Collection Title: Carmarthen weekly reporter

Provider: The National Library of Wales

Rights: The copyright status or ownership of this resource is unknown.

View full details

First Previous Image 3 of 4 Next Last
Full Screen
20 articles on this page
By the Way

By the Way. A BUt is being promoted to prevent the sale of "raw whiskey." So long as they get their whiskey, consumers don't -mind if it is boiled. A "string" of 24 cart horses was sold by private contract in this neighbourhood lately for £ 2,000—an average of JE83 6s 6d each. v *• President Wilson says that America is "too proud to fight." We all know the type; but we never heard such a beautiful name applied to it before. Thirty four serious, fires have occurred since September in the Government factories. And there are people who think that the "spy scare is all nonsense. There are now four kinds of Guards in the British Army—English Guards, Scottish Guards, Irish Guards, and Welsh Guards. The German Army consists largely of another species- blackguards. "it- Mr F. J. Finglah, Borough Surveyor, was present at the meeting of the Carmarthen Town Council on Tuesday for the first time after his long illness. All present were pleased to see him in his old place. At the meeting of the Town Council on Tuesday, Mr David Samuel proposed "three barley corns" as a nominal rent. At the rate at which corn is rising, this might prove to be a very substantial rent. £85 to £95 was paid at the Dalis fair, Lampeter, on the 6th inst. for cart horses. A few even fetched JE97. It is a significant fact that there were numerous German buyers at the fair last May. The reason of the Government's decision to prohibit the export of coal does not seem to be properly understood. Welsh coal has been sent to Italy, whence it found 'its way into Germany. This is the real reason of the high price. The Germans will give any price for i,t, There was a little hit of an anti-German riot at Carmarthen on Tuesday. A local resident who is believed to be of German ex- traction got badly mauled in consequence of some remarks alleged to have been made about "French's contemptible little Army." **• There is a good deal of talk as to what America will do in regard to the sinking of the Lusitania. America, it may be confidently prophesied, will do nothing. America can do nothing. The United States has an army of 30,000 men. This would not last more than a day at the rate this war is going. • When troops are being billeted, the phrase is often used that the "King pays the bill." It is much to be feared that the fact that certain landladies can't get their bills settled will give this phrase an unpleasant signifi- cance. It is a igreat pity to see the King held up as one who "bilks the landlady." *«• A Queenstown jury lias returned a verdict of wilful murder against the Kaiser. This is a more practical step than it appears. If he should fall into the hands of the British at some time or other, it might prevent him being regarded as a prisoner of war. He is merely a convicted felon, who has so far escaped justice. A fire broke out on Friday afternoon at the Cottage, Tanerdy, occupied by Mrs Elizabeth Jones. The police and the fire brigade were promptly on the spot, and succeeded in ex- tinguishing the flames before any serious damage was done. It is believed that the thatched roof was set on fire by a passing traction engine. • The lessons of all the shipping disasters— whether due to natural causes or piracy—is that the boats in three cases out of four are useless. In one case which occurred a couple of months ago, the boats all proved useless. In the face of all the disasters which do take place, the carrying of boats is still regarded as a matter of form. ft** Coun. T. Diavies, Guildhall square, met with rather a serious accident on Friday in his pharmacy. He was engaged in handling some acids when some of the liquid bespattered his face. At first it was feared that his eye was damaged but now it is hopeu that he will be nothing the worse of the accident permanently There have been several' statements made lately as to the "munition factory at Burry Port." That is near enough to distinguish it from munition factories in Scotland or the Isle of Man. But if any German aviators drop bombs on Buriry Port on the off chance of hitting a. munition factory they will waste their bombs. The death of Mr Wm. Jones, M.P., will cause a pang of regret to everybody who ever heard him. The "Punch" writer who said "Oh William Jones! Oh William Jones! I much admire your silvery tones" expressed a pretty general sentiment. Amidst all the wave of mourning now so prevalent, many will feel special sorrow that those silvery tones will be heard no more on earth. •*» Commisioner Higgins on Monday evening told a story of a Salvation Army captain, who was always being told "Why don't you go and work?" So when the Citadel wanted paint- ing he started on the job. Two workmen passed along. "Look Bill," said one "there's that Salvation Army captain doing a poor fellow out of a job." The moral is obvious. Italy is on the brink of war. Italy has been on the brink for the last nine months, and Italy is likely to remain on the brink until the war is over. Italy does not mind a hit being on the brink; but Italy does not in- tend to go any further. Now that the German bands have all been cleared out of England and France, the Italian organ- grinders monopolise the street music business and they do not intend to lose their chance. ••• A good story is told of the May-or of Llan- elly (Sir Stafford Howard). The other day while driving in a inral part of Carmarthen- shire he overtook a fanner who was plodding along painfully, and good-humouredly gave gave him a. "lift." On reaching his destina- tion the farmer, by way of showing his grati- tude, handed the Mayor threepence "for a drop of whiskey." The Mayor accepted the money, which he gave to his chauffeur, and it was some days later before the farmer dis- covered whom he had "tipped." **♦ There has been a good deal of discussion over the "flash" or black patch worn by the Welsh Fusiliers at the back of the tunic. It has the same origin as the deep collar worn by blue-jackets. Soldiers and sailors used to wear their hair in plaited pigtails which were dressed with a mixture of flour and grease. Special measures were necessary to protect the uniform. In the same way the "an¡- macassar" was invented to protect our chairs against the macassar oil which was used on the hair. Men have dropped these affecta- tions because they no longer have any hair to grease or oil.

