Collection Title: Cambrian Daily Leader

Provider: Llyfrgell Genedlaethol Cymru

Hawliau: Nid yw statws neu berchnogaeth hawlfraint yr adnodd hwn yn hysbys.

Gwylio manylion cyfan

Llun 1 o 6 Nesaf Olaf
Full Screen
26 erthygl ar y dudalen hon
Advertising

The Cambria Daily r Leader gives later news than any paper published in this -is- j trict. I

Advertising

The London Office of the "Cambria Daily Leader" is at 151, Fleet Street (first floor), where adver- tisements can be received up to 7 o'clock each evening for insertion in the next day's issue. Tel. 2276 CentraL j

ARTILLERY DUEl

ARTILLERY DUEl. BRITISH GAIN WEST OF POZIERES 1 FRENCH AIRMEN BUSY I SHELLS ON STATIONS AND MUNITION I FACTORY. TO-DAY'S BRITISH OFFICIAL. I The following telegraphic dis- patch from the British General Headquarters in France was issued at 12.45 p.m.:— Last night, as the result of a minor operation west of Pozieres, we gained some ground. In other minor operations north of Bezantin-le-Petit, north-west of Delville Wood, we captured a few prisoners. Ouring the night there was con- siderable artillery fire on both sides on various portions of the British front. A raiding party destroyed an enemy mine shaft east of Loos. Near Yyres-Comines Road, we ex- ploded a small mine in the enemy's lines, and occupied the crater. TO-DAY'S FRENCH OFFICIAL. The French official communique issued by the Press Bureau this afternoon says On the right bank of the Meuse the battle continues on the Thiau- mont-Fleury front, which the Germans attacked during the night with extreme desperation. Several counter-attacks with large effectives made on our positions in the neighbourhood of Thiaumont were repulsed with heavy losses to the enemy. Our troops in the course of the fighting even succeeded in cap- turing the work, which we subse- quently evacuated under the fierce bombardment. Ve brought back 80 prisoners in this action. in the region of Fleury the fighting has been just as violent, the Ger- mans multiplying their counter- attacks on the village, each pre- ceded by artillery preparation. Afisr sevcrai fruitless attempts we I gained a footing in the southern portion of Fleury, where the fight- ing continues to be very lively. An attempt to dislodge us from the station situated to the south- east of the village failed in face of the resistance of our troops. The enemy also attacked during the night our new positions to the east of Vache-au-Ville. They only succeeded in sustaining heavy losses. (n the region of Vaux-Chapitre and Le Chenois the artillery duel is very active. in the Vosges yesterday, towards 10 p.m., the enemy launched, on the salient of La Chapelotte, an attack which was dispersed before being able to reach our lines.. The night was relatively calm on II the rest of the front. AVIATION. I During the night of the 3rd and 4th of August one of our bombarding air squadrons dropped 80 shells of large calibre on the .railway sta- tion of Noyou, and on a munition factory. Fifty shells were thrown by another squadron on the railway station and the enemy bivouacs in the region of the Somme.

SWANSEA TRIBUNAL I

SWANSEA TRIBUNAL. I Question to be Raised in I Parliament. Next Tuesday (writes our London corre- spondent), Mr. Waller Long is to he asked if lie will make inquiries; into the case of Mr. G. Crowden Clement, who recently appealed for exemption to the Swansea Appeal Tribunal, and if he will asceatin whether the chairman of this tribunal, in hearing this appeal, ruled that the statu- tory regulations were out of ordqr ia per- mitting the applicant to atk questions, and whether he will order a rehearing of the case, and will instruct the chairman of the tribunal that the statutary regula- tions are binding of him.'

GERMANYS FOOD SUPPLYJ

GERMANY'S FOOD SUPPLY. Famine Stories Denied. Amsterdam, J? ridav.—A long official | statement on the economic situation in Germany has been published in Berlin. It states that the entire population will have considerable reserves with which to enter upon the present economic year, which will certainly yield better results. The statement denies reports of famine or extraordinary restrictions endangering the health of the population As to the supply of meat, it -ys arrangements have I been made with breeders which will guarantee a good supply of pork. The. fat rations now allotted of 90 grammes per week per head is regarded as quit. suffi- cient. A German newspaper points out that during harvesting special precautions will 1 be necessary against incendiarism by pri- soners of war, who move about freely in the fields.

