Collection Title: Carmarthen weekly reporter

Provider: The National Library of Wales

Rights: The copyright status or ownership of this resource is unknown.

View full details

First Previous Image 2 of 4 Next Last
Full Screen
16 articles on this page
Advertising

BmmfflnMi ESTABLISHED 1854. DAVID fiTOSWILUAMS BOOKBIIiTDEE/, ZEJTC, I CHAPEL ST., CARMARTHEN. Magazines, Periodicals and all kinds of Publications Bounc^ to suit the owner's taste. Hymn Books, Bibles, etc., repaired and re-covered. Books Bound in Publishers' Cases at Publishers' Prices. BOOKBINDING TO THE TRADE. Autumn and Winter Season 1915-16. Misses LEWIS & CLARE have the pleasure to announce that they have now on view a grand Show of High-Class Millinery, repleat with the very 0- Latest Novelties. The favour of a visit is cordially invited. Cavendish House, ————— 41 King Street, Carmarthen. A. H. STOODLEY, ELECTRICAL ENGINEER & CONTRACTOR GARFORTH, BARN ROAD, CARMARTHEN. Electric Lighting and Power, Private Plant, Bells and Telephones a Speciality. All Business will receive my Personal Attention. WATCHES & CLOCKS REPAIRED. JEWELLERY REPAIRED LIKE NEW. GILDING AND ELECTRO PLATING. HIGH-CLASS WORKMANSHIP. ESTIMATES GIVEN ALL WORK GUARANTEED AT JOHN WILLIAMS Watchmaker, Jeweller, & Silversmith, 9 & 10 Lammas Street, 0 &. 1: L &1 .4- 3 E?. i r-r 1-1 M 1*-T Established 1336. -AI WEDDING CARDS. Anyone requiring the above should, before placing their orders, send for our NEW SPECIMEN BOOK CONTAINING THE CHOICEST DESIGNS OABDS AND PBICES SUITABLE FOB ALL CLASSES W. S. MoRitis, Wholesale Grocer, Corn, Flour and Seed Merchant, O-A. ttjl&JLJEZjTttJElJSr. Nat. Telephone, 50. Telegrams, Morris, Merchant Carmarthen." SEND FOR PRICE LIST1 ST PETER'S, CARMARTHEN THE FORTY-EIGHTH ANNUAL CHEISTMAS TBE1 will be held at the ASSEMBL YROOMS, CARMARTHEN ON THURSDAY, 6th JANUARY, 1916, WHEN- LADY STAFFORD HOWARD Has kindly consented to open the Tree AT 2.30 P.M. ADMISSION ONE SHILLING. Contributions are earnestly solicited, and should be sent to any of the following Stall-holders VICARAGE STALL- LNIrs Parry Griffiths, The Vicarage, FANCY STALL-Mrs Lester, Furnace Lodge. FANCY & Toy STALL—Miss White, King Street. Do. do. —St. Peter's Church Choir. (Contributions to go to Mrs Reeves, 54aKing-st.) REFRESHMENT STALL—Mrs Spurrell, The Misses Spurrell, and Mrs De Rees, Picton Terrace. FARMERS1 STALL—Mrs James Jones, Cwmoernant Farm Mrs Stephens, The Avenae; Miss Jones, Floiida House. SWEET STALL—Mrs D. Pughe Evans, The Parade. J TEA STALL—Mrs Evan Jones, Greeubauk. COFFEE STALL—Mrs Lapham Thomas, Mrs Nicholas, t King Street; Miss Mary Davies, 106 Priory Street. f The Proceeds will be devoted to various important I Parochial objects. ———— I 1\ C.E.T.S. ST. DAVID'S DIOCESAN BRANCH. THE WAR AND TEMPERANCE. A MEETING WILL BE HELD ON MONDAY, DECEMBER 6th, 1915, AT THE SHIRE HALL, CARMARTHEN, WHEN ADDRESSES WILL BE GIVEN BY MAJOB RIQ-O- (Late M.P. for Westmorland), Of the Parliamentary War Savings Committee, AND SIR. STAFFORD HOWARD, K.C.B, THE CHAIR WILL BE TAKEN AT 8 P.M. BY THE BISHOP OF ST. DAVID'S. Further particulars may be obtained from the Rev. J. CALEB HUGHES. 24 Picton Terrace, Carmarthen. PRIVATE XMAS AND NEW YEAR GREETING CARDS. New Specimen Books CONTAINING LATEST AND Exquisite Designs Sent to intending Patrons at any address on —receipt of an intimation to that effect Prices from 2s. per dozen. REPORTER OFFICE, 3 BLUE ST. YENO'S LIGHTNING COUGH CURE The Ideal family remedy. Contains 110 opium, morphine, paregoric, or other harmful drug. Cures at all ages. COUGHS.COLDS & INFLUENZA j Veno's is the surest and speediest cure for these winter ills, the nest pro- tection against more serious dangers. CHILDREN'S COUGHS Soon yield to Veno's-ev £ n Whooping cough. And there in JIO trouble in giving it, children simplv love Veno's. Other sizt-a and, 3/ La rge 111 FL from chcmists anil store* —p • — I I I mm W everywhere. Refvse sub- ■ I I A • stitutei, they are not S Bottle I I "just at good as Veno's." r YOU CAN RELY ON Clarke's B41 Pills as a M Safe and Sure Kemedy J in either Sex, for all Acquired or Constitutional Discharges from Urinary Organs, Gravel, Pains in i the Back and kindred complaints. Over 50 years' Success. Of all Chemists, 4s 6d { f t |>K |?