I only ask for protection. She is continually beating my children, and she says she will do it again.—You wanted to bring her here? No, I didn't wish to bring her here; I wanted to vindicate my character—that is all. She has been to the police four times this year.-Isn't this all owing to complaints about the children making a noise in front of her house? No; the children are too much afraid.—Have you caller her a bitch? No; she called my child a crazy bitch.—Mrs. Elvira Cook, St. John Street, with some hauteur, gave corroborative evidence. At the outset it was evident she does not love Miss Craig, because, when Mr. Howell put it to her, "Do'you know the defendant?" she replied with sarcastic frigidity: "Too well; and I think it is time someone looked after her in Ogmore after all that has happened. -(Laughter.)-Have you a grudge against her? I don't know who hasn't'. If you lived by; her, you wouldn't ask such a thing! (Renewed laughter.)—Did a little boy kick a football into her garden? She kept the football until she had to deliver it 'up.-Do your children attend the school?—Assuming a dignified pose, witness answered, "No," in a most emphatic tone of voice.-Do you love her? Love her! Who could love her? (Laughter.) Why, you could bring the whole of John Street here to say the.same. It's a shame we have had to put up with it all this time. I If she could .have her way, she would put us all in gaol. (Laughter.) She treats people like dirt. -You wouldn't associate with her? Associate with her! I don't know who would associate with her! (Laughter.)—Mrs. Woolacott, who, like the previous witnesses, was well dressed, gave corroborative evidence. She declared: I don't see why we should be annoyed by this person! She doesn't pay my rent. (Laughter.) —Mr. Howell: Are you afraid pf her? No, I am not afraid of her, but I must protect my children.—Why protection? Are you afraid she will kWk you down? .0, and I'll watch she don't. I can protect myself, and I never was a "bully." (Laughter.)-Mr. Howell sub- mitted that no offence had been committed within the section. It was a "trumpery, rub- bishy case," and a case that should be dis- missed. He had not condescended to issue a cross-summons. This was an attempt at the victimisation of a woman who had held a re- sponsible position for 37 years. It was true Miss Craig repeatedly had had occasion to com- plain to the police, and, rightly or wrongly, she was under the impression that these women sent their children to annoy her. Was it neces- sary to call his client?—The Bench answered in the affirmative.-Miss Craig (sworn) said she had been 37 years in the profession, and for the last 17 years had been head mistress of the Abep Council School. She had complained to the police about the children "kicking up a row' in front of her house, and she believed that Mrs. Williams and Mrs. Woolacott sent their children to make a noise to annoy her. She hadn't tackled the women herself, because "one couldn't get any sense out of them." She denied using the words complained of, and alleged that Mrs. Williams accosted her on this occasion, and used most objectionable lan- guage towards her.—The Chairman (Mr. Wm. Powell) said the Magistrates considered the charge had been proved, and there would be a fine of 10s. in each of the two cases.—Miss I Craig (evidently greatly taken aback) Who is fined?—The Chairman: You are.—Miss Craig: Well, I am. shocked !—Mr. J. T. r Howell: It's I all right, Miss Graig.

NANTYMOEL I

NANTYMOEL. I i.i Winning Number of Wm. Venn's Prize Draw- ing, 546. To be claimed within 14 davs.—Dd. Edwards, 19 Nantymoel Row, Nantymoel. 196 Winning Numbers of Mr Tom Hibbert's Prize Dra wing: -1609; 2144; 1534; 1563; 2329; 1306; 2090; 697; 2068; 845.; 1180; 2345; 2330; 1692; 802; 1587; 826; 305; 1786; 253; 2125; 2098; 2468; 563; 351; 249; 1131; 2022;. 2080; 2108; 226: 483; 578; 1561.—Prizes to be claimed within 14 days, to I David Thomas, 14 Vale View Terrace, Nanty- J moel. 211

