Collection Title: Cambrian news and Merionethshire standard

Provider: The National Library of Wales

Rights: This resource is copyright of Cambrian News Ltd.

View full details

First Previous Image 5 of 8 Next Last
Full Screen
14 articles on this page
Oo DEATH OF SIR JOHN GIBSON I

-="'r, thai he vould learn his tty ti educate liimf eir. With the htticr mm in view went to all sorts of night schools, attended ela&»es at the Mechanics' Institute, classes at the National Schools, and took advantage of I all attempts on the part of well-intentioned people to teach beys. The result was practically nothing. On the advice of I masters he studied Cobbett's Grammar, Bacons Essay, Milton's "Paradise Lost/' Barnard Smith's arithmetic. Hiley's Grammar with exercises, a Latin grammar, a shilling dictionary, some numbers of the -Cornhill Magazine," jusc hEn started. Those books he bought for a sovereign which he borrowed at the 'ai.- nf five per cent. per annum interest and repaid the capital and interest with the first he earned as a journeyman printer at Leeds. He then felt fairly on the way. He had discovered that his Lancashire dialect was not a strength and the extent and depth of his ignorance frightened him. After leaving the night school lie sat up until two, three, and even until six o'clock on the following morning reading Milton, many pages of which he committed to memory; working arithmetical questions, alwavs dull work to him writing exercises from Hiley's Grammar, learning exercises from Latin Grammar, and writing essays for the night school. He learnt his Latin exercises as he walked to and from the printing office. He read everything he could get hold of. including Pope's Iliad, Shakespeare, Locke's Essays, and the news- papers. With a boy afterward highly- placed in the Indian civil service, he worked at lelining in an empty house in St. Anne's-place, Lancaster. The other boy just walked through Barnard Smith's arithmetic and everything else while ycung Gibson stumbled at every step. He was left so hopelessly behind by the other boy that he became disheartened. In his own estimation he felt that he was a mere mass of disturbed ignorance, from which there seemed no way out. At the night school, however, one of the masters gave the scholars A Railway Station" as the sub- ject of an essay. The task at first appeared simple enough, but by the time he had made half a dozen starts the sim- plicity disappeared and the essay left un- written. He, however, determined to write the essay and started to describe the arrivals and departures at a railway station. There was a marriage party; a young soldier going away an emigrant party business men, etc. When he had go that down he re-wrote the essay, and somewhere about five o'clock in the morn- ing he had finished the essay. The school- master read out the essay and said that if the writer had not copied it from any book it was very creditable to him. That was the first consciousness of any sort of power the young man ever experienced. He knew he had not copied his painfully- constructed essay, and the thought began to stir in him that he might in the long run do something. On a subsequent occasion there was an examination of the pupils for prizes in arithmetic. He felt that it was no use for him to compete, so instead of doing the work for the examina- tion he used his paoer to write an account of "A Great Race," which he handed in with the examination papers. A night or two after, when the results were announced, the master read the narrative and publicly complimented the writer on the vigour of the account. He privately advised the young man that his strength lay in writing and said if he persevered he might become a newspaper writer. He attended that school for three years and at last felt that he had made a start in educating himself. He continued in the school until the. early days of February, 1862, when he was out of his apprentice- ship. During those years he pondered much on religion. He. read, th Bible constantly and thought about God and life and heaven and hell. It seemed to hiru that God was I represented to be a fool, or tyrant, or both. God was preached as being at enmity with. all His creatures and that I hell was their inevitable doom. The voung man's mother was an uncompromis- ing Calvinist: but he could not believe that the world and all its people were lost. A wav out of the terrible destiny did not reveal itself quickly; but he saw that prayer was useless, for he had prayed without avail. The conclusion he reached in those davs was that he would be himself and take like a man whatever consequences arose out of being himself. The way seemed hemmed in before him; but he did not care. He had not made himself and he knew that he honestly and earnestly desired to be much better than he was. and his sense of justice repudiated the idea that he was to tle treated as an offender because he was wronglv constituted. Toward the close of his apprenticeship the Lancashire cotton famine was making itself felt and the outlook was very gloomv. The longest six weeks he ever lived was from Christmas, 1861, until the beginning of February when he went to Leeds as a jobbing printer, in the employ of Mr. Charles Goodall. His intention had alwavs been to go to London, and he only went to Leeds because he got work there in answer to an advertisement of 248 a week with sevenpence an hour overtime. His wages for the first week were 28s. and ninepence or tenpeiice. He never had so much in his life before at one time and went to work the second Monday with something akin to hope in his heart. While at Leeds Mr. Gibson attended Dr Brewer's Chapel CBaptist) and went regu- larly to Sunday School and joined a young men's Christian Association where he read a paper on "The Lights of Life" which did not give satisfaction. At a discussion class he took the side of the Southern States against the. North and was after- ward more or less in favour of the North. That was a lesson to him which he never forgot. From that day forth he never wrote, or spoke, on the side he did not believe in. The consequence was that he often had to be silent; but he was true to himself. It was at the Sunday Scnoot lie made his first speech. He forgot what was the subject, or what was said. All ie knew was that when he stood up he saw a lot of black shoulders and red faces. In the event of his leaving Leeds, he intimated his intention of joining the Independents. About that time he received a letter from a Mr. Wane that tempted and shook him as nothing had tempted or shaken him. He was still trying to educate himself, but found that progress was slow and difficult He longed for a liberal education and felt he was weak because he was ignorant. Mr Wane, whose class he had attended in Lancashire, wrote that he and some friends had decided to enable Mr. Gibson to go to St. Bee's College in Cumberland for three or four years. They would pay all ex- penses and provide him with means to live. All he would have to do in return