Collection Title: Herald of Wales

Provider: Llyfrgell Genedlaethol Cymru

Hawliau: Nid yw statws neu berchnogaeth hawlfraint yr adnodd hwn yn hysbys.

Gwylio manylion cyfan

Cyntaf Cynt Llun 9 o 12 Nesaf Olaf
Full Screen
32 erthygl ar y dudalen hon
ABERAVON

ABERAVON. At the Aberavon Borough Police Court, before the Mayor (Mr. W. J. Williams), Messrs. Charles Jones, George Longdon, John Phillips and Alderman David Rees, Thos. Williams, who had several previous convictions against him, was sent to prison with nard labour for one month for drunken and disorderly conduct.—For allowing his horse to stray, Robert Hyall, Aberavon. was fined 56.; and William I John, Taibach, for riding a bicycle and neglecting to give- warning of his ap- I proach. was fhwd 7s.—Archibald Coles, for furiously driving a horse and cart .in Dock-road, Port Talbot, was fined 20s.. WEST RHONDDA COLLIERY. CASE. I In a case heard at the Aberavon County Court on Tuesday in which Thomas Wal- ters. colliery manager. King-street, Port Talbot, sued Jonathan Williams, of Rose Bank, Sketty, Swansea, accountant, for for grtods sold, moneys paid and for arrears of salary, and the defen- dant counterclaimed £ 71 4s. 6d. for coal taken and not accounted for by Walters, lor the retention of a colliery surveying (Hal and for neglecting to keep an accurate plan of the workings and ventilation at West Rhondda Colliery, Afan Valley, we reported that the Judge entered judgment for the plaintiff for S13 6s 9d. and for the defendant 17s. The solicitor for the defendant, Mr. Ewan Gibson Da vies, Port Talbot, desires i;s to state that the actual judgment for f.-)Ilows:T-Lidl&niont for the defendant on the plaintiff's claim, and judgment for the defendant to the extent of S32 10s. 3d. on the counterclaim made by the defen- dant. The importance of the difference lies in the fact that the plaintiff will have to pay the costs of the claim and the counterclaim..

BRITONFERRY

BRITONFERRY. It will be learned with regret that ex- Councillor William Phillips, who has been ill for -i long time, is now confined to hie bed. Some parte of Britonferry received a, visit cf the winged ante on Monday afternoon, but not in such a great force ae at other places. In one garden they were shovelled lip in thousands. The Britonferry and Baglan Boy Scouts, who spent a week in camp at Penwyllt, re- turned home on Saturday last. During the camp week a visit was paid by Madame Patti, and the diva had a word with moat of the Scouts. This week the enumerators have been busy over the registration work, and although only a few volunteered to do the work, it appears to have been carried out eatiMac- torily ae far as it has gone. Next Monday a start will be made to collect the forms, and it is hoped to have this completed by Wed- nesday at ,-ea,tJt. BagLin people may well feel proud of Pte. Bert Andrews, who has this week returned to his regiment" somewhere in France. "Bert" went out to Ute front in January lat-t, and was in several engagements. In the battle around Hill 60. however, he re- ceived a done of shrapnel in the back white carrying a wounded comnde to a place of safety, and after leaving hospital he came home on fick leave. Now he ha.s again returned to do hie bit." Private Arthur Beer, of the 1st Welsh, and son of Mr. W. J. Beer, of Medina, House, stationed at Bedford, was la.st week compli- mented by the presiding magistrate of the Bellford norough Sessions for saving a woman who attempteQ to commit suicide in the Hirer Otule.- Thb gallant act- of-Private Br-er,'eaid the magistrate, had no doubt saved the woman's life, and he wiehed the deed recorded. After bringing the woman to the bank, she made a second attempt. and young Beer again saved her. Mrs. Llewellyn, of Baglan liall, ha kindly placed a large portion of her residence as a hospital for wounded soldiers, and st present twelve are stationed there, while more are expected soon. Lasrt week the F.rython Glea Society, under the baton of Mr. D. Ba=??ett Davie-, who also accom- panied en the piano, gave a concert to cheer up the noble fellows who hid done well for their King and country. In the largest ward the soldiers were made as comfortable as possible, so that they might have the fullest en joyment, and seated among them was Mr6 Llewellyn, Miss Llewellyn, and severai nurses, party sung the Soldiers' Chorus" from "Faust," Myfanwy," "Haul Away," The Way to Build a Boat," Italian Salad," Soldier'6 F,Imwell," and In the Sweet." All the items were loudly cheered, but a special request was made for the •' Italian Salad" to be repeated, which was clone, much to the enjoyment of the audience. Solo.,3 were also sung during the evening by Miaa Jane Thomas and Messrs. William Jones and James Jones, while Mr. W. S. Bevan gave eome humorous recita- tions.—On behalf of his comrades Corporal Peake thanked the artietes for their kind- ness in coming to entain them-.t fact which they much appreciated, and he ex- pressed a hope that they would soon come again. Mr. Ivor Thomas responded on be- half of the party.

