Collection Title: Carmarthen weekly reporter

Provider: The National Library of Wales

Rights: The copyright status or ownership of this resource is unknown.

View full details

First Previous Image 4 of 4
Full Screen
10 articles on this page
I rIlE PASSING WE Ei K

rIlE PASSING WE, Ei K, "Let there be thistles; there are grapes: If old things, there are new; Ten thousand broken lights and shapes Yet glimpses of the true."—TENNTSCN. It is time that the British Public woke up and insisted that the Government should make war against Germany in a whole hearted style. Hundreds of our British soldiers have been killed by poisonous gas, and all that the Government apparently in- tends to do is to protest against it as a breach of the Hague Convention. What is the use of talking about conventions and treaties to a power which cynically boasts of its contempt for "scraps of paper." At the last meeting at t-he,Ha,-u, the question of the use of asphixiating gases was brought for- ward. Some argued that there was no more objection to suffocating your enemy by poi- sonous fumes than there was to blowing him to pieces with an explosive. There is a good deall to be said in favour of this view. But Germany agreed to the article and the Ger- man representative signed it. When an international convention is held, nothing is really carried by a majority. If any Power objects to a certain article, that Power's representative has a perfect right to refuse to sign, and then whatever the others do, that Power is quite free. Thus most of I the Great Powers had adopted an article against "privateering." A "privateer" is an armed vessel belonging to a private owner, licensed by a certain Power and obtaining as a reward the "prizes" which it captures from the enemy. Thu £ during the war with Napoleon, both France and Britain issued "letters of marque" (really licenses) to hun- dreds of ship owners to utilise their vessels as privateers. The owner found and armed the vessel, and paid the crew. If the vessel were captured by the enemy the owner had to bear the loss. On the other hand, if the vessel captured numerous traders belonging to the enemy, the owner made his fortune and the crew did very well too—for there was a re- cognised scale on which the prize money was divided. The owner perhaps took twenty shares, the captain twelve, a first lieutenant ten, other lieutenants eight, petty officers four. able seamen two. and boys one. This is the origin of the Irish sailors prayer "that the enemy's ehot might be divided like the prize money." That man was rather ahead of his day! «*• Most nations have to-day decided to issue no "letters of marque" to privateers. The United States of America however never agreed to that article, and their representa- tives have never signed it. Therefore, the ¡ American Government might in a future war without dishonour employ privateers. This is fair and, above board. America never agreed to this proposal, and the other Powers know it. Therefore in case of a war with America, any of the other Powers would have a perfect right to use privateers against Americans. France and England both signed the declara- tion. Neither France nor England therefore could honourably use privateers against each other. But either France or England would be perfectly justified in using privateers against America. One of the fundamental principles of international law is that those who sign an article are not bound by it except in regard to. other signatories. A Power which refuses to agree to an article cannot claim any benefit from iit. When a Power refuses to agree to an article it is suspected of having 'something up its sleeve." When the American Government refused to agree th the article abolishing pri- vateering, it had a very small navy, but it had a very efficient and swift-sailing meroan- tile marine, on which it depended for defence in a campaign with England or any of the Southern Republics. The motive in that case was evident, and perfectly honest. Suppose however at the last meeting at the Hague, that the, Germans had refused to agree to the article prohibiting the use of aspliixiating gasies What would the other Powers have concluded ? They would have jumped to the conclusion that the Germans had invented some particularly deadly gas which they were going to use in the next campaign, and they would all have made arrangements to coun- teract this method of warfare. The Germans however were not going to give themselves away, so they signed the article not with the object of observing it, but with the object of hoodwinking the others. This is the German view of treaties. A German statesman would laugh with scorn at the idea of anybody ex- pecting him to observe treaties. The only use of treaties is to tie the hands of other people! # ,< It is full time therefore; that the British Government retorted on the Germans with a little of their own methods. It is perfectly absurd to suggest that the Germans are to be allowed to suffocalte our men with poisonous gas, but that our principles do not allow us to use gas to poison the Germans. If a bur- glalr breaks into a house and threatens the family with a crowbar, what should we think of the head of the family if he were to say "N:o; I disapprove of violence, and my oon- science willl not alliow me to be so brutal as to hit this fellow with the coal hammer. feiuch methods are entirely beneath my honour and dignity." If our consciences are too tender to smother the Germans, there is no reason why they should not with favourable winds asphyxiate all the British soldiers in France, occupy the Channel Ports, bombard Dover from Calais, effect a landing, and asphyxiate their way up to London. And are we to sup- pose that our rulers are prepared to witness all this and to do no more than to protest against it as a breach of the rules. War is niot football. There is no referee who wiiM. disallow a goal. If the Germans get Calais or get London, they get them-whether it is according to the rules or not. An event which has come to light in German South West Africa shows that the use of gas is not merely due to the zeal of any local commander, but is part of a deliberate German policy. In Africa, the Boers have found that the Germans in their retreat poisoned the wells with arsenic. It is quite impossible to believe that a German commander in Belgium and a German officer in a remote district of Africa used similar methods by mere chance. The order has evidently come from headquar- ters that the Germans are to resort to poison when they have failed by military methods. It is quite impossible any longer to talk of the German "Soldier." The Germans have abandoned that character altogether. They are a failure as a military nation, so they are going into the pharmaceutical business. The German recruit need not trouble any longer 'about the "goose step" or the use of the rifle. The drill-sergeant is to be replaced by expert toxicologists and the German Michael in his shining armour wiU give way to the German Borgita expert in the compounding of poison- ous prescriptions! 