Collection Title: Herald of Wales

Provider: Llyfrgell Genedlaethol Cymru

Hawliau: Nid yw statws neu berchnogaeth hawlfraint yr adnodd hwn yn hysbys.

Gwylio manylion cyfan

Cyntaf Cynt Llun 7 o 12 Nesaf Olaf
Full Screen
31 erthygl ar y dudalen hon
LATEST WAR NEWS

LATEST WAR NEWS COLONIALS' FINE DASH I IN GALLIPOLI, AUSTRIANS REFUSE TO FIGHT SERBIANS. AUSTRIAN STRONGHOLD INVADED. The following oommuniaue was issued Issued in Paris on Thursday afternoon:— In Artois there has been cannonading &,)(I coml,)ats with petards around Souchez. In Argonoe the enemy twice attacked our trenches last night in the region of Marie Tlierese and of Fontainc-aux- Ciiarmes., They were completely re- pulsed. At tho Bois le Pretre there was fairly lively fighting from trench to trench with grenades and large bombs. in the Yosges, at the Linge, tho Ger- mans made an attempted attack, which va,. thrown back after a combat with grenades. There is nothing new on the reet of the front.

THE WINNING OF HOOGE

THE WINNING OF HOOGE. Field-marshal Sir John French reports ma-follows.- August 10. (1) On the north-west of Hooge and in the rnins of the village itself we have, consolidated the ground gained yesterday, impulsing one weak infantry attack during the night. (2) Yesterday afternoon there was no infantry fighting, but there was a vio- lent artillery engagement, as a result of which all the trenches in the open ground Bouth of Hooge became untenable by either side. We have now slightly with- drawn the position of our line which lay south ot the village. This makes 110 material difference to our position. (3) The total number of prisoners cap- tured by us yestc-rday was 150. The Press Association special corre- spondent with the British Headquarters fiends the following dispatch under date August 9.- As the result of a successful attack early this morning in the vicinity of Hooge we captured some 1.200 yards of ;the enemy's trench, taking 150 prisoners, including some officers, and several machine guns. The 500 yards of British trenches which it will be remembered were carried by the enemy on July 30 with the aid of Hame projectors were re-occupied, and further progress was made to the north and west of the village of Hooge. The number of prisoners taken, which for a local action is unusually large, affords an index to the heavy losses suffered by the enemy. Our casualties in the attacx} were, it is eta ted, light. About dawn this morning our artillery, ■with the welcomc and valuable assistance of French batteries en our left, opened a concentrated firo upon the wieuiy's posi- tions, breaching his trench and cutting ihis barbed wire entanglements. The ar- tillery preparation was followed by an in- fantry action, which was carried out with the greateft dash and bravery. During the day the captured positions were con- solidated and strengthened. At present it is. of course, impossible to Rive details as to tho troops employed in the assault, but all concerned displayed their customary powers of courage and en- durance. while the co-operation of the different forces employed left nothing to be desired. The artillery did excellent work, not only in the preliminary bombardment, but in "curtaining" the roads leading up to the German positions and generally in cupporting the infantry. At Langemarck direct hits were re- gistered on a German train which was probably bringing up supplies for the troops in the firing line. Five of the trucks were derailed, while several heavy explosions were also caused. The enemy's resistance was not great, land his troops seemed somewhat lacking in spirit. During the day the Germans shelled .Yprfcs very heavily, but ae the town is now devoid of troops only material damage of an unimportant nature was caused. There was also a heavy artillery notion on our part along the canal to the West of Ypres. Exact reports of the present state of the feituation about Hooge are not yet to liand. It is. however, apparent that we have crossed the Ypres-Menin road, and have established ourselves there. Fight- ing is still proceeding. Tuesday's 11 p.m. Paris communique is as follows:— The day has been quiet. Artillery actions only are reported in Artois, in the -valley of the Aisne (Troydn district), on the borders of the Argonne Wood, and in the Forest of Apremont. Four of our airmen who took part in the bombardment of Sarrebruck have not returned to our lines. One of them is re- ported to have knded in Switzerlan near Payere, in the canton of Vande. Amsterdam, Tuesday.—The following official communique from General Army Headquarters is issued in Berlin to-day East of Ypres strong British foroee suc- ceeded in capturing the western part of Hooge. French mine explosions near the farm of Beausejour were unsncceeaful. After the destruction of the viaduct vMt of Dammerkirch by our artillery on May 30th the French had recently com- gfetcd a new bridge across the Laig, south of Mansbach, which our artillery veeter- day destroyed with some good hits. South of the border of the Resien Wood, -"rt of Verdun, we shot down a French captive balloon. Between Billingen and Rheinweiler, south of Muelheim Baden, a French aeroplane was forced to land by the fire of our anti-aircraft guns. A pilot-observer was captured. Near Pirirt our fire forced an enemy airman to make his way into SwiM territory.—Press As. sociation War Special.

