Collection Title: Brecon & Radnor express Carmarthen and Swansea Valley gazette and Brynmawr district advertiser

Provider: Llyfrgell Genedlaethol Cymru

Hawliau: Nid yw statws neu berchnogaeth hawlfraint yr adnodd hwn yn hysbys.

Gwylio manylion cyfan

Cyntaf Cynt Llun 6 o 8 Nesaf Olaf
Full Screen
18 erthygl ar y dudalen hon
Advertising

Nature's! J?   t Herbal  i Healer for Jmm Cuts & Skin Disease. BIP EVERY HOME NEEDS ZAM-BUK. THERE is a safety, effectiveness t and reliability in herbal Zam-Buk that cannot belong to ointments made with animal fats and mineral drugs. Zam-Buk contains just those healing substances which I Nature has intended for the use of humanity ever since she gave us the instinct to rub a place that hurts. HHHHHnH The herbal extracts used in the preparation of Zam-Buk are carefully selected and scientifically combined. The ingredients assist one another, and the result of this perfect compounding is the most successful skin remedy known. I Ci t Every particle in Zam-Buk plays a distinct part in overcoming disease and helping Nature to grow healthy new skin. Because of its rare herbal origin 1 Zam-Buk maintains its high standard of Healing, 'Soothing, and Antiseptic efficiency and wholesome- ness for all time. It is the ideal herbal healer that is superior to all other skin remedies. MmBuk 01 Judged either by its unique character or the results it consistently gives, Zam-Buk is a remarkable preparation. As a herbal achievement it is famous and historic, and to keep a box of Zam-Buk always handy means a saving to your pocket and a ready issue from the hundred and one accidents and complaints that affect the skin. There is nothing so effective as Zam-Buk for the treatment qj Eczema, Pimples, Rashes, Blotchy Skin, Running Sores, Bad Legs and Ankles, Piles, Children's Scalp Sores (especially Ringworm caught at school), Cuts, Bruises, Burns, Scalds, Poisoned Wounds, Ulcers, Festering Sores, Baby's Sores, Chafings, Scdly Patches, Sore Feet, Trench Itch, Rheumatism, etc. Witho'tZam -B uk. U3 a box, at all Chemists. Stores, Y.M.C.A. Huts Army II- Navy Canteens.

Llandovery Lighting

Llandovery Lighting. I- ONE-SIDED AND INADEQUATE. Llandovery Town Council met on Tuesday, the Mayor (Mr Daniel Jones) presiding. Mr R. Thomas described the arrangement come to be- tween the Corporation and the police as to the lighting of the streets during the winter months as very one- sided and inadequate. -Since the resolution on the sub- ject had been passed, lie understood there had been modifications of the Order. The Clerk pointed out that, in face of the resolution on the minute bearing on the terms come to with the gas conipanf; the council could not now move in the matter. An analyst's report on the town's water supply was submitted. This showed the water to be pure and suitable for dietetic and drinking purposes. Alderman Watkins observed that he was very glad the report showed the water to be pure. It would shut the mouths of those who had been going about saying it was not.

Presteign Soldier Killed

Presteign Soldier Killed. FAMILY LOSES THREE SONS.. We regret to announce that Corporal W. G. Milli- champ, a son of Mr Charles Millichamp and Mrs Millichamp of Millfields, has been killed in action in France. The sad news was received by Mrs Milli- champ, in a letter from the Officer Commanding the Company, on Wednesday morning, which stated that Corporal Millichamp was killed on the 2nd inst. He had; been gassed a short time previousjy and must have only just returned to the line when he was killed. Corporal Millichamp was well-known locally. He was educated at the County School, Presteign, under Mr H. Smith, M.A., and entered the Civil Service, giving up his position to join the Army (the K. S.L.I.). He was the composer of several poems and possessed con- siderable talent in this direction, having recently won the first prize at one of the Y.M.C.A. competitions at the front for the poem entitled, "Blighty." This makes the third son Mr Millichamp has lost in the present war, and much sympathy is felt with Mr and Mrs Millichamp in their bereavements.