'However all this is a game that two can pilay at. The westerly winds will soon be blowing, and there are chemists in France and England. It is a pity that poison was intro- duced into the war, but seeing that it has been introduced the Germans should have their fill of ift. No sentiment can stand in the way of deailing effectively with these, fiends. • •• The sinking uf the Lutitania and the drowning of 1,400 or 1,500 passengers has hardly startled the woiM P, much as might have been expected. Human life is very cheap at the present moment, and the moral de- pravity of the German character has become so manifest that nohing which they could do would horrify the civilised world. If we were to learn to-morrow morning, that the throats of all the British prisoners in Germany had been cut, we should not be surprised as far as the moral guilt of the action were concerned. The Germans are quite capable of doing that —or anything else of the sort if it suited their purpose. We need not fear that they will do anything of the sort, because it does not suit their purpose to do so. So long as they hold a certain number of. British prison- ers they hold hostages from this country. If the British prisoners were all killed, the Ge-r- mans would be deprived of any leverage on the fears of the British Public. But should circumstances arise in which it would suit the Germans better to kill the British prisoners than to keep them alive we need not deceive ourselves as to the course which would be adopted. We hear it said that such deeds are "worthy of the Dark Ages." This is a dis-M tinct libel on the Dark Ages. No such deeds were ever perpetrated in warfare between nations in the Dark Ages as are now perpe- trated by the Germans. If there ever vere wars in the Dark Ages which were fought with ferocity they were the Crusades. Yet there was a singularly chivalrous feeling which grew up between the Christians and the Saracens. At the beginning of the Wars of the Cross, Christians regarded the Mahommedans as hardly human; they were foul fiends outside the pale of courtesy. The early Saracens had much the same contempt for the Christians. Yet as the wars progressed we find these feel- ings changing. The later Crusaders seem to have regarded the Saracens as very fine fellows, fcnd the Saracens on the other hand developed a high regard for the warriors of the West. Even to-day legends linger on in the East of the prowess of the "Malek Rik," the great warrior who is the hero of many songs and tales. The "Malek Rik" is no other than the Lion-Hearted Richard of Eng- land. There is a story of a Christian knight who Was captured by a Saracen Emir and who was verv anxious to pay a visilt to his house. The Emir allowed him to go on his promise that he would return within a year and a day. The Knight went home, returned within the stipulated time and died in captivity. When Saladin captured Jerusalem from the Chris- tians, he allowed all the Christians-men women and children—to depart unharmed. To those who had no property he gave suffi- oient money to enable them to return to their homes. And this is what we are led to be- lieve was the "Dark Ages." We have been deluded. The "Dark Ages" were not in the past. We are living in the Dark Ages now. The fact that the Christiana and the Saracens came to have a higher regard for j each other as the wars progressed is no iso- lated fact. This often happens in campaigns. Is it happening in this campaignp Are we beginning tta respect the Germans more than we did at the beginning of the war P Not at all. Exactly the opposite has happened in this case. Before the war started, millions of people in this country were filled with the idea that the Germans were a highly "cul tuned" race aBd that they were really the model nation. Those of us who scoffed at this pro-Germanism were regarded as persons of no education and -no culture. At the begin- ning of the war millions of people in this country spoke with regret of the cruel neces- I sity which made us enemies of such a fine la"e as the Germans! To-day we hear nothing of this. Nol) riy in this country has a good word for Germ 1 -1-,7 i except the German spies and the few British hirelings who are receiving traitor gold from Potsdiam. We are not changing our feelings for Germany now except for the wor; The feeling of regret with which we entelr3d en the war has been changed to a feeling of hatred against everything German. The longer the war lasts, and the more we see of the German character, the more do we detest them. We often find that we have had dust j thrown in our eyes as to the characters of other people. ^Ye find as the time goes on that we have had dust thrown in our eyes as to the German character. The German does not improve on acquaintance. The more we learn of him, the more loathsome does he appear. The Germans are a nation who have utterly rejected all moral standards, and de- spise anybody who refuses to do everything in his power through conscientious scruples. They do not respect us for our good treatment of German prisoners. They only think what a pack of fools we are-Qr else that we are trying to creep into their good graces. off Meanwhile let us not be deceived by any talk of British victories. There have been many British victories and many British defeats in this. campaign. We have had many victories, but they have bad little prac- tical effect. Meanwhile practically all Bel- gium is in German hands. We cannot, we dare not make peace with the Germans in Antwerp. It is no use talking of peace until' the Germans are d/riven out of Belgium—and -they are holding on tightly. This does not necessarily mean that the Germans must be defeated in Belgium. If the Allies inflicted a 91,U staggering blow at Metz or Straasberg, the