I COLONIALS DASH I i

— I' COLONIALS' DASH. I ] i An important new move in the Darda- nelles operations was revealed in last night's official dispatches. British forces have effected a new lamlmg in the Gallipoli Peninsula. Ac- cording to the Temps," this landing took place at Ari Burnu, which, although not marked on the most recent maps, is probably situated to the north of Ansae Cove, in the vicinity of Sari Bair. The landing would seem to have fol- lowed or preceded heavy fighting, for Sir Ian Hamilton reports that a footing on the Channk Bair portion of Sari Bair has been gained, and that the enemy suffered considerable losses. Sari Bair is & range W11ft. high, and commands a view across the peninsula- Another landing by the Allies is re- ported by the Turks to have taken place at Karatchali, situated on the mainland in the north of the Gulf of Saros, not far from KavaL- Y.-Ilieli-lic-i behind the Bulair ) f1"" Ttio.ICur.kfi (iiifcuu U;lJ¡aV. the troops in this quarter, and as Sir Ian t only speaks of a fresh landing, it is possible that this operation was simply a feint to cover the more important enter- prise at Ari Burnu. Sir Ian Hamilton's dispatch is as fol- lows Press Bureau, Tuesday. Sir Ian Hamilton reports that fighting at several points on the Gallipoli Penin- sula has taken place during tlie last few days. Substantial progress has been made. In the southern zona two hundred yards on a front of three hundred yards have been gained east of the Krithia read, and has been held in spite of determined counter-attacks, vhich have been repulsed I with heavy loss to the enemy. Repeated attacks by the Turks elewhere in this zone have been beaten off. Several attacks by the French corps have been made, and their whole-hearted co-operation has proved of the greatest assistance. In the Anzac zono a footing on the Chunuk Bair portion of Sari Bair has also been gained, and a crest occupied after fierce fighting and the successful storming of. strongly held positions: Here, too, the enemy's losses have been considerable. The advance was commenced at night under cover of a searchlight from a des- troyer. Elsewhero a fresh landing was cuccees- fully effected, and considerable progress I made. Six hundred and thirty prisoners have been taken, with ona \ordenreldt gun, two bomb mortwrs, nine machine guns, and a large number of bombs. Scattered about nro-(itietntities of the enemy's rifles, ammunition and equipment. The Turkish dispatch announcing the scene of the landing is as follows Amsterdam, Tuesday. A telegram received, via Berlin, states that the following official communique has been issued by the Turkish Head- quarters:- In the Dardanelles, en tbe night of August 7th, under the protection of his fleet, the enemy landed new forces, part in the environs of Karatchah. north of Gulf of Saros, and the remainder at two points  north of Ari Burnu. We completely ilied the enamT's forces which landed near Karatchali. He left behind some twenty dead. North cf Ari Burnu the troops which landed made a slight advance under the protection of the fleet. We repelled the attacks and took some soldiers and officeris prisoners. I The communique claims considerable success for the Turks near Scdd-ul-Bahr in beating back attacks. More fierce fighting has followed the new landings in thf Gallipoli Peninsula. As 1 a result the area held. by the British in the Anzac zone has been nearly trebled. rurther north, presumably at the ¡ points near Ari Burnu, where the new force was put ashore and gained come ground. Sir Ian Hamilton reports Hint no further progress has yet been made. It is only to be expected that the British < forcsp hers should rafcet with stubborn opposition, as the enlargement of the British forces and pMitioIlS north of Gaba Tepc menaces the flank of the Turkish position at Kilid Bahr and the communications of the fortress height of Achi Baba. Press Bureau, Wednesday. The latest report from Sir Ian Hamil- ton states:- Severe fighting continued yesterday in the Gallipoli Peninsula, mainly in the Anzac zone and in that to the north. The positions occupied were slightly varied in placas, but the general result is that the area held at Anzac has been nearly trebled owing, chiefly, to the gal. lantry and dash of the Australian and New Zealand Army Corps, while to the north no further progress has yet been mads. The troops have inflicted heavy losses on the enemy, and the French battleship St. Louis is reported to have put out of action five out of six guns in Asiatic bat- teries. The St. Louis is a sister ship of the Gaulois, damaged in the famous concerted attack on the Narrows in March. She took the place of the Bouvet, gunk on that memorable occasion. The St. Louis dis- places 11,000 tons, and carries four 12-in., ten 5.5-io., and eight 4-in. guns. The two allusions to operations to the north" refer to the lauding on the Turkish mainland at Karatshali, to the north of the Gulf of Saros. Amsterdam, Wednesday.—An official communique issued in Constantinople to- day says:- On the front north of 4i Burnu yes- terday we repulsed the encmy after a. vigorous attack. Along a front of 500 miles (?) we captured 1 machine gun and two hundred rifles. On the left wing, near Ari Burnu, on the night of August 9th-10th, we again conquered a portion of the enemy's trench. Near Seddul Bahr, on the left wing, we captured some French troops, among them a.n officer and many weapons. On the other front the situation is un- changed. New York, Wednesday.—The United Press (the American news agency) to-day publishes the following article received from its special correspondent, Mr. Henry Wood. Realising fully that the moment they may be pushed from the European side of the Bosphorus the Ottoman Empire will j practically cease to exist, the Turks aT3 feverishly preparing for. last defence j and a last stand at Constantinople. It is the firm conviction of the foreign population in Constantinople that the Turks will prefer to die there to the last man rather than submit to the fate of j being pushed back to the rank of a second or third class .Aati(; nation. With every possible defence to the city from the side of the Dardanelles and the Gallipoli Peninsula now perfected to the highest degree to which combined Turk- ish and German genius has been able, the Young Turks havo hastily turned their attention to the two other vulnerable j points that remain. These are the pos- sibility of a Russian descent on the city from the north, following a landing on the Black Sea coast, and an attack from the rear across the fortifications of Adria- nople, Lule Bourgae, and the Teliataldja line. North of Constantinople now the two triangles formed on the east and west of the Bosphorus by the entrance of the latter into the Black Sea have been closed to all foreigners. Hasty work of fortifica- tion is being carried on, so that even if I the Russians succeeded in running the gauntlet of the Turkish fleet and making a landing, stiff resistance would be put up to an advance on tke city. Equal secrecy is also being maintained regarding the strengthening of the fortifi- cations at Lule Bourgas and on the Tchataldja line, but at Adrianople I was permitted to pass an entire liay. As at all other important military centres in Turkey German officers swarmed on every hand directing the work.—Exchange Special.