Advertising

z_ BEYAN & COMPANY, Ltd., 97, St. Mary-st., and Near Empire, CARDIFF. Registered as "The Cardiff Furnishers." Branches throughout South Wales & Monmouthshire. COMMODITIES of every kind have considerably increased in price, but few things to a greater extent than all kinds of Furniture; in fact, some Furnishing requisites are practically unobtainable! With the foresight resulting from their Sixty- seven years' business oareer, and in oonfident anticipation of such advances, BETAN AND COMPANY utilised their great Ware- houses in connection with their numerous Branches by cram- ming them with Stock of every description at pre-war prices! The result is that they are now in the happy position of being able to offer these vast Stocks far below to-day's value! Every article warranted, and all goods delivered free up to 200 miles. FURNITURE FOR THE I MILLION! A VISIT to our Show-rooms will show you the kind of Fur- niture you require-tastefully designed, soundly constructed o the best materials, and carefully finished-Furniture that will last a lifetime and be a source of pleasure all the time. Our hug. stock caters for all tastes and all pockets, and is always open for free inspection. You are cordially invited to paj1 us a visit, aad we shall be pleased to give advice and quota- tions if desired, to help you in furnishing your home in the test, most comfortable, and at the same time, most economical manner. Train Fares of Cash Customers paid! »

GARW GLEANINGS

GARW GLEANINGS (By, LLOFFWR ARALL.") I l We heartily congratulate Lieut. M. E. Thomas (Royal Engineers), son of Rev. and Mrs. Morgan Thomas, Bettws Rectory, upon being awarded the Military Cross. < Thanks are due to the members of the Garw Liberal Club, Pontvcymmer, for the excellent reception given to the firing party at the Mili- tary funeral. < < < We sympathise with all Garwite allotment- holders who were disappointed over the distri- bution of the second lot of seed potatoes sup- plied bv the Council. t It didn't matter how large the quantity or- dered—141bs. each was the order of the day, at 15/- per bag. • Of course, the distributors presumed that each bag contained 1121bs., and upon receiving the 15/- served out one bag between every eight purchasers of 14lbs. After weighing and dividing between the pur- chasers, it was invariably found that each bag contained considerably less than 112lbs., so the most that any purchaser had when the bag was divided was 131bs.-and often, in the case of children who were afraid to speak up, much less. What price the conscientious person who signed that he would set 141bs., and who only received 131bs.? Some amusement was caused, however, when some of the local farmers came up with their carts to carry away the quantities ordered, and had to be satisfied with 14lbs.! They ought to have brought their carts later on in the day, when any quantities required were doled out indiscriminately. < Mr. Frank Hodges, Garw miners' agent, ad- dressed a mass meeting of miners on Sunday last in the Garw Valley on the question of combing-out. *• • < The meeting unanimously decided in favour of accepting the recommendation of the M.F. of Great Britain National Conference to take all men who had entered the collieries since 1914; and, further, to co-operate with the Gov- ernment to find more men. < < We regret to learn that foodstuff have been stolen from some allotments at Blaengarw and some gardens at Pontycymmer. • • • Now that committees of the various allot- ments are appointing persons to watch from ments are appt us hope some of these selfish wasters will be caught, and given the birch-rod at least. Garw folk welcome the good news that the Ffaldau Colliery Company have marked out the ground near the corner-house of Waun ,Bant, Pontycymmer, with a view of commencing a level. w A local officer raided a house at Pontycymmer in search of a deserter. < w The address was quite correct; also a man lived there corresponding with the name on his book. But judge of his feelings when, on de- manding the surrender of the deserter, it was found he was 70 years of age! An eight months :ld pony was tried in trac- ings at the Pantygog Market. v Is it true a member remarked, "Nothing like training animals young"? 0 0 A local knut took "self raising flour" in mis- take for health salts-! No wonder he is getting tall! A Garwite fell asleep on the roadside outside Bridgend. On waking he set out to walk to- wards Southerndown. Happily, he discovered his mistake in time, but it cost him a long run to catch the train. Of course, nothing the matter! < A certain young knut at Pontyrhyl is awak- t ened each morning by his wife singing "Joshua." Does he fall off to sleep at night to the strains of "Sing me to sleep" r Charlie Chaplin isn't in it! A certain Garwite returning from work passed two men carrying a boring machine. 4. « » Did he remark to his friend, "What poor chap are they taking home?" I We learn that the Victoria Street pig dealers are setting "mongul wussals" in their allot- ments to provide food stuff for their pets. One noted gardener uses sulphate of ammonia I on his garden. Did he sprinkle about 141b. of Demarara sugar on the garden before he realised his blunder? • • • A Blaengarwite who had ordered a cwt. of I potatoes, received half a cwt. bv rail, and inside was a note, "Don't be 0 0 One of our Ponty tradesmen was seen picking up a small piece of coal. No wonder the Ffaldau coal haulier wants a war bonus!