I rIlE PASSING WE Ei K

German armies might have to leave Belgium to defend the Fatherland. This was how Lady- smith was relieved in 1900. British victories in other fields necessitated the Boers abandon- ing the siege and removing their armies else- where. Whatever the price, the German Army must be given a staggering blow some- where.

Advertising

Paralysed Nerves Another London Wonder-Care by Dr. Cassell's Tablets "rs Han5on. Mrs. L. Han-on, of 67, Macauley-road. East Ham. London. E., says My illneiw caime on with laryngitis. After a time there was a prickling sensation all over me; then my knees used to give way, and soon I was quite helpless. All use Yiad gone out of my arms and le'gr. I could not move by myself; could not even sDeak-I had no power nt ail. Everything was done to restore power; I underwent electrical treat- ment and massage. but not the least benefit resulted. I had been helpless for about eix months when my husband got me Dr. Cassell's Tablets. They did what nothing else had been able to do. Gradually power returned to me; I learned to walk, and speech came ba/ck Rapidly I became my old self again, and at the present time am well and strong." Dr. Cassell's Tablets. Cisscli$Tablets 3rp A CftDuinp AN/I remedy for all lonn, ol norre or*™" weakn if?n old or young. Compounded of nerve-nutrient? *nd tonics ot indi.«putab!y proved efficarv, they are the recognised modern homo treatment. for NERVOUS BREAKDOWN HJERVE PARALYSIS SPINAL PARALYSIS INFANTILE PARALYSI8 NEURASTHENIA NERVOUS DEBILITY •LEEPLE88NESS ANÆMIA KIDNEY DISEASE INDIGESTION STOMACH DISORDER MAL-NUTRITION WASTING DISEASES PALPITATICN VITAL EXHAUSTION PREMATURE DECAY In Ke and 2:9e! economical. A Free Trial Supply"' to you on receipt of name and addr«« atid rt*mps for and packing. Address- nr fallr. Co., Ltd., 413, Chester-road. Manche^Tr'. Dr'Ca»s11