GERMANS VTANT TO REACH PETR0GRAO

GERMANS VTANT TO REACH PETR0- GRAO. The possibility of a great German offensive against Petrograd with the ob- ject of capturing the city is being seri- ously discussed by Russian military writers. The conditions, it is pointed out, are very different from 1812, and the Germans realise the enormous advantages to be gained by an effective blow at the heart of the Empire. The starting point of this offensive would apparently be Courland, and the port of Riga, which, however, is separ- ated by a distance of 260 miles through a tract of most difficult country, from j Petrograd. It is authoritatively affirmed that whatever the enemy's plarts he will oat. be permitted to «8fCU the ca&itjil.- The Fortress of Kovno, which presents q formidable harrier to the completion of the German concentration in this north- ern region, is now being attacked with great desperation. Guns of 16in. calibre were brought against it, but all the at- tacks were repulsed with enormous losses. It is unofficially reported that prelimi- nary measures suggesting the evacuation of Kovno have been taken. K Influencing the Balkans. Petrograd, Tuesday.—It is suggested here that German operations between the Dvina and the Niemen, that is in the regions directly contiguous to or situated near the roads to Petrograd, may be de- signed to exert political influence in the .Balkans, but so far the measure of their success is not commensurate with the fccale on which they arc planned. The Germans originally contemplated a simultaneous attack cn Riga by land and sea, but the fleet, which was en- gaged in trawling for mines in the Gulf of Riga, was probably not apprised of Von lvulow's defeat on the Misea, so that the plan to co-ordinate land and sea movements failed in detail, as is indi- cated in the latest communiques. Similarly the attempt to etorm' the western defences of Kovno had go far been a costly failure. Serious Losses. The abandonment of the line of the Middle Vistula is not so Much the result of the enemy's occupation of Warsaw as of the arrival of strong German rein- forcements on the Narev front between Lomza and the Bug. with a consequent menace to the right flank of our Wawsaw group. Having held the Warsaw line long enough to enable the harvest to be gathered in and to obstruct the enemy's task of bridging the river, no useful pur- pose could have been served by our con- tinued presence in that region. More- over, both Von Scholtz and Von Gallwitz have sustained such frightful losses in the Narev fighting that before they pan repair them our 'Warsaw army ought to enjoy ample time to make good its re- tirement eastward. The same factors likewise retard the junction of the northern armies of Von Scholtz and Von Gallwitz with the southern armies of Von Woyrsch, the Archdhike Joseph Ferdinand, and Von Mackenser?.—Per Pross Association.— Timfes telegram. A Bow-Shaped Front. Petrograd, Wednesday.—From last night's communique, it is evident that Lomza and Ostrov (2 milee S of Lomza) are in German hands. The enemy is re- ported to be very strong on a 40-mile bow. shaped front towards Dvinsk (on the Petrograd railway). Military authorities anticipate that the enemy's aggressive will be persisted in. notwithstanding the checks announced this morning. As regards Petrograd seriously entering into the enemy's plans, strong doubts are expressed. The operations necessarily cover a vast front, and the lake and marsh country of the Pskov Government ;3 well adapted for defence.—Renter. [Tho enemy has already claimed the capture of the Loinza stronghold.] Bavarians !n Hot Pursuit." Amsterdam, Wednesday.-—The official communique issued in Berlin to-day says: The army of General von Hiadenburg has repulsed weak Russian attacks during the last few days on the left side of the road Riga—Mitau. Otherwise there is no change north of the Niemen. [The Wirels version of the German report says" strong Russian advances were repulsed on the Riga—Mitau road.j An attack by strong- RitFsian forces from Kovno faiINI. The number of prisoners taken here since August 8th has increased to 2,165 and the number of machine guns to 16. East of Lomza our troops are advancing towards the line. The enemy is still resisting at the bridgehead position near Wisna. South of Lomza the entire Russian front is giving way. Tha strongly consolidated position of the Czerwony Bor could not be maintained by the Russians. Our pur- suing ramies crossed the Czerwonv Bor. advancing eastwards. We captured a rail- way junction south-east of Ostrow. East of Novo Georgievsk we captured the fort of Berdaminow. which the Rus- sians evacuated. The fortresses of Novo Georgievsk and Brest Litovsk were bom- bordsd from our airships. The left wing of the army of Prince Leopold of Bavaria, in hot pursuit. reached the neighbourhood of Kaluczyn. On the right wing the army of General von Wovsch last nicrht stormed positions on both sides' of the enemy rearguard positions at. Jedlanka, west of Lukow. We made over a thousrmd prisoners. The allied armies under General von Mackenser. are attacking the enemy posi, tions behind the sectors of Bvstrzycg fsouth of Radzyn), Tymenitoa (west of Par-zew), and on the .line Ostrow- Uchrast. On the upper Bna- and the Zloh, Lipa the situation is unchanged.—Reuter.