was to become a Churchman and at the end of the college course become a clergyman. There was the thing he most desired in the world—education—placed within his reach. That night he went to Wodehouse Moor and literally rolled on the ground in agony of mind. To put the thing he had hungered for away from him seemed too cruel and he tried to think of some way of escape. There was none. He returned to his lodgings and wrote the letter which condemned him to ignorance and the life of a printer. Mr. Gibson continued to work at Goodall's until the summer, or autumn, of 1862 when work became scarce and he and others were discharged. He therefore resolved to leave Leeds and make his way to London and ultimately to New- Zealand. After a visit to his home in Lancashire he returned to Leeds and was again engaged, becoming what was known as a casual hand and was admitted a member of the Pointer's Society. Occa- sionallv he worked in the jobbing office of the "Leeds Mercury." He was then known as the tall independent printer and as a man who could work forty-eight hours without rest. A trifling incident determined Mr. Gibson to leave Leeds and to go what printers know as "on the road." He went to Huddersfield, thence by train to Manchester, and then to Warrington by canal boat, afterward reaching Ohester and Wrexham. On the way he passed a oleasant time between Chester 8J.d Wrex- ham, and remembered being quite startled on seeing the name of a Welsh baronet on a cart and realized that he was in Wales. He eventually reached Oswestry and obtained work on the Advertizer," that being the first The Late Sir John Gibson. time he was engaged on actual newspaper work. Though he was engaged for that night's work only, he was offered further work the following week, which he. accepted as affording a good opportunity of learning to become a newspaper composi- tor. He was subsequently told by the foreman that he could remain as long as he liked. At that time Oswestry had only just been connected with the outer world by railways. The line as far as Ellesmere was not finished and the line to Aberystwyth was not finished until some tune after. Life passed pleasantly for some months at Oswestry, where he made the acquaintance of the lady who became his wife. A dis- pute occurring in the office at the end of November, 1864, he. was given notice, but wa,,7, offered the foremanship by Mr. Askew Roberts, the proprietor, which he re- fused. At the expiration of his notice he returned to Lancaster, where he remained until February, 1865. He then walked to Freston. thence to Ormskirk, Liverpool, and Chester, subsequently reaching rex- ham, Oswestry, and Shrewsbury, where he obtained work on the "Chronicle." He next went to Newport in Shropshire, Staf- ford. AVolverhampton Birmingham, and on to 'Worcester through Droitwich. At Worcester lie obtained work on the "Journal," one of the oldest papers in England, then edited by Mr. Joseph Hutton. He was then invited by one of the partners of the Advertiser'' to return to Oswestry and accordingly left Worcester for that town. After the Rev. Thomas Gasquoine had settled as minister of the Congiegational Church, Mr Gibson became a member of the congregation and was asked to go out to neighbouring villages to preach. He compiied with the request and for six or seven years he preached on an average twice every Sunday and sometimes walked twenty miles to and from the chapels. He nlso Preached once in the Primitive Metho- dist Chanel at Oswestry, several times at the Independent Chapel. Aberystwyth, and once in South-place Chapel. London. The Aberyst wyth and London sermons were preached after he went to live in .1heryst- wyth. He never preached the same. ser- mon twice and never wrote HIS sermon ex- cept once, which he read with dismal effects on himself at Carneddi. He used to think and read all the week while at work as a compositor and then write out short head- ings en half a sheet of notepapers. His object in that course was to teach himself to speak. He did not think he was ever popular as a preacher, and yet he was in demand. He was deter mined to instruct himself whether he instructed others or not. He did not believe it was right to accept money for preaching and never would and never did take a farthing, which was a sore point with other preachers. He told a friend that if he gave up printing to attend to a church the church ought to keep him, but that he would not be paid merelv for preaching. He assisted the poorer churches to get out of debt by lecturing. on week nights. He often re- ceived hints that his sermons were not what weie called gospel sermons, and the more he rend and thought the more heterodox his utterances became. He did not aim at saying anything unorthodox, but simply aimed at saying what he thought was right. He went on reading the Bible and pondered about God and Jesus Christ. He answered the questions that presented themselves to him as well as he could and was true to himself, and the truer he was the more wicked and hopeless he became according to orthodox views of religion. He maintained that if any good was to be done to working men it would have to start in providing tliwm with better houses. In 1866 any sort of a hole was thought to be good enough for a working man. He accordingly formu- lated a scheme and, Mr. Minshall finding the money, seven houses for working men were erected at Swan Hill. Gogerddan- cottages at Aberystwyth were built on the same plan which Mr Gibson proponded on going to liv, at. Aberystwyth. He also took interest in the Institute and Cottage Hospital at Oswestry. Whilst he started a series of thirty articles in the "Advertiser" on "working men y. hch created P. great deal of interest It was his first sustained effort at v riting, and he liked the work and obtained sufficient indications of success to encourage him to continue his efforts to (Otain greater skill. About 1868 or 1869, he helped to form a friendly society. On Monday morning, November 30th, 1870, Mr. Gibson started, at the invitation of Mr. Woodall, of The Oswestry Adver- tiser, is traveller for that firm. At that time the "Cambrian News," then called the Merionethshire Standard," was only a paper in name. It was published at Bala and was a reprint of four pages of the "Advertiser." Mr. Woodall had tried. to establish a Liberal newspaper at Aber- ystwyth called the "Aberystwyth Times." It was to be supported by the Liberals and Nonconformists, but they did nothing and money was lost steadily. One. of Mr. Gibson's early tasks was to go over the district of the Merionethshire Standard" and "Aberystwyth Times" and report Oil what he thought was needed to make the amalgamated papers pay as the "Cambrian News." Progress iNia, isljow, but still) something was done and little by little the paper obtained a character of its own, though it was still mainly a reprint of the "Oswestry Advertizer." On the production by the Oswestry firm of a Liberal paper for Shrewsbury, called "The Salopian," Mr. Gibson was engaged