CWMAVON I

CWMAVON. At Aberavon on Monday, John "Wil- liams, collier, Cwmavon, was fined 20s. for using indecent language. In common with other parts of the country, Cwmavon was on Monday visited by a plague of flies, which proved in some instances very disconcerting. During the week-end several young men who have joined the. Colours visited their homes. They all looked in the pink of condition, and quite cheerful in view of the fact that soon they will be moved, on" to the firing line. Eiluned," the popular tenor soi lo, and composed by Nlr. 1). Afan Thomas (organ- ist of liethesda Cimpel, Britonferry) was the test piece at the National Eisteddfod, held at Bangor last week, and attracted a huge number of competitors. The Rev. J. Owen Jones (Hyfreithon), pastor of Tabernacle Church, last week preached in the open air to the Welsh soldiers at St. Abaph, ale of Clwyd, and during the week-end toured the military rentres at Llandudno, Rhyl, und Pres- tatyn to minister comfort to the Cwm- ivon and Pontrhydyfen boys stationed there. A pretty wedding was solemnised at the Church of the Holy Cross, Port Talbot, last week, the contracting parties being Miss Mary Emily Larkworthy, eldest daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Geo. Lark- worthy, of JR. Church-square, to Mr. Ivor lewis, of 19. Church-square, Cwmavon. fte TRev. I). Bankes-Williams, RD., vicar gf Cwmavon, performed the marriage pwwnony. We have on several occasions been asked to call attention to the necessity of having at least some of the lamps lit during dark nights, particularly so now when lighting- up time is scheduled about 8.30 p.m. Workmen from the hillsides and else- where obliged to meet the night train at 9.35 and passengers from the 10 p.m. train experience great difficulty in moving out over crag, torrent, and network tV railway tracks such as we have in Crrmavon. This week Mr. D. Afan Thomas was pre- sented with a purse of gold by his numer- ous friend*. in recognition of the stand he made recently in the courts against Mr. Cyril Jenkins. It will be remembered that Mr. Thomas proceeded against the Rhondda musician for nominal damages !)r infringement of copyright, when he succeeded, and also subsequently, upon appeal, at the higher courts, London, although both judgments carried with them costs, his musical friends through- out the Principality will regret to learn that the costs, after all, had to be borne br hioiself. The work of distributing the National Register forms commenced on Monday. A word of explanation is necessary to explain why the Parish Council holds itself aloof in this work, for it is unfair to say they refused to participate in the work. Their chairman (Mr. Wyndham Edwards) had made all necessary arrange- ments with members of the Council, the teachers at the Council Schools, and a few outsiders, to cover the whole district, but somehow they were not appreciated by the powers that be."

BAGLANI

BAGLAN. I At Aberavon Police Court on Thursday, Frederick Jones, tinworker, Baglan, was fined £.1, for obstructing the police in the discharge of their duty.—P.C. North said that he was arresting a man, when de- fendant rushed up and causrht the. prisoner by the arm and tried to take him away.

CRYNANTI

CRYNANT. I A native of Crynant, near Neath, Mr. O. T. Hopkins, was the winner of an essay prize at Bangor National Eisteddfod last week. The subject of the.essay was "An Acoount of the standard of Living and Wages of the Coal Miners." The prize was X15. Nine essays had been Kent in for competition. The adjudicators were Professor W. J. Roberts, University College, Cardiff, and Mr. Thomas Jones, M.A., secretary of the Welsh Insurance Commissioners. Mr. Hop- kins was a pupil at the Neath County School, where he held a scholarship. He was the winner of an essay prize at the National Eisteddfod at Abergavenny.