I CORRESPONDENCE

I CORRESPONDENCE. I GARW TRIBUNAL AND LICENSEE CASES. I To THE EDITOR. I Sir,-Allow me to draw attention to the unjust treatment meted out to landlords of hotels by the Ogmore and Garw Military Tribunal. In view of the great need of men in this terrible crisis, why is it that only one landlord of a public-house, in the Garw and the one who had practically the greatest responsibility) has had to join up, whilst others, many of them only managers, and nearly all of military age, are allowed to remain? Of course, I do not wish to cast any reflection upon the members of the Ogmore and Garw Tribunal, but I do feel that they are not impartial when dealing with the cases of licensees in the Garw.—Yours, etc.. I FAIRPLAY. I

rNANTYFFYLLON IJ I

r NANTYFFYLLON. J Concert to Wounded.—On Friday evening last I the wounded soldiers at the Maesteg Cottage Hospital were entertained by the Nantyffyllon Schools' Juvenile Choir. All the items were greatly enjoyed by the soldiers and staff, and the choir was invited to give another concert at a future date. The programme was as follows :— Choir, "Come away, Elves"; song, "A Pretty Tale," Miss Jennie Evans; recitation, "Flo's Letter," Miss Phyllis N. Davies; choir, "Casa- bianca"; song, "God Bless Daddy," Miss May Evans; recitation, "Nurse Cavell, Miss Phyllis N. Davies; song, "God Bless the Armv and Navy," Miss Bronwen Williams; choir, (a) "Doli," (b) "Cyfri-r Geifr"; recitation, "The Preacher," Master Rees Evans; song, Laddie in Khaki," Master Howard Evans; choir, "A Sailor's Life" ,(solo bv Master Willie Bowen); recitation, "Johnnv Bach," Miss Phyllis N. Davies; solo, "Child of Nazareth," Miss Blod- wen Isaac; choir, "Alawon y Brynlau"; song, T-ho-Volunteer Organist/' Misa Bessie BeTaA. V