Charges Against Carmarthen Lodgiog House Keeper

Charges Against Carmarthen Lodgiog House Keeper. BENCH RECOMMEND WITH it A W A L OF LICENSE. At the Carmarthen Borough Police Court on Monday before the Mayor (Mr J. Lewis), Mr J. B. Arthur, Mr H. Howell, Mr D. Lewis and Mr T. Bland Diavies. Mary Hawker, the licensee of a registered lodging house in Mill street, was charged with a breach of the bye-laws relating to the separation of the sexes. Head Constable Mayall said that he had considered seriously whether he ought not to charge the defendant with a more serious offence. P.O. Lllewelyn said that about 10 minutes after midnight on the morning of the 16th inst. he visited, the defendants lodging house in company with P.O. Morgan. In one room he found Lewis Griffiths, a gunner of the R.G.A., Elizabeth Jones, a native of Neath, William Phillips a native of Carmarthen, and George Wallace, a native of London. In another room were D. J. Banfield, of Station road, Lliangennech, Mary Anne Williams a natirve of Carmarthen, Samuel Reedor and a woman supposed to be his wife. An Airedale terried also shared one of the beds. Some conversation took place in the course of which Mary Anne Williams made charges against Elizabeth Jones, and said that it was her con- duct which caused the trouble. P.C. Morgan gave corroborative evidence. Mr T. Evans, clerk to Mr H. B. White, proved that the house was registered for eight males only. The Bench fined the defendant £3 with the alternative of 28 days imprisonment—and also recommended that the license of the house be withdrawn.

The Question of Health

The Question of Health The question of health is a matter which i* mre to concern us at one time or another when Influenza is so prevalent as it if just now, so it is wcJl to know what to ta.&e tc ward off an attack of this unfit weakening disease, this epidemic catarrh or cold of an aggravating kind, to combat it whilst under its baneful influence, and particularly at to? an attack, for then the system is so lowered as to be liable to the most dangeroua of com- plaints. Gwilym Evans' Quinine Bitters is acknowledged by all who have given it a fair trial to be the best. specific remedy dealinc with Influenza in all its various stages, beina a Preparation skilfully prepared with Quinine and accompanied with other blood purifying and enriching agents, suitable for the liver, digestion, and all those ailments requiring tonic strengthening and nerve increasing properties. It is invaluable for those suffer, ing from colds, pneumonia, or any serious ill ness, or prostration caused by sleeplessness, or worry of any kind, when the body has a general feeling of weakness or lassitude. Send for a copy of the pamphlet of testi- monials, which carefully read and consider well, then buy a bottle (sold in two sizes, 2a 9d and 4s 6d) at yout nearest Chemist or Stores, but when purchasing see that the name "Gwilym Evans" is on the label, stamp and bottle, for without which none are genuine. Sole Proprietors: Quinine BitMrl Manufacturing Company, Limited, Llanellj; South Wales.