to organize it in that town as well as throughout Shropshire. He also wrote a series of articles for the paper over the title of "The Proud Salopian" as well as a weekly article for the Advertizer" and for the News." The "Salopian" was discontinued in 1873, after a loss of two or three thousand pounds had been made, and Mr. Gibson was asked to go to Aberystwyth to organize, manage, and edit the "Cambrian which work he commenced in September of 1873. The progress of the paper was steady and after 1873 its success was assured. That success was not assured, however, without great opposition and one or two libel actions, The then propri,etor deciding to settle one of the actions by apologising, Mr. Gibson required that the issue of the paper which contained the apologv should also contain his resignation. AMien the ipapdr appeared with Mr. Gibson's resignation a procession was organised which went through the streets after dark with the Militia Band and a bier containing an effigv I vv i at its head. This so roused the indigna- tion of Mr. Gibson's staunchest friends that they decided on purchasing the "Oambrian News," of which Mr. Gibson became editor and proprietor. He wrote seven or eight columns of original matter a. week. He also wrote a novel, which he called "Gorwen," publirheq books on "The Principles of Agriculture" and "Women's Emancipation," and contri- buted leading articles to London and pro- vincial daily papers on subjects of national interest. Several years ago he was elected a mem- ber of Aberystwyth Board of Guardians and was placed on the commission of the peace for the borough. His name appeared in the list of knights in the King's new year honours for 1915, on which occasion he received congratulatory mes- sages from hundreds of friends in and out- side the Principality. Sir John Gibson was a lucid, eloquent, and convincing public speaker. On more than one occasion he converted an hostile audience into a friendly one. His nspiring address to Towvn County School some years ago will be long remembered. On the passing of the Local Government Act be held a series of meetings throughout Cardigan- shire explanatory of the provisions of the Act and met with singular success. One I' of his most remarkable utterances was delivered at the Old Assembly Rooms, Aberystwyth, when, on the spur of the moment, he spoke on "Music" immediately after he had been followed up to the meet, ing by a hostilely-demonstrative crowd. He did not believe in indiscriminate charity; but he had a tender spot in his heart for children and for deserving people in distress and illness who were apt to be overlooked by ot,hiers, whom he quietly and effectually assisted and relieved. His advice and counsel were often asked in the solution of difficult problems. The words he once wrote generally might be applied personally to himself—"The man to whom people in trouble and difficulty turn for help has not lived altogether in vain. t; THE FUNERAL. The funeral was fixed for eleven o'clock on Wednesday morning when, in compli- ance with the wish of the deceased, it was decided that no mourning should be worn and that the arrangements should be as simple as possible. There were no wreaths, but flowers were sent by Ata-yn, Jack, Gladys, Dodo, and Boy; the Cambrian New/i" staff and the assistants in the shops and employees in the binding aMI l i.n hine departments, and by the Misses Marie and Helen Garner, Terrace-road. Though the funeral was of a private character, a large number of the towns- people assembled :n North-parade, includ- ing the Mayor (Alderman Edwin Morris), Aldermen C. M. Williams and T. J. Samuel, Councillors David Davies, Rhys Jones, and J. D. Williams; Mr. P. R. Roberts and Mr. Evan Evans, Mr. A. J. I Hughes, town clerk; Mr. W. P. Owen, Mr Dan Jones, solicitor; M4 Peter Jones, J.P., Mr. D. C. Roberts, J.P., Mr. R. Bickerstaff, North-road; A-lderxnan J. M. Howell, J.P., Aberay -on; Mr. Robert Ellis, J.P., Professor T. A. Levi, Dr. Morgan, Mr. David Owen; Great Dark- gate-street; Mrs. King Roberts, fr. A. Waterlow King, J.P., :\b:. David Lloyd, Pengla'se road; the Rev. Henry Evans, Penrhvncoch; Mr. Gordon- Dalies, solici- tor; Mr. J. B. Kitto, L. and P. Bank; Mr. David Thomas, ortli ate House Mr T. E. Owen, county surveyor; Mr. J. W. Brow-u, North-road: Mr. S. Galloway. Mr James Jones, North-parade; Mr. John Davies, Trefeehan; Mr. R. G. Bennett, Mr. R. D. Vaughan, Mr. John Morgan, and Mr. William Joii-e,, Mr John Morgan, Brynymor-terracjS; Ir Rea. Richards, Miss Williams, 28, North«-parade; Miss James. 24, North-parade; Mr. W. R. Hall, acting' editor; Mr. Llew Davies, North Wales representative; Mr. John Griffiths, accountant: Mr Richard Davies, foreman Mr. J. H. Richards, traveller; Mr Arnold Smith, bookbinding department; Mr. J. Ashworth, lithographic department; Mr. Kehler, machinist; Miss Phillips, shops managerist.; Mr J. Lumley Jones, reader; and the other members of the staff number- ing forty. The chief mourners were Mr. John Gibson, son: Mr. and Mrs. Rutter, London; and Mr. and Mrs. Daniel, Deyon- shire, sons-in-law and daughters. At the house, before the cortege pro- ceeded to the Cemetery, a service was con- ducted by the Rev. T. A. Penry, minister of the English Congregational Church, of which Mr. Gibson was once a member and deacon. As the cortege passed through North-parade and Llanbadarn- road blinds were drawn. The Rev. T. A. Penry also conducted the service at the Cemetery and committed the body to its I last restliig-place. L The funeral arrangements were satis- factorily carried out by Mr. David Williams, Prospect-street. During the service at the house the rev. gentleman read the following beautiful lines written by the deceased :— Not only in the darkness Guide Thou my way; Not only when I stumble s Be Thou my stay; But in the noonday sunshine Shed brighter light; And when I walk in sureness Lead me aright. Not only when I ask Thee Stand by my side: Not only when I seek Tllee Near me abide. But when I see no danger Protect me still; And when I wander from Thee I Shield me from ill. Not only in my blindness Watch how I trend, Not only when in sorrow I Be Thou my friend; But when I walk earth proudly Touch Thou my eves. i And in Thy own way lead me And make me wise. j Not only now but always May I be thine; Not only here but elsewhere. Great God be mine; But if my will grows wayward Still bring me in; And though my faith be clouded Count it not sin. IN MEMORIAM. Up life's steep ladder did he elimh With firm and steady tread; Now bow we to a will divine, For strong Sir Gibson's dead. Swerving not to left or right, Scanning each weary road, He trod the way of trutfj alight. Easing. the heavy load. Tiny children knew their friend: Had sympathy complete. Walking old haunts up and down, Where God and nature meet. How many sturdy climbers. Somehow let go their hold, And sinking into 'blivion Are with the mass enrolled. His personality—so strong. Will long remembered be: And how he wrote of death. And life's- Eternity. AWEL.