CARMARTHEN UNDER THE SEAKOHLIGHT

CARMARTHEN UNDER THE SEAKOHLIGHT. Jo/ne, come, and sit you down; 1°0 shall DOt budge, YL. shall not go, till I let you up a RIOM Where you may see the inmost part of yon. SiiKHruu. The fumes which arise in hot weather from the tarring of the streets are almost serious enough to constitute a ore ch of the Hague Contention. Farmers are feeling pretty hopeless over the labour problem just now. The question which many of them are debating is whether they will be able to procure labour at any price to get in the hay. ft# The Local Government Board has stopped the work undertaken by the Asylum Com- mittee for the purpose of renovating and im- proving Wauniago. Local bodies are prac- tically forbidden to undertake works involving capital expenditure, because they are not allowed to float loans. The County Council has been prevented entering into a contract for the re-building of the Lough or Bridge. if it stands it stands; if it falls, it falls. Any- "how it is not going to be rebuilt. «*« We hear a good many exhortations to carry on "business as usual." The Government is going out of its way to discourage business. When the Guardians made up thei,r minds to build the Cottage Home, the L.G.B. stopped them. When the Asylum Committee entered into a, conitract at Wauniago, the L.G.B. step in and prevent the contract being carried out. This means that men engaged in the building trade will be thrown out of work. Is this a roundabout way of getting men to work in munition factories? If the State re- quires men to do certain work, there is a good deal to be said in favour of compelling them. We may get down to the rule of compulsory service in regard to any work which a man is capable of doing But if this is the object, it should be announced in a straightforward fashion, and not be aimed at by means of subterfuges. On the other hand, if it is not the object, what can be t,he object? Is it to bankrupt the Unemployment Funds-or what? The men who live by the building trade must live. «** The Carmarthen Corporation has done well to provide receptacles for rubbish in certain parts of the town. They serve a double pur- pose. They contain the rubbish, and they also provide much-needed playgrounds for the children. To see a little boy standing on his curly head in a rubbish tip is to witness the height of human felicity. Whether he will enjoy quite so much felicity when his mother meets him on his return home is another question; but in the meantime he enjoys the fleeting hour. «** One more thing which the war has stopped is the attempt to rush Carmarthen Borough into another water scheme. The proposal was was totally unecessary, 'but it was at one time no use attempting to argue against it. Now however if the Council were unanimous— which they never were-,and were determined to carry out the scheme they Would not be allowed to do so. There is a bright lining to every cloud. It is highly probable that the present objec- tion to loans will last not only for the period of the war, but for a, long time afterwards. Whatever the issue of the war, the finanecr, of the country will be mortgaged for twenty years or so. A good deal of the available capital will have been lent to the Govern- ment. Once the war is concluded, the Govern- ment will endeavour to pay off so much every year; but it will be a long time before any- body who. wants to borrow money will be able to float a loan easily. Public bodies of all kinds have for the last twenty years been rushing light heartedly into borrowing; but they will have to restrain Itheir talent in that direction for some time. a. A- There seemed to be a general consensus of opinion at the Carmarthenshire Chamber ot Agriculture last week that the present boom in agriculture is not going to last. There may be something to be said in favour of the idea that there will be a reaction; but after all a good deal of the feeling is due to the farmer's natural pessimism. In every country under the sun, farmers are inclined to grumble. When however things are so< prosperous that it is impossible to find auy f ault with the pre- sent, they feel that it can't last Ibng. and that there is a very bad time coming. **• It is an absolute certainty that the present inflated prices can't possibly continue after the war. In the first platee, there is likely to be a great import of fc/reign produce as soon as the war comets to an end. It is true that a good deal of permanient damage has been done to large agricultural areas on the Continent, and that it will be ten or twelve years before they can become -as productive as before. But after all the arotta in which fighting has taken place and is likely to take place are very small compared to the whole extent of the Continent. Moreover there are huge consign- ments of goods like corn, bacon, salt butter, etc., which have been held up by the war and are in store. When the war comes to an end there will be a. huge surplus of agricultural produce thrown, on the market at an alarming sacrifice. Things will doubtless rectify them- selves in a short! time; but the chances aire that for the first few months of peace agricul- tural produce may touoh bedrock prices. There are many elements which might modify that result; but that is a possibility at any rate. Even however if there was little improve- ment in the quantity of imports, it does not follow that the. present prices could be main- tained. The price depends after all on the amount of money in the pockets of the pur- chasers. It is no use 'sticking out" for high prices in a market in which there is little money. There never was a time in the history of the nation in which money is being so lavishly spent as it is to-day. There are over a million families getting "separation allow- ances." from the Treasury; in nine cases out of ten they are having; more money to handle than they ever dreamt of in their wildest dreams. As a result of enlistment labour is scarce, and employers pay more wages than they issuaHy do. All this memsthat the buyers go to market with more money in their pockets. It is literally true th-at thousands who used to have a herring to breakfast now have bacon and eggs. Naturally the price of bacon and the price of eggs go up when there is an increased demand. It is the. same all through. The working classes are having the time of their lives and in consequence farmers are able to get better prices for food stuffs. But what will happen at the end of the war? The separation wllowances will cease. Ammunition factories and sim;Iar businesses J will not want men, and when a large part of p the Army is disbanded, a mass ef men will be thrown on the labour market. Things here too will rectify themselves in time of labour with the national tendency to of lbaour with the national tendency to depress wages. Moreover taxation will pro- bably be high, for we shall have to repay all the money which we are throwing about so freely now. Farmers therefore may find them- selves in a market in which money is abnorm- ally scarce. There will be no price at all for eggs and bacon if everybody is too hard up to buy them! ALETHSIA.