ITALIAN FORCE PENETRATES INTOI IAUSTRIAN STRONGHOLD

ITALIAN FORCE PENETRATES INTO I AUSTRIAN STRONGHOLD. R-ome, Wednesday.—An official commu- nique published to-day says:— in Cadore, while effective action by our artillery continues against a powerful curtain fire on the part of the enemy, in the upper valleys, the Austrians have attempted by frequent but vain attacks to drive us back from some of the positions we have recently conquered Thus, on August 9th, our troops re- pulsed an attack in the Valley of Sexten against Fonte del Rimbianco, and an ad- vance in force by the enemy on the Seiko- pel. In Carni. intense and sustain*! actions are reported along the whole of our front, and small advances by our in- fantry. The enemy also attempted, but without success, to construct barbed wire entangle- ments facing our trenches on Monte Medato. Neat Plava, at nightfall yesterday, our troops successfully repulsed a double attack by the enemy, although the latter were powerfully supported by artillery. On the Carso Plateau, our troops, after having in the night of August 10th re- pulsed an attack in the Sei Busi district, took the offensive in the morning, and at some points made considerable progress. The ardour of our infantry was such that tero companies succeeded in capturing at the point of the bayonet a strongly en- trenched height well inside the middle of the enemy's front. Owing to a powerful and concentrated artillery fire by the enemy, the two posi- tions could not be held. Nevertheless the stubborn resistance of our troops in the rear successfully broke up the enemy's counter attack. In the Monfalcone sector, the Austrian artillery resumad its fire, but this time .without result. Gorizia Encircled. I Geneva, Wednesday.—According to news from Milan this morning, the Austrians are removing from Gorizia everything that would aid their enemy. The town is areirele,d by' the Italian artillery, and most of the population left a week ago. Austrian reinforcements are making des- perate attempts to save this important town, whose fall is expected shortly.