NEATHI

NEATH. At Neath on Friday, William George Smith, collier, Qlyn-neath, was fined 5s., and ordered to pay 35s. damages caused to a tree at the Lamb and Flag, Glyn- neuch, th-3 property of Mr. 0. Spence. Ex-P.C. Xrtjyson, of the Welsh Guards, has been spending a few days at Neath. He spoke with enthusiasm of the fine spirit displayed by this crack regiment, which we hope and believe is destined to play a glorious part in the great cam- paign in the west. Of the first battalion, with which he is connected,, he said: They are the finest lot in the British Army. With the exception of about three men, they are all bordering on 6ft. in height." Leyson is naturally proud of the honour the King has recently con- ferred on the regiment. As far as can be gathered, all the mem- bers of the Neath Borough Force, who have joined the colours, are doing well, and are enjoying excellent health. They are, almost without exception, making progressive strides in the glorious profes- sion they have chosen. A few are still in this country, but others have for some time been somewhere in France loyally serving King and country. By the way, Trooper Lewis Lovfett, of the Canadians, an old Neath boy, is home again. He is suffering from an injury to the muscles of his arm, due to an acci- dent when dealing with remounts some- where in France. Although painful, his hurt is not serious, and Lewis hopeD soon again to be back to active duty. Another well-known Neath boy, Trooper Sammy Griffiths, of Windsor-road, a member of the Canadian contingent, has been home on furlough. Young Griffiths, who migrated to Canada a few years ago and obtained a lucrative post at Winni- peg, like thousandj of others, left all for the Mother County The last meeting of the Town Council was about the dullest on record. Even Councillor J. R.Jones, who revels in pyro- technic displays, was more silent than a damp squib Although the meeting was held in the morning, there was more yawning than talking. But the meeting was not allowed to dis- perse without a loyal resolution with re- ference to the war. But this important matter would have been forgotten had it not been for Councillor W. E. Rees, who drew attention to what other public bodies were doing, and suggested that Neath should join in the Empire's ex- pression of loyalty and determination to prosecute the war to a successful issue. The resolution then came from the Mayor and was carried nem con. One matter of local importance and interest emerged into some prominence from the minutes- of the Gas Committee. This suggested that good progress was being made with the reorganisation of the gas undertaking, and showed, incident- ally, that the recent exhibition had per- formed all that was expected of if. Messrs. Jackson and Carpenter are to be congratulated upon their energy and the close attention they are paying to their arduous duties. The Town Council have lost no time in introducing Councillor Henry Thomas into the administrative affairs of the Corporation. The new councillor has been placed upon the Streets and Water Committeft-two of the most important committees of the council. The death of Councillor E. S. Phillips caused vacancies upon the Swansea Port Sanitary. Authority, and upon the over- seership of the borough. For the former position Mr. Walter E. Rees was ap- pointed, l and for the latter the ex-Mayor (Councillor W. B. Trick). With reference to the appointment of Mr. Rees as the town's representative on the Swansea Port Sanitary Authority, a friendly gibe came from Councillor John Ref's. 1 move," said he, Mr. W. E. Rees, for he "has plenty of time." He might have added that Mr. W. E. Rees employed his time to good purpose. If the suspension of football has given the Welsh secretary a good deal of leisure we quite well know that that leisure has been turned by him into real good work. He has taken, and continues to take, a very active part in the comfort of the Belgian refugees, and in connection with the administration of the Sailors and Soldiers* Association, both he and Mrs. Eees have been indefatigable in their labours. Then, again, Mr. Rees is the local representative of the Patriotic Society, and, to the writer's personal knowledge, he has been the means of bringing substantial financial assistance to the widows of those who have died gloriously for their country. Well, Councillor John Davies' wish has been fulfilled! He is now a member of the Market and Cattle Diseases Commit- tee. A wag suggested at the recent Coun- cil meeting that a membership of the Cemetery Committee was the (,uly thing needed to make his life a joy ior e.*or, The only other committee alterations are in connection with Old Age "ensions and Gibbs' Charity. Aid. Charles new fills the vacancies on each body. When, some years ago, the Corporation launched its first housing scheme, the local Jeremiahs shook their heads ominously. Of course, they were unanimous in the- prediction of failure, or, in other words, in the opinion that these 60 odd houses would become more or,leas a burden on the rates. But, we are pleased to say, they were wrong. As a matterVof fact, this first scheme, besides accomplishing a healthful improvement—and, by the. way, a highly necessary one, too--hm proved to be self-supporting. With regard to the second scheme, which makes provision for 90 houses it is too soon to speak yet. But thfis undertaking is nearing completion, and with every indication that it will prove equally as successful as the former one. A pretty wedding was witnessed at St. Aufeyn Ohurch, Devonport, on Saturday, when Harold Charles, eldest, son of the late Alexander Semmcns, of Torpoint, a.nd l Mrs*. A. H. Richards, of Neath, was i--Uried to Daisy Gertrude. third J daughter of Mr. and Mrs. R. W. Gloine, of Devonport. The bride was charmingly attired with pink silk and orange blossom, with a tulle hat to match, and carried a shower bouquet of white lilies-land roses. She was attended by her si&ter, Miss Minnie Gloine, who wore a gown of tussore silk with a mob cap to match, and carried a bouquet of pink carnations. The ceremony was conducted by the Rev. H. J. Petty, Vicar, and the bride was given away by her father. Mr. J. K. Gloine officiated as best man. After the ceremony Mr. and Mrs. Gloine received the guests at the home of the bride. Amongst others present were Mr. and Mrs. A. H. Richards, of Neath. The happy couple left later for Neath, to spend their honeymoon. Handsome pres- ents were received from the bride and bridegroom's relatives and friends. THE PRICE OF A PUPPY. At Neath County Court on Wednesday, before Judge Lloyd Morgan, K.C., Richard Phillips, licensed victualler, Onllwyn, sued John Daniel, Eagle Restaurant, Port Talbot, for the delivery of a fox terrier puppy, or in the alternative, for a sum of £12, the value of the puppy, Mr. A,Jestyn Jeffreys appeared for the claimant, and Mr. Lewis M. Thomas for the defendant. Mr. Jeffreys said that on June 15th de- fendant wrote to the plaintiff, stating that he had a puppy for sale, which was of good blood and the very best, and suit- able for exhibition." Phillips, who was a "doggie" man, agreed to buy the bitch for £ 3, and, although he afterwards sent a cheque for S3 to the defendant, he had not received the dog. Defendant denied that he had agreed to sell the pupply to defendant for 93, and said that he wanted S5 for it. Phillips increased the offer to S3 10s. on the occa- sion of his second visit to Port Talbot. His Honour decided to adjourn the case for the defendant to call witnesses as to the alleged increased offer made by plaintiff.

PORT TALBOT

PORT TALBOT. The dispute at the Cefn-y-Bryn Colliery which is situated at Bryn, near Port Tal- bot, has now been -settled, and work will be resumed forthwith. Lovers of Dickens' works should by no means fail to visit the New Theatre this week, where a dramatical version of -David Copper field is successfully pre- sented by Miss Florence Gloseop-Harris and Mr. Frank Villiers' excellent com- pany, under the direction of Mr. Max Jerome. The .caste, which lumbers Ili well-seasoned artistes, includes Mr. Fran* Forbes Robertson (who is a nephew of Sir J. Forbes Robertson), Mr. David Cham- pion, Mr. Geprgelloward, Mr. Max Jerome, Miss Gertrude Gilbert, and Miss Marjorie Allen, who perfectly sustain the characters of David Copperfield, Micawber, Dan Pegg,otty Uriah Heep, Betsy Trotwood, and Agnes Weekfield re- spectively, and are supported by the remainder of what patrons declare a really excellent company. Tho play is one of the best productions yet presented at the New, and is in four acts. The manager, Mr. Edward Furneux, deserves every praise for his selection of such high- class fare. Next, week the up-to-date and rollicking successful farcical comedy, Oh, I Say," will he presented by Mr. Mark Blow's No. 1 Company, including Mr. Jess Sw6et and Miss Gladys Archbutt.

SKEWEN

SKEWEN. Last Saturday, Sunday, and Monday the local Salvation Army Corps had the pleasure of a special visit from the Kenfig Hill Troop of Life-Saving Scouts. The series of meetings concluded will a grand demonstration on Monday evening, the programme consisting of patriotic dis- plays, physical exercises, ambulance sketches, Indian Club drill, and hand bell selections. The visit was greatly enjoyed, and large numbers availed themselves of the opportunity of witnessing the various performances. The remarkable victory achieved at the National Eisteddfod by the military choir led by Private Tommy Tucker, son of Mr. and Mrs. John Tucker, of Tabernacle- street, has caused great rejoicing in the locality. All were well acquainted with his attainments on the pianoforte, but were hardly prepared for such a splendid distinction as he has secured at the national gathering. Had he won the D.C.M. on the field of battle there would hardly be more cause of joy in his native village, and all readers will join in ex- tending to him the heartiest congratula- tions. The movement inaugurated last week to form a local platoon of the National Volunteer Training Corps seems likely to bring a large number of men into training who are ineligible for the Regular Army. Several old Volunteers have already fallen in, and will serve as a stimulus to the new recruits, as they have had the benefit of some years of training in the past, when the Volunteer movement was strong and populai in this dfctrict. We are informed also that already some young men, who have hitherto not re- sponded to their country's call, are more inclined to join the, Colours as they see the veterans responding. Undoubtedly there is still the need for men, since there is every likelihood that this war will be a long one.

