Collection Title: Carmarthen weekly reporter

Provider: The National Library of Wales

Rights: The copyright status or ownership of this resource is unknown.

View full details

Image 1 of 4 Next Last
Full Screen
3 articles on this page
Advertising

THE BLACKSTONE -ir JL i OIL ENGINE ) THE GREATEST LABOUR SAVER on the FARM. f > I SIMPLE RELIABLE ECONOMICAL. Never Beaten in Competition. 4 i, I Several Sizes can be seen actually at work at our Market Depot. WE SUPPLY AS" h. p. giPETTEn,si, OIL ENGINE FOR £ 32. ALL SIZES OF PETROL BOTES IN STOCE We are Sole Agents for theflCelebratedc j nT "INTERNATIONAL" PETROL ENGINES. EXPERT ENGINEERS sent to all parts of the country. ESTIMATES FRiERL J W. TBIST SON AGRICULTURAL ENGINEERS, CARlVLARTHEN. Bedstead Showrooms-5, St Mary Street. Furniture Showrooms-I, St Mary Street, 33 Quay Street. Branch—9, Priory Street. Farm Implements-Market Place, Carmarthen, Llanelly, Llandyssul, and Llanybyther. t t Pi LLS A MARVELLOUS REMEDY. r For upwards of Forty Years these Pills have held tlte first place in the World as a Remedy for PILES and GRAVEL, and all the common disorders of the Bowels, Stomach, Liver, and Kidneys; and there is no civilized Nation under the Sun that has not experienced their Healing Virtues. THE THREE IURMS OF THIS REMEDY No. I-GeQrge's Pile and Gravel Pills. No. 2—George's Gravel Pills. No. -GeDrge's Pills for the Piles. S)id everywhere in Boses, lg. lid. and 2e. 9d. each. By Post, Is. 2d. and 2s. lOd PROPMEfOB—J, B. GIORGE, N;R.pg,i HIITWAIN, ABEBOAftE. PRINTINGII PRINTINCII I GOOD CHEAP AND EXPEDITIOUS PRINTING EXECUTED AT THE "REPORTER" PRINTING & PUBLISHING OFFICES, 3 BLUE-STREET OABMAE TJEIE 1ST ORDERS BY POST receive prompt and careful attention. p R ICE S ON A P P LIe A T ION. rhe Carmarthen Weekly Reporter PUBLISHED IIVEBY THURSDAY EVENING, Circulates throughout South Wales generally, and has the CIARGEST IRCULATION IN THE COUNTY OF CARMARTHEN PillOB ONN PtlqNY; POST FREE 1/9 PER QUARTER THE BEST ADVERTISING MEDIUM FOR aLL CLASSES OF ADVERTISEMENTS. NOTICES TO QUIT FROM LANDLORD TO TENANT AND TENANT TO LANDLOlipik,- 7 J [May be obtained at the R-El'ORTEII OWICE," Blue-street,iCarn-iartheu. PRIJE ONE PENNY. 'X STOP ONE MOMENT X Oh Dear Doctor MUST My Darling die? There is very little hope, I But try TUDOR WILLIAMS' PATENT I BALSAM OF HONEY. WHAT IT IS I Tudor Williams' Patent Balsam of Honey Is an essence of the purest and most effica- cious herbs, gathered on the Welsh Hills and Valleys in their proper season, when their virtues are in full perfection, and combined with the purest Welsh Honey. All the in- gradients are perfectly pure. WHAT IT DOES 1 Tudor Williams' Patent Balsam of Honey Cures Coughs, Colds, Bronchitis, Asthma, j. Whooping Cough, Croup, and all disorders of the Throat, Chest and Lungs. Wonderful Cure for Children's Coughs after Measles. It is invaluable to weak-chested men, delicate women and children. It succeeds where all other'remedies fail. Wold by all Chemists and Stores in Is., 2s. 6d., an4 4s 6d. bottles. Great saving in purchasing larger size Bottles. WHAT IT HAS DONE FOR OTHERS. What the Editor of the "Gentlewoman's Court Tournal" says:— Sir,—The result of the bottle of your splendid Tudor Williams' Balsam of Honey is simply marvellous. My mother, who is over seventy, although very active, every winter has a bronchial cough which is not only distressing, but pulls her down a lot. Its gone now. With best wishes for your extraordinary preparation. W. Browning Rearden. YOU NEED NOT SUFFER! Disease is a sin, inasmuch that if you act rightly, at the right time, it can, to a great extent, be avoided. Here is the preventative The first moment you start with Sore Throat tae' a dose of I TUDOR WILLIAMS' F-A-TEUTT BALSAM OF HONEY. It has saved thousands I It will save youl It is prepared by a fully qualified chemist, and is, by virtue of its composition, eminent- ly adapted for all cases of Coughs, Colds, Bronchitis, Esthma, etc., it exercises a dis- dinct influence upon the mucous lining of the throat, windpipe, and small air vessels, so that nothing but warmed pure air passes into the lungs. It's the product of the Honeycomb, chemically treated to get the best results. The Children like it, THEY ASK FOR IT So different from most modicines. Nice to Take Cures Quickly For vocalists and pablic speakers it has no et,'ual, it makes the voice as clear as a bell. Manufacturer Tudor Williams, MEDICAL HALL, ABERDARE. TO POOR RATE COLLECTORS, ASSISTANT OVERSEERS, &c. FORMS of Notice of Audit, Collector s Monthly Statement, &c., Poor Rate Receipt Books, with Name of Parish, Particulars of Rate.&c., printed in, can be obtained at the REPORTEB OFFICE at Oheap Rates. Send for Prices. Rates. Send for Prices. THE CARMARTHEN BILLPOSTING COMPANY, NOTT SQUARE, CARMARTHEN. BILLPOSTlNGand ADVERTISINGS all Branches, throughout the Counties of Carir then, Pembroke, and Cardigan R. M JAMES. Manager. Carmarthen County Schools. THE GRAMMAR SCHOOL. HEADMASTER E. S. ALLEN, M.A (CANTAB). COUNTY GIRLS- SCHOOL HEADMISTRESS Miss B. A. HOLME, M.A., Late Open Scholar of Girton College, Cambridge. FEES:— £ 1 9s. per Term (inclusive). Reduction when there are more than one from the same family. The Term began on Thursday, April 2od 1915. Boarders can be received at the Grammer School. 1/1 £ WE CLAIM THAT 2/9 JD IPV TTBrS DROPSY, LIVER, AND WIND FILLS OVSfi Constipation, Backache, Indigestion,Heart Weak- ness, Headache, and r Nervous Complaints. I' g Mr. John Parkin, 8, Eden Crescent, West Auckland, writes, dated March 12th, 1912 I must say that they are all that you represent them to be, they are splendid, indeed I wish I had known about them sooner. I shall make their worth known to all who suffer from Dropsy." Sole Maker- S. J. COLEY & CO. 57 HIGH ST, STROUD,GLOS. | WEDDING CARDS. NEW SPECIMEN BOOK CONTAINING LATEST <3j EXQUISITE DESIGNS Sent to intending Patrons at any address on reoe pt of an intimation to that effect. PRICES TO SUIT ALL CLASSES. REPORTER" OFFICE 3, BLUEST.