>c per box, or sent direct, post free, ■ ( for Sixty Penny Stamps by the Ii41 PILLS Proprietors—The Lincoln and /x, r *r Midland Drug Co, Ltd,Lincoln. from Mercury v ST, PETER'S CHURCH, CARMARTHEN. SUNDAY EVENING, DEC. 5th (at 8 p.m.) ORGAH RECITAL by Mr HAROLD MALKIN, F.R.C.O. Vocalist Mr Lewis GileR. Violincel'o Mr Gustave Jones. Offertory will be given to Organist and Choirmaster. t. Carmarthenshire Red Cross Society President: Mrs Pryse-Rice, Llwyn-y-brain. A GREAT JUMBLE SALE will be held at the G-WALIA 1-1 A. T-i T-j, ST CLEARS, On TUESDAY, DECEMBER 7th, 1915 at 12 o'clock punctually, to embrace the Parishes of St Clears, Llanfihangel, Llanddowror, Llanginning, Eglwyscummin, Mairos and Pendine, IN AID OF THE ABOVE FUND, when all kinds of LIVE AND DEAD STOCK, FARM AND KITCHEN PRODUCE, FRUIT AND VEGETABLES, IMPLEMENTS, ARTICLES OF FURNITURE, And any other thing likely to realise the smallest amount, will be SOLD BY AUCTION The Proceeds will be distributed as follows:—One- half to the Carmarthenshire Red Cross Society, and One-half to the Parent Society in London. Entries will be taken up to and including the actual time of Sale, but it is hoped that all Contributors will either make their entries to the Local Com- mittees in the different Parishes, or to the Hon. Sec., Mr W. V. HOWELL THOMAS, St Mary's Auction Mart, Carmarthen, as soon as possible. The following Auctioneers have consented to give their services gratuitously:—Messrs J. HOWELL THOMAS & SON, JOHN FRANCIS & SON, LLOYD & THOMAS, JAMES DAVIES & PHILLIPS, T. BEVAN ARTHUR, T. JOHN. It is hoped that the Country generally will con- tribute generously to the above Fund, and that the inhabitants of St Clears and neighbourhood will attend the Sale and purchase liberally. REFRESHMENTS will be supplied at Moderate Charges. willbeheld in V; J3I Vy JDJ JLV 1 the Evening. A SEPARATE BUILDING, duly certified for Religious Worship, named Davies Memorial Hall, situated at George Hill, in the Civil Parish of Llandilo Urban, in the County of Carmarthen, in Llandilo-fawr Registration District, was on the 18th day of November, 1915, registered for solemnizing Marriages therein, pursuant to 6th & 7th Wm. IV c. 85. Dated the 23rd November, 1915. R. SHIPLEY LEWIS, Superintendent Registrar. TO ADVERTISERS. PREPAID SCALE OF CHARGES FOR ADVERTISING IN THE REPORTER. No. of One fhree Six Words. Insertion. Insertions. Insertions. s d s d s d 20 1 0 2 3 3 6 28 1 6 3 6 4 6 36 2 0 4 0 6 6 44 2 6 4 6 6 6 The above scale only applies to the Situations, To Lets," and To be Sold by Private Treaty," clases of Advertisements, and must be paid for in, advance, or the ordinary credit rate will be charged, HALFPENNY STAMPS, or Postal or Post Office Orders, payable to M. LAWRENCE, at Carmarthen, Replies may be made addressed to the ReporUi Office, and will be forwarded to advertisers when stamped envelopes are sent. IN MEMORIAM CARDS—We have a large and assorted stock to select from. Prices to suit all classes.—Reporter Office, Carmarthen. JAMES JONES, Billposter and Advertising Agent for Kidwelly and neighbouring Villages. All work duly executed. Address :—Station Road, Kidwelly. VISITING CARDS from Is 6d for 50; Printed V on Ivory Cards. -Repoi-ter Office, Carmarthen. RITING PAPER AND ENVELOPES. TT Large quantity always in Stock. -I?epo?-ter Office, Carmarthen. \\f EDDING CAKDS—Prices and styles to suit ▼ ▼ • all Classes. Speciment Book, containing the Latest and Choicest Designs, sent on application.— Reporter Office, Carmarthen. ■— WANTED, Out-door APPRENTICES (Male and Female) for the General Furnishing.— Harries, Towy Works, Ltd., Carmarthen. WANTED-Steady and reliable Man (abstainer) w to take charge of one horse and to assist in warehouse.—Apply, Herbert Jones & Co., Carmar- then.