A SENSATION IN THE AFAN VALLEY

A SENSATION IN THE AFAN VALLEY. A sensation was caused at Blaengwynfi, Avon Valley, on Saturday, when it be- came known that the station-master of Blaengwynfi (Rhondda and Swansea Bay Railway), named John Evans, who lives at 3, Graig-tcrraoe, Blaengwynfi, had been arrested on a charme of embezzling Z196 14s. Id., the monies of the railway company. The prisoner was subsequently brought before the Aberavon county magistrates. Inspector W. E. Rees asked for a re- mand for the purpose of making further inquiries. Mr. Lewis M. Thomas (for defendant), applied for bail. The magistrates granted the applica- tion, accused in S200 and two sureties of £100. The sureties were the Rev. Thomas Williams, Blaengwynfi, and Mr. Idris Waters, ex-J.P., and former chairman of the Glyucorrwg Council. At Aberavon, on Monday, John Evans, sta- tion-master, 3, Graig-terrace, Blaengwynfi, appeared on a remanded charge for the alleged embezzlement of f,196 J4s. Id.. the property of the Rhondda and Swansea Bay Railway Ccmpa.ny. Mr. Arthur Deere, for the railway oom pany, smd that the case was a very com- plicated one, and thereforeaaked for an adjournment until Thursday. Mr. Lewis M. Thomas, on behalf of ac- cused, said the amount involved was a large one, and he thought that an adjournment until Thursday would not be sufficient. Mr. Dfcore: I promise to provide Mr. Thomas with the details of the case during the day which was acceptable to the de- fence. The case was adjourned until Thursday next, accused being again admitted to bail, himself in £200 and two sureties of igiod each.

No title

Owing to the backward stato of the hops in Kent. the picking of the crop will begin about ten days later than last season. Mr. H. Hanson, who leased Imber Court Park, Thames Dittion, Surrey, from Lord Micheihaja, on Wednesday agreed to a per- petual injunction against the holding of galloping horse 'races there. While trying to move a iurnbridgp over the Leeds and Liverpool Canal at Leigh, Lancashire. Harry Simpson, aged ten, son of a; private in the Army Service Corps serving in France, fell into the water and was drowned.

MADAME MORRIS 1

MADAME MORRIS. 1 TRIBUTES TO AMMANFORD I VOCALIST. I Ammanford gave its public reception to Madame Bessie Morris, the winner of the soprano solo trophy at the Bangor National Eisteddfod, on Wednesday night, when a crowded congratulatory meeting was held at the Ivorites' Hall, and when all phases of the town's public life paid tribute. She was accorded a splendid ovation on appearing on the stage. During the proceedings she gave a beautiful rendering of "Nant y Myh- ydd," and had immediately to respond to a vociferous encore with Cartref." I Mr. J. Harries, J.P, (Irlwyn), Chair- man of the Ammanford Council, who con- ducted the meeting in able style, an- nounced that Madame Morris had won 450 eisteddfodic prizes, comprising 12 semi- national trophies, 76 champion solos, 17 silver cups, as well as teapots, cruet- stands, flower vases, and many medals. In the course of a graceful address, Madame Martha Harries-Phillips, the well-known vocalist, who occupied the chair, expressed the delight it gave them to welcomc Madame Morris and extend her their heartiest congratulations. It was not a small thing she had achieved. The standard t6-day at the National eis- teddfod had risen so high that it meant very hard and continuous work to win that high distinction. Madame Morris, they all knew, had a most charming voice, but it required something infinitely more to have achieved what she had-a head, intelligence, and a heart. They were proud of her; she had brought honour not only to herself, but to her native town of Ammanford. Other Tributes. I A telegram was read from Alderman W. N. Jones, J.P., expressing regret for lll. ability to attend, and forwarding hearty congratulations and best wishes. Con- gratulatory speeches were given by Coun- cillor J. Morgan, Councillor John Davies, Rev. Wi. Jones (Cymmer), Councillor Wm. Evans, Mr. Wm. Jones (Gwilym Myrddin), Mr. W. Walters, and the Rev. E. Richards (Tonypandy). Pennillion were read from Gwilym Cynlais," and by Mr. Isaac Jones, Mr. D. R. Griffiths (Amanwy), and Gwilym Myrddin." To a capital musical programme* the; following contributed: Mr. R. J. Thomas (violinist), Mr. Tom Williams (tenor}, Miss Llinos Thomas, Cwmamman (herself" a double National winner for penillion singing), and Madame McCarthy-Edwards. The acconii),t-i-f- was Mr. George A. Thomas, L.L.C.M. At the cloae Madame Morris gave thanks in feeling terms for the welcome given her. The singing of Hen Wlad fy Nha4«u," Madame Morris taking the solo, terminated the proceedings. The arrange- ments were in the hands of Mr. V. W. Lloyd.