MAESTEG URBAN DISTRICT COUNCIL I

MAESTEG URBAN DISTRICT COUNCIL. Contest for the Chair. At the annual meeting of the Maesteg Urban District Council, held at the Council Offices on Tuesday last week, there were present:—Messrs. David Davies, W. Jones, Gomer Davies, H. Laviers, Jenkin Jones, H., M. Jones, R. Griffiths, A. Nicholas, J. Evans, C.C., A. J. Hicks, P. Jones, J. Aughes, and T. Lewis, with the clerk (Alderman E. E. Davies), the engineer and sur- veyor (Mr. S. J. Harpur), and the sanitary in- spector (Mr. G. E. Howells).—Mr. Jenkin Jones was voted to the chair pro. tem. Election of Chairman.—Mr Gomer Davies pro- posed Mr. John Hocking as chairman for the year. He had been a member for years, and was very faithful in attendance. He was also senior member of those who had not been through the chair.—Mr. Jenkin Jones seconded. —Mr. John Evans, C.C., moved as an amend- ment the appointment of Mr. John Hughes. It was three years since a Labour man had been in the qhair.-Mr. A. J. Hicks seconded.—Mr. Gomer Davies was sorry to see the Council divid- ing on the choice of a chairman after adopting a system of election by seniority. A Labour representive had occupied the chair four times during the last eight or nine years. If Mr. Hughes was the senior member, he would only have been too glad to support him.—Mr. David Davies said Mr. Hocking was, and had been all his life, a Labour man. He was a member of a Trades Union and a Labour Council. Finallv, he was the senior member for the chair.—Mr. J. Evans: When we say "Labour man," we mean a man directly representing Labour.—Mr. D. Davies: If I am not a Labour man, there is no other Labour man in the room. By the Labour vote I have licked those who call themselves direct representatives of Labour, and I can't stick it.—Mr. Henry Laviers: I am sorry there is any opposition on this occasion. Mr. Hock- ing is the senior member, and the chair is his by right. When Mr. John Hughes' turn comes, I shall be most pleased to support him.—On the motion being put, Mr. J. Hocking was elected by eight votes to' five.-Mr. Hocking, on taking the chair, thanked the members for the honour conferred upon him, and hoped the dig- nity of the cfyiir would not suffer in his hands. ,Ir. Gomer Davies moved a vote of thanks to the retiring chairman (Mr. Jenkin Jones). He had perfBrmed his duties in an able and un- biassed manner, and had been cxmrteous at all times.—Mr. Thomas Lewis seconded.—The vote was carried unanimously. Committees.—On the motion of Mr. Gomer Davies, the various committees were re-elected en bloc, with the inclusion of Mr. A. Nicholas on the Finance Committee. Surveyor's Resignation.—A letter was read from Mr. S. J. Harpur, engineer and surveyor to the Council, tendering his notice, and asking to terminate on the 11th of June next.—Mr. Gomer Davies, in moving the acceptance of the resignation, said it was not for them to stand in the way of a man who was being honoured and elevated to a higher and more responsible posi- tion. Mr. Harpur had been engineer and sur- veyor to the Council for the last seven years. Their relationship .with him had been most happy and pleasant, and it was only advance- ment and promotion that caused him to leave, and the permanent work tHat he had carried out in the town would remain a living testi- mony to his worth and ability.—Mr. Thomas Lewis, in seconding, said that whilst at Maes- teg Mr. Harpur had done his duty, and had rendered great services to the Council and to the town.—Mr. H. Laviers supported. The fact that Mr. Harpur was going as chief surveyor that Mr. ]Flarpur wahs e to ad been secon d in com- "to Middlesex, where he had been second in com- man for seven years, spoke volumes for him, and he would return with the best wishes of the Maesteg Council.