Collection Title: Herald of Wales

Provider: Llyfrgell Genedlaethol Cymru

Hawliau: Nid yw statws neu berchnogaeth hawlfraint yr adnodd hwn yn hysbys.

Gwylio manylion cyfan

Cyntaf Cynt Llun 12 o 12
Full Screen
30 erthygl ar y dudalen hon
Advertising

LI. and T. BULLIIV. HEATH FIELD MEWS, SWANSEA. I MOTORS AND CABS ALWAYS READY. Telephone Number, 65. Telegraphic Address: Bullin, Swansea.

Advertising

NEATH AND DISTRICT, BILL-POSTING CO. ADVERTISING CONTRACTORS. Owners of all the Principal Hoardings in NEATH and DISTRICT. For Terms, &c., apply:— Manager, 45, London Road, Neath.

MARGAM COUNCIL I

MARGAM COUNCIL. I WORKING MEN'S DWELLING I I SCHEME SHELVED. ———— The umal monthly meeting of the Mar- gam District Council was held oa Monday evening. Mr. Richard Evans presided, and others present wer? M<'?i\s. G. Lips- L'omb, Edward Lowther. Capt. J. Presto*. R?v. Thos. Howell, Edward Evans, LI. Nicholas, J. Walters. T. Main waring, James Watkins (who took his set for the first time), D. E. Jones (clerk), J. Cox (Surveyor), C. Cook (accountant), Evan Rees (gas manager). Afon Valley Road. I A deputation headed by Mr. William Jenkins, J.P., Chairman of the Glyn- corrwg Council, waited on the Council to urge the necessity of the making-up of he Afon Valley road and Ynys Fawr, so as to provide mean-s of access for the people in their district to come down to Port Talbot, and in particular to deal with accidents to workmen at tlw Vallev collieries. It was resolved thai applica- tion be made to the Road Board for per- mission -to proceed with the necessary work Shops Act. I letter was read from the Clerk of the County Council stating that not only was there no objection to the appointment of one inspector of the Shops Act jointly for all the districts, but it was with a view or uniform administration as well as uniform bye-laws that the delegation of the Council's powers had been made to I the area of the three district councils and Aberavon. A letter on the subject was read from the Glyncorrwg Council inti- mating their agreement over the appoint- ment: 4# a joint inspector. The whole matter was left to be dealt with by the joint committee to which Mr. Harry Davies' name was added in place of Mr. Jonah Charles. Council Vacation. I It was resolved that no meeting of the j Council be held in September. Water Scheme. I The Survevor rei>orted on the proposed new water scheme near Cilygofid, to- gether with the plans and sections. It was decided that before proceeding further with the scheme the clerk be directed to communicate with Mr. Lips- comb on behalf of Margam estate with a view of ascertaining whether Miss Lalbo-t would be prepared to grant a lease oi I the sate and water rights, and if so, upon what terms. Working Men's Dwellings. I A letter was read from the Local Gov- ernment Board as follows:: "I am directed by the Local Government Board to state that they have had under con- sideration the reports made hy their in- spector, Mr. II. S. Stewart, after the in- quiry held by him in reference to the ap- plication of the Urban District Council or Margam for sanction to loans of £ 5.25-4 and £ 0,703 for the purposes of schemes for the erection of working class dwell-I ings under Part 3 of the Hou-sing of the Working Class Dwellings: Act, 1890, at Taibach and Bryn respectively. 'Hip Board a.re satisfied as. to the need of further dwellings in the district. I i,-ni however to draw attention h the Board's circular letters of the 11th and I March, 1915: and to state that in the cir- cumstances they think the scheme must be postponed. Subject to the settlement of the drainage arrangements at Taibach, the schemes appear to be generally satis- factory. "The Board will vrequire to be fur- nished with a drainage plan on a larger scale than that forwarded for Taibach, showing clearly the position of all in- spection chambers, and they are advised that all inspection chambers should be provided at all bends in the drains. It is not necessary that any drain should exceed four inches in diameter. As regards the period for repaym-ent of loans, I am to state that the period usually allowed by the Board for works in connection with the sewerage, is SO years, and the period for street works 20 I years. The Board observes that the schemes do not comply in all respects with the bve-laws in force in the dis- trict, but the Board presume that the Council intend to revise their hye-laws so that the schemes may be in accordance therewith. As regards the Bryn scheme, I am to request that the Board may be furnished with a detailed estimate of the street works, and may be informed whether the vendor's approval of the plans has been obtained." It was resolved that the surveyor pre- pare the necessary plans and informa- tion in accordance with the request of the Local Government Board. Medical Report. I The Medical Officer (Dr. J. H. Davies, II.D.) reported that during the month of July the number of births registered was 27—16 bovs and 11 girls. One illegitimate birth was registered. This gave a birth rate of 20.9 per 1,000 per annum. The deaths for the same period 11, giving a death rate of 8.5 per 1,000. as com- pared with a death Tate of 6.95 for the corresponding month of last year. Dng the moath, two cases of T)p Igeria were notified, and both re- moved to the sanatorium. Prince of Wales's Fund. Tbe Clerk reported that the sum of JB483 9s. 4d. was afcill standing to the credit of the above fund at the bank. It was resolved, on the motion of Mr. Rees Llewellyn, ?mcnaed by Mr. E. Lowther, that the further sum of £450 be for- warded to the treasurer of the fund. I Bryn-road. I Mr. John Walters said he-had again to call attention to the bad state of the roads at Bryn, and it was resolved, on the motion of Mr. Rees Llewellyn, seconded by Mr. John David, that the surveyor be direetedto report upon the matter. National Registration. It was reported that a special com-I mitt-ee had been appointed for carrying: out the work incidental to the X atiOilal1 Registration Act, consisting of the chair-' man, Major Thoe. Gray, Messrs. Bees Llewellyn, W. B. IIaHowes. E. Lowthec, Ll. Nicholas, G. Lipscomb, John Walters. The Clerk reported that with the assistance ox Mr. McLean he had gone carefully into the division of the differ- ent wards, and bad divided the Western Ward into 26 sub-divisions, giving each enumerator an average of between 6G to AA I houses: the Central Ward into 11 sub-! divisions, East Ward six sub-divisions,: and the North Ward into three gTib-divi- eaons, making a total of 46 su}a,diYisÏ<>n.s.: A satisfactory number of volunteers for the work was reported. New Motor Service. On the motion of Mr. Rees Llewellyn, seconded by Mr. LI. Nicholas, it was re- 4ec.orKled by Mr. Ll. solved that the application of Messrs. W. Barnes and Sons for a motor char-a-banc license to seat 35 to t8 persons, which thew intended to run between Port Talbot and Kentig. to start from Bethany Chapel, I Port Talbot, be granted. Gas Loan. I In regarcl to the negotiation of a g&61 works loan for Sl,500 at 4 per cent. pel- annum, it was decided to affix the com-I mon seal of the Council to a mortgage of the district fund and general district rates and the income of the gas works undertaking to the bank. This, with the previous mortgage, brought the amount up to S:5,000. Mr. Lowther; It is a most satisfactory I arrangement, and reflects great credit on our clerk and accountant.