No title

SHORTHAND.—Master Arthur Jones, Car- marthen House, has been successful in ob- taining a theoretical certificate in Pitman's Shorthand. DEATH.—We regret to record the death of Mr John Evans, of Penrheol farm, Johnstown which took place on the 30th November, after a long illness. Deceased who was 49 years of age, leaves a widow and four children, with whom the greatest sympathy is felt. The funeral took place on Saturday at Gwyddgrug, Pencader. The officiating ministers were the Rev J. Dyfnailt Owen and the Rev Griffith Thomas, vicar of St. Davids, where deceased was a member. CONCERT.—On Thursday, November 28, a concer was given at Lammas street School- room by the Myrddin Glee Society, under the oooiduotorsihip of Mr William Jones. The chairman was Mr W. J. Wall is-Jones, who in a short address referred to the desirability of holding concerts at such a time in our his- tory but having in view the fact that it was in aid of thhe Sunday School funds he had come to the conclusion that no exception could be taken to holding the concert. There was also the question of music which had such a soothiing effect. A glowing tribute was paid to the work done by Sunday Schools, and it was remarked that what was learnt in Sunday School was not forgotten in after life. After the address the following programme was gone through:—Party, "Bydd Meius gofio y Cyfammod" solo, Miss Marilf Jones; solo, Mr John Thomas; duett, Messrs Tom Davies and Briniley Jones; part song, Ladies choir; solo, Mr T. B. Davies; solo, Miss Maigjgie Clarke; recitation, Miss Anniie Jones solo, Mfos H. J. Jones, (encored); part song, Ohoir; solo, Miss Gladys Price; solo, Miss Mair Jones (encored); recitation, Mr Cynnog Huglhes (encored); trio, Mr B. J. Evans and friends; National Anthems of the Allies, The Choir. The singing, etc., throughout was of a high standard, and Mr Jones is to be com- pliimented on the pleasing programme he had arranged and on the singing of his choir. Miss L. A. Jones and Mr Watts acted as the accompanists. The usual vote of thanks ter- minated an enjoyable evening, and before leaving the congregation joined in singing "Hen Wlad fy Nhadau," Mr Tom Davies taking the solo. A meeting will be held at the Shire HaJJ, Carmarthen, on Tuesday next, in connection with the St. David's branch of the C.E.T.S., when addresses on "The War and Temper- ance" will be delivered by Major Rigg (of the Parliamentary War Savings Committee) and Sir Stafford Howard, K.C.B. Full particulars i1 our advertising columns. ORGAN RECITAL.—An Organ Recital will be given by Mr Harold Mialkin F.R.C.O., at St. Peter's Church. Carmarthen, on Sunday even !ng next, at 8 p.m. Mr Lewis Giles will be the soloist, and Mr Gustave Jones will be the violence Hoist. "LINSEED COMPOUND" with Warm water is a« excel lent, gargle for sore throat, colds, coughs, etc.