NOTES FROM LiBERA YRON

NOTES FROM LiBER- A YRON. 8tH JOHN; GIBSON. A FRIEiND'S TRIBUTE1.. c. He was my friend- Faithful and true to me— But Brutus says he was ambitious And Brutus is an honourable man." The words serve to indicate the diversity of opinion that must always be expressed when Sir John Gibson's life and tvtark come under review. I shall leave dates and figures to Jte dealt with by others. They belon g to time. At this dour moment I can only deal with impressions and they belong to eternity. About forty years ago the nefivspape? called the Oswestry Advertizer" and the ( "Cambrian were the only local Liberal weekly newspapers that j-eached these parts cf the country. For some time, with the craze of the scribe who has been a familiar figure in every Welsh village. I used to send news paragraphs to the "Cambrian News," chiefly of the doings at Good Templar Lodges. Good Templarism was then on the crest of its fame an(d usefulness. And in those days Mr. Gibson, who represented the newspaper as district editor and had taken up his residence at Aberystwyth, came to Abcrayron and waited upon me with singular grace and deference. His message was to ask me to name my price for the work I was already doing; and he would not accept a refusal. Be it known that in those days it was a distinction which satisfied youthful' ambition to have one's literary effusions printed in any newspaper of repute, with the stationery and stamps provided by the writer. I named my terms. They were accepted. And that relationship and others that followed remained till the end; The sensation of the tender grace" of that one act will never come back to me. There are only two or three of such like everlasting experiences in a long life. Later there was a law suit. He was sued for libelling a friend of some work- house inmate. He was now the owner of the Cambrian Xews," but bearing heavy liabilities. The law charges connected with that law suit were supposed to amount to J3400 or £500. Without consulting anyone. I wrote to the late Mr. David Davies of Llandiman to enquire whether it was not the right thing to present Mr. Gibson with a testi- monial in the form of a sum of money equal to the amount of costs. The reply was "Certainly; I wil] give £1GO, or more, if necessary." WTien I had secured promises of nearly £300 I wrote to Mr. Gibson to say what I was doing. He replied, "I will not accept a single penny." After that there was another law case in which he sued a Welsh newspaper for damages for defamation. He was awarded a sum of JE50 by a jury, and Mr. Justice Field gave him costs. He divided the JB50 in equal shares between the witnesses he had summonsed and) he sent with the cheques his apologies for keeping them away from their business. These are samples of the manf Then to know him. and Mrs Gibson and the children, in those Arcadian days when they lived in a house in Chalybeate-street, and to find out what a host and hostess they were to a boy are necessary ex- perience to appraise the character of the deceased Knight. Through what entanglements he fought since: How deep were the wounds and what poison was on the barbs it is not for me to enquire; but simply to testify that he was courageous to a fault. He dealt hard blows, not at the man, but a.t what the man was. Never was there so impersonal a. foe. To the prude and prig and puritan he was merciless; but it was the affectation and the conceit and the pretence which he slew. Men unable to understand the elevation of his mind had to try to find out some discreditable motive for the vehemence and pertinacity of his onslaughts. He had all the daring and all the chivalry of the bucaneer. He went out like the knights of old in solitary fashion. He slew the giants Despair, Ignorance, Prejudice, Monopoly, Tyranny, and he left their carcasses on the roadside, never deeming it anything to boast of. There was always so much to be done that what had bee