Advertising

Every box of "ENGLAND'S GLORY (Matches used means MORE WORK for British -Worl,-peo-ple.-Morelsnd, Gloucester. 515 1

I Crickhoweil District Council

I Crickhoweil District Council. I ROADMEN'S WAGES INCREASED. Mr A. J. Thomas, vice-chairman, presided at Crickhowell District Council on Monday. The Chairman referred to the loss the Chairman of the Council (Mr W. G. James) had sustained by the death of his youngest son, aged six years, under sad circumstances, and proposed a vote of condolence with him and his wife and family. Mr E. Pirie Gordon seconded, and it was carried by the members standing. The Deputy Surveyor (Mr Wilfred Watkins) re- ported a case of overcrowding in Crickhowell, a four- roomed cottage being occupied by a father and mother, a girl of 19, a lad of 14, and two young children. There was only ona bedroom far them all to sleep in. The father worked away during the week and returned home over week-end. I At the request of the Local Fuel Overseers, the I Council appointed a committee, comprising the Chair- man, Vice-Chairman, and MessrslE. Pirie Gordon, Roger Howells, John Thomas, and Josiah Phillips, and Mr D. M. Evans, Relieving Officer to the Crick- j howdl Board of Guardiana, was nominated to render clerical assistance during the next few months. I On the motion of Mr Gwilym C. James, it was de- cided to pay all the Council's roadmen capable of doing a full day's work, 30s. per week. Mr James said they were bound to bring their men up to tbo standard paid by local farmers. A letter was read from the Crickhowell Gas and Coke Company, quoting a price for the lighting of 12 lamps for the winter months, in excess of the price paid last fyear: and in this connection the Clerk read a letter from the Local Government Board appealing to local authorities to cut down to the lowest minimum the consumption of coal and gas. Mr Henry Thomas paid there were strong complaints last year from. Crickhowell people about insufficient lighting. The Council unanimously decided to refer the matter to the Parish Council

No title

Second-Lieut. Digby Cecil Caleb Dickinson, S.W.B. (younger son of Mr and Mrs F. D. Dickinson, of Abery- skir Court, Brecon), whose death in action in France we have already announced, was the sixth of his family to hold a commission in the famous. 24th Regt. HLs colonel writes :—"He was in command of hi. company in the attack en August 18th, and it was characteristic: of him that he should have been right at the head of his men. His death is a great loss to us, lie had a quite except- ional hold .ver the men under him, and his absolute fearlessness and enthusiasm had a great effect on all who came in contact with him. His company was magnificent in the attack, and it was largely owing to the fine spirit and determination they had got from him that they carried through the attack with such success." -=-————————————————————————————————— I

Advertising

MOLES AND RATS DESTROYED ——— BY USING ——— WARD'S MOLE AND RAT POISON. Largely used for over ten years. II. -Per Packet Sold only by Chemists. (If you cannot obtain send the name of your nearest Chemist to the Sole Maker and Originator). "SEE YOU GET WARD S." J. Ward, M.P.S., Builth Wells. br69ij57j2612