REFUSED TO FIGHT SERBIANSI

REFUSED TO FIGHT SERBIANS. I Rumours of a German invasion of Serbia have been much to the fore of late, together with reports alleging the gather- ing of large German armies on the fron- tier of our Balkan Allies. The present position of the military operations in this area as indicated in the following 6t.te- metit is of the greatest interest. 1 When, some time ago, a second in- vasion of Serbia was reported as immi- .ne&t r't(i.a.t,QJ;Ô i| £ j £ eeg £ to ktate. the roported army of invasion. They dis- covered two Austrian army corps lying some distance inland from the Serbian frontier. This discovery alarmed the Serbians, as it was taken to be the nucleus of a new force. Later, these two army corps were-reinforced by Bavarian troops. Rufused to March Against Serbia. j Ihis force remained in position for some considerable time, and was then with- drawn. Prom prisoners and deserters the reason for the withdrawal was discovered. Amongst the Austrian troops there was an evident unwillingness to march against Serbia, and as far as the Bavarian troops were concerned, the Austrian commander objected to using them as a part of his force, for the reason that they were abso- lutely unacquainted with mountain war- fare and, from his point of view, not only useless but dangerous in an attack on Serbia, which would involve operations of that nature. The intervention of Italy has since ab- sorbed all the available Austrian troops trained for mountain warfare, and she can spare none to send against Serbia.. To this alleged non-adapta.bility of the German troops for mountain warfare is attributed the reason why Germany has so far not joined Austria in the war against Italy. She is waiting until the Italian army leaves the mountainous regions of the Austro-Italian frontier be- fote she goes to the assistance of her ally.

IA VISIT TO THE FLEET

I A VISIT TO THE FLEET. The Secretary of the Admiralty makes the following announcement through the Press Bureau:— The Prime Minister and the Chancellor of the Exchequer have paid a visit to the Grand Fleet, and were guests during their visit of Admiral Sir John Jellicoe. Before their departure officers and men from a number of ships were assembled, and the Prime Minister addressed to them. and through them to their com- rades in the fTeet, some words of congratu- lation and confidence. Amsterdam, Wednesday.—-An official I telegram from Berlin eavs after having boldly broken through the British watch- ing forces the German auxiliary vessel Meteor waged a commercial war. On the nights of August 7th and Sth the ship encountered the British auxiliary cruiser Ramsey which the Meteor attacked and destroyed, saving 40 of the crew, including four officers. Next day 4 British cruisers surrounded the Meteor, end as a battle was hopeless and escape impossible, the commander 6ank the Meteor after the crew and the British prisoners and the crew of a sail- ing vessel which had been sunk as a prize had been saved. The whole of the Meteor's crew has safely reached a Ger- man port. (Signed) Behorke. The Meteor (3,613 tons) was a steel twin- screw steamer, built in 1004 by Blohm and Voss, Hamburg, for the Hamburg- Amerika Line. She was fitted with elec- tric light and a wireless installation, and had two decks.

SUBMARINE TORPEDOEDI

SUBMARINE TORPEDOED. I Rome. Wednesday.—The Chief of the Navy Staff issues the following commu- nique :— Two Austrian destroyers this morning fired at Bari, Santo Spirito, and Mol- leta. One person was killed and seven wounded, all civilians. The damage done was immaterial. In the Upper Adriatic tho Austrian submarine U 12 was torpedoed by one of our submarines, and sunk with all on board.-Reuter. A few weeks ago an Italian submarine was sunk by an Austrian submarine. Sub- sequently Italian divers at work in the vicinity di&covered a submarine of foreign nationality, and it was thought that the duel between the two U boats had re- sulted in the destruction of both combat- ants. No official statement has, however, been made.

Advertising

i ■ 11 Mr. R. McKenna,Chancellor of the Exchequer,says:— II The man, be he rich or poor, is little to be envim who, at ji j, this supreme moment, fails to bring forward his savings jjj | for the security of his country." How you can I. invest in the i War Loan. I ■ I You can still taljfe your share in the great ||| 4J War Loan through the Post Office. If you have saved £5 or more, go to the I Post Office and buy ^"5 of Scrip Certificates or as many of them as you can. These Certifi- cates will be exchanged in any Money Order Office between 1st and 15th Derember, 1915, for the same amount of 4i War Loan Stock. Ifyou exchange your Certificates for Stock you will get interest at the rate of 5% per annum, or 54. per month for each R5 Certificate from the first day of the month after you bought the Certificate until 30th November you will also get a bonus of 1/- for each I 95 Certificate that you so exchange into Stock. After 1st December your Stock will bear interest at the rate of 41% per annum, that is to say that each half year you will get 2s. 3d. for each X5 so invested. If you have only a few shillings handy go to the Post Office and buy a War Loan Scrip Voucher. You can have either os., 10s., or £1 vouchers and you can buy as many as you like. < Keep them carefully until 1st December when you can exchange each twenty 5s. vouchers for a d55 Stock Certificate. You will also receive the < interest your money has earned up to that time, i and in addition a bonus of Is. for each E5 of Stock I that you take. Afterwards, as long as you own your Stock, you will receive your interest on June 1st and i December 1st each year. Remem ber you cap at any time sell j your War Loan Stock at the market price } through the Post Office. « If you cannot see your way to collect enough vouchers to buy £ 5 worth of Stock I within the next year, do not buy vouchers but put your money into the Post Office Savings Bank. Go to the Post Office TO-DAY < i 1 1 1 •

BRITISH WARSHIP LOST J

BRITISH WARSHIP LOST. J » Press Bureau .Tuesday. The Secretary of the Admiralty makes the following announcement H.M.S. Lynx, destroyer, struck a mine in the Ndrth Sea and sank on the 9tli Angnst (Monday). Four officers and 22 men were saved. The Lynx belongs to the K class of 20 destroyers, built under the 1911 pro- gramme, and completed in 1913. The dis- placement is 935 tons, and they can steam at more than 30 knots. Three 4-in. guns and two torpedo-tubes are carried. Oil fuel only is consumed. The usual comple- ment is 100 officers and men.