ITOWY FISHERIES I i

I' TOWY FISHERIES. I ■ The Towy Fishery Board, at a special meeting, held at Carmarthen, on Wednes- day, Mr. L. D. Thomas i)residiug, had under consideration the terms of the application already made by their execu- tive committee to the Board of Agricul- ture for a Provisional Order under the Salmon and Freeh water .Fisheries Act, 1907, for the regulation of the fisheries in the area of the fishery district of the rivers Towy, Taf and Loughor and their tributaries. The Order provides, among other things, for alteration of the constitution of the Board by reduction of appointed mem- bers, by addition of members representa- tive of licensees for fresh water iish, and by addition of members elected by owners of private fisheries. Mr. Mervyn Peel referred to the ab- sence of the representatives of Gla- morgan, Cardigan, Brecon and Pembroke counties, who had not attended the meetings for years, and said there were many members of the Board who never attended, and therefore were perfectly useless to the Board. Mr. Peel added that the Board would be gaining more control over the rivers by the order than they ever had before. Mr. Thomas Smith, Carmarthen, pro- posed that the Board support the applica- tion for the Order, which had already been made by the Executive Committee, and the Rev. W. Thomas, Llanboidy, seconded. Mr. Wm. Evans, Carmarthen, said he did not agree with the provision for ex- tending the powers of limiting the number of nets to be used. The Rev. A. Fuller Mills said all such questions would have to be raised at the inquiry. Everything they might do there that day served no purpose, and he said the meeting was therefore a perfect farce. Mi-. Peel: All we want to do is to let the Board know the kind of powers we require. At present they had no power to limit the size of fish. Fishermen were continually taking email fish into their basket.

LOCAL SIGNALLERS1

— — LOCAL SIGNALLERS.' The current issue of the G.W.R. Magazine" publishes the result of a recent signalling examination held at Swansea by an official from the office of the superintendent of the line, Padding- ton. All the candidates gained a sufficient number of marks to merit the certificate, which reflects great credit on Mr. T. V. Rees, chief staff clerk of the Swansea division, who gavo the candid'ates p, course of lectures. The following is the list of candidates, with marks appended Mr. F. W. Ham, relief clerk, Swansea, 435; Mr. R. John. clerk, loco. *office, Neath, 403; Mr. W. J. Jarrett, goods clerk, Morriston (late booking clerk, Britonferry), 3901.; Mr. P. R. Higginson, loco. office, Neath, 374; Mr. S. E. Jones, superintendent's office, Swan- sea, Mr. G. W. Heanmens, st iperi-ii-' tendenh. ofiice, Swan&ea, 'if)!),* Mr. L-. W. New, clerk, Port Talbot, 257; Mr. R. J. John, parcels clerk, Neath, :)5.

HUSBAND AND WIFE DROWNED

HUSBAND AND WIFE DROWNED. Mr. and Mrs. Hardy Jacobs, giving their address its Bloomfield-road, London, who arrived at the Headland Hotel, New- quay, on Monday evening, were on Tues- day drowned while bathing. Mrs. Jacobs suddenly called for help, and her husband went to the rescue with two other visitors. Mr. Jacobs himself got into difficulties, and his body and that of his wife were afterwards recovered. Attempts at artifl-cial respiration failed. A strong under-current was running off the shore at the time. Notice boards warning bathers are affixed at different places on the beach.

KING AND PHOTOGRAPHERS

{, KING AND PHOTOGRAPHERS. While walking in the Long Walk at Windsor on Tuesday, with Princess Mary, the King came across a; party of Press, photographers, with whom he had an in- formal chat. He inquired kindly of them as to the nature of their work, and dis- played great interest in the answers they gave him. Before leaving his Majesty told them he was staying at Windsor for a rest. The King will; come to town for the Privy Council on Thursday. It was originally intended that the Council. should meet at Windsor, but other en- gagements having arisen his Majesty has decided to return to London for the day.

IINCREASED GOLD PRODUCTIONI

I INCREASED GOLD PRODUCTION. Tho Transvaal Chamber of Mines, Johannesburg, advises by cablegram that the total output of the mines of the Transvaal tor Iiilv amounted t? 770,355 ounces, of the value of £ 3,272,258. I The production in June was 755,280 ounces, of the value of £$,208,224 I