r I SOLDIER AND A LOAN

■ _—- ■ — r SOLDIER AND A LOAN. False Pretences Charge at Neath. At the Neath Borough Police Court on I Saturday, the hearing was resumed of a charge cigainst Albert Edward Stockwell. a private in the Black Watch Regiment, of obtaining a sum oi £ 50 by false pre- tences from Edmund Law, moneylender, Neath. Mr. W. M. Thomas (Bridgend) prosecuted, and Mr. Evan David (Cardiff) appeared for an interested party, W. Morris (Porthcawl). Mr. Thomas said accused was a barber, and carried on the business of hairdresser and fancy goods dealer at New-road, Porthcawl, which he took over from Wm. Morris in the summer of 1913. Morris assigned to the prisoner all the saleable articles, stock, &-c- for JC126, and the t'ur- niture was hired to him a.t a rental of £2 10s. per annum. Prisoner carried on this business until March of this year. In October last prisoner approached Mr. Law and asked him for a loan of Jt'oO on an I.O.U. He told Mr. Law that the furniture, foe., was his property, and Law agreed to lend him .£50 on a bill of sale on the furniture. Consequently an Tnven- toTW was made by Mr. Parminter, Neath, to7?v was made bx, M i, and a bill of sale was drawn up,q)y rr. M. Arnold and executed on October 12th, when prisoner received .650. Prisoner paid a few instalments of I' .£2 10s. a month, but in March this year, as the result of an execution put in and a distraint for rent by the landlord. Iaw obtained consent tender the Courts Emer- gency Act for leave to enter into posses- sion of the furniture, k-e. Morris came forward and claimed the goods, and it was then discovered, for the first time, that prisoner was not the owner of the furniture. Prisoner then absconded, and it was later ascertained that he had joined the Black Watch. Evidence was -ivt-To by Mr. Edmnnd Law, moneylender, bearing out his lici- tor's statement, and by Mr. Wm. Morris. Tn reply to the charge, prisoner said: f wish to say that the money was not borrowed with any intention to clioot or defraud. It was simply a family at;air, and I was wrongly advised. If I intended doing Mr. Law down, there were other ways than enlisting in my own na.me in the army. I -hoald have written Mr. Law. only the eleven weeks in hospital hindered me." Stockwell was then committed for trial, bail being allowed.

ABERAVON THOUGHTREADINGI CASE

ABERAVON THOUGHT-READING I CASE. An amusing story was told at Aber- avon Police Court, when Leonard White, who styles him-elf Clare, the expert thought reader," appeared to answer a charge of obtaining the sum of ld. from P.C. Hurford by false pretences on July 30th. Mr. Lewis M. Thomas defended. P.C. Hurford said that on Friday night last he was on plain clothes duty in Water-street, when he saw defendant giving exhibitions of face reading. He was staring at people's faces, and mark- ing off on a printed sheet their char- acteristics, which he sold at Id. each. Defendant was declaring thai he was no phrenologist, or thought reader from Bond-street, who charged 5s.; he only charge d Id. (Laughter.) Witness paid Id., and had his char- acter read. He was declared to be "Hasty in speech—(laughter), tender hearted— (loud laughter), rough and ready—(laugh- ter), and good looking—(laughter). Mr. Thomas: What have you to com- plain about? You surely had a penny's wor' h ? Witness: It was false pretences; what I he said was not true. Mr. Thomas: Surely you do not object to be called rc Good tempered and good looking"? Mr. Thomas: If you were not satisfied, why didn't you ask for your penny back? Witness: It was too late. Witness added that he went back and bought a second character chart, which declared him to be U Rongh, ready, and easy going." (Laughter.) None of the characters were the same as on the first sheet he received. P.P. McGov-em prodncod a large printed placard, describing defendant as an expert thought reader, and other mystic arts. Defendant, in evidence, said he had been an expert character reader for more than twenty years. It was a science— the science of phvsiognomy. Defendant was fined .£1.