ELECTION OF DEACONS AT ELIM

ELECTION OF DEACONS AT ELIM. The following gentlemen were elected deacons of Eltiim Congregational Church. Ffynonddrain, on the 25th ult.: Messrs Jos. Davies, Trevaughan Lodge; Daniel Havard, 39, TreVaughan; D. Jeremy Rees, Clifton House; William Thomas, Ffynonddrain; Daniel Jones Thomas. 49, Tnevaughan; and Thomas Williams, Brynamlwg.

ILLNESS OF COUNCILLOR JOILX LLOYD

ILLNESS OF COUNCILLOR JOILX LLOYD We are sorry to learn of the serious illness of Coun. John Lloyd. Dark Gate, Carmarthen, who has undergone some serious operations recently at a private nursing home at 18, Portland street, London, W. The first I operation was successfully performed by Dr I Peter Daniel on Friday morning and the second on Monday night, the other specialists in consultation include Dr Rowntrie, Dr Young and Sir Arthur P. Gould. RED CROSS HOSPITAL. The Secretary desires to acknowledge with many thanks gifts of game, vension. vege- ¡ tables, eggs, linen, baskets, periodicals, etc., from the following:—Lord Dynevor, Mrs I Owen (The Palace), Mrs Gulston, Mr John Hinds, M.P., Mrs Spence Jones, Major Cass, Mrs Lloyd, Giilfachwen; children of Blaina Schools; Mrs Rees, Llanllwni; Mrs Kenneth Walker; children of National School, St. Clears; Council Schools, Carmarthen; Miss Rogers, Oakiield; Ammanford Working Party (per Mrs W. N. Jones.

CARMARTHENSHIRE INFIRMARY

CARMARTHENSHIRE INFIRMARY. The House Committee begs to acknowledge with many thanks the receipt of the follow- ing gifts: Vegetables and flowers, Mrs Spence Joses, Cwmgwili; pheasants;, Mrs Gywnne- Hughes, Glancothi; periodicals, Mrs Gwynne Hughes, Glancothi; Mr R. M. James, Notts square.—W. D'. Thomas, Secretary.

The Question ot Health

The Question ot Health Tlio question of health is a matter which to •are to concern us at one time or another when Jnflnensa is so prevalent as it if just now, eo it is well to know what to taie to ward off an attack of this mist weakening disease, this epidemic catarrh or cold of an aggravating kind, to combat it whilst under its baneful influence, and particularly after om attack, for then the system is so lowered as to be liable to the most dangerous of com- plaints. Gwilym Evans' Quinine Bitters 11 acknowledged by all who have given it a fair trial to be the best. specific remedy dealing with Influenza in All its various stages, being a Preparation skilfully prepared with Quinine and accompanied with other blood purifying and enriching agents, suitable for the liver, digestion, and all those ailments requiring tonio strengthening and nerve increasing propeities. It is invaluable for those suffer- ing from colds, pneumonia, or any serious ill new, or prostration caused by sleeplessness, or worry of any kind, when the body has a general feeling of weakness or lassitude. Send for a copy of the pamphlet of testi- monials, which carefully read and consider well, then buy a bottle (sold in two sizes, 2a 9d and 4s 6d) at your nearest Chemist or Stores, but when purchasing see that the name "Gwilym Evans" is on the label, stamp and bottle, for without which MIle are genuine. Sole Proprietors: Wain, Bitten Manufacturing Company, limited, I laneilj, South Wales.

MAYORS BELGIAN REFUGEES FUND

MAYOR'S BELGIAN REFUGEES FUND. Parish of Sit. Peters: E4. Prdordy Congregational Church: L4. Elim Chapel: t2. Tabernacle Chapel: L2. English Baptist Church: tl 10s.

tLighten Your Work For

Lighten Your Work For Christmas. When preparing your Puddings and Mince- meat..buy shredded ATORA Beef Suet, it is guaranteed absolutely pure, goes further and keep otr months. Your grocer seUs it— 101d per lib and 5id per tlb Caftm.