Whitland lioral District Council

Whitland lioral District Council. The annual meeting of the Whitland Rural District Council was held at the Hotel Gros- venor on the 7th inst. Mr W. Thomaa, the retiring chairman, presided pro tem. I ELECTION OF CHAIRMAN. Mr T. Davies proposed, Mr Matthias secon- ded, and it was carried unanimously that Mr Levi Davies., tlie vice-chairman, be elected chairman for the ensuing year. Mr Levi Davies in returning thanks said that he was conscious that he was elected for no personal merit of his own. There were many abler men who might have been selected ("No, no.") For some time paet it had been the custom to select the members to occupy the chair in irotation. He hoped with their assistance to be able to carry out the duties of the office. They would during the coming year have to do a great deal of important busi- ness-amongst them no doubt to deal with the housing question. The Council had al>- pealed to several of the landlords to erect new houses. He was glad to say that several of the landowners had taken the matter up. He hoped that others would follow their example. When the Council knew how many new houses had been built, and how many more they re- quired they would be in a position to take steps in the matter. APPOINTMENT OF VICE-CHAIRMAN. Mr Peter Howell proposed that Mr James Davies be elected vice-chairman for the ensuing year. Mr Morgan Phillips seconded, and Mr a Matthias supported the motion, which was carried unanimously. Mr James Davies said that he was much obliged to them for the honour which they had conferred upon him. It was an honour which he had not expected, and for which he was not anxious. MUTUAL COMPLIMENT-. Mr T. Davies proposed a vote, of thanks to the retiring chairman. Everything which the Chairman had touched during the past year had been hall-marked with the word "Pro- gress." We live in a progressive age,. and the Cbairma-n had led them in the way of Progress. Mr Thomas had also been a link between this Council and the County Council. This had proved beneficial to the Council in more than one way. Mr Th-onui,had always j a iradiant smile which helped a good deal in the despatch of business. He was one of the ibest chairmen that the Council had ever had. He had "hitched his waggon to a star." He (Mr Davies) believed that Mr Thomas would be the chlaiirman of the County Council before long. His business experience and capacity would qualify him for any position. Mr D. Phillips seconded the motion, which was carried unanimously. The Chairman, in returning thanks, said that it had been a very pleasant year for him. He felt it a great honour to preside over such an intelligent, energetic and progressive body as the Whitland District Council. What he had done he had done for the benefit of the district. They had succeeded in regard to some of the applications which they had before the County Council, and he hoped that they would succeed in regard to the others. He was greatly indebted to their C!erk (Mr H. Lewis) for the assistance he had received, No member need be afraid to accept the office j when they had such an excellent clerk. If it were not that the war were in progress, he would propose that Mr Lewis be paiu a much larger salary than the paltry t30 a year which he received. ONLY CHILD'S PLAY. A long discussion took place over the pro- posed re-appointment of the Roads Com- mittee, and complaints were made as to the state of the roads between Pendine and Red Roses. The Surveyor said that the state of the road was largely due to farmers carting lime over it by traction. He had ordered 300 toM of stone for the road last year, but the con- tractor had only delivered one-third of the amount. Since then they had been rolling and improving the road. Mr T. L. P-hilips said that he must cart lime in the winter; he could not do so in the summer. Mr James Howells. said that it was quite unnecessary to have a committee going about in a waggonette inspecting the roads on a summer day. That was only child's play. They were only wasting money which had much better be spent on material. Mr D. Davies: We canot accept one mem- ber's statement. Mir J. Howells: We can accept what the Surveyor says. If we can't, why do we em- ploy him. No Roads Committee was appointed. RATES STATIONARY. The Clerk (Mr H. Lewis) said that the total amount of the estimated expenditure for the year was £ 3,170. Their receipts from various sources were estimated at £506, leaving a balance of £2,664 to be raised by ai rate. This would be 4< ¡ 9 more than would be raised by a rate of lid; but the Finance Committee re- commended that they have the lid rate the same as last year.