No title

Three sc  f rpate d in Thr schoolboys have bPE'n treated in hospital at Tottenham far poisoning, caused by eating lahurnam seed-pods. The boys collapsed in t'^e street.

MYTHICAL DAMAGE r

MYTHICAL DAMAGE. r Germany's Report of the Air I Raid. Amsterdam, Thursday.—An official statement issued in Berlin to-day say Last night a great number of our naval airships again attacked tie South-Eastern Counties of England and dropped success- fully a Jai- number of explosive and in- cendiary bombs, especially on London, the naval base at Harwich, on railway works, and on industrial establishments in the oounty of Norfolk, important from a mili- tary point of view. On their approach the airships were attacked by enemy foroes under the rays of numerous search- lights, but they returned all undamaged. The Press Bureau is officially informed the, above statement is practically untrue from beginning to end. ————— e ————— A WONDERFUL STORY. I IMAGINARY INTERVIEW WITH I DUTCH SAILOR. Amsterdam, Thursday (received Friday). —The LokalanzitCer prints a telegram from the Telegraphic Union, dated Flush- ing, Aug. 2nd, stating that a Dutch engi- neer, who spent the night of July 31st- Aug. 1st in a London suburb, witnessed the German airship &ttaok. He stated on his arrival at Flushing to correspondents of the Telegraphic Union that he was a guest of an Anglo-Dutch Rowing Club, and passed the night with his friends in a boathouse on the Thames. The damage done was, he says, so seri- ous that it is at present impossible to esti- mate it. Several warehouses were de- stroyed, and ships at anchor were seriously damaged. The excitement of the London population was indescribable. He adds that a whole quarter of Huntingdon was burnt out, and the loss of human life in Kejit was especially great. With reference to the above story, I hear that no boat from England has ar- rived at Flushing for three days.—"Times" War Telegram, per Pretis Association (Copyright). I

LABOUR AFTER WAR I

LABOUR AFTER WAR. I Mr. Asquith Assures Triple I Alliance. Mr. Asquith made an important reply to a deputation of the Triple Labour Alliance (miners, transport workers, rail- waymen) on labour conditions after the war. A Demobilisation Committee, with Labour represented, is dealing with the problem, but he made the following defi- nite statements: The Government is pledged to restore trade union practices. It will try to create special emergency machinery to deal with workers who have to be replaced. It has temporarily insured munition workers of that class (some 1,500,000 against unemployment. Demobilisation will be slow, and a glut of labour is unlikely. But some period of furlough on full Army pay must be granted.

CASEMENT SENTENCE

CASEMENT SENTENCE. Statement Shows Sympathy Would be Misplaced. The Pr"ss Bureau is instructed to issue the following statement:— All the circumstances in the case of Roger Casement were carefully and re- peatedly considered by the Government before the decision was reached not. to interfere with the sentence of the law. He was convicted and punished for treachery of the worst kind to the Empire he- had served and as a willing agent of Germany. The Irish rebellion resulted in much loss of life, both among soldiers and civilians. Casement invoked and organised German assistance to the insurrection. In addition, though himself for many years a British official, he undertook the task of trying to induce soldiers of the British Army, prisoners in the hands of Germany, to for- sv.ear their oath of allegiance and join their country's enemies. Conclusive evidence has come into the hands of the Government since the trial that he had entered into an agreement with the German Government which ex- plicitly provided that the brigade, which he was trying to raise from among the Irish soldier prisoners, might be employed in Egypt against the British Crown. CASEMENT AS MURDERER. I Those among the Irish soldiers, prisoners in Germany, who resisted Case- ment's solicitations of disloyalty were sub- jected to treatment of exceptional cruelty by the Germans; some of them have since been exchanged as invalids and have died in this country, regarding Casement as their murderer. The suggestion that Casement left Ger- many for the purpose of trying to stop the Irish rising was not raised at the trial, and is conclusively disproved not only by the facts there disclosed, but by further evi- dence which has since become available. Another suggestion, that Casement was out of his mind. is equally without founda- tion. Materials bearing on hits mental condition were placed at the disposal of his counsel, who did not raise the plea of insanity. Casement's demeanour since his arrest and throughout and since the trial gave no ground for any such defence, and, indeed, was sufficient to disprove it.

PROPHETS TAME FINISH I

PROPHET'S TAME FINISH. I Wellington, New Zealand. Friday.— After 17 dayse trial, the Maori "prophet" Rua. has been sentenced to one year's hard labour and one year of reformatory treatment. Rua proclaimed himself the Kaiser, and with armed followers took to tin bush. He was captured after a fight involving the death of two Maoris and the wounding of four policemen.— Reuter.