AFRAID OF BEING TORPEDOED I

AFRAID OF BEING TORPEDOED. I At a special Aberavon Borough Police Court on Saturday, Paul Phillip Bistow, a coloured man, was charged with failing to join his vessel after negotiating an ad- vance not for £7 6s. 4d. Capt. Andre Fhiest, master of a French 6ailing ship 6aid he engaged defendant as cook. Defendant was ordered to join the ship on Monday last. Owing to his non- appearance the ship was- unable to pro- ceed to sea on Wednesday. P.S. Jones gave evidence of receiving defendant in custody from the Briton- ferry police. When charged, defendant said: I was afraid to go away with the ship, as four of the company's ships have been torpedoed off the Scillies." Defendant, who now expressed his re- gret, was sentenced to 21 days' hard labour.

IFUNERAL OF NEATH HEADMASTER

FUNERAL OF NEATH HEADMASTER. The funeral of the late Mr. W. P. Venables, of London-road, Neath, for 35 years headmaster of the M-elyn SchooLs, took place at Llaniwat old Cemetery. The obsequies were attended by the Mayor (Mr. Matthew Arnold) the mem- bers of the Town Council, and of other governing bodies in the district, many members of the scholastic profession, and a large body of the general public. The family mourners were: Messrs. Gilbert, Sidney and Vernon Venables (6onB) J. Mogford (eon-in-law), Addie Venables (grandson H. Venables, soli- citor, Cardiff (nephew). W. C. Cooper, H. John, and Wm. John, Landore (oorasins). The Rev. A. F. Evans, M.A. (rector of N eathlofficiaied.

I AN AFAN VALLEY PIT

I AN AFAN VALLEY PIT. FORMER MANAGER & ACCOUNTANTI GO TO LAW. At Aberavon County Court on Tuesday, before Judge Lloyd Morgan, K.C., a re- mitted action was heard, in which Thos. Walters, a colliery manager, King-street, Port Talbot, sued Jonathan Williams, accountant, of Rose Bank, Sketty, Swan- sea, for £22 156. 5d. for goods sold and de- livered, and moneys paid by plaintiff on behalf of defendant, and for arrears of salary. A counter-claim was made by defendant for S71 4s. bd. for coal sold and delivered, the retention of a surveying dial and for alleged neglect to keep an accurate plan of the workings and of the system of ven- tilation at the West Rhondda Colliery, Avon Valley. Mr. Dan Perkins represented the plain- tiff, and Mr. Villiers Meager appeared on behalf of defendant. Mr. Perkins explained that plaintiff had for four years been engaged as manager at the West Rhondda Colliery. Upon re- ceiving due notice from defendant, plain- tiff terminated his work at the colliery. Defendant in August, 1914, was appointed by the debenture holders as receiver of the colliery. The defendant TO sued in a personal capacity, and not as a receiver. Plain tiff in evidence gave a detailed list of items which formed the claim. No one had ever made complaints of the manner in which he worked the colliery. As a matter of fact, the colliery expert appointed by defen- j dant had approved of the way in which the colliery was worked. Neither had any complaints been made of any irregu- larities at the colliery by the Home Office inspectors, who had paid regular r visits. He owned a number of coal trucks atod these were cut up and the timber was supplied to defendant. For the defence Mr. Meager urged that! his client was quite willing to pay for any goods he received, but he denied that the amount claimed was owing. In re- spect to the counter-claim, it was alleged that the plaintiff did not acoount for the whole of the coal. Defendant, in evidence, stated that whilst plaintiff acted as auafiager, he bought a truck of coal to be distributed amongst some of the workmen and him- self. It was entered at the colliery as containing 6 tons, 12 cwt., but upon being weighed by the railwav company, it weighed close on 9 tons. Through the mistake of the plainti?. witness had paid royalties in connection i with the West Rhondda. Colliery to the wrong people. After hearing evidence given by Alfred J. Hanier, Port Talbot Railway and Docks Co.'s station agent, and H. R. Ricketts, haulier, in respect to the weight and delivery of the coal in question. Geo. W. Davies, M. T. Stewart (surveyor), and Ed. Evans (mining en- gineer), His Honour entered judgment for plain- tiff of P,13 6s. 9d., and for defendant on 'I the counter claim £ 45 17s.

