Collection Title: Carmarthen weekly reporter

Provider: The National Library of Wales

Rights: The copyright status or ownership of this resource is unknown.

View full details

Image 1 of 4 Next Last
Full Screen
4 articles on this page
Advertising

PLEASE CALL TO SEE OUR STOCK OF AUTUMN & WINTER MACHINERY I r* ■■ Ll -D ALt- .c. o-,o"2=.-c.i¡:' i j. 'i IN T A-\A on W. TIIOftt S & SOI lEOMON&EBS, HOUSE FMIS2EES. m AGEICULTUEAL IMEttS, CAR MARTH EN. Ironmoogery- -10 Hall Street and 9 Priory Street. Bedstead Showrooms-5, St Mary Street. Furniture Showrooms—i St Mary Street. Farm Implements—Market Place, Carmarthen, Llanelly, Llandyssul, and Llanybyther. v. Telegrams "Thomas, Ironmongers, Carmarthen." Telephone No. 19, t') PRINTINGIN PRINTINGII GOOD CJ0EAP AND EXPEDITIOUS PRINTING EXECUTED AT THE ♦'REPORTER" PRINTING & PUBLISHING OFFICES, ) a BLUE-STREET | ORDERS BY POST receive prompt and careful attention. —1 .p R ICE S ON IPPLICATION. • fhe Carmarth enW eekly Reporter j PUBLISHKD ZVZRT THOBSDAY EVENING, Circulates throughout South Wales generally, and has the LARGEST IROULATION IN THE COUNTY OF CARMARTHEN PBICIK OKK PENNT J POST FBSX ty9 PER QOABXBB THE BEST ADVERTISING MEDIUM FOR aLL C £ A3SFS OF ADVERTISEMENTS. NOTICES TO QUIT FROM LANDLORD TO TENANT AND TENANT TO LANDLORD. Ma) be obtained at the "RKPORTKK OFFICE," Blue-street,lCarmartheo. PRIJE.ONE PENNY. EORGE ILENK6 LLS A MARVELLOUS REMEDY. For upwards of Forty Years these Pills have held the first place in the World as a Remedy for 4 PILES nd GRAVEL, and all the common disorders of the Bowels, Stomach, Liver, and Kidneys; and there is no civilized Nation under the Sun that has not experienced their Healing Virtues. i. ■■1 THE THREE vRMS OF THIS REMEDY • No. 1—George's Pile and Gravel Pills, No. 2—George's Gravel Pills. No. 3-George'sPilisfor the Piles, Sold everywhere in Boxes, I& 3/- each. By Post, 1/4 & 3/2. .J I ..J. Oil- J. tL G Hn(a, inn*wain, ASIMSDA^F* Y STOP ONE MOMENT X Oh Dear Doctor MUST My Darling die? There is very little hope, But try TUDOR WILLIAMS' PATENT BALSAM OF HUNEY. WHAT IT IS Tudor Patent nn Isa m of lIone) Is an essence of the purest and most effica- cious herbs, gathered on the Welsh Hills and Valleys in their proper season, when their virtues are in full perfection, and combined with the purest Welsh Honey. All the in- gredients are perfectly pure. WHAT IT DOES 1 Tuilor iVilIinins' Patent Balsam of Honey Cures Coughs, Colds, Bronchitis, Asthma, Whooping Cough, Croup, and all disorders of the Throat, Chest and Lungs. Wonderful Cure for Children's Coughs after Measles. It is invaluable to weak-chested men, delicate women and children. It succeeds where all other remedies fail. Bold by all Chemists and Stores in Is ltd, 2s 9d, and 4s 6d bottles. Greal saving in purchasing larger size Bottles. WHAT IT HAS DONE FOR OTHERS. What the Editor of the "Gentlewoman's Court