—This was agreed to. HOUSING DIFFICULTIES. A letter was received from Mr T. R. Davies, agent to Miss Yelverton, regarding certain notices which (had been served. He pointed out that Rose Villa was held on a lease of three livea, and thiat the liability for repair lay on the leaseholder. In the case of Panty- deri a new house would probably be built; the difficulty was how to house the tenant in the interval. In the case of Parogwyn the rent was only 30s a year, and a sum of £50 had recently been spent in repairs. Mr D. Davies: What is the position suppos- ing theserepaits are not carried outP The Clerk: It is for the Council to say then whether they widt make a closing order. Mr D. Davies said that there were one or two who were preparing to He-build. In other cases they were prepared to repair houses. The Sanitary Inspector (Mr D. Jetnkim) had put the fear of death on many of the owners. In those cases in which the waus would not stand another story they could build other rooms on the same level and make bungalows. A letter was read from Mr H. L. Lewis tating that a tenant of his in Llandissilio was 84 years of age. She had always lived in the house and enjoyed good health. Mr D. Davies said that it was a curious thing that people in these houses often lived to great ages. Mr T. Davies: If she had a good cottage she would live to be a. hundred. The Inspector: -Of course everyone wants to fight his own casef and net do anything. If anything I have been too lenient. Mr T. L. Phillips said that if they went about the thing in the right spirit they would have no difficulty in getting the required work done. Mr T. Davies: We have been considering this matter for two years, and it is time we did something. It was decided to allow two months for the required work to he carried out. SURVEYOR'S REPORT. |The Purveyor (Mr Rees Davies) reported as follows:— "The steani i-oller started working on the 23rd November and finished on the 12th day of April, 1915, having during that period worked for 100 days including the day allowed for travelling. My estimate was for 1091 days. Owing to frosty weather the roller was idle for 191 days, which was a loss to the owners and a great inconvenience in the working system. It is pleasing to report that the work was carried out satisfactorily and without any accidents. Thirteen parishes were visited; Marros was left out owing to the contractor failing to carry out his stone contract; special attention will be paid to this parish when the roller is next engaged. Dur- ing the 99 working days, 5943 cubic yards of stones were dealt with. I attended personally for 71 days and my son for 15days, in all 86 days. For Ciffic, Eglwvscymyn, and Pendine parishes I had to engage Mr Benjamin John, from Llan-glydwen, to act as foreman. 1 had no other experienced person in those parishes to undertake such work. Pendine Sea Wall: I received a cheque for zC 60 from Sir Mairteine Lloyd's agent towards the cost of constructing this new isea wall, which I sent to Mr Henry Lewis, of Narberth, the Clerk to the Council. The two dwarf wail,!s are now being built to protect the other walls from the hea.vy back sea waves. Cefncirch and Fronscawen Quarries: The cleaning and digging of stones at these places are in lull swing; this will enable the con- tractors to start and complete their contracts in good time; in fact H}me of these have al- ready commenced in different parts. A Bad Practice: Several persons have re- cently taken chain and other harrows over the roads when going from one field to another, and thereby defacing and loosening the our- face stones, !and every effort is now being mad to discontinue such practice. Proceed- in should be taken in future against any person or persons for this kind of offence."