GERMANYS WAR AIMS I

GERMANY'S WAR AIMS I Exposed at Liandrindod Wells. I COL. LAMBERT WARD'S LUCID ADDRESS. -1 Germany's true war aims were tellingly exposed to a crowded meeting held in the Grand Pavilion, Llandrin- dod Wells, on Wednesday, when a lucid address was given by Lieutenant Colonel Lambert Ward, D.S.O., H.A.C. The address was listened to with the greatest interest and attention, and was made clear by the aid of Lord Denbigh's well-known war maps. Sir Arthur Walsh, K.C. V.O. (Lord Lieutenant) presided, and was supported by Lt. Col. Lambert Ward and Sir Francis Edwards, M.P. Several patriotic songs were rendered by Miss Evelyn Norton, a great favourite with local audiences, and Mr Marcus St. John, a member of the Inside the Lines" Company at the Pavilion, gave a couple of appropriate recitations in good style. An orchestra of ladies and gentlemen brought together by Mrs Ernest Bryan Smith played some selections at intervals. The Chairman suitably introduced Colonel Lambert Ward, who stated that the object of the lecture, similar to others being given all over the country, was to edu- cate public opinion on the war. Though happily the day was now past when some people did not know there was a war on, there was still a regrettable amount of ignorance with regard to the causes which led up to it, as to what thoywere fighting for,and why they must goon till final victory was achieved. Very few people seemed to realise what would be the position of this country if thejifailed to bring this war to a satisfactory conclusion as they did not understand what Germany's war aims really were, and how for the last two generations she had been bringing up her people to believe England stood in the way of what she considered her natural development and legitimate aims. "We have no war aims (cheers) except to checkmate those of Germany, but we must not lose sight of the fact that our com- mercial prosperity after the war depends to a very great extent-almost entirely--upon our military position at the end of the war." Col. Lambert Ward, proceeding, said he had noticed a 'good deal of war-weariness in certain sections of the community, which was, perhaps, not to be wondered at after four years of war, but the war must be brought to a satisfactory conclusion, or else it would mean the conclusion of the British Empire. Pacifists. I Pacifists, said the Colonel, might be divided roughly into three classes-the conscientious objector, those persons who maintained that there was no need for them to have entered the war at all, as Germany did not want to fight them, and another class, the most dangerous of all, who maintained that lasting peace was possible on a compromise more or less on the existing military situation. With regard to the conscientious objector he had little or nothing to say, for he thought this class of person had had far too much gratuitous ad- vertisement already. With regard to those who said there was no need for them to have gone into the war he agreed with them up to a certain point. Germany did not want to fight them; she intended to deal with the Allies in detail, and to attend to them when she had crushed Russia and France and built up a gigantic Navy with the money obtained from them (Hear, hear). This had always been their policy, and Prussia had fought more wars of aggression and conquest during her comparatively short existence as a first-class power than any other two nations put together. As Mirabau had truly said, "War is the national industry of Prussia." To enable Ins audience to understand how thorough- 1) Prussia pinned her faith to war as a paying com- mercial undertaking the speaker dealt in an interesting manner with the birth and progress of the German nation, referring to the war with Denmark for Schles- wig Holstein, to the crushing of Austria at Sadowa, which brought in its train the allegiance of Wurtem- burg, Bavaria and Baden, and to the war with France. From this last war Prussia obtained 200 millions ster- ling indemnity, about twice what the war cost them, and they annexed Alsace Lorraine. Thus the present position of Prussia was shown to be due to war, and war alone, and therefore there was small wonder that the Prussian people looked upon war as a paying com- mercial undertaking. Whenever the German people became restless under the almost intolerable burden of militarism they were told that the present position of Germany was built up entirely by war. From their earliest childhood German children were taught to look upon war as a paying proposition also, there had been without ceasing peaceful penetration by German travellers and agents into all quarters of the globe, and the whole nation became obsessed with the idea of world-dominion. German trade was carried into all harbours of the world, and German diplomatists laboured unceasingly to spread German doctrines and teachings in the Mohammedan countries of the East. This syncronised with the founding of the great pan- German party in Germany, a party whose motto was World dominion or downfall." Foremost amongst thc-ir plans was the foundation of a great European federation, under German rule. In 1911 Britain was eminently peaceful, and whatever accusations might have been brought against her no one could say she was prepared for a great European war. The same applied to France, who was making peaceful progress in Morocco, and was doing nothing in a warlike pre- paration. Britain did not know even now exactly what preparations Germany was making, but it was certain she was pretty well ready. Enlarging on this theme, and pointing out how British interests came into conflict with Germany in her dream of a great central European Railway, the speaker took his audience gradually up to 1914, and described graphically how Germany was insistent upon war, and refused all suggestions of a peaceful settle- ment of the trouble occasioned by the murder of the Austrian Archduke. France was bound to Russia and Britain was bound by treaty to France, in addition to being a signatory to the neutrality of Belgium, but even if the counsels of cowardice had prevailed be did not think Britain would have been long out of the wAlt for British public opinion would never have toler-at the outrages of the Germans in this war. (Cheers). The Only Peace Terms. Britian had no idea of Germany' speace terms. They had formulated their own very clearly, and in reply re- ceived a cordially expressed wish for a German peace, with a suggestion that they should give up Aden,Gibral- tar,Malta,the Falkland Islands,Colombo and a few other places to provide Germany- with submarine bases. (Laughter). All they had to go upon were unofficial utterances in the various German papers. They must go on to the finish, (applause), for if they let the Ger- man people think they had won the war they simply made another war certain. So far war had always paid Germany, but this must be the exception. (Hear, hear). To let Germany gain a single benefit out of this war was to place a premium on future wars. Never in the history of the world had any nation shown such a callous disregard of human suffering, outraging women, butchering old men and children, leaving the dead unburied, and the wounded unattend- ■ ed, and Germany must be effectually taught that this did not pay. Britain went into this war thinking the Red Cross flag would protect their ambulances and dressing stations, but it took only 14 days to discover that these got more shelling than a battalion of troops, and it I took on jv 10 days to find out the stretcher-bearer parties were ruthlessly machine-gunned, and the wounded left to die unattended. Therefore the war must be pursued, and until Germany was made to see that war did not pay, and until she made such re- paration as lay, in her power for the wrong she had done there would be no peace with her or her Allies. (Cheers). The Chairman announced that the collection had amounted to ;C42 10s., and after payment cf expenses there would be left over £ 31 10s. from the funds of I the Cottage Hospital. Sir Francis Edwards proposed a hearty vote of thanks to the Countess of Malmesbury, Mrs Bryan I Smith and the committee of ladies and gentlemen who I made the arrangements for the meeting, to the or- chestra, to Miss Evelyn Norton and Mr St. John, to Mr W. Alec Millward, to Lieut.-Col. Lambert Ward and the Chairman, and all others who had helped to make the meeting such a great success. The vote was I, carried with acclamation.