IMAYORS RELIEF IN BELGIUM FUND

MAYOR'S RELIEF IN BELGIUM FUND. Parish of St. Peters: £10. Elim Chapel: £ 1. Tabernacle Chaipel: VJs. Refugees at Rhydygors: Is 7d.

CARMARTHEN VOLUNTEER TRAINING CORPS

CARMARTHEN VOLUNTEER TRAINING CORPS. Order for week commencing Decern. 6th. Rifle range is open for practice and class firing as usual. Drill: Thursday, at 2.30 p.m,; officer in com- mand, Platoon commander J. Saer. Sunday, at 2.30, at the Market; officer in command, Sub-Company Commander H. S. Holmes.

CARJMARTHENHIRE FOXHOUNDS

CARJMARTHENHIR.E FOXHOUNDS. Decem. 7—TreJech; 10.45. Deioem. 10—Green Castle; 10.45.

Advertising

Indigestion and "Nerves" Extremely Severe Case Cared by Dr. Cassell's Tablets. Mrs. Holmes, of 87, Bolton Brow. Sowerby Bridge, says: I had got into a low. run. down state, with no life' in me, and though I had medical treatment I only got more depressed and neurasthenic. No food agreed with me; what- ever I ate caused wind and palpitation, and the fspliUintr headaches I endured wer« really agonising at t .me6. I got no sleep at night, and I was so ncrVOU6 that I dreaded to be left alone. I had suffered for over a year when I got Dr. Cassell's Tablet.s. Soon after I began to feel brighter. I could sleep at night, and I grew stronger and better daily. All the bead aches and indigestion left me, and presently I found myself well and strong." Dr. Cassell's Tablets Dr. Cassell's Tablets are a genuine and tested remedj for all foTRis of nerve or bodily weakness in o'.d or young. Compounded of nerve-nutrients and tonics 01 indisputably proved efficacy, they are the recognised modern home trea'.ment (or NERVOUS BREAKDOWN KIDNEY DISEASE NERVE PARALYSIS INDIGESTION SPiNAL rAEALYSIS STOMACH DISORDER INFANTILE PARALYSIS MAL-NUTRIT ION NEURASTHENIA WASTING DISEASES NERVOIJS DEBILITY PALPITATION SLEEPLESSNESS VITAL EXHAUSTION gkN)EM!A PREMATURE DECAY Specially valuable for Nursing Mothers, and during the Critical Periods of Life. Chemists an(I stores in all parts of the world sell Dr. Cassell's Tablets. Prices Is., Is. 3d.. and 3s.-the 3s. size being the most economical. A FRXE TRIAL SUPPLY will be sent to you on receipt of name and address and two penny stamps for postage and packing. Address: Dr Cassell's Co., Ltd., 418 Chester-road, Manchester.