Carmarthen Town Council

Carmarthen Town Council. The quarterly meeting of the Carmarthen Town Council was held at the Guildhall', Car- marthen, on Tuesday. The Mayor (Mr John Lewis) presided. "BILKING" THE LANDLORDS. The Mayor paid that as he was coming down that evening he saw Mr Poison who told him that there were many people who had billeted soldiers and who had not been paid for them. He wished to know whether the Town Clerk or the Chief Constable were in any way re- sponsible. The Read Constable (Mr Mayall) read some correspondence which he had had with head- quarters with regard to the billeting of a couple of companies of the 61st Brigade R i .A at Carmarthen between the, 4th and the 12th April1. It appeared that some had been paid for seven days instead of eight, and that some had not been paid at all. Mr J. B. Arthur: Are there any who have not been paid at all ? The Head Constable: There are many. Mr D. Williams: Who will be responsible ? The Mayor said that the police had nothing to do with it: Mr W. Spurrell said that it had been re- ported to this Council that the military authorities were not satisfied with the rate of pay, and they wrote asking if they could as a Connerll assist in fixing a more satisfactory rate. The only roplv they got was "Thank you very much; theie is nothing you can do." The Council were not to blame if the rate were too high. Mr Holmes: They suggested that the rate was to be 3s 4-Ald, The Read Constable: Yes. And then they wanted them to take 2s 6d? -Yes. Mr Holmes: Some people are goiifg to lose money on it. PATCHING THE STEAM ROLLER. A letter was read from Mr Hancocke, an employee of the G. W.R., with regard to some repairs to the Corporation steam roller which he had done in his own time. He said that he had given his price at £10. If the wor'k had been done by any firm, it would have cost more. Mr J. Lloyd: The bill was paid at the weekly finance meeting. The Mfciyor: Yes. Mr J. Lloyd: I thought it was not in order to pay more than L5 at a weekly finance meet- ing. The Mayor said that the matter had been referred to the Finance Comimittee with full powers. Mr J. Llioyd: Who valued it at £10? The Mayor: Anyone who knows anything about boilers knows that it is cheap at £10. The Surveyor (Mr Finglah) said that on previous occasions when they required repairs done to the boiler they found it necessary to get a man from Llanelly or from the G.W.R. to do them. As he could not get a man from Llanelly, he wrote to the G.W.R. The G.W.R. sent Councillor Martin to see the machine. He inspected it and said that a man could be found to do the work amid that the cost wouM be about ;t;10. He (the Surveyor) gave orders that the work was to be proceeded with. He did not take it that t,10 was quoted as a lump sum. He thought details wouild be supplied. Mr D. Williams said1 that he was told that it was worth £ 23 to Jt25. COUNTY EDUCATION SCHEME. A letter was read from the Clerk to the Oounty Council stating that Llanelly had applied for an amendment of the County Education Scheme so that she should have all her County Councillors on the County Educa- tion Committee. The Mayor asked Mr Holmes if he had any- thing to say on the subject. Mr Holmes: I have nothing to &ay except that I do not want to sit on the County Edu- cation Committee. At the same time if Llanely claims certain privileges, I do not see why Carmarthen should not claim them. Rev A. Fuller Mills said that if Llanelly had the wihole of her members on the Educa- tion Committee and Carmarthen had only one, Carmarthen would be placed at a great disadvantage. It Was decided to lapply,for full representa- tion. LONG MEMORIES. A discussion took (place over the state of a hedge in Richmond terrace, the boundary of the County School property. Mr Dunn Williams said that the hedge was working its way out to the middle of the roa l and making the road narrower. Rev A. Fuller MiHs said that a committee visited the place and they found that the .hedge had been like that from time imme- morial. Old people who saw it a hundred years ago said it was just the same. Mr Dunn Williams One of our workman said that it had worked out within the, last ten years. Mr Spurrell: I think Mr Mills Should .i rc the names of those who remembered :t a hundred years ago. WATERING THE STREETS. Mr Oliver Jones said that notices had been issued warning the public against wasting water. At the same time, the Corporation watering cart filled from the mains when they could get a supply from Mr Morgan's place in St. Catherine street. Mr Dunn Williams said that he saw a v%at,r cart filling from the main in John street. Tlfe Surveyor said that all streets in t ■ e neighbourhood of St. Catherine street were supposed to be watered from Mr Moi gan s supply. Mr Dunn Wililams What about John at. ? The Surveyor: St. John street ought to be watered from St. Catherine street. I ,nos not aware of that. Mr L. D. Thomas said that there would not be so much watering needed if the roads were jar-spraved. There was no dust on the roaJ from Furnace Lodge to Abergwili. When they had the tar macadam in Priory street the horse brush was not there a day. He lid not think they should buy a tar sprayer 6nd then alllow it to go into old iron. Mr Oliver Jones said that they had better take the pipe and the key from the drivers. It was very handy to go to the nearest hydrant when they had the pipe and key. Mr W. Thomas (Water Inspector) ) -e- sented a report showing the work of inspection lie had done. In most cases the taps were all right; in other cases the leaks had been recti- fied the same day. THE DISINFECTING APPARATUS. A discuss ion arose over the provision of water to the disinfecting apparatus. It was proposed to provide water by a pipe from the Grand Stand in the Park. Mr D. Samuel thought that the cost would be considerable. It would be better to sink a well and pump the water. The Medical Officer thought that the water which they would pump might not be so clean. It was decided by 10 votes to 7 to get the water by gravitation from the Park. Tho question then arose of getting an ease- ment from the Ecclesiastioai Commissioners of England to bring the pipe through their fields. Mr J. B. Arthur moved that they offer a sum not exceeding 5s a year for an easement. 'Mr Oliver Jones suggested Is. Mr D. Samuel: I move that we give three barley corns (laughter). It was decided to ask the CommiSSiiQners for their terms