Cardiganshire Recruits

Cardiganshire Recruits. List of recruits secured by Major L. J. Mathias. staff recruiting officer for Cardi- g,in,sliire Peter Ellis Talybont, R.F.A. John Rowlands, Whitchurch. R.F.A. John G. Richards, Aberystwyth. R.F.A. Albert Chamberlain, Aberystwyth. R.F.A. Thomas J. Green, Goginan. R.F.A. Thomas Morgan, Goginan. R.F.A. Albert E. Jenkins, Aberystwyth. W.R. T. Thomas, Aberporth, Pem. Yeomanry. Tom Kane, Blaenporth. 3rd Welsh. John Booth, Lampeter. 16th R.W.F. John E Jones, Aberystvrvth. 14th R.W.F. F. Longscn, Stockport. R..F.A. J. H. Aisthorpe, Stockport, R.F.A. E. Harrop, Hadfield, R.F.A. J. J. A. Joues, Lampeter. A.S.C. R. Gregory, Aberystwyth. R.F.A. D O Jones, Aberystwyth, A.S.C. D. A. Hughes. Lampeter. 9th W.R. e. F. Hyett, Llangranog, Ri.F.C. D. M. Owens. Aberystwyth, R.E. Richard Headon, Aberystwyth, R.F.A. R. J. Parry, Lampeter, S.W.B. J. B. Jones, Newcastle Emlyn. R.A.M.C. Evan Adams, Newcastle Emlyn. A.S.C. David Adams, Newcastle Emlyn, A,S.C'. William Griffiths, Newcastle Emlyn, A.S.C. O. J. E. Powell. Aberystwyth, A.S.C. Ivor Ellis. Aberystwyth, A.S.C. William Norton, Cardigan. R.F.A. J. H. -Niui-torA. Aberystwyth, A.S.C.

LAMPETER

LAMPETER" Double Wedding. -A double wedding took place at St. Peter's Church on Tues- day morning between Mr. David Evans, cabinet maker, College-street, and Miss Ellinor Thomas, Artliog; the other party being Mr. Samuel Evans, signalman, G.W.R., and Miss Mary Evans, house- keeper at the Vicarage. The bridegrooms were attended by their brothers and the two- brides acted in the capacity of brides- maid to each other. The marriage cere- mony was performed by the Rev. Canon Camber Williams, assisted by the Rev. D. D. Evans, Werndriw. The church was full and the bridal couples received hearty con- gratulations. The Rev. W. Ll. Footman, (allege School, gave away Miss Thomas, and Alderman E. Evans gave away his sister, Miss Mary Evans. The happy couples went to Llanwrtyd for their honeymoon. Promotion.—Mr. J. T. James, who is with the 16th Battalion R.W.F. at Llan- dudno, has. been promoted full corporal.

BANKRUPTCY EXAMINATION

BANKRUPTCY EXAMINATION. At the Bankruptcy Court, at Carmarthen at-, TuesdaJí; Daniel Watkins,, sc^lic'^or^ and. magistrates' clerk Lampeter, came up for his adjourned examination. His gross liabilities were put at 23,507, and his deficiency £ 2,183. Mr. W. P. Oweil, Aber_ ystwyth, appeared for debtor, who attri- buted his failure to Stock Exchange specu- lation, and Mr. T. Howell Davies, Carmar- then, and Captain and Mrs. David Evans, Lampeter, creditors. Replying to the Official Receiver (Mr. H. W. Thomas), debtor said he had no record of his dealings on the Stock Exchange. He admitted having paid into his general banking account cheques received in respect of various clients., which he was still answer- able for. In 1898 he was appointed co- trustee with Howell Howell, jun., of Pont- garreg, Carmarthen, of the Howell Howell Trust, and an account was opened in their joint names in the National Provincial Bank on October 24th, 1898. Under the will of. Howell Howell tl,600 was to be set aside for his daughter, Hannah Jane Evans. and her children after her. Was that fund set aside?—I cannot say. It was before my time. There was JE800 stock in the London and North-Western Railway, which represented Ll,200, and there was another J3100 outside that stock. He did not take any interest at the time in what, he had been appointed trustee of. Proceedings were taken against him and an order was made on Febraury 15th direct- ing the necesarv inquiries of accounts. Has anything been done under that ord,pi- "-No- What was left at the bank as security was this-London and North-Western Rail- way stock and the houses in Williams'- eourt, Carmarthen. As a matter of fact, there was rather a big margin, because, to meet the overdraft of about £ 670 on Mr. Howell's private account there would be securities of about £ 1,700. You would not want all that. At any rate, you arranged a loan of L670 from Mr Jenkins of Lampeter :-Yes.-Further questioned, debtor said the stock certificates held by Mr Jenkins for his £ 670 was sold hy Mr. Jenkins for more than £ 800 to the bank. The balance, after ded.ioting the t670, was naid: into Mr. Howell's account at the bank at Lampeter. You appreciate your position in regard to this, that you were co-trustee with Mr Howell and that you partook with him in using this trust estate in a manner in which it should not be used?—Of course. Under Mr Howell's will the farms of Pantvrefail and Pengraig were to be held in trust for his son, William Archibald Howell, for his life, and afterwards to his children., William Archibald Howell died in the lifetime of the testator. With re- gard to Pantyrefail, there, was a mortgage given on Jhe farm on December f-th, 1910, to Captain David Evans and his wife, of Lampeter, for RRX. You issued that mortgage ?—Yes. You were acting as solicitor for the people lending the money; you also acted as solici. tor for the borrower and, further than that, yen are also as trustee in reality one of the borrowers. So, knowing your posi- tion as- a trustee, you got these people to advance this £ 8C0 and you did not disclose your position, though you were acting as solicitor for them?—I Thought the men y could be paid for without anyone knowing. But what was the idea of your not dis- closing yourself as a trustee ?-Real] v, I have no clear explanation at present. You had no definite object in view, had I.YOU;[ I have been thinking over it, but I do not recollect what influenced me at the time. Debtor said that he himself received the RSM from Captain Efvans in J35 notes on November 25th, 1910, and the money wenc to buy shares. Then you knew that you were doing what you ought not to do?—Certainly. Arid you know that the result of that transaction has been that Captain Evans has lost his money?—That is so. With regard to Pengraig Farm, there is a.mortgage dated September 6th. 1911, for £ 1,000 to Thomas Price. That was also drawn up by you and you acted on behalf of Howell and Price Yes. Why did you not join as a partv?—Well, having started the other way in the fiist mortgage we had to continue. Yoll also say in that deed that the £1,000 was required to make advances to the bene, ftciaries under the will and 'n anticipation of the future sale of the estate among the beneficiaries. You knew that wrórg? —I did. That £ 1,000 was also paid to you in C5 notes on September 6th, 1911?—Yes. What was done with that money 3 That was partly jp shares and to repay a loan of £ 250 which I had from Miss Herbert, Col- lege-street, Lampeter. By Mr. W. P. Owen—I am perfectly satisfied in my own mind that not a penny went to my own pockets. The Official Receiver then questioned debtor as to the signature on the £ 1,000 mortgage. Debtor admitted it was not the signature of Howell Howell, but that it was written by him with Howell Howell's authority and subsequent knowledge, as the latter did not turn up. Questioned by Mr. T. Howell Davies, debtor said that Captain and Mrs Evans. of Lampeter, had at the time implicit mix, fidence in him. When you knew tha- Mr. Howell had deposited trust security to cover his mm account, did you take any steps to inform the bank r—No, he represented them as his own. So you knew when you went to Captain Evans the financial position of Mr. Howell Howell?—Yes. Captain Evans was a retired sea eaptain, and in consequence of the loss he has suffered he has had to go back to sea ?— I cannot say that. ) So the recital in the mortgage was un- true to you own knowledge?—That is so. I Debtor said he invested the L-8W in shares in the Enterprise Gold Mining Com- pany. They turned out very badly. Mr. W. P. Owen—In all these transac- tions have you put a penny piece into your own pocket —Not a penny. I have spent my own and my wife's money in trying to make up the deficit.- You started your unfortunate state of affairs in order to put your dead friend right ?—Yes. I never had anything to do with stocks before that. Debtor added that he never received anything as costs from the estate or from Mr Howell Howell. The examination was closed subject to the debtor supplying his deficiency account. j