Advertising

RHEUMATISM J KIDNEY TROUBLE. I Rheumatism is due to uri-c acid, which is also the cause of backache, lumbago, sciatica, gout, urinary trouble, Atone, gravel, dropsy. Estora tablets, a thor- i otiglily harmless specific based on modem medical science, are the successful treatment, and have cured I from ills, aches and pains, under the impression that they are the victims of ailments common to their sex, but more often than not it is due to the kidneys, and in such cases Estora Tablets will set them -right! Estora Tabtett.. an honest remedy at an honest price, 1 o per box of 40 tablets, or 6 for 6/9. All chemists or posture free from E.stora Co., 132, Charing Cross Roadr London. W.C. 2. Brecon Agent, Walter Gwillim, London, Medical Hall; HuHth Wells Agent, T. A. Colt- man, JI.P.S., The Pharmacy. bl!44pl212

HEADMASTERS WIFE 1

HEADMASTER'S WIFE. 1 DEATH OF MRS. DAVIES, WHITTON. TRIBUTES FROM OLD SCHOLARS IN RADNOR AND I BRECON. We regret to announce the death of Mrs Frances Charlotte Davies, the dearly beloved wife of Mr D. R. Davies, headmaster of Dame Anna Child's School, Whitton, and for 22 years head-master of the school at Talyhont-on-Usk. She passed away after a long illness on the 9th inst. in her 81st year. Mr and Mrs Davies celebrated their golden wedding 3 years ago, when at a public meeting presided over by the late Sir Powtett Milbank, Lord Lieutenant of the County, Mr Davies was presented with -a cheque for £ 150, and an album containing the names of 212 subscribers, the majority of whom were old scholars of Talybont and Whitton schools. The deceased, who was the youngest daughter of the late Mr Harry Htfmfray, of Scet-hrog House, ltrecoii.sliire, was highly respected by all classes, and the deepest sympathy is felt for Mr Davies in his bereave- ment. Mr and Mrs Davies lost two sons at the Front in 1915, and she never recovered from the shock experienced when ,she heard officially of the death of her eldest son, who fell in action at Givenchy. The funeral took plrfce on Friday afternoon last. when the remains were interred in Whitton Churchyard. The coffin was taken to the church the previous night, and on Friday morning the bereaved husband and family all partook of the Holy Eucharist at an early celebration in Whitton Church, the Vicar of Knighton being the celebrant. The chief mourners at the funeral were Mr D. R. Davies (husband), Mr W. Homfray Dair- ies (son), Q.M.Sergt. Davies (son), Mr J. A. Davies (son), Mrs Clarke (daughter), Mr and Mm Cooper (son-in-law and daughter), Mr Sheard (daughter), and Mrs Grain- ger (daughter). The bearers were Messrs. Tom Mose- ley, Walter Williams, Charles Edwards, Walter Kinsey. W. Wozencroft, William Stephens, John Davies (all old scholars) and John Williams. The coffin which was of unpolished oak with black trimmings, was supplied by Mr Joseph Price, of Presteign, and on the plate was the inwription-"Fran,cis Charlotte Davies, born September 20th. 1837, died September 9th. 1918." Rev. Claud E. Lewis, priest-in-charge, of Whitton, officiated both in church and at the grave. Miss Reeve, of Evancoyd, an old friend of the family, presided at the organ, and- •hymns 221 and 499 were sung in church, and the "Nunc Dimittis." At the grave "Peace, perfect peace," was sung. The church was crowded, and every sympathy was shown to Mr Davies and family in their ead bereavement. Among those present at the church were Sir Robert