Pencader Show

Pencader Show. A successful agricultural show was held at Pencader on the 6th inst., there being keen competition among the numerous entries. The judges were: Horses, Mr Esaiali Evans, Ty- gwyn, Llangendeirne; cattle, pigs and milk- ing, Mr Davies, Werndrefi, Nantgaredig, and Mr Rees, Blaanoennen, Carmarthen; sheep and poultry, Mr Rees Evans, New Quay road; butter and eggs, Mr Thomas Jones, Ninant, Llanllwni; and oatmeal cakes, Mr Tom Evans, Glanawmor Mill, Pencader. Awards: Entire cart horse: 1, Messrs Davies, Nant- menvn, "Biddolph Briton"; 2, Thos. Evans, Parkadd=i. Llanybyther, "Master Top." Entire hackney: 1, D. Evans. Ffynom Llewelyn, "C'ettwr Relish" 2nd, Mr Jones, Troedrhiwrliwch, "Tyssul Danegelt." Mare or gelding, carter, three years up: 1, Dl. Williams, Blaengifre, Pencader, "Jolly" 2. Davies. Brynfaeson. Colt or fiUy: 1, Davies, Brynseason; 2, Hy. Evans, Giifachwenisaf. Collier: 1, Davies, Bedw; 2, Mrs Thomas, Landdu. Hackney, more or gelding, shown in hand or under saddle 1, Dl. Davies, Maesycrugiau 2, John Jones, Nantygiragen. Hackney colt or filly: 1, John Jones; 2, Jones, Nantcwmgwili. Pony, under 13.2: 1, D. J. Thomas, Dol. gran; 2, Jones. Open flat race for ponies under 13.2: 1, T. B. Thomas, Brynhawk; 2, Hy. Evans, Gwar- coed. Milking cow, any breed: 1 and 2, Daniel- Evans, Tiiavellers' Rest, New Inn. Shorthorn bull, any age: 1, James Thomas, Pentremawr, Rbydargaeau; 2, Daniel Wil- liams, Blaengifre, Pencader. Shorthorn cow or heifer, in milk or in calf: 1, Daniel Williams, Bliaengifre; 2, John Evans, Wilkes Head, Llandyssul. Shorthorn heifer or steer, under eighteen months: 1 and 2, John Evans, Wilkes Head, Llandyssul. Bull, any other than Shorthorn: 1, Daniel Jones, Nantygragen; 2, Samuel Jenkins, Cwmhwplyn. Castlemartin cow or heifer, in milk, or in calf: 1, Daniel Evans, Travellers' Rest; 2, John Evans, Wilkes' Head. Milkinig competition: 1, Miss Jones. Blaen- gifre; 2, David Jones, Farmers' Arms. C'ow, any breed: 1, John Evans, Wilkes' Head; 2, John Davies, Cwmglwen. Ewe, any breed, two lambs at heel: Richard Jones, butcher, Llandyssul; 2, Joihn Davies, Cwmgwen.

THE GREAT SKIN CURE

THE GREAT SKIN CURE. BUDBOiYS S.U. 8KB OINTMENT. Ib will cure Itching after one application destroy every form of Eczema; heals old Wounds and Sores acts like a charm on bad legs is infallible for Piles Prevents Cuts and Festering will cure Ringworm in a few days removes the most obstinate-Eruptions and Scurvy. Boxesand Is ld. Agent for Car- marthen, Walter Lloyd, Chemist; Kidwelly, L. Jones; Whitland, Mr Walters; Narberth, Mr Toobng; Clyndeiwen, H. Morris.

DALIS FAIR

DALIS FAIR. The great Dalis Fairs ait Lampeter opened on the 5th inst.. and never before had they kindled so much interest. Dealers arrived in the district early in the week, visiting the farms for bargains. Although many purchases were made, the supplies of all classes were greater than anticipated. Heavy horses were not plentiful, and so great was the de- mand that dealers went out to the roadsides to meet them, and farmers got the prices they demanded without difficulty. A few nice specimens went xor £90 each, but the popular price was £70, fully 45 per cent, higher than last year. Light horses made a fairly good show and the demand for the best type was as great as ever. The best hackneys reached £70, but one sold for £95. Cobs were plentiful, and there was no material change from last year, prices ranging from £30 to £35. A few nice ponies were paraded, and the demand for these also was about the aver- age. Prices varied from £18 to £25.