II Carmarthen Bankruptcy Court

Carmarthen Bankruptcy Court. The Carmarthen Bankruptcy Court was held at the Guildhall on Tuesday the 11th inst., before Mr Registrar D. E. Stephens. The examinations were conduoted by Mr H. W. Thomas, Official Receiver. STOCK EXCHANGE SPECULATIONS. Mr Daniel Watkins, magistrates clerk and solicitor, had gross liabilities stated at £ 3,567 12s Id, of which L2,476 12s Id were expected to rank. The assets were estimated at 1:293 6s 3d. leaving a deficiency of £ 2,183 5s lOd. Debtor, in answer to questions, said that he was admitted in 1888. He commenced practice in Lampeter in 1899. Part of the house furniture had belonged to his wife before marriage, and his wilfe in June, 1914, paid him £85 for the rest. Rumours of his financial position got about, and the bank had asked him to close his account. There was no deed or bill of Bale; his wife paid him the money. He had oeen dealing on the Stock Exchange. Firsf of all some friends of his wanted to open a coal mine. Foolishly enough he advanced some money and lost it. Then he started a newspaper in Lampeter. The publisher went bankrupt, and lie (Mr Watkins) did not get a penny of all his ex- penditure. Apart from that, his losses were due to Stoclk Exchange transactions. He had called a meeting of creditors. A .pro- posal put before them was that he should pay 2s fTd in the £ and continue to pay a certain portion of his professional income, until 10s in the £ had been paid. The money lenders would not agree to ttrs. He was trustee of some small estates. Hê kept the accounts all in his own private account, and owed balances on them. The case was adjourned. INCREASED PRICES. Benjamin SoutheLl, Disgwylfa, Shaw street, Gowerton, gas fitter. In this case the lia- bilities were £13-1 lis and the assets jE38 18s 4d. Debtor alleged as the cause of his failure "Increased prices of materials and losses on contracts." Mr D. T. Morris, from the office of Mr D. H. Williams, solicitor, Gorseinon, represented the debtor. The examination was adjourned. TRANSACTIONS WITH MONEY LENDERS David Ivor Evans, Station road, Cardigan, coal merchant. The liabilities expected to rank were t932 Is 8d. and the assets to £ 207 18s Id. The causes of failure alleged by the debtor were "Want of capital; interest paid to moneylenders and banks." Mr W. Levi Williams appeared for debtor. Debtor said that he carried on business at Cardigan. He was now 43 years of age. He commenced business in 1907." He had no previous experience of the coal trade. He had been a farmer before. He had a coal yard at the station. He had no horses and carts. He had never kept a cash book; he kept a ledger day-book and bank book. He first resorted to moneylenders in 1913. He signed for £100 and received £ 70. That note was discharged. In January. 1914. lie signed a note for £50, and received £35. He also signed other notes for £150 and for R50. He first became aware of his insolvency six months previously. He believed that he become entitled to, a considerable sum on the death of a relative; but when the relative died no will could be found. The examination was closed.

MAYORS BELGIAN RELIEF FUND

MAYOR'S BELGIAN RELIEF FUND. Amounts already acknowledged: t709 8s Id This sum includes subscriptions that have been paid in advance, in some cases up to one year). Parish of St. Peters: t4. English Congregational Church JE4. English Baptist Church: £1 10s. Presbyterian College Students: 6s 8d.

BANDAGES URGENTLY NEEDED

BANDAGES URGENTLY NEEDED. An appeal has been made by the "Ladies' Emergency Committee of the Navy League" for bandages for the wounded in the Dardan- elles. They should be made of clean, un- bleached cotton, 6 feet long, in three sizes, 2!, 3J and 5 inches wide. They are urgently needed. As the sewing clasises in the town have now been discontinued, it is hoped that ladies will make them at home. Parcels of these bandages will be gratefully received for immediate despatch, by Mrs Bl'agdon-Riohards, Castle House, secretary Ladies Sewing Committee.

ST CLEARS

ST. CLEARS. WE are pleased to record the success of Miss Mary Howells, daughter of Mr T Howells, Maesyrbaf, Gellywen, St. Clears,' who has passed the elementary section of the London College of Music examination in pianoforte playing, with honours. CARMAIITHAN Printed and Published by the Proprietress, M. LAWRKNOB. at her Offioea i Blue Street, FBIVAT, May lifcb, 1925,