Green-Price, Bart.. Dr. Horace Debenham (Presteign), Mrs and Miss Whitehead (Nantygroet-), Mr and Mrs Moseley (Monaughty), Mr and Miss D. Ed- wards (Nantygroes),. Mrs Harrison, Miss Harrison and Miss Cripwell (Rectory), Mr E. Kinsey, J.P. (Whitton Court), Mr and Miss Edwards (Stapleton Castle), Rev. A. Leitch (Askhill), Mr and Mrs Mival (Lower Dolley), Mr and Mrs Evans (Penlan), Mr and Mrs Evans (Litton Court),- Mr and Mrs Evans (Pilleth Court), Mr Pugh (Cwmwhitton), Mr Morris (Lleast), Mrs Wozencroft (New Buildings), Mr Grime (Bank, Howey), Mr George Davies (Walk Mill), &e. Letters, conveying deep sympathy and regret that they could not attend were received from Edith, Lady Milbank (Norton Manor), Rev. H. C. Green-Price (rector of Penibridge), Mr Whitmore Green-Price (the Gables), Mr J. A. Beebee (Woniastoii), Kev. John Williams (rec- tor of Sully, and an old pupil teacher of Talybont S{'hocl), Mr D. H. Mason (late London traffic manager Schoct), Midland Railway Company, and an old pupil of of the Talybont School), and Mr and Mrs Moss, of Blackwood. Besides the floral tributes of love and affection from the bereaved husband and children, the following wreaths were received "In affectionate remembrance and heartfelt sympathy," from Mr E. H. Whitehead and family. "In affectionate remembrance and much sympathy," from Edith, Lady .Milbank. "With Sir Robert and Lady Green-Price's deepest sym- pathy." "With affectionate and loving sympathy, from Mrs Philpott-s and Mr and Mrs Moss. "With deep .sympathy," frwn Dr. and Mrs Hacquoil, of Penarth. "In loving remembrance of dear aunt," from Nell, Maria and Enid. "With deepest sympathy." from the maids at Nanty- groes.

Advertising

Nervous and Sleepless. WEAK WITH INDIGESTION AND LOSS OF REST, BUT SOON CURED BY DR. CASSELL'S TABLETS. Dr. Cassell's Tablets reinforce the vital power of the system and give new strength to every bodily function. Here is proof Mrs Longthorn, 1, Herbert Place, Princess FHrpei. M.'ishrc'. Kotherham. savs :—"I was in a dreadful state of weakness, with my nerves all shuttered, and utterly broken in health. I could hardly eat anything, iand as for sleep, I never had any real rest. When I dozed off I ha,d dreadful dreams of PalliD- and other horrors thalc made me wake again with a. start. My nerves became so bad that I was afraid to cross the street till some- one came and took my arm. I suffered terribly with wind, EGO. "I had medicine, and -was advised to have my teeth out; but nothing did me any good. Then at last I got Dr. Cassell's Tablets, and almost from the first tlieyli-elped me. All my pain werit and iiii, nerves became all right. Now I can eat and sleep like other people, and feel quite well and strong. Dr. Cassell's Tablets, are the Proved Remedy 'for— Nervous Breakdown Nerve Paralysis Spinal Weakness Infantile Paralysis Neurasthenia Sleeplessness Anaemia Kidney Trouble Indigestion Wasting Diseases Palpitation Vital Exhaustion Specially valuable for Nursing Mothers and during the Critical Periods of Life. Sold by Chemists and Stores in all parts of the world, including Australia, New Zealand, Canada, Africa, and India. Prices: 1/ 1/3, and 3/- (the 3/- size being the most economical). IMPORTANT.-Dr. Cassell's Tablets are guaranteed free from iron and from narcotics. They .can neither constipate nor induce a drug-taking habit. If you desire further information, write to Dr. Cassell's Co., Ltd., Chester-road, Manchester.