Llandilo County Court

Llandilo County Court. The Llandilo County Court was held on the 6th inst. before His Honour Judge J. Lloyd Morgan. THREE CORNERED CASES. Reference was made to an interpleader in which H. Jones trading as H. Young was the plaintiff, Oscar Mills, the Palace, Ammanford was defendant, and Evan Evans, of College street, Ammanford, claimant. The plaintiff had levied on the defendant who is lessee of a Picture Palace, and the claimant contended that the property was his. Claimant was stated to be the owner of the premises. Mr W. L. Smith, who appeared for plaintiff, said that the case had been adjourned from the last court to enable the claimant to file particulars of his claim. Since then he had received particulars of the claim which did not in any way conform to the rules of the court. He had his clients there and it was regrettable that they should be driven about from pillar to post. Mr Hurley said that he had had the papers from Mr Evans who acted for the claimant. If His Honour considered the particulars in- sufficient he would ask for a further adjourn- ment. The case was adjourned until the next court. HORSE "COMMANDEERED." Mr D. Evans, of the Ivy Bush, Iiandebie, licensed victualler, claimed £14 from Mr Geo. Williams, a police constable of. Swansea, in respect of a cheque which he had given the defendant to purchase a horse. The case had been partly heard at the last court. The defence was that the defendant acted as a gratuitous agent for the plaintiff and purchased the horse and paid for it. The plaintiff never got the horse and it was sug- gested that it had been requisitioned by the Army Authorities. On the other hand it was alleged that it was not proved that the horse seized by the Army Authorities was' the horse in question. The following additional evi- dence was now called :— Defendant said: I received a cheque from the plaintiff, D. Evans. He told me to pay for the mare. Mr Noyes said that if the instructions were in writing, the letter must be produced. Defendant said that he had not the letter. Defendan said that he was to purchase the animal. He was not paid for what he did. He had often purchased horses for plaintiff; but never got paid for it. Usually the seller saw to the delivery. In this case he purchased the horse from Mr Edward Jones. He en- dorsed the cheque received from plaintiff and handed it over to Mr E. Jones. Jones pro- mised to deliver the mare. He was given to understand that the mare had been com- mandeered for the Army. Cross-examined by Mr Noyes: This animal was taken from the Drill Hall to the Pound on the 7th August. Mr Hurley handed in a letter. Mr Noyes said that it referred to the im- pounding of a horse; but there was nothing to show that this was the animal referred to. Defendant said that the military authori- ties could not finu an owner to pay for the horse, and it was taken to the found and sold. It was sold on the 10th or 17th August. He wrote to the plaintiff stating that the mare had been commandeered, and that the seller had gone to the front. Clrcss-examined by Mr Noyes. the defendant said that the cheque had been paid to the bank by Mr Francis. He did not know how it passed into M'r Francis possession. The Judge: What do you get for this ? Defendant: Nothing. You must have had some remuneration?—1 got nothing. Mr Noyes: Have you not left it with Mr Evans to pay what he thinks fit ? Defendant: He has given me a couple of shillings. Mr Noyes: You said you were a purely un- paid agent. Mr Hurley: If you look at the evidence given last time you will find that the plaintiff admitted that the defendant was a gratuitous agent. The Judge: Possibly he did not know what a gratuitous agent meant. Mr Noyes: You have had a voluminous correspondence with Mr Evans? Defendant: Yes. In these letters you have never given the name of the buyer?—He never asked. The Judge said that he thought the defen- dant had acted foolishly in handing over an open cheque to a man who was going about fairs dealing in horses. Many of these were men of straw. You don't know what became of this mare after it was sold ?—Only what I have been told. Mr Noyes: Do you mean to say that you handed over a cheque with an open endorse- ment to a. man you did not know and told him to send on the horse? Defendant: I did. You say you did not get paid for those —I have not always received something for every deal I have done. I have once or twice. It is against the rules of the Force to take other employment?—Yes. You think that a gratuity which you leave to a person to give what he thinks fit is not "employment"?—It would not be direct em- ployment. Mr Hurley: As a matter of fact you got nothing in this case ? Defendant: I did not. The Judge said that it seemed perfectly marvellous that anybody should hand over an open cheque to a person whom lie did not know on his promise to deliver the horse. B. Framcis1, cattle dealer, Swansea, said he changed a cheque for £14 for Trevor Jones. He afterwards cashed the cheque at the bank. It was endorsed by the defendant. Plaintiff recalled said that he had previous dealings with the defendant. There was no fixed rate of payment agreed on. The pay- ment was voluntary. In this case, plaintiff forwarded a cheque for £14, because defen- dant said that he knew- of a "good thing." The Judge found for the plaintiff, the amount to be paid at the rate of 8s a month. It was agreed that credit should be given for £-1 15s which the police held as payment for the horse commandeered and sold provided they were satisfied that this was the horse in question. MASTER AND SERVANT. E. O. Morgan, a. farm servant, sued Wm. Edwards, farmer, Llwynbedw, for wages alleged to be due. Mr Noyes was for the plaintiff, and Mr Hurley for the defendant. Plaintiff said that he entered into a yearly contract of service with the defendant in November last. The contract was verbal, and the wages were to be jE30 a year. The con- tract was made at Dryslwyn at the plaintiff's oDd place. Plaintiff was to work till 7 p.m. every week day, to get a weekly half holiday, and to get every Sunday off. He found that he could notfinilsh the work till 10 or 11 p.m. Sometimes he could not get his dinner until 2 p.m. or 4 p.m. Plaintiff slept in a bedroom which leaked. The rain came in through the roof. The bed clothes would not be dried for him the next day. He had a cold all the time. He complained to his employer and Raid that he would rather go and sleep over the horses. He gave notice on the 20th of January that he was going in a month. The defendant when lie was about to leave wrote that no farmer could possibly keep a servant all over the winter and then allow him to leave, and that therefore he would be reluc- tantly compelled to sue in the County Court for breach of contract. (Mr Noyes said that the letter was not written by the defendant. The Judge: It sounds like a letter which would be written by the village schoolmaster or somebody like that. Defendant went into the box and said that they had dinner every day at 12.30 p.m. The Judge: So I should have thought. 1 did not know that farmers as a rule dined in the afternoon. Defendant said that the work was finished at 6 p.m. or 7 p.m. The room did not leak. In wet weather when the wind was in a cer- tain direction, a damp spot appeared on the wall. The Judge found for the defendant.