I Joint Counties Mental HospitaL

:=: Joint Counties Mental HospitaL NEW LAUNDRY SCHEME AND GOVERN- MENT OBJECTIONS. A meeting of the Committee of Visitors of the Joint Counties Mental Hospital was held at the Institution on the 15th inst. Mr \V. N. Jones,, Tirydail, presided. Further correspondence was read from the Board of Control with reference to the pro- posed postponement of the Wauniago con- tract, and the suggestion was considered that all the balance remaining in the special build- ing fund (provided by the adjustment of the moneys paid by the counties of Carmarthen and Pembroke) be entirely devoted to the laundry contract. It was explained that the Board of Control had suggested the postponement of the con- tract for the renovation of W auniago (acquired for the purpose of relieving the over-crowding at the Institution) as it was of relative unim- portance compared with the Local Government Board's decision to restrict capital expenditure and the employment of labour. The Board of Control could not submit the contract for the approval of the Secretary of State, and main- tained that inasmuch as the contract for the erection of the laundry was more important, all the moneys in hand in the special building fund (provided by the adjustment of moneys paid by the counties of Carmarthen and Pem- broke) be entirely used for the laundry con- tract. To this the committee had agreed, and the erection of the laundry commenced, but now the Local Government Board declined to sanction the laundry contract, and the Secre- tary of State refused to remove the restrictions imposed by the L.G.B. with regard to the ex- penditure of capital and labour. Mr D. Evans, Manordaf: Can Wauniago be utilised without any alteration?—say as dor- mitories. as we are so overeriwded here. It seems a. pity that we have a block idle, without some use being made of it. Mr C. M. Williams, Aberythw vtli In that case we can make a precept on the counties for any repairs, apart from the Board of Con- trol, though if we are going to carry on any great alteration it must b submitted. The Clerk The counties might object to pay now because they can't get loans. With regard to the building fund, the committee had passed a resolution to pay for Wauniago, and also t500 for furnishing, and that the balance should go to the laundry fund. The Board of Control now suggested that the whole of the money should go to the laundry con- tract, the committee should determine the Wauniago contract immediately and make the best possible bargain with the contractor for I tlie payment of work already executed, and, as the immediate carrying out of the contract was impossible owing to the war, a Court of Law would hold tliat^ the contract was no longer binding. The Board assumed that in the interests of the ratepayers every effort would be made to determine contracts on the best possible terms. A Member: Does that interfere with the award made by Sir Henry Cunningham P The Clerk: The award says the money must be applied for certain purposes-building. re- pairing. etc., but it states in the award that the money should be looked upon as capital moneys. Mr C'. M. Williams said that was the most important committee meeting lie had attended When the Committee were making. every effort to put the Institution into a proper state and provide accommodation w hi;h had been needed for the last eight or nine years, the Commis- sioners had threatened to take matters into their owwn hands. Immediately the com- mittee were in a position to remedy this, this money was paid into the building fund, and in order to extend the accommodation, the committee purchased Wauniago. That build- ing was useless as it was now, and the- com- j mittee were coolly told by the Board of Con-, j trol that it was of no great importance. Well, J there were things taken in hand by the gov- eminent of far less importance than that. He t-aid stroiigiy they ought to proceed with the laundry. They could not possibly leave the poor inmates to sleep on the floor. Were they doing their duty to the poor inmates, and also to the counties concerned. In Cardigan- shire they had determined 0 ask their county member to move on their behalf. If a depu- tation had been al,lowed to state the case they could have brushed away his red-tapeism. The Committee had found room for a number of patients from Cardiff and packed their own patients oil the floor. And this was how they were treated by the Government. He said unless they did something these inmates would rise against them on the day of udgment. Al- though the ratepayers were crying for ecenomy, they were willing to spend this money on the poor people. Mr Ben