Journal" says:— Sir,-The result of the bottle of your splendid Tudor Williams' Balsam of Honey is simply marvellous. My mother, who is is simply marvellous. My mother, who is over ,SeverIL'ty, although very active, every winter has a bronchial cough which is not only distressing, but pulls her down a lot. Its gone now. With best wishes for your extraordinary preparation. W. Browning Hearden. YOU NEED NOT SUFFER! Disease is a sin, inasmuch that if you act rightly, at the right time, it can, to a great extent, be avoided. Here is the preventative The first moment you start with Sore Throat tae a dose of TUDOR WILLIXMSI PATEN'I' BALSAM OF HONEY. It has saved thousands 1 It will save you! It is prepared by a fully qualified chemist, and is, by virtue of its composition, eminent- ly adapted for all cases of Coughs, Colds, Bronchitis, Esthma, etc., it exercises a dis- dinct influence upon the mucous lining of the throat, windpipe, and small air vessels, so that nothing but warmed pure air passes into the lungs. It's the product of the Honeycomb, chemically treated to get the best results. The Children like it. THEY ASK FOR IT So different from most medicines. Nice to Take Cuies Quickly For vocalists and pablic speakers it has no efoual, it makes the voicr as clear as a bell. Manufacturer Tudor Williams, MEDICAL HALL, ABERDARE. TO t'OOR RATE COLLECTORS, ASSISTANT OVERSEERS, &c. FORMS of Notice of Audit, Collector s Monthly Statement, &c., Poor Rate Receipt Books, with Name of Parish, Particvilat,s of Rate.&c., printed in, can be obtained at the REPORTER' OFFICE at Cheap Rates. Send for Prices. THE CARMARTHEN BILLPOSTING COMPANY, NOTT SQUARE, CARMARTHEN. BILLPOSTINGand ADVERTISINGin all its Branches, throughout the Counties of Oarir* then, Pembroke, and Cardigan R. M JAMES. Manager. I Carmarthen County Schools.- THE GRAMMAR SCHOOL. HKADMASTEB: E. S. ALLEN, M.A. (CANTAB). COUNTY GlnL. SCHOOL HEADMISTRESS Miss B. A. HOLME, M.A., Late Open Scholarr of Girton College, Cambridge. FKKS £ 1 9s. per Term (itclusive). Reduction when there are more than one from the same family. The term began Wednesday, September 15th. Boarders can be received at the Grammar School. I. 1 i/ij WE CLAIM THAT 2/9 DR. r-r 7 s DROPSY, LIVER, AND WIND PILLS 1 CVRJI Constipation, Backache, I n di gestion, Heart W eak- ness, Headache, and Nervous Complaints. Mr. John Parkin, 8, Eden Crescent, West Auckland, writes, dated March 12th. 1S12 "I must say that they are all that you represent them to be, they are splendid, indeed I wish I had known about them sooner. I shall make their worth known to all who suffer from Dropsy." Sole Makar— S. J. COLEY & CO, 57 HIGH ST, STROUD,GLOS. I WEDDING CARDS. -> NEW SPECIMEN BOOK CONTAINING LATEST (5, EXQUISITE DESIGNS I Sent to intending Patrons at any address on receipt of an intimation to that effect. PRICES TO SUIT ALL CLASSES. REPORTER" OFFICE 3, BLUEST. [