VOLUNTEER TRAINING MOVEMENT AT SKEWENI

VOLUNTEER TRAINING MOVEMENT! AT SKEWEN. At the Central Hall, Skewen, a well- attended public meeting was held with a view of forming a platoon of the National Volunteer Training Corps for Skewen and Neath Abbey. Mr. P. G. Way, Goshen, of the Main Colliery Co., who has undertaken the formation of the local division, presided. After a few remarks explanatory of the object of the meeting, the Rev. L. Lindsay, Vicar of Tonna, made a fine appeal to those present to volunteer. He pointed out that, accord- ing to international law, whoever was in uniform or wore the badge ofsucli a corps was allowed to defend 11.16 country and his home by force of arms. Mr. Russel Stone (Neath) followed with a few words showing who were eligible for the corps. He paid a tribute to Skewen for its past faithfulness to the old volunteer movement. The Chairman said that as a result of correspondence with the Glamorgan County Education Committee, he was able to announce that the use of that hall had been granted for drill, on Monday and Thursday nights. Others who spoke were Mr. W. B. Trick, Ax-Mayor of Neath; and Councillor Ogley L. David. Private Bob Greenway, of the Grenadier Guards, home wounded from the front, addressed the meeting. He said how he had done his bit for his country, and he felt very proud that they were ready to come forward. But it was heart-breaking to see so many young lads at Skewen, Neath and Swansea, walking about doing nothing. He could not express his feel- ings, when he remembered there were men out there old enough to be their fathers, aye, and grandfathers; while so many young ones here did nothing. Thou- sands were falling, and their souls were calling for vengeance. He had a 'churn, Private Edgar, who came all the way from America to rejoin, although he had served 21 years in the army and held two South African and two Egyptian medals; and he fell at Richebourg. The Germans were trying everything—they tried their gas; they tried their fire jets. He hoped all v-olnng men would come forward. At the close of the meeting, nearly 40 signed on for the V.T.C., some of them being old members of the local Volunteer Corps.

POLICE OUTFLANK TAIBACHI POACHERS

POLICE OUTFLANK TAIBACH I POACHERS. At the Aberavon County Police Court on Monday, three Taibach colliers—Thomas George Moore, Charles Moore, and Thotnaa B-ees—were charged with trespassing in pur- suit of game of Egrlwysminydd Farm, Mar- ga.m Estate. on the 26th ult. Defendants pleaded guilty. Mr. Lewis M. Thomas (prosecuting) said defendants had no alternative but to plead guilty as they were caaiglht by P.S. Pinoott and P.C. Evana, and they had three grey- hounds and a whippet working the ground. P.S. Pinoott said he saw the dogs chase rabbits or hares. He went towards them I and drove them into the arms of P.C. Evans,- who was in hiding. Both defendants Moore nad previous convictions. Thomas George Moore was fined 40s.; Charles Moore 24s., and Bees 10s.

BILLY BEYNON BEATEN I

BILLY BEYNON BEATEN. A large erowd put in aa ip- pearaace at the Liverpool Stadium when Young Fox (Leeds) met Bill Bey- non (Port Talbot) in a contest of 15 three-minute rounds at Sst. Slbs. Beynoa, although at a disadvantage in height. I foroOO. exchanges, and did excellently at close quarters, Fox occasionally swinging to his head, but his efforts were feeble. After the half-way stage, however, Fox showed excellent form, employing cleverly his left, wiped off his arrears, and at the cloee Fox gained a verdict on pointe.

No title

Writing oome, 8, Territorial with the 5th Durhams, now at the front, says: You should see the Lloyd George shell burst. It mmaiA yut you in better heart."

MARGAM MyftDER RECALLED

MARGAM MyftDER RECALLED. DEATH OF WELL KNOWN POLICE INSPECTOR. At his residence in King-street, Port Talbot, the death took place of ex-Police Inspector Alexandria MacDonald, at the age of 72 years. The deceased was a native of Ross, Sootland, but joined the Glamorgan Con- stabulary over 37 years ago. He rose from the rank of constable to the posi- tion of inspector, in which capacity he was first appointed at Pontypridd, and afterwards held similar positions at Gelly, Gowerton, Llandaff and Port Talbot. Ten years ago, he retired on a superaunuation at Port Talbot. In conned ion with the sensational murder of gamekeeper Scott, the deceased officer played a conspicuous part in run- ning the murderer, Joe Lewis, to earth. He tracked the murderer from Brombil Mountains, where the tragedy occurred, to a cottage at Salt-lake, Taibach, where Lewis regained overnight, and subse- quently the people of the house—Mr. and Mrs. Williams—were arrc-sted and tried for aiding and abetting in the murder. At the Aberavon Borough Police Court, the Mayor said that the Bench had heard with great regret of the er-Inspeetor's death, and they wished to express their sympathy with the widow. The deceased had been connected with the borough for many years, and he had al- ways proved himself a highly courteous and capable officer. Mr. Charles Jones (magistrate), and Mr. Lewis M. Thomas (solicitor), made eulogistic references to deceased and ex- pressed their sympathy with the widow. The remains were interred at the picturesque Chapel of Ease burial grounds, Port Talbot, on Monday. In the funeral procession were county and borough justices of the peace, town and county councillors, members of the Afan Freemason Lodge (of which de- ceased was a member), solicitors, ministers and a large number of prominent towns- folk. Nearly a hundred members of the Glamorgan Constabulary, representing D. B. H. and C, Divisions, under the command of Superintendent Ben Evans (Neath) were also present, along with Deputy Chief Constable J. Williams (Pontypridd), Superintendent T. Wil- liams (Treharris), and Superintendent J. Jones (Canton). The coffin was borne to the graveside by Police Inspectors W. E. Roes (Port Tal- bot), John Hale (Caerphilly), J. Davies (Mumbles), David Morris (Britonferry), Wm. Gill (Skewen), Rees Davies (Porth), and John Jones' (Llaptrissant). Prior to the interment, the body was taken into St. Theodore's Parish Church, where a service was conducted by the vicar (the Rev. D. J. Jones, M.A.), assisted by the Revs. Ogwen Davies and W. Harris (curates), who also officiated at the graveside. The chief mourners were Messrs. W. Young, J. Young, T. Adams (Whitchurch, Somerset), T. Williams (Tondu), J. E. and Master Alec Isaac (Maesteg), Mr. R. Williams (Tondu), and P.S. Alfred Brice (Taibach).