11 ALWAIS NAGGING I

11 ALWAIS NAGGING." I U I would rather live without him," re- marked Emily Elias, Resolven, who sum- moned her husband, Gomer Elias, Cly- daeh, at Neath on Friday with desertion. She said there had been a quarrel, and her husband turned her out of the house and ■sold the furniture. Questioned hy Mr. Jestyn Jeffries, who defended, witness said her husband had never struck her, but he was jealous and always nagging. An order of maintenance of 10s. a week was made, and the parties were advised to patch up their quarrels and live to- gether happily

SCALES OF FATE I

SCALES OF FATE I M. PICHON'S STRIKING TRIBUTE TO GREAT I BRITAIN. WHY THE HUHS HATE US I Paris, Friday.—In an article in the Petit Journal," M. Pichon writes that in taking the decision she took two years ago, Great Britain decided the fate of the war. He continues:— Let no Frenchman deceive himself on this matter. Events have proved that if the struggle had been localised between France and Russia on the one hand, and Germany and her allies on the other, Ger- man victory would have been the conse- quence. It is useless to cherish phan- tasms. The facts are there. Without Great Britain our ports were practically at the mercy of the enemy, our overseas communications practically cut off. 1 WHY THE HUNS HATE US. I "Germany has made no mistake on the point, and if she now hates the British it is because, she sees in them the prin- cipal cause of her approaching downfall. She declared war only because she counted upon the non-participation of Great Britain. She had worked for years to assure herself of this, and had been prodigal of her advances to Great Britain, and when the moment came when she plunged Europe into the abyss in which it is now being ruined and exhausted, she thought herself sure that she had suc- ceeded. M. Pichon adds: H What, is not known in France, and what ought to be said at this moment when demonstrations are being organised which will reaiffrm the indomitable resolve of Great Britain and her Colonies, is that standing outside the Government of those days in which the energy of Mr. Winston Churchill, the loyalty of Viscount Grey, the will of Mr. Asquith, and the foresight of Mr. McKenna triumphed, there were four men who played parts of capital importance in bringing about the declaration of war on Germany—Mr. Bonar Law, Lord Lans- downe. Mr- Austin Chamberlain, and Mr. L. J. Maxse. WORLD'S MOST REPUGNANT FOE. I lot no b ranchman ever forget these names. They are those of great, clear- sighted Britons, who, to their imperish- able honour, saw that the cause of their country was one with that of ours, of our ally Russia, of honest minds and of free peoples, Their rewards will be the destruc- tion of the vilest and most repugnant foe the world has ever known, the crushing of the murderers of Captain Fryatt and Miss Cavell, and the overthrow of the unworthy nation which has made a 'national anthem of its song of hate and pillage. GERMANY'S FATE SEALED. I The f Journal," in an article on what Great Britain is doing in the war, says: Great Britain's declaration of war on Germany sealed German's fate once iiid for all, and destroyed all her hope of vic- tory. Germany could crush France, and then turn on Russia, but Great Britain was out of her reach. Little is known of the prodigious task of patient labour ac- complished by the British Fleet; never- theless it is by this silent work that Ger- many is being done to death. Were Great Britains share in the war confined to the blockade of Germany, it would deserve the highest honour, but. the British are not people to be satisfied with giving the minimum of help. The Ger- mans nursed the illupdon that Great Britain would be their friend. Their dis- appointment only heightened their hatred and thirst for revenge. PIVOT OF THE COALITION. Great Britain has become the pivot of the coalition against Germany and, as she has always done, she is bringing all her might to bear. What our friends are proudest of is their military effort, and with perfect justice, for it is the consum- mation of the British creative faculty. Great Britain can well say tha.t nobody but she could have achieved such a result, but the victory of which she has a right to be proud is still more the victory won over herself by the adoption of conscrip- tion. Nothing shows more clearly than this that clear-sighted intelligence and un- shakeable determination which are the driving power of Great Britain in the Allies' march to victory."