—Messrs. Jenkin Jones and A. J. Hicks, together with the Chairman, also spoke of Mr. Harpur's high merits as an officer of the Council; and the motion was carried unanimously. The Small Dwellings Acquisition Act.—An in- timation was received from a townsman that he wished to purchase the house he lived in, under the Small Dwellings Acquisition Act He had one-fifth of the purchase money ready, if the Council would advance the remainder.—Mr. Gomer Davies moved that application be made to the Local Government Board for a loan in accordance with this application.—Mr. A. Nicholas seconded. They should be prepared to do all in their power to encourage thrift and assist people to become owners of the houses in which they lived.—Mr. J. Evans also supported, and the matter was referred to the Housing Committee for further considerate 6n. National Baby Week.—Mr. Henry Laviers pro- posed that all bachelor members retire while the Council discussed arrangements for the National Baby Week. (Laughter.)—Eventually it was decided to advertise the National Baby Week by leaflets and posters. Compulsory Treatment for Tuberculosis Patients.—On the mition of Mr. Gomer Davies, seconded by Mr. A. J. Hicks, the Council sup- ported the application of the Insurance Com- mittee at Cardiff for compulsory powers to re- tain tuberculosis patients at sanatoria until they had been given the full treatment of the insti- tution. Prohibition.—Application was made for the opinion of the Council in respect to the prohibi- tion of the manufacture of alcoholic drinks dur- ing the war and six months afterwards.—Mr. Gomer Davies said the people ought to be given an opportunity of expressing their individual opinion.—Mr. David Davies agreed, and added that he could do without beer better than some of the members of the Free Church Council. It' was a bad principle to force this question on public bodies for resolutions in favour of pro- hibition.—Mr. John Hughes: This is not a ques- tion of total abstinence, nor a question for the Free Church Council, but a question of urgent national importance, and we should consider it. —Mr. Henry Laviers said they had pronounced in favour of giving compulsory powers for re- taining tuberculosis patients in sanitoria, and surely they were equally justified in committing the' views of the public on the question of pro- hibi_ tion.—Mr. Gomer Davies said he differed with Mr. Laviers. Tuberculosis was a disease that was cutting .down young lives. Mr. Laviers: The food question to-day is very seri- ous and urgent.—Mr. Hicks thought there was no comparison between the two questions.—Mr. A. Nicholas: This is a question for the Govern- ment. If the Government feels that prohibition is necessary under the present circumstances, they should exercise the power vested in tljem. He thought that public bodies were made use of for party aims.—The matter being put to a vote, only four were in favour of a resolution in favour of prohibition. Public Weighing Machine.—A request was re- ceived from the Chamber of Trade asking the Council to refix the public weighbridge, for the convenience of the public.—On the motion of Mr. A. Nicholas, seconded bv Mr. H. M. Jones, it was decided that the Highway Committee select a new site, and proceed to fix the weigh- bridge immediately. Market Closing Hours.—A request from Mr. William Thomas, Market inspector, for the Council's permission for a^stall-holders having soft food and perishable gOTds for sale to keep open until 10 p.m., was referred to the Market and Property Committee.