GERMAN AUXILIARY CRUISERSI PRIEFCAREER I

GERMAN AUXILIARY CRUISER'S I PRIEFCAREER. I The Secretary to the Admiralty made the following announcement at eight p.m. on Wednesday:— H.M.S. Ramsey (Lieutenant H. Raby, R.N.R.), a small armed patrol vessel, was sunk by ih? German fumed &et auxiliary steamer Meteor on August 8 in the North Sea. Four officers and 39 men were saved. The Meteor subsequently' sighted a squadron of British cruisers, and her com- manding o&cer, realising" that escape was impossible, ordered the crew to abandon the ehip, and then blew her up. Later the Secretary to the Admiralty I announced the following casualties among I the officers of the Ramsey:- Lost. I Lioiitenant- Harry Jiaby, R.N.R. Acting-Lieut. Charles P. Baufctie, R.N.R. Acting-Lieut. Sidney J. Usher, ll.N.R. Assistant-Engineer George M. Pottie, R.N.R. Assiatani-paymtsker Seymour G. Duprey, li.N.R. SHghtty Wounded. ?BEr't?' Thoav J. Fay la, KN.B. I

FRENCH MUNITIONS 11

FRENCH MUNITIONS. 11 Paris, Thiursday.-M. Albert Thomas, Under-Secretary for War, in an interview published by the Petit Parieien," said at the present moment a fresh effort is being made in France comparable with that in England. The patriotic outburst of the beginning is being succeeded by a new and meth- odical spirit of enterprise. Factories have been built which will fcoon provide the national defence with enormous quantities of munitions. In order tq enable* our workers to or ganise, many eteps have been taken in France. There has been a first effort (I which we are to-day adding another. The first lap has boen covered; for the second we resemble England. We arc forging new tools to reply to the demands of the Commander-in-Chief, to achieve results which we wish to realise we have taken many measures. 'lens of thousands of men have been placed at the disposal of manufacturers. To-morrow women will be employed and men unfit for mobilisation. We have manufactures in grept quantities. We will increase them, double them, and our manufacturers have understood and are nobly fepconding -our efforts. It is by tens that our new factories aro counted. Even small manufacturers havp come to us feeling they cannot work alone. They form groups. We have en- couraged them in this. We have an army which is now suffi- ciently equipped to reply to any blow. It weuld even be capable of a strong offen- sive. Every day our strength increases, not only in England but also here, and in spite of the formidable industry of Ger- many, it is impossible that the resouroes or the Allies will not assure them, at the right moment, complete victory. What we have, what Englaud has and will have —all these resources will assure our j supip,mav and qfcf victory. i

ONE MAN A MINUTE 1

ONE MAN A MINUTE. 1 Cape Town.—Recruiting for the Over- seas Contingent is proceeding satisfac- torily. On Tuesday in all the large centres in Cape Town, enrolments have been at the rate of a man a minute. The recruits accepted are liien of fine physique and mostly with campaigning experience, dth good sprinkling of old Imperial soldiers. Schoolboys of J6 have presented them- selves to the recruiting officers, begging hard to be allowed to go as buglers.

SACRIFICED A GOOD BERTHI SACRIFICED A GOOD BERTH

SACRIFICED A GOOD BERTH. I SACRIFICED A GOOD BERTH. Mr. Jack Hansard, a well-known Swansea business man who sacrificed a lucrative position in order to enlist in the A.S.C. He is a capital amateur comedian.