Stitch in Time

Stitch in Time. There is an old saying H A stJitch Îl1 im. saves nine" and if upon the first jymptome of anything being wrong with our health we were to resort to BOme simple but proper means of correcting th& mischief, rin6-tenths of the suffering that invades our homes wovild be avoided. A doao of Orilym Quinine Bitters taken wfeen y f,1 feel the least bit out of sorts is jast th* t "stitch in time." You can Gwilym E ans' Qiunine Bitters at any Chemists or Stoi in bottlee, 2s 9d and 4s 6d each, but ramen.ber that the only guarantee of genuineness is the name "Gwilym Evans" oa the la. cl, stamp and bottle, without which none t genuine. Sole Proprietors: Quinine Bitteis Manufacturing Company, Limited, Uaneily, South Wale

Death of Mr Wm Jones MP

Death of Mr Wm Jones, M.P. We regret to announce the death of Mr Wm. Janes, M.P. for North Carnarvon, which took place on Sunday afternoon at the resi- dence of his cousin at Upper Bangor. He recently had a severe illness in London, and came to Wales to recuperate. The cause of death was heart failure. The son of a farmer, Mr William Jones was born at Ceint Bach, near Penymynydd, Angle- sey, in 1859. Both on his mother's and his father's side the family had been conected with the land in Anglesey for generations. After the death of his father, his mother re- moved to Anglesea, where the future M.P. attended the Church School, and then the British School (Nonconformist). His aptitude as a scholar was early apparent. He eventu- ally became a pupil teacher, entered Bangor Normal College, and subsequently com- menced teaching in Cardiganshire. His next sphere was in London, where he took service under the School Board at Barnsbury, and perhaps the greatest impressions of his life were made upon him during the nine years he spent as senior assistant at the Barnsbury School. He was brought into contact with some of the leading London Welshmen of his time, and threw himself heart and into every movement for educational advancement I within his reach. He became a great reader at the British Museum, and read papers be- before the Philological Society on Welsh W "ords. He also identified himself with the Welsh political movements of the Metropolis, helped to found a. Cymru Fvdd Society, and wlas for a time president. So prominently had the young Welshman identified himself with the Nationalist cam- paign in Vales that it was not surprising his name was mentoned as the natural successor to the late Mr William Rathbone in the re- presentation of the 'Arvon division of Car- jiarvonsMre. He was elected for the con- stituency in 1905 with a greater majority than any previously recorded in the division, his opponent being Professor Hughes, who held the Chair of Anatomy at Oaa-diff. It was in the days of the Penrhyn quarry strike that William Jones—the quarrymen's representative—rose and moved the adjourn- ment of the House of Commons to discuss Lord Penrhyn's attitude. He did excellent work in other ways. In 1903 he carried a resolution enabling Wales to get a National Welsh Museum and Library. He was a member of the Council of the Welsh National Museum and spared no effort in placing the institution on a firm basis. He was a Junior Lord of the Treasury and Welsh Whip. THE FUNERAL, The funeral of the late Mr William Jones, M.P., took place on Wednesday at Llangefni, in the presence of large crowds. A prelimin- ary service at Pondyffryn, where Mr Jones died, was conducted hy the Rev Daniel Row- lands, among those present being Lord Ponty- pridd, Sir Herbert Roberts, Bart., M.P., Messrs Herbert Lewis, Ellis Griffith, M P 's, and Mr Baker, of the Government Whip's Office. A public service was afterwards held at John Elias Memorial Chapel, Llangefni, at which Lord Pontypridd, Sir Herbert Roberts, Mr Ellis Griffith, the Rev T. Charles Williams, Rev John Williams, Mr Herbert Lewis and other delivered appreciations of their friend. Mr J. Pentir Williams (North Carnarvon- shire coiioner), the deceased's election agent, read extracts from letters from the Premier and others expressing their sympathy with members of the family and their own sense of loss. In the procession from the chapel to the cemetery were a numlber of Llangefni school girls, each carrying a wreath. Wreaths were sent by the Chancellor, the Government Whips, Principal Sir John Rhys and family, the Welsh Parliamentary party, Sir Herbert and Lady Roberts, Mr Herbert Lewis, and others. In the presence of leaders of Liberalism and a strong representation of Welsh mem- bers of Parliament, touching reference was made to the late Mr William Jones, M.P., one of the Government Whips, at a memorial service held at the Charing Cross Welsh Cal- vinistie Methodist Chapel. The little chapel was crowded. The Chancellor of the Exche- quer was present with Mrs Lloyd George. He walked to the chapel accompanied by Mr Balfour. Other members of the Cabinet also attended. The service was conducted by the Revs Peter Hughes Griffith and Morgan Griffith. The Rev Morgan Gibbon, who de- livered the address, said William Jones was true to his country, but he was more than a Welshman. Irishmen, Scotsmen and Welsh- men made the best Englishmen, and William Jones was English. With grim weapons our young men were now fighting for the very causes to which he gave his soul. He patiently believed that right was on our side in this tremendous and painful struggle. He had no doubt as to our duty and of the issue. Among those present were Sir Ivor Herbert M.P., Mr E. T. John, M.P. and Mrs John, Mr Donald Maclean, M.P., Mr J. MaeCullum, M.P., Sir Jesse Herbert, M.P., Mr Haydn Jones, M.P., Mr John Hinds, M.P., Mr Timothy Davies, M.P., and Mrs Davies, Mr Vaughan Davies, M.P., Mr Glyn Jones, M.P., and Mrs Jones, Mr R. H. Davies, C'.B., Mr Walter Ilea, M.P., Mr Owen (secretary Welsh Army Corps), Mrs Llewelyn Williams, Mr Howell Idris, Mr Howeill Williams, Mr Glynn Evans, representatives of the Chief Whip's Office, and Lieut. Rees Jones (London Welsh Battalion), etc. Sir Alfred Mond, who was engaged on a Government Committee, was re- presented by Mr Dan Thomas.