PONTYRHYL

PONTYRHYL. Sergeant Injured.-We regret to announce that Staff-Sergt. G. J. Griffiths is now in hos- I pital at Orpington. Kent, suffering from blood poisoning, the result of an accident received in I1 Belgium.

Advertising

?, -? .Iv. ¡ ¡.: .l:?:i\;j:>i +. ,l:( S  4 Send for a free sample of and test its wonderful virtues for yourself. Simple Simon washes the clothes by simply boiling 30 minutes. a. Simple Simon uses the natural oxygen of the air for densing and bleaching. Simple Simon is simply wonderful. Send Id. stamp for postage and mention dealer's name and sample will be sent by return. n n r"TI»w cau—jaPtvftiUlNrtlfi j»»iliodg| t'œmn-: Ii N05DAK1N I" J NO RUBBm¡: ¡ e Sl:'g,. U <. 30 MINYTES Christr. Thomas & Bros., Ltd SS 28 Broad Plain, Bristol IHHIHB8HIi9IH £ XBHBHE29HBH99BRBH £ N$9l

MAESTEG

MAESTEG.. Late Captain Morris.—The late Captain Oscar D. Morris, S.W.B., whose death in action on the 21st April is announced, was born at Nanty- ffyllon, and was a son of the late Mr. and Mrs. David Morris. He was 29 years of age. After leaving the elementary school, he commenced as a boy in the office of Caerau Colliery, but left this occupation, and was apprenticed to the grocery trade, and eventually entered as a stu- dent at the Carmarthen Preparatory School, where he proved himself a good student and a very hard worker. Later he entered Cardiff University, where he took his degree of B.A. with honours. He had just completed his studies when the war broke out, and he at once joined the South Wales Borderers. The later family history has been tragic. The father, mother, and now the son have died during the last 12 months. The news of Capt. Morris's death caused quite a shock at Nantyffyllon, as the family were held in very high esteem. Council's New Chairman.-Mr. John Hocking, the new Chairman of the Urban District Coun- cil, is an 'old inhabitant of the town, having been born at Maesteg, son, of the late Mr. Robert Hocking, a plasterer by trade. Forty- three years ago he married the eldest daughter of the late Mr. William Shaw, who for 29 years was manager of the Llynfi Iron Works. Mr. Hocking is grand superintendent of the Juvenile Templars, and as such it is his duty to visit every lodge in Wales once in every year. He has to see to the keeping of all their accounts, and to arrange competitions, adjudicate the same, provide the prizes, and distribute them to the successful candidates. He is the organist of the Llynfi Lodge of Freemasons, and has occu- pied a similar position for the last forty years at the Maesteg Wesleyan Chapel. He is also a member of the Town Band, and is, in fact, well known generally in local musical circles, hav- ing conducted the Maesteg Orchestra for many years. He is. captain of the Maesteg Fire Bri- gade, and chairman of the Central Glamorgan Permanent Building Society, and has repre- sented the East Ward on the Council for the past seven years. School Governors.—The monthly meeting of the Governors of the Maesteg Secondary School was held at the Plasnewydd Board Room on Fri- day afternoon, when there were present:— Alderman E. E. Davies (in the chair), Mrs. HmY'ells, Mrs. Hartshorn, Rev. Iorwerth Jones, Mr. J. Howells, Griffiths (Abergwynn), Mr. J. Evans, C.C., Rev. W. H. Thomas (Tabor), with the headmaster (Mr. J. S. Griffiths), and the deputy clerk (Mr. Tom Richards).—The Chairman said they were all delighted to see Mr. Griffiths, after his Ions illness.—Abdications for exemption from further attendance, on various grounds, were received and dealt with, and an application for the remission of one quarter's fees, on ac- count of stoppages at the colliery, was granted. —The terms of the Maesteg Cricket Club (J23 3s.) for the use of the cricket field for the season, were accepted.—As a result of the Governors' appeal for reconsideration of the scale of salaries for the staff, the Chairman reported the conces- sions made by the County Council, which were considered very satisfactory.—It was decided to make up the salary of Mr. Evans, the assistant master, who had joined up for Military service; and the cleaner of the school was allowed an advance of £ b for additional work in school hours.

TONDU AND ABERKENFIGJ

TONDU AND ABERKENFIG. J Musical Successes.—The following pupils of Mrs. J. W. Hopkins, Llandogo House School of Music, Aberkenfig, were successful at the recent examination held at Bridgend in connection with the London College of Music: -Elementary (lst class), Miss Alice Maud Jones, Caerau; Miss Beatrice A. Williams, Penyfai; Primary (lst class). Miss Annie Hayes, Bridgend Road; Miss Violet G. Thomas. Pandv Rorl Miss Tw TTrpn Queen Street; Master Howard Saunders, Tondu; Mi ss Violet Thomas, Tynewydd House, Cefn Cribbwr; Miss Annie W. Owen, Caerau; and Miss Annie Hurley, Prince of Wales Hotel. 212 Obituary.—We regret to record the death of Miss Gwenllian Edwards, fourth daughter of Mrs. and the late Mr. J. W. Edwards, Sarn Villas, Aberkenfig, who passed away on Wednes- day, May 2nd, at the early age of 29 years. Deceased, who had been in failing health for 'some months, was of a genial disposition, and beloved by all her friends. The funeral took place on Sunday, and was largely attended, the deceased being an ardent member of the Llan- santffraid Church and Sunday School. Rev. E. J. Rosser officiated at the house and graveside. The hymn, "Guide me, 0 Thou Great Re- deemer," was sung. Headed by the members of Llansantffraid Sunday School and Choir, the cortege slowly wended its way to the old Parish Church, the "Dead March" being played as it entered. The choir, under the leadership of Mr. Barton, impressively sang, "When our heads are bowed with woe," the 39th Psalm, "How brisrht those "lnrions snirits .ehino" ceased's favourite hymn) :r¡ j ;&£;ve of My Soul." The chief mourners included Mrs. Illy ? Edwards (mother); Pte. W. M. Edwards, A.O.C. (brother); Mrs. D. M. Maloney (sister); Mrs. E. Jones (sister); Mr. Kopkin Edwards (brother); Miss Susie Edwards (sister); Mr. and Mrs. Jj C. Edwards, Bryncoch (uncle and aunt); Tom, Gladys, Jack and Edwin (cousins); A. Jones, Pencoed; and Mrs. Tapscott (Moun- tain Ash). There were many beautiful floral tributes.