LLANELLY COUNCILI

LLANELLY COUNCIL. I Railway Company and Public I Right-of-Way. At the monthly meeting of the Llanelly Borough Council on Thursday, Mr. W. B. Jones presiding, the Surveyor (Mr. Jen- kin), in accordance with Council's in- structions reported on the alleged public right-of-way over the Burryport and Gwen- draeth Valley Railway between Burryport and Pontyberem, in connection with which several persons have been prosecuted by the company for trespassing. The. Clerk (Mr. J. n. Blake), at the out- pet explained that the surveyor had pre- pared his report, but the magistrates had not yet given their decision. The question was whether the Council wanted the report read then, or whether they wanted to wait until the magistrates' decision was an- nounced. The Chairman (Mr. W. B. Jones) directed that the report should be read. In his report the Surveyor stated that the part in dispute was two-thirds of a mile in length, and his information was that the public had used it without inter- ruption up till a bout, a month ago, when the railway company tried to stop people going that way. The railway in question had been constructed along the site of the old canal, and he was informed that the towing path of the canal had been free and open to the public, and this right of passage was continued up to the time men- tioned. It appeared that the right of using had not previously been disputed, and he thought the Council should take the neces- sary stepe to contest the right of way from Cwnimatvr to Pembrey. The inhabitants would be prepared to furnish evidence. The public continued to pass and repass over the right-of-way. Several members expressed the view that the rights of the public should be pro- tected. The Surveyor said tha.t the people did not want the Council to take action until the magistrate* had given their decision in the test cases, and if that decision was favourable to the defendants then it would not of course be necessary for the Council to intervene. It was decided to leave the matter in abeyance pending the decision of the magistrates, and tJ". clerk was authorised to watch, the case, k J

IN EAST AFRICA f

IN EAST AFRICA. f ——— Belgians Take Two Important German Towns. Le Havre, Thur&J<.y (received 1'riday) .1 -A Belgian oommumque issued b?f f??ys the right wing of fie Belgian troops in East Africa, continuing its march to the South, has occupied Kigoma and TTjiji, the -igoma aind ltjijii, t j ?,? most important German port on Lake Tanganyika, and tin; teiminus of the rail- vnty from Dar Es tikn to the lake.

NO TIDINGS I

NO TIDINGS. Italian Submarines Which Never Returned. Rome, Thursday —It is officii1 lly an-j ncunced that the no Italian submarines; which left on a il vsion to enemy coasts; some time ago ha5* liot returned to their; bases, and cousequ: nt^- they must hOI considered to have tx- ;n lost.

TALE OF A PONY

TALE OF A PONY. Strange Sequel to a Neath Sale. I At Neath County Sessions on Friday, Morgan Davids (19). }ahourer. Neath, wasj charged on remand with stealing a pony, I vaaued 1:11 lOis., the property of David Morgan, auctioneer, Llantwit, Neath. Prosecutor said he held a sale at the Angel yard on the 31st May, and he sold the pony to John Williams, Maesycwm- mer, Cardiff, but was4 asked to graze it for a week. lie sei-t. defendant with it to Cadoxton marsh, and lie did not seoj the pony agaiji Geo. Jackson, rag and bone collector,! Morriston, t'aid he nought the pony off j accused for !i7, and gave the lad Is. for hi- train fare He explained that he was; selling the jvony for his master, a coalj mercliau and he w.ato(i S8 for it. Wit-! ness subsequently so d the pony for 4:6. P.S. Davie, gave e, idence of arrest, and h reply to the charge, accused replied: I did not steal the pony." Accused was comn itted for trial, bail, to the extent of £ 3„ being granted.

A NAMELESS HERO I

A NAMELESS HERO. I British Officer and an I Unknown Rescuer. Paris, Friday.—The following story by a British officer, published in the news- papers, has made a great impression in Paris:- The officer, a lieutenant, was wounded in a German trench Fhile bis soldiers were retiring. Before doing so they placed h,illll in a rather deep hoK'. From this he tried to scramble, but in vain, as his woundod shoulder hurt him, and his right arm was useless. He was resolved to try again r?hcr than fall int ,D¿ of i? G.?? mans, though he recognised the chances were ten 1;.0 one that he would be taken prisoner. Fortunately a sold;er came to his rescue just at the "moment when a German machine-gun became busy in a trench quite near. "This brave fellow," relates the lieutenant," wriggled up to me on hands and feet like a lizard and, saying, Get on my back, EÙ: lifted me as well as ho could. I fell three times while he was crawl- ing up the slope with me, and three times he stopped in the middle of the hell which was raging around us and picked me up. Then I felt him quiver under me, and at the same moment I was wounded in the left arm. I fell down and looked at him. I shall never forget his face, but he had lost his cap and ooat, and I do not know to which battalion he belonged. His fore- head was cut, and he was bleeding frealy j I so I pulled him to the stump of a tree and laid him down, placing his head on my haversack. I then dragged myself as well as I could to find a stretcher-bearer, but was carried away in a counter-attack by our troops. I thought I should find my rescuer, but have never done so.—Press Association.