WIRELESS ROMANCE

WIRELESS ROMANCE. | MYSTERIOUS CHANGES. 1 A curiously fascinating account of the < method by which President Wilson's re- cent Notes were despatched to the Ger- man Foreign Minister appears in the well-known American technical journal, the' Telegraph and Telephone Age,' which speaks with the voice of high authority. The latest Lusitania Note is cited r.s an example. After Secretary of State Robert Lansing had affixed his signature to it at 12.50 p.m., he handed it to the chief clerk of the State Department, who took it downstairs to the main-floor, where the telegraph and cipher rooms are situ- ated. The pages of the Note, consisting altogether of approximately 1,500 words, were distributed among the cipher clerks, and the work of enciphering it began im- mediately.. Before important Notes, such as this, are placed on the wire, it is the custom generally to prove the' accuracy of the coding by deciphering it and comparing the result with the original. The Lusitania Note was tested in this way, and did not leave the hands of the chief cipher clerk until he had satisfied himself that when decoded by Ambassa- dor Gerard in Berlin it would be identi- cal, word for word, with the Note as the President wrote it. The first page of the Note was coded at 2 p.m., and an operator began to tele- graph it from the State Department to the Commercial Cable Company's office at 20, Broad-street, New York.. At this stage the message was in the form of a stream of Morse dots and dashes, which, the operator in the cable office was busily re-translating and typing into the same coded form in which it existed at Waslington. As the sheets were written up by this man they were handed to the cable operator, who proceeded to prepare ,the message for transmission over the submarine cable, and at this point it took OIl another disguise—a very strange one indeed. It is perhaps generally known that the Morse code of dots and dashes employed on land lines is not suitable for sub- marine cabling,-and that another system, known..as," the continental cable. code, is. In ouder to ensure regularity. and.. ^evenness in the transmitted signals, nearly all messages, instead of being hand-keyed,, are ..sent by an automatic transmitter. The nearest-example to theope.ration of this .machine is an automatic piano- player. As in the latter the musical conir position is disguised in a maze of per- forations in a paper roll, so in the caole transmitter the message exists in the form of a procession of small round holes in a continuous strip of paper. Simultaneously with, the clicking of the automatic, transmitter in the office of the Commercial Cable Company, the signals are received, on a recorder at the distant end of the cable, once again in a different disguise. A paper tape runs through the I,recorder a nd a delicate glass siphon draws a fine ink line on it. When no signals are passing, this line lies in the middle of the, strip, perfectly straight.. WI-icna dot" arrives the siphon I draws a little hiimp above the, line, while 'the if a dash is 6çnt.. the hump is below. Thus the signals in a message are repre- sented by a continuous line of full hills and valleys. Hojielessly unmeaning as this line may appear to the unitiated, the expert cable operator is able to read it al- most as quickly and with as much cer- tainty as if it were ordinary print. It will be interestings in conclusion, to summarise the disguises which the Lusi- tania message assumed at different stages of its journey. The original Note was, of course, in plain English, and in the Presi- dent's handwriting. Then it appeared in coded form, undecipherable, save by aid of the secret key. On its way from the State Department at Washington to the office of the Commercial Cable Company it existed as electrical impulses of the American Morse dot-and-ctfeish code, be- coming audible on the sounder in the cable office. Once more it reverted to its coded form in the typed copy which the operator at the sounder handed to th-t, cable man. In its next shape, the perforated strip, it bad lost the last vestige of meaning to the casual observer. Then, through the cable, once, more it exists as electrical pulsa- tions, becoming visible at the distant end as a wavy line trailing down the middle of a paper slip. The expert receiving operator translates and types this as fasc as the siphon traces out the mysterious symbols, and if one were to compare th" copy he makes it would be found, identical with the coded • me~<-ge which a few minutes ago was being keyed on from "Washington to 20, Broad-street, New York. This is not the end of. it, however. Once more it is turned into electrical form and despatched over other wires and -cables, until, finally, it is taken from tBe very end instrument and typed out for, the last time in its coded form. Now corned "the very difficult and lengthy process of de- coding, performed by the key in the hands of Ambassador Gerard in Berlin. <

IGORSEINON HERO FALLS I

I- GORSEINON HERO FALLS. I News has been re- ceived by his parents at 16, Trinity-street, Gorseinon, of t#e death in the trenches of Private Charlie Footman, of the 6th Welsh. Of him his onicer wrote: "Hè was an excellent sol- dier, a man who led a good life, and, moreover, he set a good example tp others."

I BOYS BIG BRAINI

I BOY'S BIG BRAIN. I An inquest was opened and adjourned at Islington yesterday concerning the death of Arthur Evan Williams, a 15-year- old Boy Scout, of King Henry's Walk, Balls Pond-road, who was found hanging by a rope attached to a hpok in the centre of a trap-door over the landing. John Williams, the boy's father, a dairyman," said he was a careful a jd steady lad, and enjoyed good health, lie was very fond of acting, and witnqstf thought he might have been acting at- the time.. Mis. Williams said her son appeared well and cheerful, and at half-past four, when 'she called him down to tea, he was singing at the top of his voice. He was very fond of reading penny books, but he would also read trade books and books on motors. ■ Medical evidence showed that deceased's brafti weighed 54! ounces. The normal weight in the case of an adult was 49

IMANX BOARDINGHOUSE KEEPERS RUINED

MANX BOARDING-HOUSE KEEPERS RUINED. The utter failure of the Isle of Man I holiday season has disastrously affected the majority of the islanders, who depend upon holiday makers for their livelihood. There is a strong feeling in, the towns and villages that the Manx Government proposal to grant £ 50,000 to be advanced in loans to distressed boarding-house' keepers, will be altogether insufficient to cope with the situation, and a movement is on foot to secure payment of two-thirds of the local rates out of public funds and to obtain a grant from the Imperial Government.

No title

Liverpool, dairymen attribute a decision 'j to increase the price of milk by a penny a I quart to the higher cost of dairy cattle.