I KENFIG HILL

KENFIG HILL. Ciparettes for Soldiers.-The following have received 300 cigarettes each, and wish to thank The Boys at Kenfig Hill" for their kindness in thinking of them.—Cpl. Syd Angell, Cyclist A. A- T. Mount, Sgt. Sam Smith, Driver R. Wil- liams, Pte. T. Jones, Pte. Steve James, Driver G. I Roberts, Cpl. B. Pemberton, Pte. D. R. Thomas, Pte. W. Dacid Pte. D. W. David, Gunner S. Howells, Pte. G. Stevens, Pte. W. James, Sgt. H. Orme, Driver A. T. Hopkins, Driver R. 0. Hopkins, Sgt.-Major A. Hamens, Cpl. Jehu Chester, Pte. W. J. Chester, Pte. J. Thomas, Stoker H. Baldwin, Sgt., E. Townsend, Gunner E. J. Nicholas, Gunner B. Richards, Driver A. Vine, and P te.Will.Jenkine.

I BLAENGARW

I BLAENGARW. Musical Success.—At & recent examination under the London College of Music, the follow- ing pupils of Mr. David C. James, L.C.M., A.T.S.C., were successful in gaining a high per- centage of marks, and obtaining first class certi- ficates, viz.:—Miss Sarah Baker, Messrs. David Davies, Isaac Powell, Henry William Parry, Dav i BdWin Thomas, all of Blaengarw. 183 Reported Missing; Now Killed.—Mis. N. I. B. Goss, Railway Terrace, Blaengarw, has received a notification that her husband, Pte. Manuel Goss (son of Mr. and Mrs. G. Goss), Somerset Light Infantry, who was posted as "missing" on the Somme on the 1st July, 1916, has been re- ported as killed in action. He was called up as a Reservist soon after the outbreak of war, and left for France with the early drafts of the first Expeditionary Force. Prior to enlistment he was a postman at Pencoed. Eisteddfod.—At the Workmen"s Hall, Blaen- garw, on Saturday last, the first annual eistedd- fod under the auspices of the St. John Ambu- lance Brigade Band was held. The presidents were Messrs. W. J. Morgan, M.E., T. E. Lewis, J.P., M.E., and W. Dryburgh, M.E.; and the conductor, Rev. D. C. Davies, all of Blaengarw. Adjudicators: Music, Messrs. Samuel Davies, Maesteg, and R. W. Jones, Porth; recitations, Rev. D. C. Davies, Blaengarw. The accom- panists were Mr. D. C. James and Mrs. T. Wil- liams, Blaengarw; secretaries, Messrs. D. Davies, Blaengarw, and D. J. Stephens, Ponty- cymmer. The awards were :-Girls' solo (under 16): 1, Miss Hilda, Williams, Blaengarw; 2, Miss Betty Sparks, Blaengarw. Boys' solo (under 16): 1, J. H. Lewis, Blaengarw; 2, Emlyn Lewis, Maesteg. Recitation (under 16): Miss Lilian Poole, Pontcymmer. Pianoforte solo (under 12): Ceinwen John, Maesteg. Champion pianoforte solo (silver cup): Miss H. C. Jones, Bryncethin. Contralto solo: Miss Mary Wal- ters, Bryn. Prize bags: Miss L. M. Davies. Blaengai-w. Open recitation: Mr. W. Thomas, Nantymoel. Novice champion solo: Mr. B. LiOyd, inantymoet. Soprano solo: Miss E. M. Lewis, Tonypandy. Tenor solo Prize divided between Mr. D. J. Davies, Nanty:ffyllon, and Mr. Isaac Morris, Blaengarw. Bass or baritone solo: Mr. Granville Davies, Maesteg. Open champion solo (j £ l Is. and silver cup): Mr. Granville Davies, Maesteg. Children's choir: Nantymoel (conductor, Mr. J. Evans). Chief. choral: Blaengarw Music Lovers (conductor. ¡ Mr. Watkin Williams).