fBLAENAU FESTINIOG

f BLAENAU FESTINIOG Accident.—Mr. R. Owen Jones, the county coroner, accompanied by Ins son and Inspector Stephen Owen, whilst motoring from Blaenau Festiniog to hold an inquest at Penrhyndeudj-aeth on Tues- day evening, collided wit>» anotbei motor car coming in the opposite direction round a sharp corner near Tanybwleh. The occu- pants were thrown out on the road. The j Coroner was severely hurt, and had to be taken home without holding the inquest French Flag Day.- The lowng Women's Christian Association realised over for the French Red Cross Society by means of the_sale of miniature banners. Five Days a Week.—Work of five days a week insteftd of four days was commenced last week at Maenofferen Quarry. An Old Inhabitant.—The funeral took place on Friday of Mr. Owen Williams, Tyddyn Gwyn Mawr, Cwm Cvnfal, an old inhabitant, who passed away at the age of seventy-four years. Obituary. Ihe death took nlac* oil Monday after a Jong ilines.s of Miss Martha C. Hug lies, daughter of Mrs. Hughes. Tan- [ygraig, and sister of Mrs. Jonathan Davjes. Portmadoc, and Mr. R. () Hughes chemist, Blaenau Festiniog. "She ^wa» forty years of nge. Graduates.—Miss May Catherine Evans. Mount Pleasant, and Miss Gwaldys Ml Arthur, Bryn Eirian, hav taken the B. A. degree of the University of Wales. They studied at Bangor College. Sad Death.—The death took place on- Saturday at the age of twentv-nine years, after a lingering illness, of' Miss Uwen, daughter of Captain and Mrs. Owen, Post Office, Rhhv. and sister of Dr. Owen, Shrewsbury. Hojtjs Hospfta: Reserve.—The following. members of the Blaenau Festiniog division of St. John Ambulance Brigade left Blaenau I estmiog on Monday to do dutv with the Hospital Reserve at the Miltbank Military Hospital, London:- Corporals Llewelyn Jones, Thomas H. Williams, Lance-Corporal' R. Gwilym Jones, Privates Thomas H. Jones, W. R, Hughes, K,vid F?P V> rGTeV R Williams; David Elans, R. G. J ones. Lewis Jones Ivor Jones, and Hugh P. Roberts. There are now eighty-six members of the division serving in military- hospitals.