THE FRYATT CRIMEI

THE FRYATT CRIME. I King's Letter to a Hero's Widow. The following is a copy of a letter which by command of the King has been sent to Mrs. Fryatt:— Buckingham Palace, 3rd August, 1916. Madam,—In the sorrow which has so cruelly stricken you the King joins with his people in offering you his heartfelt sympathy. Since the outbreak of the war his Majesty has followed with admiration the splendid services of the Mercantile Marine. The action of Captain Fryatt in defend- ing his ship against the attack of an enemy submarine was a noble instance of the resource and self-reliance so characteristio: of that profession. It is therefore with feelings of he I deepest indignation that the King learnt j of your husband's fate, and in conveying to you the expression of his condolence I aiii commanded to assure you of the ab- horrence with which his Majesty regards this outrage.—Yours very faithfully, (Signed) Stamfordham. SWANSEA SEAMEN'S DEMAND. The Swansea branch of the National Sailors and Firemen's Union have passed the following That we, the members of the National Sailors' and Firemen's Union, protest against the cruel uliii-cler of Capt. Fryatt. of the s.s. Brussels, hy the officials of the German Government; and further call upon our Government to bring those re- sponsible officials, of whatever rank, to justice at the conclusion of hostilities."

SHEER IMPUDENCE I

SHEER IMPUDENCE. I David Jno. Bevan, a discharged soldier, of Cadoxton, summoned nenry Kivell, at Neath, on Friday, for assault. Complain-' ant said Bevan accosted him on the road and told him to join the Army, adding You are only putting a sham laiiie on to get out of the Army." Ho was then struck in the mouth. The Magistrates' Clerk: Hav& you been to France? Complainant: Yes, sir. The Magistrates' Clerk: Then his re- mark to you about joining the Army was sheer impudence. Complainant said the case had since been settled by defendant, who paid him 25s. In consequence he asked the Bench .to withdraw the cat)e--T" was agreed

PALM KERNEL DUTY I

PALM KERNEL DUTY I PARliAMENT, AMID SOME BEAT, DIS- CUSSES A MYSTERIOUS IETUR SOME, INSINUATIONS I The Colonial Office Vote was carried in the House of Commons on Thursday night, but it was the occasion for a lively scene. During Mr. Bonar Law's speech there arose an unpleasant sccne. He had argued very pertinently, that the differential ex- port duty on palm kernels from West Africa followed the precedent of the tin duty imposed on the Federated Malay States in 1903. which was to have been ex- tended to Nigeria by the late Liberal Government—before the Coalition was formed. lie then read a letter from a neutral margarine firm, which, he sug- gested, explained the excitement over palm kernels. It was dated June 21, and ran: I have received your letter of Satur- day, 17th inst., and the memorandum about the Palm Kernel Committee has come to hand. We have considered it best not to do anything at the opening of Par- liament, as a question of this nature is generally lost among the most important business matters which are brought for- ward, but we have asked a member of the House to put a. question down asking the Premier if time would be given for the discussion of the matter, which is of great importance to the future policy of this country. NOTICE IN THE PRESS. In the meantime we have inserted in the Press the following notice: When Parliament reassembles a num- ber of members interested intend to press tor a discussion on the report of the West African Produce Committee before the re- commendations are adopted. The main recommendation is to impose an export duty of JcZ a ton on palm nuts coming from British West Africa except in cases where they are to be crushed in this coun- try. The feeling is that this change is too far-reaching to be made without discus- sion in the House of Commons. It is not merely a. question of Free Trade as against Tariff Reform. The departure contem- plated is so novel that members interested think it ought not to be made as it were behind the back of Parliament: H This is for the purpose of drawing the attention of members to what is going for- ward, or otherwise matters of this kind are likely to slip through. When the ques- tion comes on the notice paper we shall send out a furt her notice to the papers in order to bring Lord Henry Bentinck at once rose and asked if it was suggested that he had been influenced by the margarine firm. Mr. Ramsay MacDonald. amid some excite- ment, put the same question, and Mr. Molteno. who has sometimes inquired about this matter, denied all knowledge ,oLt,U. -t ],w--anzvrerr-d that the firm would not act in that" crude II way, at which Sir George Toulmin, who had spoken, asked. Is the insinuation directed against me? The beginning of Tariff Reform," said Mr. Llewelyn Williams. No," retorted Mr. Bonar Law, it is the end of opposition to a reasonable fiscal policy." "WAS THE LETTER STOLEN?" This did not help matters, and Mr. MacDona.ld put the blunt question: Was the letter stolen?" A stolen document," added Mr. Snow- den. A nice honourable thing to do." It is authentic," said the Colonial Secretary, not very happy, but I hnv% no inteation gf telling members how I got it." Having quoted this letter," asked Mr. Hazelton, is the right hon. gentleman not bound to lay it on the table of the I House? Thart would be the case," said the Cha irman, "if i.t were an official docu- ment, but I cannot see how it applies to this." I can see it." replied Mr. MacDonald. Is it not an oiffcial document in its pre- sent form? We ought to get the name of the writer, and the name of the member to whom the letter was written." 'f The hou. member may think that," answered Mr. Bonar Law, but I lian-e a different view of it. I am at a loss to understand all t'his heat. I have read the letter for the purpose of showing that vested interests do attempt to use what- ever influence they can to get political I pressure brought to bear." (Cheers.)