Cricket

Cricket. LLANELLY INTERMEDIATE V. CARMAR- THEN OLLEGE. The Llanelly Intermediate School team played their first match of the season with Carmarthen College on the. latter's ground on Saturday, and compiled 95 runs, to which the homesters responded with 69. The win- ners have chiefly to thank- Mr Stanley Lewis for their victory as he was the only player on their side to get into double figures. Before being dismissed he reached the half century. D. Samuel took most wickets for them, four falling to his lot for 26 runs, while T. Samuel took 3 for 10, and Mr Davies 2 for 29. On the losing side Brown with 16 not out, W. E. Boot with 14, Palmer with 13, and Wain with 12 were the best scorers. Lilanelty School. Mr Stanley Lewis, c Palmer, b P. Care 50 W. Griffiths, c Brown, b Tom Jones. 6 Mr Davies, c Tom Jones; b Harlow 7 T. Jones, b Boot 8 H. Jones, c Harlow, b Boot 0 T. Williams, run out 0 D. Samuel, b Brown 0 R. Pulleii, c Palmer, b Haaiow 2 R. Paton, c Harlow, b care 9 I. Evans, c Brown, b Boot 1 H. Davies, not out 1 Extras 11 Total 95 Carmarthen College. P. Care, b Mr Davies 7 Leadbeater, b D. Samuel 0 Palmer, b D. Samuel 13 W. E. Boot, run out 14 Tom Jones, c Lewis, b D. Samuel 1 F. George, b D. Samuel -k T. Harlow, b Mr Davies 0 Wain, by T. Williams 12 Brown, not out 16 I Etheridge, c T. Jones, b T. Williams. 1 I T. Thomas, lbw., b T. Williams 5 I T. Thomas, lbiv., b T. Williams 0 Extras 5 Total 69

FAIRS FOR MAY

FAIRS FOR MAY. 6. Lampeter, Cayo, Fishguard, Laugharne. 7. Lampeter, Pencader. 8. Lampeter, NewcastJe Emlyn and Adpar. 10. Carmarthen, Newcastle Emlyn, Adpar. 11. Haverfordwest, Tregaron, Talgarth. 12. Cross Hands, Llanfihangel-ar-Arth, Nar- berth. 13. Cross Hands, LLanelly. 14. Llandilo, Llansawel, Pontyates, 81;. Clears. 15. St. Clears, Llandilo, Llandovery. 17. Letterston, Llanybyther. 'Llanarthney, Llandilo Bridge. 18. Kidwelly, Tregaron, Llangadock, Maen- clochog, Whitland, Hay, Brecon. 19. Rhayader. 21-22. Llanboidy, Tirecastle. 24. Llanddarog. 25. Tregaron, Pontardulais. 26. Lampeter, Llansadwrn. 27-28. Llangadock.