CefnCoed Tramdar Service

Cefn-Coed Tramdar Service. 1 ■■ BOARD OF TRADE INQI IRY. A Board of Trade inquiry was held at Merthyr. on Thursday, into the application by Vaynor and Pen- deryn Rural Council that a more frequent tram service should be run between Merthyr and Cefn-Coed, and that the terminus in future should not be at Pontmor- lais but at Graham Street, Merthyr, as formerly. Mr A. Ellis, city engineer, Cardiff, presided, and the other Commissioners were Messrs N. J. Young (tram- ways manager, Newport), A. Nicholls Moore (electric and tramways engineer, Newport), and D. James (tramway engineer, Swansea). Mr Frank T. James, as clerk to the Vaynor aDd Penderyn Council, put the case for the application,and his statement was supported by members of his Council representatives of the Merthyr Corporation, and local miners. Mr Summerville and Mr Lewis W. Dixon (manager) replied on behalf of the Merthyr Electric Traction Company. „ The inquiry was closed.

TERRIBLE BACKACHE SUFFERING

TERRIBLE BACKACHE SUFFERING CUBED BY ONE BOX OF BAKER'S BACKACHE PELLETS. Mr C. S. Smith, a tailor, of Marvelstown, Kells, Co. Meatli, Ireland, writes :—"I suffered terribly 'from pains in the back and shoulders, but the first box of Baker's Backache Pellets cured me in a week. I can now work quite easily alt the tailoring, sitting dn the middle of the table. I thank you very .much, and am telling all the people round there what Raker's Backache Pellets have done for me." There as no doubt that Baker's Backache Pe-Ilets are a wonderful cure for Back- ache, Rheuma'tism, Lumbago, Sciatica, Gra-vel, Dizziness, and all Kidney Troubles. Price 1/3 per box, from Boots, Taylors, and all chemists, or post free direct from Baker's Medicine Co., Ltd., 1, 'Southampton Row, London, W.C. 1.

Advertising

r~i' —~ii 

NEWPORT COUNCIL

NEWPORT COUNCIL Vote for Talybont Scheme. NEGOTIATIONS WITH MERTHYR ENDED. At Newport Town Council, on Tuesday week, the Mayor (Councillor William Evans) presiding, the question of the new waterworks was raised. Alderman T. Parry said the committee had given serious oonsid- I eration to the latest letter from the Merthyr Corpor- ation, but felt that no good purpose would be served by re-opening negotiations with Merthyr. As far back as July, 1917, they asked for information from Merthyr; that information had not yet been supplied. This was a matter of life and death to Newport, and he appeal- ed for their support in carrying through their great undertaking at Talybont. Mr F. P. Robjent pleaded for another conference with Merthyr. Why couldn't they have a joint board: j Alderman Parry We have a definite reply from Merthyr that they are not likely'to entertain the question of a joint board. Dr. J. Lloyd Davies and others maintained that Merthyr would not in a few years' time be able to sup- ply sufficient water for Newport. Mr E. A. Charles said the Talybont scheme would cost a million and a half, and a Is. and a penny rate to the town it was I therefore, worth while again considering Merthyr. Mr Charles Williams said Newport wanted 4,000,000 gal- lons per day, no mean customer, but Merthyr had not turned a pebble to obtain their custom. What con- clusion could they draw from that ? Replying to criticism Alderman Parry said that Merthyr had made water contracts with Pontypridd, which, if it did not have a sufficient supply, could com- mand Merthyr to cut off Newport. A motion that the question be referred back for re- consideration was lost by six votes to 15, and the Council decided to apply to Parliament to proceed with the Talybont scheme.

Advertising

| I The GrietuniestjCastard I 1.

No title

A Kryumawr committee, convened by the vkar (Rev. F. L. Oswell) and Mr Lewis Lewis, schoolmaster, hat; de- cided to hold a flag day and concert at the Market Hall jn aid of the "Evening Express" Prisoners' of War Fund.

Advertising

i j B jssi ADTDMN SHOW THIS JfEEK. 1BHI BigAUTUMN SRO wLa THIS -WEEK, i ii ffl • H 1 •. a MILLINERY & COATS. I ED ■ m •' H 00 • |§ 1m M 00 H 111 1 B David Jones, & Co., ft TALGARTH. 1 1 DRAPERS. The Firm that Value Built. OUTFITTERS. ffl tit