HINDENBURG IDOL I

HINDENBURG, IDOL. German Press Rejoices in New Command. Amsterdam, Friday.—Commenting on the extension of Hindenburg's conmiand in the East. the Nach- rich ten" writes:—The rieht man in the! right place. This will be the unanimous opinion of our people and our army, and also of our allies. A desire long cherished by tho people but never directly ex- pressed, is now fulfilled. In the present crisis, created by the general Russian at- tack. the consolidation of army groups for joint action was a necessity. All commanders of army grouj>s and armies will readily and ungrudgingly submit to Hindenburg's authority. With full con- fidence everyone looks to the national hero, as the Kaiser called our lliuden- burg. With still greater confidence than! heretofore the entire German people now waits the further development of warlike events in the Last, and of the war in general. The proved master of strategy i in the war against the Russians, v. ho i brought to a standstill the big Russian I steamroller in East Prussia, and hy masterfully using his nincers, captured hundreds of thousands of nrisoners, will i again find means and ways of vic-- tonously meeting the storm of Russian masses, which are equinned with war materials fror:1 France. England, Japan and America. The right man has been put in the right placp The Volkzeitung a lso welcomes Hindenburg's new command. It says- Germany's confidence in her army leaders in the East has never been shaken, but that the appointment of Hindenburg in j supreme command increases this confi- dence to certainty. The moral, not to say Inagic, influence which emanates from the name of Hindenburg. will doubtless! make itself felt among the soldiers of1 our armies in the East. The knowledge that they are under Hindenburg'e com- mand will be wcrth several army corps. We know the east is in the beat hands.— ij Piess Association.

TODAYS WAR RESUME

TO-DAYS WAR RESUME! 'Leader" Office 4.50 p.m The French have re-taken Fleury and a/11 the trenches between the village and Thiaumont. They have also captured numerous prisoners. The German report of the air raid over England makes amusing reading. It is claimed by the Huns that bombs were dropped in London, on a naval base, and on railway works and industrial estab- lishments. Thr; Press Bureau says the statements are practically untrue from beginning to end. A British Headquarters message is a a further record of progress. More pri- sons have been taken. M. Pichon pays a striking tribute to Britain's sea power He says that with- out the intervention of Great Britain, France and Russia could not have been victorious. In East Africa, the Belgians have taken two important German towns. The German Press rejoices over the ex- tension of Hindenburg's command in the East. He is proclaimed as being the right man in the right place.