Advertising

YOU CAN RELY ON Clarke's B4] Pills as a Safe and Sure Remedy in either Sex, for all Acquired or Constitutional Discharges from Urinary Organs, Gravel, Pains in the Back and kindred complaints. Over 50 years Success. Of all Chemists, 4s 6d tnTrmva per box, or sent direct, post free, vliAKIl li S for Sixty Penny Stamps by the 841 PILLS Proprietors—The Lincoln and /T< Midland Drug Co, Ltd,Lincoln. (Free from Mercury)

Welsh DisputeClosed

Welsh Dispute-Closed. FREE CHURCH ORGANISATIONS. For some time past there has been, unfor- tunately, a considerable amount of difficulty and misunderstanding over Free Chua-ch Council matters in Wales. We are now informed that, by the concerted action of the Rev F. B. Meyer (the general secretary of the National Council) and Mr W. Beddoe Rees (Cardiff) the differences have been adjusted, and as a result of negotiations conducted in a perfectly conciliatory spirit on either side, the Rev James Evans has accepted the sum of £ 75, together with the literature in his keeping, in full discharge of the ex- penses incurred by him as the late secretary of the Welsh Consultative Committee. A com- mon -agreement on all the outstanding points of difference having been arrived at, the hope is expressed that it will lead to complete unity of action on the part of all Welsh Free Churchmen. With reference to the foregoing, the He". James Evans states that he was urged by his committee to meet the other side generously in order to terminate the dispute, and the supporters of the National Union were quite prepared to discuss terms of the amalgama- tion of the two bodies in the same generous spirit.

Lusitania Torpedoed

Lusitania Torpedoed. OVER 1.400 LIVES LOST. Te Lusita-nia was torpedoed by a German submarine on Friday off the Irish coast. Hopes entertained on Friday night that most of the passengers would be saved have proved false. It was learned early on Saturday that only 658 had been rescued, but an addi- tion was made to this number later bringing the total up to 753. The number of passen- gerscarried was 2,160. On Saturday night the Admiralty issued a statement to the effect that he above figures may be a ken as, approximately correct. The Admiralty also announce that the statement appearing in some neiwspapes that the liner was armed is wholly false. It is gathered from those rescued that after passing the Fast-net the Lusitania had slowed down. The precaution had been taken to have the boats ready in case of emergency, and a sharp look out was being kept. Off Kinsale, the order was given for full speed. Suddenly a few of the passengers and crew saw the conning tower of a subman'vv on the starboard side. Immediately afterwards a torpedo was seen travelling towards the liner. The torpedo entered the stokehold and there was a. violent explosion. The Lusitania immediately took a heavy list, and before the startled passengers and crew could realise what had happened another torpedo struck the vessel forward. In less than half an hour —according to some estimates within minutes —the Lusitania took a headlong dive and dis- appeared. Among the distinguished passengers who have been lost are Mr A. G. Vanderbilt, the American milionaire, and Mr Chas. Froliman, the stage manager. LADY MACKWORTH'S STORY OF HER ESCAPE. Lady Mackworth states that it was after lunch that the ship was torpedoed. She at once thought something dreadful had occurred but her father did not quite a.gree with her. However both proeroed to their cabins and put on life belts. Having fixed hers, she came up to "A" deck but did not see her father. She saw Dr Fisher and his sister-in-law among friends, who, she was glad to learn,, were both saved. The deck was inclined at a fearful angle, making it impossible to get about. She was still on the deck when the ship went down, and she was sucked under to a great depth. When she rose to the surface she swam to- wards a board, and having grasped it offered a corner to a man, who gladly availed himself of it, and heldon for a time, relinquishing his old later. Lady Mackworth was by this time feeling the effects of her immersion in the cold water, and although not frightened must have lost consciousness, for the next she remembered was that she was floating with a deck chair under her, but how she got it she does not know. After another long interval she again be- came unconscious, and had no idea how she got on board the Blundell., a trawler, Which brought her on to Queenstown. Whileunconscious her clothing was cut away, away and she came ashore clad in an overcoat and a blanket. Her gratification on landing from the xAiue- belt and finding her father and his secretary awaitin her was extreme. Lady Mackworth came ashore in the same boat as the captain of the Lusitania. While there was admittedly a certain amount of confusion she thought the officers and crew acted very bravely, but she could not understand why they kept shouting there was no need of hurrying as the ship would not sink when it was obviously impossible for it to float many more minutes. t She thought that the stewardesses were very brave, and she mentioned the case of one of them who went back with a lady to get a life- belt when the deck was almost vertical. Mrs D. A. Thomas has received many tele- grams of congratulation on the escape of Mr D. A. Thomas and Lady Mackworth. WHITLAND PEOPLE MISSING. Mr Ernest Thomas, son of Mr D. Thomas, furnisher, Whitland, and Mrs Thomas, home- ward bound from Winnipeg, were on board the Lusitania. Anxious inquiries in all quar- ters have been made, but, so far, no trace of the missing couple are to be found.