Henrys Claim

Henry's Claim. THE WORKIXG oFIreAL TRIBUNALS. "SINGLE MEN FIRST. (The following has been written by Capt. H. S. Townroe, Private Secretary to the Director-General of Recruiting) in order to explain clearly, and in homely phrase, how t'-Ie local Tribunals will do their work). Henry stopped on his way back from work and read the poster, headed "Single DH n Fkst." describing the group system i»jt duced by the War Office. He went home q.f1Ï.cikly and at tea (I to his mother. "Do you know, mother. ] shall really have to go this time, They uo going to take all single men first. J would like to go Is i volunteer." Mrs Morris replied resignedly. "V r veil. my d"«i, if you will, you will. I ilo'i't set- though that it is right to take a widow's TWO sons. Still, if they want you to go and help beat the Kaiser, I suppose you must." Mrs Morrils showed visible signs of teal's, and Henry dropped the subject for the time being. Henry that night could not get to sleep. His mind revolving over his attempts to join the Army since August 4th, 1914. Since his brother, Robert, had enlisted, he had al- ways wanted to join the local Territorials, but his mother, terrified at the idea of both herwns becoming soldiers, had always per- suaded him that his place was in her stationer's shop, and that drills, at night would interfere with his work. Then when war broke out. he begged his mother to Jet him go with his old pals. She explained that business in the country had to be car- ried on by someone, and that he was doing his bit behind the counter as well as if he woro khaki. Henry rolled over on the other side of the bed. as he realised now what a lame excuse that had been. Still he had been everything to his mother since his father died when he was three years old, and he had given way to her. For her sake be had received the cold shoulder from Maggie. He loLled over oil the other side, as he thought of those winter months when Maggie refused to speak to him on the grounds that he was a "little slacker." Then came Mr Lloyd George's demand for munition workers. After a great struggle with his mother he had persuaded her to allow him to leave the shop and return to his former work of varnish making to which he had been apprenticed. His mother had agreed to engage Maggie to help her in the shop. ( Accordingly, in April, Henry went off to the Varnish Factory^ and by October had assist- ed in the manufacture of many thousands of gallons of varnish, which was used to cover high explosive shells. Henry rolled over again as he thought of those hot stiniit)er months in the smelly factory, and his qualms of conscience, its further friends joined the Army. At last. he decided to join the next day. With that decision he went to sleep. He went to the recruiting office the follow- ing morning, was found medically fit, re- ceived his 2s 9d pay. and was passed into Section B., Army Reserve. He was told that as his age was 26 years and as he was a single man. he was in No. 9 group. < 1916 had come. For ttiree months. Henry J had walked the streets, usually in Maggie's company, proud of tlw armlet with the red crowii displayed on his left aim. He was so proud of the armlet that when he wore his overcoat, he always transferred it so that it could be seen, and Maggie usually carefully adjused i,t with the help of a safety pin. Then one day as he passed the Post Office, he saw in the window a notice with the Royal Arnt3 on the top, stating that in a few weeks' time Group 9 would beealled up il)j- service with the Colours. The time had come. and he was face to face with the great opportunity he would have to leave Ms mother and fight tor I KM1 and for the other mothers of Eiitain in the ranks of the Army. When he returned home he discussed the question with his mother whether he should appeal to the local Tribunal to be postponed to a later group. She advised him to consult the works mana- ger. The following day, the works manager asked him whether he was willing to appeal, as the firm must have his consent before they could send in a claim that he was required for the manufacture of varnish. Henry haid "1 am ready to do whatever 1 am told and go wherever J am wanted." "That is the right spirit." said the works manager. "WeJ!. I think you are helping your country better here than anywhere else, but it is not for me to say. It is for the represeiiitatives of the country sitting on the local TrilmnílJs." The employers, therefore, filled in a form. They stated that Henry. was not only indi- vidually indispensable, hut that they had been trying for six months to obtain others also to do similar work. They said they were solely engaged on the manufacture of varnish for shells a.nd that they had already sent over 40 per cent, of their men to the Army or avy. They were prepared to give half wages to any man who had enlisted under the group sys- tem. but asked that Henry snould not be called up for several months. They stated t further that they had just engaged six men I invalided from the front as unfit- for further service, and were training them to take the places of Henry and five otilicii- men. The case on one Wednesday evening. It was held in a room in the Town Hall. The slaite iMayor was in the ch a ir. He knew Henry well, for he was a superintendent of the Sun- day School which Henry had attended as a hoy. On his right sat Admiral Caroe. who lived at the HaU just outside the town. Next him was Joe Bartlett, wjjo had organised the great strike in 1911. and whose reputation foi- fivii-v recruiting speeches was well known throughout the whole of the country. Also sitting tlieiv were two members of the local Town Coitii(-,ii-oiie a. Free Church minister, and the other a -local shopkeeper. Henry expected to have to make a speech and. as a matter of fact, had told his mother exactly mhat he intended to say. The Chairman, however, asked the military representative to state why he did not agree with the claim. Captain Balfour made the following tite- mClt I have talked this case over very carefully wiitli my Advisory Conunitttee. We fully understand how hard it would be for Mrs j Morris to have to give up her second son. hut we wish to point out that with he ) dependent's allowance and half wages from j the firm, she will not lose a penny from the weekly allow ance always given her by her boy. Her shop is not dependent on-her eon, and she has now trained a girl ass.istant to take his place. With regard to the t-laim made by the firm of varnish makers, we have consulted a representative of that industry, and we have come to the conclusion that Henry Morris is not indispensable for any length of time—in fact, we understand that in a few weeks' time it would he possible to replace him. We, therefore, ask that he bo postponed to a group which will probably bo called up a little later. We would not urge this if the military necessity was not so great as you are all aware." The Chairman then spoke. He said. "My tribunal has read carefully the requests set forth by Henry Morris and his employers, asking for him to be postponed for several months. We shall not need to trouble tho appellant any further, as we have decided to postpone his calling up until Group 14. In hort. we have postponed his calling up for five groups. We hope that. that will be satas- factory to him. and will give time to his firm to find a substitute for him." This concluded his case. The work mana- ger reported to the managing director that evening. "We shall have young Morris for some time. That will get over our diffi- culties." The Managing Director replied "This is an excel lent system. It leaves the decision not to the individual conscience or to the indi- vidual employer, but to the representative of the Nation." Henry told his mother that night. "You don't know, mother, what a relief it is to mo not to have to decide for myself whether 1 should go. but to know that I am just in the hands of my cotintrvoaii-d am doing my bit wherever I am told to go." B. S. TOWN ROE.