Evans, Pencader, said he was not so well versed in this subject as Mr AYilliams. but it seemed to him that although this money had undoubtedly to be kept for this particular purpose, still the Board's consent might he very necessary to this particular improvement before it could be carried out. Suppose they wanted to put up a superintendent's house, it would come within the clause of the agree- ment but they woidd have to have the Board's consent. The Clerk We hare not formally applied. You have not yet decided to use this money for the laundry contract. First of all the Committee has to decide whether, consent or no consent, you wish to use this money for the laundry contract. At the present moment the committee has not decided to apply the money towards the laundry fund. All you have done is to apply so much for Wauniago and furni- ture and the balance for the laundry contract. Mr D. Evans said the committee very much desired that this work should go on. They were in possession of considerable information and that information drove them on with the work. They had information which the Board of Control had not. On the other hand. was it not possible that the Home Office and the ]A)ca,l Government Board had information of another nature—the seriousness of the war. the conserving of national resources, etc.—and that they thought no money should be spent without their knowledge. The Government's fuller knowledge of outside conditions might very much modify the committee's eomse of action. The suggestion that a deputation should wait upon the Government was a most reasonable one. because in that case the local knowledge might be pitted against imperial There was no doubt in their case they might I 1 call it a parochial view-it was most desirable or absolutely necessary that this work should • go on. But if the government had certain know ledge, the committee might be prepared to forego their own views and not press them so strongly. There was no doubt the Govern, was in possession of knowledge which made them terribly anxious that no money ghould be spent which could be possibly avoided. He himself feJt. disposed, notwithstanding the committee's fuller knowledge of local condi- tions. not to press them. The safety of a nation was of more paramount importance than the safety of any given locality. Mr Ben Evans said the question was, had they the right or not to spend the money irre- spective of the L.G.B. If they had some doubt about it they ought to get counsel's opinion. Rev Hy Evans. Llangwm: It strikes me there is a saving clause "unless the matter is very pressing." It seems to me we must accept what Mr Evans suggests, or else that there should be a driving force from this committee behind the red-tapeism in London to allow this work to go on. I think we should be throwing good money after bad to get coun- sel's opinion. Mr C. M. Williams: If we wanted to borrow t6,000 it would be very different, but we have the money just like any ordinary public body w ho has the money at the bank. If there is an urgent matter in the whole of England and Wales it is this. Mr Howard Griffiths (St. Davids): I venture to propose that we ask the Government to p receive a deputation, and that the deputation appointed at the last meeting be asked to go up. I am not quite prepared to go to the ex- tent Mr Williams suggests, that we should knock our heads against these people. And even if we had the power, I don't think we should look at it in that light. But I quite agree that it is an urgent case, and that it is not in any way taking money from the Gov- ernment. It is simply diverting the money from Wanna go to this laundry. Mr Dd. Evans, in seconding, said the fact that the Institution was overcrowded to the extent of 25 per cent. was a very serious matter. Still the Government took a more serious view of the financial situation than the committee did. iMr LI. Rees. Narberth: Would it not be well for the deputation to ascertain exactly what is the percentage of eligible men work- ing on the contract. I understand that one of the reasons why they are restricting the contract is because they want to set eligible men free for military purposes. I made en- quiries from the Clerk of the Works this morning, and I found the majority are all over military age. The-Chairman said that when the deputa- tion waited on the Government they ought also to secure the services of the members of Parliament in order to make as strong repre- sentations as possible. Mr Howard Griffiths's resolution was car- ried, a.nd the Committee decided also to rescind1 all former resolutions with regard to Wauniago and devote all the money to the laundry.