AMUSING INTERLUDE IN ABERAVON SUIT

AMUSING INTERLUDE IN ABER- AVON SUIT. At Aberavon on Monday, Sarah Ann Allen, Ma.rlborough House, Tonmawr, sum- moned her husband, James Allen, Pen-er- engine Farm. Tonna, for persistant cruelty and desertion. Mr. Lewis M. Thomas appeared for com-: plainant and Mr. A. Jestyn Jeffreys for de- fendant. Mr. Thomas said the parties wer g married in 1330, and there were eleven children—all alive. In November last defendant came home in a drunken state and threatened to beat his wife, and wanted his son to go out to tight, and later threatened to brain them all. Complainant said that defendant had often assaulted her. and had on one occa- sion broken .her nose. David Allen, son of the partiee, said that in November defendant came home like a lunatic. Defendant, on oath. denied any desertion and cruelty. The oause of the bather. was that his son started in a butcher's business and witness objected to it. He found the stock getting less and no account given of it. He was quite willing to take his wife back now. He had no complaint against her. In reply to Mr. Thomas, defendant said he worked as a collier when his health per- mitted. He suffered from throat trouble. (Laughter.) The Bench diemiaeed the case.

PATHETIC PORT TALBOT PATERNITY CASE

PATHETIC PORT TALBOT PATERNITY CASE, At the Aberavon County Police Court. on Monday, a girl of quite childish appearance. named Elizabeth Ann Rosser, alias David, the adopted daughter of Hannah David, Mayfield-street, Port Talbot, summoned Gunner Wm. Walker, serving -%vith the K.F.A. at Winchester, and lately a railway fireman at Port Talbot, to. show cause, etc. Mr. Lewis M. Thomas, for complainant, said that a telegram bad been received that morning from defendant stating he could not appear, but admitted paternity. The baby, a girl, was born on June 21st. De- fendant had lodged with complainant's fos- ter mother, and it was a pathetic fact that intimacy took place when the girl was just over 14 years of age, and the cld was born when she was just over 15 When defendant knew of the girl's condition, he joined the Army. In the circumstance he asked for the maximum order of 5s. per week. Complainant bore out advocate's state- ment, and an order of 5e. a week for 16 years, with costs, was made.

No title

The Caledonian Railway directors nave declared an interim dividend on the or- dinary stock at the rate of £3 per cent. | per anuuUl Wr MM iMtt half of the curreart 'war.

IKNOCKED DOWN BY A TRUCK 1

I KNOCKED DOWN BY A TRUCK. ■■ ■■■■ 1 ■■■■■ I PORT TALBOT WOMAN'S FATAL iNJURIES. The sad circumstances of the death of I a Port Talbot soldier's wife were inquired into at the Swansea Coroner's Court on Tuesday. Deceased was Martha Dobbin, ,of 22, Dock-street, Port Talbot, who died at the Swansea Hospital on Saturday last from injuries to her arms by having been knocked down by a coal truck. Gunner Thomas Dobbin, of the Royal Horse Artillery, said the accident took place on July 16th, and he came home after receiving a telegram. He saw his) wife in the hospital, and she told how the accident happened. It appeared she was going along the road across the docks to get to the l'ost Office for the purpose of drawing her weekly allowance. It was raining heavily, and she kept her umbrella towards the right. When she got to the crossing she saw a full truck which started to move towards the tip. She stopped to allow the full truck to pass, and an empty one which she did not see came from the opposite direction and knocked her down. The accident hap. pened between 10 and 11 o'clock in the morning. The Coroner: Did your wife know thi-s was a private road belonging to the Dock Company? Witness: No, sir. I didn't know my- self. Everybody uses it. Shortly afterwards, witness remarking on the question of the privacy of the road, said his wife had a written permit allow- ing her to pass along the docks. Dr. Boyle, of the Swansea Hospital, said after admittance deceased got on well for a week and she promised recovery, but unfortunately bloodpoisoning set in, and she died on Saturday. The Coroner said it appeared to be a pure accident, the primary cause of which was the bad weather and the re- sultant necessity of using and umbrella. One would have thought, however, that Mrs. Dobbin, having used this road so often, would have known when to expeotf a truck. A verdict of accidental death was re- turned, the jury blaming no one.