WAR SEEN FROM THE AIR

WAR SEEN FROM THE AIR. Among the lavishly illustrated articles on themes from the War in the brilliant Christ- mas double number of the "Windsor Maga- zine" is an article by Claude Grahame-White and Harry Harper, written with the inten- tion of making clear to those who have never flown what air work in warfare means, with all its strangeness and its perils, and parti- cularly with that wonderful bird's-eye view, thousands of feet above a widespread battle- front, which has given the military areoplane —to use the words of our own Cammander- in-Chief—an "incalculable value" in this great campaign. Writing of the moment when the enemy's lines have been reached. Mr Grahame-W lirto says :— "You are looking down almost directly on the ridge where- the German trenches lie- Suddenly your pilot, a trace of excitement MI his face, points earthward. The trenches, which a moment- be I ore showed nothing to the eye, have now sprung to life. You are reminded, in an instant, ot the sudden dis- turbance of an ant-heap, liny figures swarm into view, the whole ridge seems alive with them, and behind the trenches, under the shelter of the slope of the ridge, you can see them moving in columns. "The ant-heap has been disturbed to some purpose. There is method, evidently, in the movement- of these tiny shapes. Out from the trenches they swarm, forming neatly de- fined columns; and as these columns pass down the slope of the ridge- towards the trenches of the enemy, they spread out at the head and extend some distance right and left, The effect, when seen from your altitude, is decidedly curious. These columns do not appear like assemblages of men. each living unit distinct. They seem rather like somo huge, creeping things that have awakened suddenly to life and are moving snake-liko down the lidge: and. when the head of tho monster appears to spread out as ;t advances, you are reminded irresistibly of some gigantic tadpole. "Down the wiope the columns move. They are -teady at first, and their progres- is irre- sistible. like that of some stream ol waiter that is running down hill. But soon you not-o a hesitancy at the extended head of the columns. The smooth lines are broken, and they seem to change shape. Gaps appear here and there that are quickly filled, but tho movement forward becomes fitful. All this you know is the effect of the British gunfire. A hail of led. pitiless and never-ceasing, is sweeping across the open space that lies be- tween the ridge and the British trenches near the wood. "Perceptibly slower now is the advance of the columns. The whole of the advanced line conies momentarily to a halt: then it is rein- forced and thrust forward by the weight of the column behind. But the progress is slower, more irresolute, and soon there comes a halt that is longer than any of those before. The line wavers, hut "t-surges forward again- Then it stops. Again conies the forward surge, but this time it spends itself almost immediately; and the next moment, with a rearward movement nothing can stay, the columns are pouring back to the trenches." The all-important interests and problems of the war inspire many of the notable fea- tures of this year's brilliant Christinas double number of the "Windsor Magazine." No fewer than sixteen plates, finely printed in colours, for instance, are on themes from the war—naval, military, or civilian in subject. Some of these plates are reproductions of important pictures, others arc portraits of Leaders in the War, accompanied by a vivid series of b ojgraphicdl sketches. Further plates in colours include a large double-page picture by C. C. Wilmshurst. and cartoous oil topical war themes by such clever artists us Lawson Wood and Harry Rountree. Among the important war articles are a. survey of the great work of Women Doctors in the War, by Beatrice Harraden, and an eloquent paper on Austialisi and the War, by Sir Geoige Rcid. who. as High Commissioner for the Australian Commonwealth since 1910, writes with espeeiail authority on the subject. The fiction of the number includes the i opening instalment of a new romantic series by H.VIliwell Sutcliffe. and omplete stories by Gertrude Page. H. de -Yore Stackpole. S. Macnaiightoii. Eden Phillpotts. Marjorie Howen, Barry Pain. Harold Bindloss. Keble Howard. Fred M. White, and Captain Chas. G. D. Roberts. Thii-s wealth of fiction 19 < finely illustrated by well-known artiste.

Advertising

j "LIXSEED COMPOUND" Ainseed, Senega | Squill, tolu, etc.) for cough and colds, II influenza. etc.