Refuted Imputations

Refuted Imputations. CARMARTHENSHIRE MINISTER'S CHARAC TER VINDICATED. The. Rev William Llewellyn Davies, C.M minister, ot appeared before Mr Justice Bargrave Deane in the Probate and Divorce Division on Monday, in compliance with an order of the Court.. made a fortnight ago, directing him to aend and give evidence in res-pect of two wills which, he had destroyed ,and which he made last yearfor the late All's -rn, Rachel Beynon, of Ashfiekl-row, Llansadwrn, who died in June. It was alleged that Mr Davies had refused to give any information respecting the wills. The Hon. Reginald Coventry now appeared | for Mr Davies. who went into the witness-box. Witness stated that deceased w as a member of his congregation, and in the autumn of last year she asked him to assist her in making a will. He made a will, and it was duly attes- ted. deceased being in a fit condition to make a will. The executors of this will were James Rees. Llansadwrn; John Rees. Llandovery (both next of kin); Isaac Rees, Llangennecli; and Mr Griffiths. Monmouth. In reply to his Lordship, witness said that lie destroyed the first will because testatrix asked him to do so. and hedidso in her pre- sence. The will contained many details, and testatrix divided her furniture between eight or nine persons. The Judge said if w itness destroyed the will at the testatrix's request it was a good revoca- tion. Witness, continuing, said that in March or I April testatrix wanted to revoke the will she made in the autumn, and asked him to make another will. He did so, but afterwards destroyed hoth wills in her presence. Some time after Mrs Beynon's death lie was ap- proached by Mr Rees W. Price, Llandovery, solicitor for Mr Rees* James, but he refused to disclose the contents of the will beca use he thought it would be a breach of trust. He was prepared, however, to do as the court directed. In cross examination by Mr Cotes-Preedv, witness denied Rees told him that Dr Hopkins had said Mrs Beynon was insane. No one told witness she was so. After the first will was made the testatrix was living with Moses j Muses at Llansadwrn. whose wife was a mem- ber of his congregation. He burned the wills in his own house, but he tore them up at the same time inthc presence of the testatrix. He told Mrs Beynon he would destroy the second will. as the will had given him so much trouble. He advised her to get a solicitor to make a will for her. Things had not been square between him and Mr Moses for some time, and Moses, had threatened him. That, however, was not the reason he declined to give information regarding the wills. Mrs Moses being a beneficiary. Mr Cotes-Preedv asked for an opportunity to call rebutting evidence, but his Lordship ) said lie was satisfied the wills were destroyed and that the story of the Rev W. L. Davies was true. He would grant Mr Da vies his costs. His Lordship it-fused to adjourn the matter. Mr Coventry sair various imputations had been made upon his client in the local papers in which there was no truth whatever. i