SUBMARINE WARFARE I

SUBMARINE WARFARE. I qERMAN CAMPAIGN A FAILURE. Amsterdam, Wednesday.—A remarkably candid appreciation 01 six months of German submarine warfare since Febru- ary appears in the Berliner Tageblatt," from the pen of Captain Persius. After quoting the words of the German pro- clamation declaring the waters round Great Britain and Ireland a war zone, he re-calls the interview granted by Von Tirpitz in November to a representative of the United Press." Von Tirpitz, on that occasion, said: Great Britain wants to starve us; we can play the same game, and torpedo every British or allied ship that approaches English or Scottish ports, and thereby cut off the greater part of Great Britain's imports of foodstuffs." Captain Persius then proceeds to make I a series of statements and admissions about the results of submarine warfare, which are virtually a condemnation of the extravagant expectations of Von Tirpitz. Captain Persius writes:—" It will be remembered that at the beginning of February in Germany high hope was placed on submarine warfare, and many believed' that as the British fleet had cut us off from overseas imports it would not j be difficult now for our submarines toi do the same to Great Britain. Part of. our press, must. unfortunately, be held! responsible for the extravagant expecta- tions which many of the public connoc.ed with submarine war against commerce. In this paper it has often been empha- sised that from an expert estimate of the l efficacy of the submarine, and in view of the number of our submarines, the success and the effect of the new naval warrare could appear only after a considerable time. Again and again we have coun- selled-patience. How necessary this. wast is evident from a simple fact, the con- cealment of which to-day would seem dishon@t¡ that the results of the activity  of our submarines in their war on com- merce are viewed in many circles as,) shall we say, very modest. The curve of our submarine successes has been greatly varied. There have been weeks when hardly one hostile ship has been torpedoed, while in other weeks more than a dozen ships have been de- stroyed. Thus, for the week ending August 4 .it was announced that fix English merchant ships and nine fishing steamers fell victims to the U boats. It was added that the departure and ar- rivals of ships from and at United King- dom ports were 1,435. This figure may be i considered too high, but there can be iaol doubt that, in any case, at least 1,000 ships, within one week have traded with English ports. When we coosider the re- suit of our submarine activity hitherto to he that ten of these 1,000 ships were destroyed many persons will declare themsel ves not satisfied, these being, of course, the persons who, without tech- nical' knowledge, cherished expectations which weie not shared by those who in some degree considered the conditions. No small number of submarines is re- quired to attack 15,000 ships, more or less which within one week entered British ports. According to "Nauticus" in May, 1914, we possessed 28 completed submarines. There is no reason not to accept the figures of this book, which are derived from. official services. Now, many assume that submarines, being so small, can be produced in a very short time. The modern high seas U boat, however, is by no means small. It dis- > places up to a thousand and more tons, and is, therefore, considerably larger than a torpedo boat. It presents a com- bination of the most minute and com- plicated paraphernalia and everything on board has to be set up with the utmost precision in the smallest space, and it is clear that the period for the construc- tion of a boat cannot be quite so short as one could wish. There is no more com- plicated fighting instrument than the U boat, which means that the task of com- manding and managing it is not simple or easily learnt, and that considerable time must elapse before tho commander and crew are familiar with the boat. At the beginning of the war our sub. marines sunk a series of warships and now one hears of almost nothing of the sort.' This is the war some arm- chair sailors talk. There is no better school than war. It is a pity, however, that it is not only we who learn in it. Only a child would accuse the British of being bad mariners. They know how to defend themselves, so they devised many kinds of protective measures. It becomes more and more difficult for U boats to get near hostile ships and launch a torpedo. Almost fabulous skill is required to avoid all the pitfalls, etc, and get away from torpedo destroyers, and, nevertheless, make a successful attack. Service aboard submarines demands the greatest tension ol all the mental and physical forces, apart from the quantity and quality of our first-class material. There is the question of quality of personnel that should be remembered when calculations are made of anticipated success in sub- marine war against commerce. Captain Persius, by way of consolida- tion, concludes by dwelling on the increas- ing number of submarines and trained crews. Everyone, he says, who is not guided by inexpert optimism thinks with satisfaction of the achievements of Ger- man U boats.—Press Association War Special.

LOCAL WEDDINGS

LOCAL WEDDINGS. There was a very large gathering at the English Baptist Chapel, Britonferry, on Wednesday morning. when the marriage took place' between Mr. Lawford Raymond Gower. eldest son of Mr. Lawford Gower, builder, and contractor, and Miss Florrie John, only daughter of Mrs. John, of Maes- y-Coed, Britonferry. The. Eev. B. Powell tpaetor) officiated, assisted by the Rev. Hy. Hughes. The bride, who was given away by her brother. Mr. J. Herbert John, was charmingly attired in a dress of cream crepe de chene, and wore a hat trimmed with orange blossoms and long streamers to match. She also carried a, lovely bouquet of choice flowers. There were two brides- maids. Miss Elsie Gower, sister of the bride- groom, and Miss Olive Davies. cousin of the bride, wh-) were dresaëa in pale blue crepe de chone. with hate to match, trimmed with forget-me-nots. They also carried beautiful boucluets- of flowers. The best man was Lieut. T. J. Edwards, of the South Wales Borderers. After the ceremony a wedding march was played by the organist, Miss Carrie John. A reception followed at the home of the bride's parent at Maes-y-Coed. and later in the day the happy young couple left, amid the good wishes of their many friends, for- the honeymoon at 13ath. A pretty wedding was solemnised at Hen- dre Methodist Chapel, Capel Hendre, (In Tuesday, the contracting parties being Mr. Geo. Holmes, of Swansea, and Mies Sarah Hughes, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Hughes, Troedyrhiw, Hendre. The Rev. T. Francis officiated. The bride, who was given away by her father, was charmingly attired in blue voile, with black picture hat. She was attended by Misa Deborah Hughes, sister, while the duties of best man were carried out by Mr. Daniel Hughes, Maesygelynen, Hendre. After the ceremony, the party partook of breakfast at the bride's home, -and afterwards. the newly-wedded couple left by motor-car for Llanwrtyd Wells.

IGREAT YEAR FOR GROUSE

GREAT YEAR FOR GROUSE. Grouse shooting opened in Scotland to- day, with the moors better stocked than for a generation. The outstanding feature is the total absence of American tenants. Many mode's were shot over solely to supply game to the homes for the wounded. In the Peak District of Derbyshire there were more guna out than was the case a year ago.