LLANGEITHO

LLANGEITHO. Success. Mr, J. J. Ashton Jones, Wynde, wen, has obtained his degree of B.Sc. of the Welsh University. He is at present attached to- the Remount Depot of the A.S.O. at Ormskirk w ca shire. Vis'tors.—The friends of Mr. Evan Stedman Davies, of, Oaerllugest, second- lieutenant m the 11th S.W.B Colwvn Bay, and of Mr. John Davies, Lone Hou.se Il«nriPTate''in the, 15th Londo" Llandudno, were glad to see them and fit-1.1* bnei:vi3lt home lo°king so well

TALSARNAU

TALSARNAU. Schoolboy's Ca!Jantry._A number of children were bathing in the estuary be tween inys Gifftan and PenmounWhen one boy got out of his depth. His nlav bv John 1 l'nes"tor he]V heard 'll Llewelyn, son of Mr J J ifcaSvea?-'hoolm £ ster'' ^lsarnau, aged i i™r ;i, He spot and aimed on the scene a^ the boy YoTn" Thoma SUi"foi,.the th^ time. J h** ,?a>' "•'thout divesting himself of his clothes, plunged.in and afL a h £ uggle succeeded in getting the drowr? ing youngster safeJv ashore It ;e [ j thnt young Thomas' gaTaftrv Jut Society^ IO "0tiC" R«^' H«ma £

PWLLHELI

PWLLHELI. 'r0,PTn-C^l Walter Roberts son of Mr. and Mrs.. CWneliu* RoWfe Eurwyn Iiobyne Owen SOn of i (Territorial™, R W F^°"d 6th Curacy. The Rer. W K Owen, M.A., Caegwenllian, Pfflltrefelin. has been T- £ Pl Abroad.—A large number of ^rvire abroad S « through Abererch and the town last week Br^n &nTr",mand °f Officer R. Troops.—There is mueh complaint over the removal of all the teoopa billeted £ thetowntobiHets-at South Beach and T ai?? at a ^>eciaJ meeting of Town Council on Friday a deputation was appointed to make to military authorities Charge ^a,nst Soldiers—At a sneeial AM Ursiav More J- Jones, Alderman Maurice Jones and Dr. R S*?8' 1 8oldiers Merthyr Tydv ll Patrick Morns and Laurence Cot- ter attached to the R.F.A., quartered at PwUheh. were charged, with having broken into the office of the Gimblet Sett Quarry on a Saturday night. Morris had been before the Bench m the preceding week on the same charge and stood remanded.— Evidence was given that the office bad been broken into and that a number of health insurance stamps were missing Defendants gave an emphatic denial to the charge and said they had picked up the stamps on the sands.—The Bench dis- missed the charge.

PORTMADOC

PORTMADOC. For the Dardanelles.-Dr. Arvor Jones, who is with the R.A.M.C., has left for tOO Dardanelles. Promotion.- Private W. G. Humphreys, nephew of R. o Fadog, who is in the R.W.F., has been promoted signaller. Personal.—-Mr. John Evans, brother of Alderman W. P. Evans, J.P., Blaenau Festiniog and of Mr. Evan Kv ins, Man- afon, Pentrefelin, who has been 'n China for twenty-five years as the representative of a large shipbuilding company, is home. on six months furlough. Troops. — Some hundreds of the troops billeted at Portmadoc. Criccieth. and PwU- heli left on Tuesday for South of England- to form part of a reserve brigade of the. Welsh R.F.A. Concert for Troops.—A concert for. troops Was held on Tuesday night at the- Town Hall. Lieut. Sorrell was announced to preside and the following to take part—- Messrs. Billy Wardle and Moses Jenkms" Messrs. Calfagan and Kerry, Messrs. Tom Davies and W. W. Leach, the Welsh G Party, and Mr. F. E. Young's party, with Messrs. J. Griffiths and R. E. Jones as accompanists. y.. Personal.—T»Ir. Victor Williams, son-of Ehedydd Eifion, who is in the navy, has successfully undergone a surgical opera- tion. Organist.—Mr. Cartwright, organist of St. John's Church, has resigned and Miss JLizzie H. Humphreys, organist at Tre-< madoc Cliurch, has been appointed to the. vauenvT.

South Wales Strike Settled

South Wales Strike Settled. A settlement of the South Wales coal- field strike was effected on Tuesday between the representatives of the Government and the Executive Council of the South Wales Miners' Federation. Mr. Lloyd George, M.P. (the Minister of Munitions), Mr. Walter R-unciman, M.P. (president of the Board of Trade), and Mr Arthur Henderson, M.P. (president of the Board of Education)., met the works- men's representatives, and subsequently the coalowners, with the result that an agreement was reached. Broadly speaking, the n.ew terms of settlement concede vo the workmen their most important demands. They have secured a new standard fifty per cent, above the old 5s a day for surfacemen; a minimum of ten per cent above the new standard rate, but no equivalent selling price; six turns for five for afternoon and night shifts; equal payments for night and day haulers; a clause dealing with non-Unionists a period o\-er which the new agreement is to run—for six months after the war, but not for three years from the date of signing. There was a coalfield delegate conference at Cardiff on Wednesday, morning to receive and ratify the terms, and it was confidently expected that work at the pits would be in full swing at night, (