THE PHANTOM HORSEMEN I

THE PHANTOM HORSEMEN. I In a letter to The Evening News with reference to the stories of The Angels of Mons," Lance-Corporal A. Johnstone, late of the Royal Engineer?, who experienced all the hardships of tb8. great retreat, writes as follows:- I would like to relate an incident that happened to myself, which, although it doesn't go to prove the supernatural, shows that under conditions of great di-I tress and fatigue the mind controls th. most ordinary things into the mystic, f must. call my experience The Phantom I Horsemen." We had almost reached the end of the retreat, and, after marching a whole I day and night with but one half-hour's rest in between, we found ourselves on the outskirts of Lanpy. near Paris, just at dawn, and as the da.-vbroke we saw in I front of us large bodies of cavalry, all foriiit-d up into f;quadroiis-fine, big men, on massive chargers. The Cavalry Disappear; I u I remember turning to my chums in the ranks and saving Thank God! We arc not far off Paris now. Look at the French cavalry:' They, too, saw them quite plainly, but on getting closer, to our surprise the horsemen vanished and gave place to I banks of white mist, with clumps of trees iind bushes dimly showing through them: I "Quite a simple illusion, yet at the time we actually picked out tho lines of man and horse as plainly ns possible, and almost imagined we heard the champing of the horses' bits' "When I tell you that hardcnpd eoldicrs who had 1),e?,n many a campaign Were qu?, t(- i-nechanic- ally along the road iiirf all ports I of nonsense in sheer delirium, you can eli boiieve we were in a fit state to 'r I a row of beanstalks for all the saints in the calendar." —-«».

I TURKS AND WARSAWS FALL I

I TURKS AND WARSAW'S FALL. Rome, Thurday.-The Exchange Tele- graph Company's coriiespondent says: ] have received from Constantinople a despatch sent from there by courier to Salonica. which rays that the recent Ger- man successes at Warsaw were exploited to the fullest, extent in the Turkish Press, and have momentarily repopulariised to a remarkable degree Enver Pasha and his coterie of German military advisers The Young Turks now openly talk of the possibility, with Germany's promised aid, of retaking Thrace, Macedonia and Albania, Active steps are also to be taken for resuscitating the holy war." The writer adds: I know for a positive fact that following upon their successes at Warsaw, Germany's next move will be across the Balkans to attempt to join forces with Turkey." —————

ZEPPELINS LAST RAIDI

ZEPPELIN'S LAST RAID. I: Paris. Wednesday.—The Ministry of Marine has issued the following state- wen t French seaplanes from the maritime aviation centre at Dunkirk yesterday dropped 12 incendiary bombs of 120 c-egti- 1 metres and six of 90 centimetres on a Zeppelin which was returning in a crippled oondition to Ostend. They further carried out the bora- ] bardmeot by night of the port of Ostend. on which they dropped 49 bombs of 90 centimetres." Bafun by British Aviator. I Dunkirk, 1 uesaay (received Wednes- day).—Allied aviators this morning des? troyed a large Z?ppalio in the neighbour- hood of Ostend. The attack was begun by a British aviator, who succeeded in seriously damaging the dirigible, the destruction of which was completed by French aviators from the Dunkirk flying cen.t,re.-Press Association War Special.

VIGOROUS RUSSIAN RESISTANCE

VIGOROUS RUSSIAN RESISTANCE. < Petrograd, Thursday.—A correction in the Russian communique of yesterday < says: Our troops, not withstanding the < losses they have suffered in the incessant i fighting, are receiving reinforcements, Und are offering a vigorous resistance on < the whole front from the Narev to the I Bug. <

BELONGED TO RIFLE BRIGADE I r

BELONGED TO RIFLE BRIGADE. !< I r I Private William George Williams, I I of the 8th Rifle Brigade, whose death in action is unofficially reported. He lived at I 3, P?n-,v-&ren-road, Swansea, and was kthe adopted 60& of Um. Brailey, Rorist.

I AUSTRALIA GREETS WOUNDED 1HEROES

AUSTRALIA GREETS WOUNDED HEROES. Sydney, Thursday.—An enthusiastic welcome is being expended to wounded soldiers who are arriving from Gallipoli.

NEW FRENCH NAVAL COMMANDER

NEW FRENCH NAVAL COMMANDER. Pars, Wednesday.-Admiral de Bon has bn appointed commander of the Naval Division at the bases of the Mediter- ranean Expeditionary corps.

NORWAYS NEW NAVAL BASE

NORWAY'S NEW NAVAL BASE. Christiania, Thursday.—It is announced that the grant voted by the Storthing on Wednesday for a naval base at Trordhjem was about X32,600, and about X12,300 for Christiansand.

KING ALBERT HONOURED

KING ALBERT HONOURED. The London Gazette" on Monday announces that the King has been graciously pleased to appoint his Majestv Albert, King of the Belgians, to be Colonel-in-Chief of the 5th (Princess Char- lotte of Wales) Dragoon Guards.

CANADIAN GENEROSITY

CANADIAN GENEROSITY. Ottawa, Wednesday.—Mr. Lougheed, Acting Minister of Militia, commenting to-day on the increasing number of private contributions of machine guns, said if the generosity of these people could end the Avar, we should speedily have a victorious peace.

PRINCE OF WALES HOME

PRINCE OF WALES HOME. The following appeared in Wednesdaj night's Court Circular from Winda&r Cae,le:- The Prince of Wales, attended bv the Lord Claud X. Hamilton (Grenadier Guards), arrived at thp Castle to-night on short leave of absence from the front.