r MARKETS v

MARKETS. v BUTTER. Cork, Thursday. First, 125; second, 123; third, 0; fourth, 0; superfine, 0; fine, 0; mild, 0; choice boxes, 0; choice, 0; fresh butter from 135. METAL. London, Thursday Copper: Dull; turnover, 300 tons; 67t to 67í cash, 68, to b8 three months. Tin: Flat; 150^ to 150i cash; 1521 to 153 three months. English Lead, 21i 2 Foreign, 20-1 20i. Spelter: 70 to 60. Middtesbro" Iron: 6ôs. Id. cash, 66s. 6d. month. CORN. Bri&tol, Thursday. No English wheat on offer. Foreign in better demand, millers, owing to bad weather exhibiting more interest in foreign wheats, and last week's prices were fully maintained. Stocks of barley are exhausted, and prices nominal. Maize and oats firm, with hardening ten- dency in prices. MEAT. London, Thursday. Beef: Scotch, long, 6s. to 6s. Sd.; short, 6s 8d. to 7s.; English, sides, 6s. to 6s. 6d.; Irish, 6s. to 66. 4d.; Argentine, hind, 6s. to 6s. 2d.; fore, 4s. lOd. to 5s .241. Mutton: Scotch Wethers, 6s. to 6s. 6d.; Ewes, 5s. to 5s. id.; English, 5s. 8d. to 6s 4d.; Ewes, 4s. 10d. to 5s. 2d.; Dutch Wethers, 5s. 8d. to 6s. 2d.; New Zealand, 4s. 6d. tta 4s. 9d.; Sydney, 4s. Id. to 4s 4d. Lamb remains quiet. Veal steady ,and Pork quiet. CATTLE. Bristol, Thursday. Beef: Short supply; trade steady; best qualities, 100s.; secondary, 93s. Best Downs, 10,1,d.; prime light Wethers, lOJd.j heavy, 9-.Jd.; Ewes, 8d. to Std.; Lamb, lid. to Is .per lb., short supply. Pigs: Baconer6, 14s. 3d. to 14s. 6d.; Porkers, 14s. to 14s. 6d. per soore. Four hundred Store Cattle sold; late rates. Milch cows, t-17 up to £25 each. London, Thursday. Cattle arrivals of both beasts and sbeep, were of a very small extent, and passed- off quietly, prices being largely nominal. Total supplies, 60 beasts, 80 sheep and 5 cows.

HIS WAITING BR10E

HIS WAITING BR10E. Few of the humbler tragedies of jEb* • war are more poignant than one ciated with the loss of the British dte- stroyer Lynx. It is a pitiful little story of a disappointed bride. Arthur Stephens, a handsome and popu- lar young stoker on the Lynrj was en- gaged to a young woman at New Maiden, Surrey. Stephens, whose parents, live at New Maiden, had attended echool boy with the little maid who afterwards: became his sweetheart. The wedding was fixed for last Sattir-, day, at the New Maiden Parish Church; the banns had been called, the carnage were ordered, the girl had received her- bridal dress, and the wedding cake had been delivered at the bride's home. Saturday came, and the marriao, (2 p.m.) drew near. But no bridegrooms came. Stephens was on his ship in the": North Sea, and it was his intention to; get leave and arrive at his home on Saturday morning. Shortly before the time for the ceremony the bride received a telegram dispatched on behalf of her lover. It ran: Expect me any day eoon." Apparently Stephens was unable to get leave of absence on the day intended. But Sunday brought no bridegroom. Monday and Tuesday dawned, and still there was no news of him. On Wednesday morning a table in the waiting girl's home was again arranged for the bridal breakfast. At this table, with the wedding-cake still in its place of honour, and with one of the bridesmaids actually in the house, the waiting girl read in the papers that the Lynx had struck a mine in the North Sea on Mon- day, and was lost. And her lover's name was not in the list of saved.

ABSENT FROM MEETING

ABSENT FROM MEETING. The Carriiarthen Town Council ap. proved of a recommendation by the Watch Committee granting the sergeants and constables of the borough police force a weekly war bonus of 2s., the matter to bet reconsidered in six months' time. Reporting on the water supply of the- town, Mr. J. Finglagh, surveyor, said it. was fairly satisfactory, but it was two million gallons lees than in the corre- sponding period last year. Councillor John Lloyd had given notice of motion rescinding a resolution passed in November changing the days of com- mittee meetings, but this was with- drawn. Councillor David Samuels said the arer- age attendance at the meetings was a good deal smaller of late, for several' councillors, who were members of the Volunteer Training Corps, had to attend; drills when meetings were heid. U should like all the councillors to btt volunteers," he declared.

WELSH COLONY ON A WARSHIP

WELSH COLONY ON A WARSHIP (Passed by Censor). That oar boys in bine" are lias earnest, and anxious for The Day toL, come when they will get another oppor-. tunity of meeting the foe, may be¡ gathered from an extract from a letter; ieent by Leading Seaman. J. J. Williams, a native of Carmarthen. He says: There is nothing doing hera at present. We are still waiting patiently,j for old Tirpitrs crowd to come out, bitt they are rather shy up to date. I daD.Jtl think they have got over ttte sheds; of January 24th yet—the sinking of tho Blucher. Anyway, they are eagerly pected, and they will be sure of a wwjni reception when they do decide to eonei out.» He goes on to say. that they have quite a small Welsh colony aboard his ship. The majority of them come from tM Rhondda district, but a couple of them come from Llanelly, one from Gowwtaa, one from Ystalyfera, one from that Mumbles, and some from Pembrokeshire. They all speak Welsh, so have great times II together in the evenings.

UNKNOWN MANS FATE IN SWAHx SEA DOCK

UNKNOWN MAN'S FATE IN SWAHx SEA DOCK. Up to the time of writing, the Swansea police had not traced the relatives of a man who was pieked up in the North Dock on Thursday morning. The corpse was seen by Mr. Raggatt. lockgate foreman, at 4.30 ajn., and Harbour P.C. Danaher brought it ashore. Discharge papers and union cards bore the name Maurice Murphy, a fireman aged 46, and the late date entered wo August 4th.

THE LADY IN THE BAR

THE "LADY" IN THE BAR. When a woman was charged on Wed- nesday at Willesden with assaulting a man by throwing a glass at him, the bar- man at the publio-house gave the follow- ing version of the incident:— The lady ordered a glaes of beer, and she only meant to throw the refreshment over the gentleman, but she amidentallT--t threw the glass as well."

WELLKNOWN QUAKERS DEATH

WELL-KNOWN QUAKER'S DEATH. The death occurred on Wednesday at Bishop Auckland, of Mr. John Bigland, president of the Bishop Auckland Divi- sion of the Liberal Association for a quarter of a century, and a well-known ,Quaker.

No title

I The sale of the first bale cf the new emt-ê" crop realised £ 210 for the Red Onm Mi Liverpool, on Wednesday. 1,