TODAYS NEWS IN BRIEFI

TO-DAY'S NEWS IN BRIEF For sketching military works near Dover a lady artist was bound over by the Dover magistrates. Members of Colonial Parliaments in London held their fourth and last con- ference on Thursday behind closed doors. Mr. Asquith stated that the registra- tion proposals would be announced before the adjournment of the House. Dublin Mercantile. Association has ap- proved the Government Bill adopting uni- form time for Great Britain and Ireland. Dr. and Mrs. Page left London on Thursday, en route for America, where the Ambassador will have an interview with President Wilson. Though the progress of shipping through the Panama Canal is being delayed by dredging, traffic is otherwise proceeding satisfactorily.—Lord H. Cecil. At a Red Cross sale at Covert Garden a pair of corsets were sold half a dozen times, and fetched 30s. on each occasion, the ultunate buyer being a little girl of five. During the past two years the British Industrial Life Assurance offices have paid 121,400 war claims for = £ 2,250,000 SillC" a month ago they have paid = £ 150,000 for 11,000 claims. A hospital of 200 beds, under Dr. Agnes Bennett, with a personnel of 58, and a motor transport column under Mr. Har- ley, has left London for Salonika to be at- tached to the Serbian Army. Mr. Hahnemann Epps, chairman of the well-known cocoa firm, and son of the late Dr. George S. Epps. who first intro- duced cocoa into this country, died at his residence, Tulse-hill, at the age of 73. The Prime Minister informed Mr. Tyson Wilson that neither the Duke of Albany, the Duke of Cumberland, nor Prince Albert of Schleswig-Molstein owned any land or house property in this country.

MORE TRAWLERS 8UNKI

MORE TRAWLERS 8UNKI Neutral Ship Gives Supplies I to Submarine. The steam trawlers Lucania, of North Shields, and the Olyrnia of Grimsby, were sunk by a Germ/a submarine off tfil North-East Coast r;IJ Thursday night. The crews were lancied. The herring ooat Prestige, of Methil, had a narrow escape. The sr hiiiariine commander ordered the crew off the ves- sel, but had not time to complete its de- struction hefore he was interfered with. The skipper of the Prestige said he t'aw the submarine obtaining supplies from a Norwegian steamer. Lloyd's report that the Britisti schooner G. E. C. Gradwell, and the Japanese steamer Kohina Maru have been sunk, and the Danish steamer Catholm has probably been sunk. [The Kohina Maru is a steel screw steamer of 3,161 tons gross.] Lloyd's Agency states that the Italian steamer Citta di Messina has been sunk. Stockholm, Thursday.—The Swedish steamer Hudiksvall. Stockholm for Raumo with general goods, has been sunk by a German submarine cutside Raurne. The crew have- been saved Havre, Friday.—Two British schooners were torpedoed by a German submarine on Thursday night. The crews were picked up and conveyed to Havre. AReuter's message, dated Thursday, says it is officially announced that two Italian steamers which left on a mission some time ago to the enemy coast have not returned to their liases, and conse- quently it is feared they may have been lost.

NOTICE TO BELGIANS I

NOTICE TO BELGIANS. I Eligibles in England Called Upon to Report. The Press Bureau Pavs the Belgian Legation in London has issued the follow- ing notice in accordance with a Royal Decree of July 216t, 1,916, and a Minis- terial Decree of July 23rd, 1916 :-A11 male Belgians born after June 30th. 1876, and before July 1st. 1898. at present in the United Kingdom have to report them- selves before September 1st. 1916, to the nearest police station, and to fill up an enquiry form. They may also apply for such forms of Major Yicomte E. De Beugliam, Director of the Central Recruit- ing Service, 35, Grosvenor-place, London, and return them duly filled up before the above date. Those wlK> change their place of resi- dence after filling up their enquiry forms must end their new address within a fort- night of their removal to the Central Re- cruiting Office, 35, Grosvenor-place, Lon- don. All persons who fail to fill up an enquiry form before September 1st next, or apply for delay, or to whom no delay is granted after application, will be sum- moned lwfore the Recruiting Commission. Men found fit for service will he divided into seven groups in accordance with their age. The first group, including married men born after December 31st. 1894, and single men born after June 30th. l886. will be taken for active service immedi- ately. Subsequent groups will he called tip successively for active service by I ^♦oyal Decive.

Advertising

WINTER COAL SUPPLY, A, a meeting at the Guildhall, Swan- &,ea, this afternoon, a committee "ail tormed to obtain certain information for the Board 01 Trade with a view to regu* lating th? 1Jpp1i. of hou??hold coal t? laf.,Dg t,io LOCAL WILL. Mr.-Tunics Stewart Crawford, of Th Arlatt, Kidwelly. Carmarthen and of Bla-.Let-place. Edinburgh, for man?  y?? m???r ?-jtlj M died on April :8rh la: j £ -:d til >ear?, left ettate valued at £7,511 grosj, with net portoc- I