EDITORIAL NOTES

Efforts are being made to secure the holding of the High Moveable Conference of Rechabites in Aberystwyth in August of 1917. Mr. Lloyd George is making himself in- dispensable. On Saturday he gained the approval of Mrs. Pankhurst at a women's Patriotic demonstration. Oil Monday night he visted Cardiff to settle the coal strike. He has done it. It is reported that the price of coal is to be further increased a.t Aberystwyth. The question naturally arises why coal should cost more in Aberystwyth than in other places in the district ? Unfortunately, the Bill regulating coal prices is not in- teilcleel to apply to middlemen. A The death occurred early on Saturday horning of Sir John Gibson, Aberystwyth, Proprietor and editor of the. ClIllhrian who received a knighthood on New Year's Day. An epitome of his strenuous life and remarkable career appeals in Another part of the paper. •K -K* Tire national register is to be made on Sunday, August 15th. Local authorities have begun preparing for the work of com- pilation and voluntary helpers will be wel- comed. The officials of local authorities lose their usual holidays in August. fio'iday-makers will have to fill in the forms in the districts where they will be Staying at the time. An advertisement published in another Part the paper by the Farm Produce ^ihu..itire for South Wales impresses on farmers the duty of offering immediately ■ to the War Office all the bay they can P°s%ibly spare of the new crop. Thev are expected to do so without remuneration. it is now possihle- for farmers to deal direct with the War Office, it will be foolish, and unpatriotic to attempt to other- ^•e dispose of their spare hny. I Portmadoc sewerage scheme has been )rpedoed by the) Local Government Board. he Urban Council, in view of the Local government Board's circular discouraging Improvements at present, wrote asking the I'd whether they would sanction a loan for a schlame -costing less than' half the Estimated cost of the ambitious scheme abandoned four years ago. The Board Without enquiring whether the scheme was urgently wanted, or not, replied "No; will not sanction' it at present." Doubt- f'ss the scheme will be officially described a hung up; but judging from the silence of the members of the Urban Council and e equanimity with which the refusal has 1l received we cannot but think that the scheme is as dead as the proverbial nail.

MACHYNLLETH

MACHYNLLETH t Presentation.—On Monday evening, at he Vane Hall, an interesting presentation J1,as made on behalf of tne associates and ^ftibers of the Girls Friendly Society to Helen Gillart, Maengwyu, on the of her marriage which takes place Tuesday next to Captain and Adjutant Jones-Evans, 2/7th R.W.F. Miss 'i'e, The Rectory, presided over a large tjlendance of members and Miss Blodwen J^mphreys, in a few appropriate words, j £ esented Miss Gillart, on behalf of the with a beautiful luncheon tray servers. Miss Gillart suitably re. The Misses Blodwen Humpnreys Nellie Evans acted as secretary and 'Usurer of the Presentation Committee. pUlpit.—On Sunday the pulpit at Maen- (C.M.) Chapel was occupied by Dr. ynddylan Jones and his forcible sermons e,'e much appreciated bv the large con- jugations. Visitors. -There are now several visitors the town and large numbers also visit J16 town dailv. So fai owing to the low I ate of the river—few fishermen have come f.(' the hotels, but the few who have been b 11 the river after the recent rains have excellent sport. OF GUARDIANS, Wednesday, July Ptesent: Mr Richard Hughe. pre- ying Mrs Mury Thomas, Messrs. Richard Gillart, Edward Jones, Machyn- •leih Mrs M. Jones, Messrs, Meyriuk Robert?, Towyn John Evans, Uobtugwyn J/illiam .Joues, Aberdovey K'lward J^URhes, Mathafarn; M. K Francis, Ciiumes- ^ychan Richard .lones, Darowen; John ?«rry, Penrhyn Lewis Lewis, Giaspwl! Lewis R. Williams, Penegoes; Thomas enkins, Talbontdraen; W. P. Rowlands, R Jones, assistant clerk; fphn Jones, master. Gi nbecessary \V0rkh0u9e.—Mr Richard ih 1 said the decrease in the uuniber of 4?^ates from twenty-two to thirteen made ^Peremptory to do something drastic in the of reducing expenses. To keep a large tf for the small number of inmates was fateful to a degree and the sooner the better "e Board considered the matter in all its ijj&ects They could not continue to go on t that "way much longer. Some savings had effected at certain points, but it was Vsted in other directions. Other Umons er,? considering the advisability of amalga- Of\lion and the figures showed the necessity bh-lachynllcth following their example. The Itb ent condition was nothing more or lees a Wft>te of money. He proposed that V>^«nunications showed be opene'i with Mr •Q Edwards, clerk to the Llailtyllin Union, \ener of the conference stating their W*hngaeas to participate in a conference. matter had been before the Board on and should now ttbe proceeded with to a settlement. Mr (|dwaid Hughes seconded the pro itIOU which was agreed. ^Ai. COUNCIL. Mi. Edward Hughes pre- iag. Fairs. V^chynlleth Urban Council intimated appointed representatives tuaco with e Rural Council in the matter of fair*. I Means of Peace.. ife. sygarreg Parish Council wtote asking the Council to allow the^ gale at the to the new bridge at Glaspwll to re- as it was a public convenience and a •

THE WAR

THE WAR. 'CANADA AND HER woi NDED SOLDIERS. lh Militia orders at Ottawa show the t'^ner in which it is proposed to provide tv Wounded Canadians returning to the L^inion from the front. A medical t will examine all officers, warrant and officers and men m- S hj ^d to Canada on disembarkation. Any h;?11 unable to travel will be sent to hos- also If their disability is found to be n'lianent they are to be retired in order tli^y may he placed, oiv pension forth- K'11!. If, however, the disability is not 'Hianent thev will continue to draw the of their rank through the divisional 'VllKixter, and when discharged from the • fe ^Pital will be paid up to the date the judges they will be fit to retuin to OQ6'1 ciyil occupations. Those arriving in ^^ada only slightly incapacitated and !\t¡alla only slightly incapacitated and Vtin to continue the journey to their homes bs discharged and paid to the date ak-v° which the Board judges their dis- k 'hty win last, provided they do not think tk "u last three months. If they judge L tk6 ^isabilitv to last three months or more, K months pay and allowance will be P ^n^d; the man will be sent to his home, the case reported as one for pension to Ou ea^ with bv the Pension Board at a^a. Pay of rank, at war rates, and