SOLDIERS WHO SOLD THEIRI BLANKETS

SOLDIERS WHO SOLD THEIR I BLANKETS. At the Aberavon Borough Police Court (before the Mayor—Mr. W J. Williams—Messrs. Charles Jones, Geo. L-ongdon, John Phillips, and Aid. D. Rees), seven privates of the 2nd 5th Welsh Regiment, named John Smith, John Ellis, Rees Williams. Charles Powell, Thomas Jones, Henry Lewis, and John Lewis, were charged with unlaw- fully selling 12 blankets, some under- clothing, value £ 5, the property of his I Majesty the King. Polly Meger, Laura Budge, George Budge, Emma Salt, Eliza- beth A. Evans, William Preece, Annie Jane Taylor, Caroline Crowley, and Mar- t garet Fellowes, all of the Sandfields, were charged with purchasing the articles. All the soldiers pleaded guilty except Private John Smith. The other defen- dants pleaded that they were not aware I the blankets were army property, but were informed that they belonged to the soldiers. Defendant Polly Meger pleaded that she did not buy the blanket found on her bed, but had washed it for Pri- vate Smith. Col.-Sergt. Martin said he received com- plaints that some of the men's blankets were missing. Later it was found that 41 were missing. Information was given to P.S. Swaffield, who searched the houses in the district and recovered 12 blankets. Mr. Charles Jonee: Is there any mili- tary ntark on the blankets? Witness: No, sir. It is not our duty to mark them. It is the duty of the A.S.C. Mr. Charles Jones: It was someone's duty, and the duty was not done. The Mayor said the Bench viewed the case with great seriousness. It would have been imagined that men inti niform would have had a higher conception of their duty to the country. If they sold the property of the King, what would I they do in defending their country? It was very sad indeed to see men wearing the King's uniform in such a position. Ellis and Williams were sentenced to two months' hard labour; Powell, Jones, Hy. Lewis and John Lewis were sentenced to six weeks' hard labour; and John Smith to one month's hard labour. The women were dismissed on payment of costs, being given the benefit of the doubt because the blankets were not marked. The men George Budge and -Wm. Preece were fined 10s.

I POOR MILK AT GLYNNEATH I

I POOR MILK AT GLYN-NEATH. I At Neath on Friday Edward Bryant, milk vendor, Glyn-Neath, was summoned for selling milk deficient in butter fat. Mr. A. Jestyn Jeffreys defended. Supt. Beai Evans said that on July 7th he took four samples of milk from dif- ferent vessels from the defendant's cart. The analysis showed that the first sample taken was genuine, but the other three showed a deficiency in butter fat of 21 per cent., 18 per cent., and 16 per cent respectively. Defendant, who said he had been a milk vendor at Glyn-Neath for over 2U years, and had never been prosecuted before, although many samples had been taken from him, was fined 30s. and analyst's fees.

BRITONFERRY GUNNER SAVES AI WOMAN

BRITONFERRY GUNNER SAVES A I WOMAN. Arthur Beer, a gunner in the 1st Welsh R.F.A., who is a native of Briiooferry, has been instrumental in saving a woman from drowning in the River Ouse. He saw the woman plunge into the water, and immediately went to her assistance, but on being brought to the bank she took a second dive. Gunner Beer, how- ever, again rescued her. The presiding chairman atth local borough sessions thanked Gunner Beer for the able manner in which he had acted in the case, and said it was no doubt through his prompt action that the woman's life was saved.

1 EXCITING RESCUE AT PORTHCAWL

1 EXCITING RESCUE AT PORTHCAWL. A great commotion was caused on the beach at Porthcavrl on Sunday afternoon. There were hundreds of people bathing, the weather being delightfully fine, when a young man, named Saunders, son of a Newport grocer, got into difficulties near the Black Rock Two men in the water Hear him were apparently unable to 6wim, but an pnlooker jumped into the sea with- out divesting himself of his clothing and effected a rescue. Under the supervision j of a Newport doctor, who reported to arti- ficial restoration, the young man soon re- ioovered. ]

No title

At Aberavon on Monday, the license :)f I the Copper House Inn. Cwmavoo, was transferred to BLannaik Jftnkift* if the late heldaft