IPONTYCYMMER

I PONTYCYMMER. Zion Church.—On Sunday last Zion Church, Po 'ntycymrher, gave a repetition, on a smaller scale, of the English Baptist Singing Festival held on Easter Monday. In the afternoon and evening the meetings were given up to singing, under the conductorship of Mr. J. Edwards. The president for the day was Rev. W. Rey- nolds, and the accompanist was Mrs. Reynolds. The anthem, Teach me Thy Way, 0 Lord," was excellently rendered. Funeral.—The funeral of the late Mr. Caleb Davies, chemist, Pontycymmer, took place on Iriday, April 26th.. He had spent upwards of 30 years in the valley, during which time he had built up a very successful and flourishing busi- ness. His genial and gentlemanly manner ap- pealed to everyone who came in contact with him. He was loved by all, and it will be a very long time.before he is forgotten by the host of friends he made in the valley. His mor- tal remains were laid to rest at Clyderwen Cemetery amid many manifestations of sym- pathy. Revs. W. Saunders, C.C., and Camp- bell Davies, B.A., PontycyAmer, officiated. The mourners were: Mr. and Mrs. H. Davies, Pontycymmer; Mr. and Mrs. D. Davies, Pem- broke; Mr. and Mrs. R. Davies, Morriston (brothers and sisters-in-law); Mr. C. Davies (nephew); Misses M. and E. Davies (nieces), and Mr. W. Mathias (cousin)., Pontycymmer. There were no floral tributes, by request.

OGMORE VALE

OGMORE VALE. Pierrot Concerts.—The Ogmore Vale Pierrots and Concert Party visited Ynisddu and Bedwas (Mon.) on the 25th April and 2nd May respec- tively, and gave very successful concerts at both places. Benefit Concert.—A successful benefit concert was held at the Workmen's Hall, Ogmore Vale, on Tuesday last week in aid of Mrs. Fisher. Ogmore Vale. Mr. W. Bartlett (Ogmore Vale) presided, and sqyeral well known local artistes gave their services free Church Parade.—The annual May Church Parade, in connection with the Ogmore Valley Silver Temperance Band was held on Sunday morning last, when the Band attended Divine Service at St. Paul's Church, Nantymoel. The sacred building was filled with an earnest con- gregation, and the* service was conducted by the Vicar (Rev. J. R. Pugh), who, in the course of his sermon paid a glowing tribute to the band for the fpee services rendered for war and ntb,-r objects. The band, which was under the con- ductorship of Mr. R Gillard, gave a beautiful I rendering of the anthem? "How beautiful upon the Mountains."

I LPORTHCAWL

I "L'- PORTHCAWL. Doaimg Maveniure.—An exciting scene, and one that might have had tragic consequences, was witnessed at Porthcawl on Saturday after- noon last. Two rowing boats, a couple of boys in each, that put out to fish in a calm sea, were caught by the hurricane that arose about 5 o'clock, and a grim struggle ensued. The lads o'clocAk,l, bert Pearce and Fred Pearce, sons of one of the pilots, and John Power, junr., and D. Strot. Luckily all were experienced boatmen and succeeded eventually in reaching the shore, along which thousands of people had assembled. PRINTED AND PUBLISHED BY THE CENTRAL GLAMORGAN PRINTING AND PUBLISHING COMPANY, IM. AT THE GLAMORGAN* GAZETTE" OFFICES, QUEEN STREET, BRIDGBKB, GLAMORGAN. FRIDAY, MAY 11th, 1917.