LATEST GERMAN OUTRAGE

LATEST GERMAN OUTRAGE. Copenhagen, Thurfiday.teDording to :1 .elogi-am from lie-ten, the i, n mail steamer Iris was stopped at 7.30 on Wednesday morning by a German sub- marine an hour's steam from the coast. The submarine fired two shots across her bows. and a German officer and some men boarded her. One of the passengers states some, bags of parcel post for Russia were thrown overboard, Imt the letter post and parcel past for ScandinaVia were not touched. The submarine dis- appeared in a south-easterly direction. • —————<—————

ALIENS SUSPECTED IN MONTREAL

ALIENS SUSPECTED IN MONTREAL. Montreal, Thursday.—A large Italian warehouse in this city was partially blown up by dynamite on Wednesday morning. Fortunately, the place had not been opened for business, and none of the employes were on the premises. The shop itself was bad!y wrecked*. The police state they have evidence that the explosion was the work of Aus- trians, who had been interned, but were released on parole. This incident, to- gether with the numerous outrages of similar character recently, has caused a strong demand for the strict internment of all alien enemies.

FOR MUNITIONS INVENTIONS

FOR MUNITIONS INVENTIONS. Press Bureau, Wednesday, 9.35 p.m. The Minister of Munitions has consti. tuted a munitions inventions branch of the Ministry, and has appointed as comp- troller Mr. E. W. Moir, M.I.C.E., M.A., M.Soc.C.E. The branch, which for 1 he present is located in Armament-buildings. Whitehall-place, will have the duty of considering projects for inventions relat- ing to munitions for warfare on land or matters appertaining there-to. The comptroller and staff of the branch will be assisted in their work of examina- tion and, if thought necessary, in the in- vestigation and development of any pro- jects that may be considered, worthy of being developed by a panel of honorary scientific and other experts. All communications should be ad- dressed to the comptroller at the above address.

KING DECORATES HEROES

KING DECORATES HEROES. The King held an Investiture at Buck. ingham Palace on Thursday, when he personally bestowed a number of military decorations, including three V.C.'s. One of the officers decorated had a par- ticularly fine record, having in the course of twelve months obtained a commission from the ranks, being mentioned in dis- patches and awarded two military decora- tions. r The three V.C.'s were:- Lance-Coroporal Joseph Tombs, of the King's Liverpool Regiment; Private Henry May of the Cameroniane (Scottish Rifles), and Rifleman William Mariner. They had removed their decoration on leaving the Palace, but at the earnest request of their friends they readjusted the crosses upon ]"-ir breasts at the gates, in the presence of an admiring crowd. many members of which pressed forward Go libake them by the hand.

QUAY WALL DESTROYED BY BRITISH SUBMARINE

QUAY WALL DESTROYED BY BRITISH SUBMARINE. Amsterdam—A letter from Constat, kinople to the Nieuwe Rotterdamsche Courant," dated July 26. purports to describe the situation there. While the writer admits the existence of various restrictions and inconveniences due to the war. he says nothing, possibly in view- of the censorship, to feonfmn tip various reports that, have circulated abroad oon- vrning a state of alarm in the Turkish sapital. Some emotion," he says, was caused by the appearance on May 24 of a British submarine in the harbour, and again re- cently, on July 17, but our populace eeems a.1 ready to be accustomed to that, too. At iny rate, this last time there was ifc evidence of excitement even in the ba" Jour quarter of Galata, despite the fmet rhat th, torpedo blew a hole 20 metres in siee in the quay wall and the explosion saused the water to spout up to a height )f 10 metreM: while three persons who :haneed to be lounging on the 6pot were silled." y

A TRENCH CONCERT

A TRENCH CONCERT. The following amusing letter reached us from a soldier at the front:- I'm having a. short rest at a little townling" behind the firing-line, but before you get this I shall be back again in the drenches "-suicide avenue—, pip-squeak promenad"ug-out drive, or my other of the beautiful and affeotieo- ite names we have for the first-line :renches. Here we really have a jolly good time. rhe Germans do their best to entertain us with their musical guns all day )ong:- Handel's Hymn of Hate," 5-6.90 a.m. Haydn's lain. Sonata, 7-8.30 (conducted by Herr Ivrupp). Beethoven's Shrapnel Symphony, 9-12.30 p.m. Mozart's Comic Opera, O! Ma Hun- ley," 1-1.30. Valse, Pip-Squeak," Liszt, 2-5. Bach's Jack Johnson" Polka, 5-9. Mendelssohn's Bomb £ «m4>" March, -J2.:1O a.m. Machine Gun Solo. I wtmldn"t leave my little bit of trench for you," MtM. ind BO on.