fCORRESPONDENCE

f CORRESPONDENCE. I THE DUTY OF ECONOMY. To THE EDITOR OF THE HERALD." Sir,—^The cry now is Economy aud Self- denial." It is a lesson that this terrible war will drive home to every cot.tage and mansion before many months are over. It is beginning to be felt already, and with I provisions rising it will still go on advanc- ing. Within twelve months the cost of living has advanced about 35 per cent. to 40 "ar cent. What will be the second year? Butter is quoted to-day about lifts, to 160s. for Irish creams, and people are advised to fat. lees meat. Butter was imported in 1915 to the amount of 4,139.000 cwt" value XZ4,084,000, representing £ 10 per year per head.- t' 0 have the advice for the country to save the gold; the way to save the gold would be to put our land into use by culti- vation and produce more in fields and gar- dens. iSt-op the drmk traffic and have les= amusements and more work of a producing kind. Make the country self-supporting, as it can be done. See what haug happened in Ireland since the farmers were granted security of tenure, compensation for ira- provements, a land court, and the farmers buying their own farms with Government monoy advanced on easy terms of interest. Why not grant the same privilege to th,- English and Welsh farmers? In fact, ex- tend the Irish Land Act to England and I '♦Vales. The writer of this letter aked these questions a" Neath when the aspiring can- didates for Pal-liamejitaiy honours addressed the electors at the Gwyn Hall. One of them—Mr. A. Thomas, of London, a bar i,istor-tl,ought I was referring to the Scotch Crofters' Act, If he reads thL. letter he will understand my ques- tions and their true significance in the face of the days and the momentous time we are passing through, and the end no man knoweth. It is the duty of landlords to-day to be "patriotic" and work with the Government, and give the same privileges to the farmers of» ^England 4zid Wales as their comrades in Ireland enjoy, namely, security of their homesteads, and they will work with a will and grow all we want. Let me illustrate what could be done in Abenvon and Port Talbot if the farmers had fair play as they deterit. Every foot of land around here should be cultivated. We have the, cry, Eat less meat," and they close the butcher shops somewhat, early three nights a week-a kind of closing order. Although eating meat will not pauperise the home to the extent that alcohol will—a dangerous luxury not re- quired at all—a/ butcher in Aberavon in- formed me that his father reared from two to three hundred sheep on Aberavon Moun- tain, and he could remember from four to five hundred on Tydraw Mountain. Recently this man bought from a farmer who resides in the di&trict three lambs weighing 241bs.. 311bs., and 261ba.; these had been fed on the herbage and grass of Aberavon Mountain. Now compa,re these with three lambs bought that were fed on the rich pastures of Pembrokeshire—three.- Solbs., 271bs., 29lbs.- the aevrage is 271bs., with a very trifle about 5ozs. iu favour of Pembroke; but you will notice one lamb of 311bs.t reared and fed on Aberavon Mountain, that could not oe beaten in this country, so I am informed. Now in face of these facts is it not the duty d landowners to enoourage and give fair play to the farmers of the district and country instead of damping their enthusiasm. Let the farmer get security for his farm, and reduce the big farms to about iOO to 200 acrcs for each homestead, and our islands could be turned into granaries like Egypt of old. And the farmer would be next in importance to our brave and noble soldiers and sailors. Their glorious deeds in the present struggle for freedom, and the defeat of the "Arch Deceiver" we all hope for, and the way 1-1 accomplish this is that e should all do our duty to our fellowmen and God, live lives in unison with God's com- mandments. Can we picture, or do we for a moment realise had Germany succeeded in her "commerce war" we should all be at peace now? Peace, because we should have been starved out, starved to surrender 45,000,000 of people, old and young, without food because the land is left untilled, and the "sun's rays" go waste, and we should be absolutely compelled to accept whatever terms she chose to impose upon us-death and starvation stalking throughout the land, children dying at the breast, mothers had no milk to give. All this Providen- tially failed because the British Navy met with no disaster. But, on the other hand, we should have had -a second and safe line of defence againat starvation by getting our land—farms .nd gardens-tilled, and pro- duce all ive require. This is the lesson that this great war is teaching. Let each one of t13 do his part and act the man in this hour of crisi1). Be honest to God and true to man.-Yours truly, William Davies. 7, Oak wood-street, Port Talbot. August irth, 1915. HEALTHY AND ECONOMICAL FOOD. To TRF. EriToR OF THE HERAjLD. I 1, Sir,—May 1 suggest to your readers that the present is an excellent oppor- tunity tote-st, the value of a non-flesh diet, and to show at the same time a patriotic spirit ? Lest any accustomed to the old order of things should think that the abandon- ment of meat would be a terrible leap in the dark it may be mentioned thn.t Dr. Sims Woodhead and Professor James Long, neither of wham are convinced n vegetarians, have recently testified to the fact that a well-balanced dietary of vegetable origin is all sufficient to sus- tain men in the highest condition both of body and mind. It is, indeed, unreason- able to imagine that we, who are already three parts vegetarian in our diet, can- not easily dispense with that other fourth Dart. There are many useful cookery books published at Id. and upwards, giving numerous recipes for the preparation of choice and economical meals from eggs, cheese, beans, peas, lentils, rice, macaroni, oatmeal, maizemeal, and potatoes (the two latter being the best and cheapest of all foodstuff's), which may be used at all times in the place of beef, mutton, pork, or bacon. May I add that further information on this aspect of the subject will gladly be sent by the Vegetarian Society, Man- chester, on receipt of stamp for postage. —Yours faithfully, Joseph Collinson. Animals' Friend Society, York House, Portugal-street, London. I August 9th. 1915.

I A LOGICAL VIEWI

A LOGICAL VIEW. I At Aberavon on Monday, John Powell, colliery labourer, Abergwynfi, was sum- moned for using bad language on the 216t and 22nd July. The Clerk: Are you guilty or not guilty ? Defendant: I was much annoyed, and I don't remember. I must have said some- thing or I wouldn't have been brought here. (Laughter).

No title

At Swansea Police Court on Wednesday. James Robbins. summoned for using a vehicle without lights, was ordered to pay I the costs.

I NEXT OF KiN

I NEXT OF KiN. AUSTRALIANS' RELATIVES WHO CANNOT BE TRACED. Many of our readers are doubtless D'fo; aware of the very large accumulation c2 monies which are now lying dormant and unclaimed in the various Government Departments of our Dominions. It is estimted that there are many thou- sands of pounds emanating from Australia, alone, and we propose during the next few weeks to publish a portion of a list of un- claimed balances to which claimants have been unsuccessfully sought for in Australia, and who have not been discovered in th-j country. Readers who may consider they are justly entitled to enter claims against tll-e monies should write to the editor of this paper marking their envelopes "Unclaimed Monies/' or write direct to Lloyd's Inquiry, 55-6, Chancery-lane, London, W.C., who have established offices in Australia and who keep records of the particulars relating to same. A stamped envelope should be sent for reply. The following is the weekly list:— John Abbott, William Alton, Robert Atterton, James Bevett, Annie Bradley, John Carter, Augustus Carroll, William Dale, George Davis, John Dawson, Jameg Dennis, James Elliott, Edward Fanning, Michael Franks, Thomas Green, Edmund Griggs, Margaret Handley, C. H. Heirs, John Higgins, James Ireland, Mary Leahy, Peter Lorsen.

I EELS THAT KILL htNTS

I EELS THAT KILL hïtNTS The following news item is circulated the New Zealand Government offices iu London: At a meeting held recently of one of the New Zealand acclimatisation societies the curator of a game farm re- ported that he had included eels in the list of vermin which caused the death of young phea.sa.nts. He gave his assurance that no fewot- than seventeen young birds had been lost owing to eels seizing their heads whilst they were in the act of drink- ing creek wa/ter. The deaths of innumer- able young ducks had been causel by eels, and it was a common thing to see scores of ducks minus a leg, which had "leer, dragged off by these voracious fish.