An Interesting Scotch Proverb

An Interesting Scotch Proverb. "Bread is the staff of life, but the pudding makes a good crutch"!—that is if made with ATORA Beef Suet. More digestible and economical than if you use raw suet. Ask your grocer for it; refuse imitations.

18 FUSILIERS FLASH

18 FUSILIERS' "FLASH." Mr W. Lliewelvn Williams, M.P.. asked the Under-Secretary for War in the House of Commons on Wednesday, whether, having regard to the fact that Welsh Regiments have no other distinctive emblem than the flash, that Wales has raised more recruits during the war in proportion to the popula- tion than any other component part of the United Kingdom, that the Scottish Highlander regiments are allowed to wear khaki kilts, which are not in any sense national emblems, and that the flash is worn on the back, and so will never be seen by the enemy, the military authorities will re-consider their decision, which has caused much disappointment and irritation, and allow the officers of the Welsh regiments to continue to wear the flash on khaki as well as on scarlet tunics. Mr Tennant: Yes, sir; this matter has been reconsidered, and authority to wear the flash with the service dress will be given for the period of the war.

BITTERNESS AMONft THE ARMY

BITTERNESS AMONft THE ARMY. The poisonous gases of Ypres have com- pletely changed the tolerant point of view in which the enemy have been held, and have affected not the victims of these unparalled crimes only, but the whole Army. A deep and bitter loathing of the Germans and of everything German has spread through all ranks, and our soldiers realise at last the shameless character of the enemy. People at home need not trouble themselves with i-queamish hesitations. It is from the rank and nife: in particular that the demand comes with the most insistence and force. This last resource of German cowardice will unfailingly result in the war being fought with a bitterness hitherto undreamed of. Strong and urgent demands on all sides are heard for the immediate deportation from England to Germany of every single German subject unfit to bear arms. It is not under- stood why the English at home can still allow Germans to go about amongst them, while their compatriots poison water and air, and inflict upon our soldier's the most horrible bar- barities.

Lampeter Claim Failst

Lampeter Claim Failst At Lampeter County Court on Tuesday, John Brown Thomas, Bridge street, painter, sued Thomas Davies, landlord of the Gastb Hotel, Lampeter, fo.r assault, and claimed JE5 damages. Mr J. Emrys Jones appeared for the plaintiff iand Mir C. Denham Evans for defendant. Plaintiff said he was at the Castle Hotel on the 3rd of March, when an argument took place, and all of a sudden was knocked down by some unknown person. The landlord then kicked him, and as he was going out took hold of him by the throat and knocked him down. Defendant said that his attention was called twice to the conduct of the plaintiff, which was very objectionable. He did not do anything more than was ex- pected of a landlord of a public house. The Judge found for defendant.

Advertising

Preachers next Sunday at Carmarthen Places of Worship. UNION ST. INDEPENDENT CHAPEL. Students, Presbyterian College, Carmarthen (Gymanfa). LAMMAS ST. INDEPENDENT CHAL'EL, Miss Rosiua Davies, Treherbert. BABELL, PENSARN. Cyfarfod Gweddi. BETHANIA (CM.) Rev Stephen Jones. Llanddarog. PRIORDY INDEPENDENT CAPEL- Rev E. Keri Evans, M.A. (pastor). PENUEL BAPTIST CHAPEL. Rev Waldo Lewis, B.A. (pastor). TABERNACLE BAPTIST. Rev E. U. Thomas (pastor). WATER ST. C.M. CHAPEL. Rev W D. Rowlands (pastor). ENGLISH CONGREGATIONAL CHURCH. Rev D. J. Thomas (pastor). ELIM. Rev D. Roberts (pastor). ENGLISH WESLEYAN OHAPEL. Rev R. F. Atkinson. Ammanford. ZION PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH. Rev Arthur Hughes, B.A. (pastor). ENGLI8H BAPTIST CHURCH. Mr G. Hay Morgan, K.C., M.P. EBENEZER WELSH WESLEYAN SHAFEL. Rev H. R. Owen, Llandyssul.

LIST OF ANNIVERSARY SERVICES

LIST OF ANNIVERSARY SERVICES 1915. Sept. 19.—Bethania. We should be glad if all secretaries at afcurclies included in our list would supply ua with lists of preachers to enable the table of anouncements to be made up regularly and correctly,