I OBSCURED MOTOR LIGHTS

I OBSCURED MOTOR LIGHTS. At Aberavon on Monday, Evan H. Lewis was fined 15s. for having the plate number of his motor cycle obscured by a lady passenger's skirt. Arthur W. Bennett was similarly charged and fined 10s. P.C. Ver- non proved the cases. The Chairman said that offenoe« of this class would in future be dealt with more severely.

I A SEA OF FIRE

I A SEA OF FIRE. There has been much, ado at Porthcawt over the strange appearance during the past few nights of a patch of sea. eeve- vi hundreds of yards in dimensions. Thia patch presents the appearance of a sea 01 fire.

Family Notices

BIRTHS, MARRIAGES, AND DEATHS, BIRTHS NOW ELIJ ONES. -On August 4th, at Tha School House. Dinas Powis, to Mr. and Mrs. R. Howell-Jones, a son. MARRIACES. CEABBE—HUGHES—On August 7th. afc Ebenezer Gong. Church, Bertram T. Crabbe, to Blodwen Bughos, both of Swansea. GOWER—JOHN.—On August 4, at Jerusalem English Baptist Chapel, Britonferry, by ( the Rev. R. Powell, assisted by Rev. Henry Hughes, Lawford Raymond. eJdeet son of Mr. and Mrs. Lawford Gower. Britonferry, to Julia Florence (Florrie), only daughter of Mrs. John, Maee-y-coed," a.nd the late Mr. William John, Builder, Britonferry. No cards. HOWAHD—WILLIAMS—At Holy Trinity- Church, on Mi?lay, Aug. 9th, by the Rev. J. Melbourne Perry, M.A., John Webber Howard, of Oxford-street School, youngest son of Mrs. Howard, 24, Nicholl-street, to Elsie May, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. J- Tucker Williams, Railway Hotel, High- street. Quiet, owing to recent .)oreave- ment. ROBERTS—MORRIS.—August 7th, at Her- mon C.M. Chapel, Penrhiwceiber, by the Rev. David Jones, M.A., assisted by the Rev. David Williams, Willie Roberts, violinist, Morriston, to Olive, the only daughter of the late Rev. James Morria ■and late Mrs. O. Morris, Penygraig and Uanstephan. SEMMENS—GLOINE.—Augufet 7th, at Devon, port, by the Rev. H8.rry Petty, Harold, eldest eon of the late Alxander Semmena and Mrs. A. H. Richards, of Neath, to Daisy, third daughter of Mr. and Mrsi. Richard Gloine, of Devonport. SANDWELL—GRIFFIips.—On August 1st. at St. Thomas Church, by Rev. W. Evans (vicar), Sergt.-Major Alf. Sandwell, 3rd Welsh Field Ambulance, to Florence, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. W. Griffiths, Z3. Delhi-street. SQUIRE-BAGLOW.-On August 7th, at Castleton Chapel, Mumbles, Sergt. Aubrey J. Squire, 2/lst Welsh (How.) Bgde. R.F.A., youngest son of Mr. and Mrs. W. Squire, of King Edward-road, Swansea, to Selina. (Cissie), eldest daughter of Mr. and Mrs* Baglow, Woodville-road, Mumbles. THOMAS-STF,PHF-N. -On August 7th, at Mt. Pleasant Baptist C-bapel, by Rev. A. Bty- non Phillips,* Private Archibald D. Thomas, B.A., 3rd Welsh Field Ambulance, third son of Mrs. W. D. Thomas, JO, Mai- vern-terrace, to Catherine W. Stephen, eldest daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Stephen, 19, St. Alban's-road, Swansea. DEATHS. COODE.On the 31st of July, Fredriok S. Cobde, Cabinetmaker, aged. 55, of 3, Wor- cee.ter-place. Swansea. DAVID.—Killed in acticn, North France. August 3rd, Jamea Stanley David, dearly- beloved son of Mr. and Mrs. Walter David; iged 23 years. For God, King, and Country. ELIAS.—On the 5th inst., at the Buteberie Arms Hotel, Neath, Ivor Elias, eon of Mrs. Elias, Furnace House, Melyn, age 32. BV ANS.-Ou the 9th inst., Ann Evans, 78, at the re&idence of her eon. William Evans, 13, Ynisderw-road, Ponta-rdawe, EVANS.—On the 7th August. 1915, Margaret Evans, the beloved wife of George Evans, 14, Bowen-street. JONES.—On August 3rd, at 6, Trifalga-p. place, Frances E. Jones, in her 85th year. MORGAN.—On the 10th August, 1915, Mary Ann Morgan, sub-postmistress, Port Tennant, in her 76th year. OWEN.—On Aug. 7th, 1915, at 39, Henrietta, street, Swansea. Mary Ann Owen, widow of John Owen, in her 79th year. ROBERTS.On August 5th, at IIS, Pentre. terrace, Pentre, Henry George Roberts. aged 56 years. WEST—On the 3rd August, 1915, Jame% West, timekeeper for 35 years Swansea Corporation, -aged 70, of 198 Kensington- terrace, Swansea. Printed and Published for the Swansea Press, limited, by ARTHUR PARNELL HIGHAM, aJ, Leader Euildings. Swansea.