Carmarthenshire Chamber of Agriculture

Carmarthenshire Chamber of Agriculture. AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENTS, LABOUR SCARCITY AND STARRING ANOMALIES. A meeting of the Carmarthenshire Cham- ber of Agriculture was held at the Ivy Bush Royal Hotel on Wednesday. Mr J. Hinds, M.P. (president of the Chamber) presided. The Chairman eakl that they had met together to consult, to congratulate, and to co-operate. It is essential that every man should do his best. The first business we have is to beat the Germans. The three things we require arc men, munitions and money. He did not agree with those who said that we are not doing our bit in this war. We have shouldered our burdens splendidly. We had already put three millions of men in the field, and we had lent money to the tune of four hundred millions to our Allies. As so much depended on money, we had to take care of the great industries which produced the national wealth. Our revenue for the year is 305 millions and our expenditure 1,590 millions, leaving a deficiency of 1,285 millions and next year probably the expenditure would be greater. It was therefore essential that we should keep intact the great fabric of our national industry. Mr Hoplkiins Jones, agricultural organiser, Rhyl, gave an address on "Agricultural Ex- periments and Food Production." He said that there had been a good deal of prejudice against what had been called the "theoretical farmer." After all, Science is merely sys- temiised nowledge; it is theory put to the test and not found waning. Agriculural experimentiS may be carried on in the field, in the laboratory, or in a combination of the laboratory and the field1. Roehampstead was founded in 1843 by private enterprise as an agricultural experimental station. The first German experimental station was founded in the year 1851. Woburn was afterwards foun- ded by the Royal Agricultural Society. Many farmers said that it was impossible to economise and at the same time to increase the production of the soil. The farmer often thought that if 4ibs of decorticated cotton cake daily did a certain amount of good, the use of 81bs would do twice as much good to the animal. It is not the quantity of food which an animal eats which counts, but the quantity which it assimilates. Beyond that, the extra food only makes manure. One ex- periment was tried in which two sets of bullocks got the same amount of food; one set got no water except that which is in the food, whilst another got as much water as they wanted. Those who got unlimited water gained weight more rapidly than the others. Experiments showed that there was no gain by using more than a certain quantity of manure. In a good many cases it was found that 10 tons of farmyard manure to the acre gave a better crop than 20 tons to the acre drid. Another method of economy was to take greater care of the manure heaps. When the heap heated and gave off steam, the farmer lost an element for which he would pay £100 a ton to a merchant. A good deal could be gained by sowing good varieties of crops. There were superior varieties of wheat, of swedes, and of potatoes. He found one variety of potato gave 6 tons to the acre, whilst another under identical conditions gave 14 to 16 tons to the acre. Some varie- ties are immune to disease. The spraying of potatoes to prevent disease was not very fre- quent in Carmarthenshire when he lived here; it is a very common practice in North Wales. The spraying gave an increase of about 4 tons an acre in some cases; the average is about 2i- tons. A change of seed in potatoes often gave an increase of 4 tons to the acre. The change of seed is not so important in the case of grain if it is dean. The Government had at last awakened to the necessity of improving stock. A Live Stock Officer had been appointed for the district. Farmers could do a good deal by keeping mrllk records. Farmers often reared the calves which appeared at the most convenient time, and not those from the best milking strain. By selection, the milking record of a herd had been raised from 300 gallons a month to 800 gallons. We can't get wheat from Aus- tralia and Canada- without sending money out of the country, and money is one of the essentials for the winning of the war. Home production is very important as it enables us to keep money at home. We are told that the farmers are not doing their duty; but if it. is pointed out to them there is no class more ready to do their duty. A good deal might be effected by the use of labour- saving machinery. In the Vale of Clwyd, the farmers combined and procured petrol and steam tacikle to plough the land. Soldiers had been released on furlough to help to put in the winter crops; the Government was therefore in honour bound to allow soldiers to help to gather in the crops. The Chairman said that he was glad to learn that the farmers are now readily con- suiting the Advisory Committees as to the crops they should sow and other matters. In Wales the land cultivated produced an aver- age of £4 19s 6d an acre; Ireland's average was jE7 10s; Scotland was also far ahead of Wales. The great difference between Ireland and Wales was, he believed, largely due to the greater amount spent in promoting scien- tific agriculture in Ireland. Mr J. Jones, Plas, said that he had found himself that an animal gained nothing by being overfed. The difficulty in regard to the manuring of the soil is that the farmers usually do not know the composition of their j soil. The great difficulty now is to get lime, but that may be to some extent remedied by the use of basic slag. He had found a little nitrate of soda a splendid thing for green crops. Mr J. J. Bo wen said that no matter which political party was in power, the farmer was allowed to muddle along as best he could. A good many farmers had started life with their heads under water and never got their heads above water. The farmer is the best judge of the method of farming most suitable to his land. One farm might carry more stock and another farm might be able to put in more corn. If every farmer grew half an acre of corn extra, it would make a big differ- ence for the whole kingdom. He was not a "starred" man. He did not know whether he was supposed to go away and to leave the farm to be worked by somebody else. If he were called up, it seemed to him that the only thing to do would be to sell the farm. Mr D. J. Harries said that he had tried 12 potatoes for experiments. Eight of them were not worth growing. The crop was not more than the seed. There was something on the leaves of the potatoes and the mangolds. The Board of Agriculture said that there was not enough iron in the soil .That did not seem true, for the earth was all red and full of iron. An analysis showed that there was more iron in the soil than anything else. The Board of Agriculture did not know every- thing. The best potato he had found was "King Edward." He did not say "King Edward VII" but King Edward. The best plan for dairy farmers was to select the heifer calves of the best milkers every May, and to sell off the old cows as the heifers came into profit. Mr T. Williams, Pontcarreg, said that a load of manure in a wet season weighed three times as much as it would in a dry season. The difficulty thus was to compare the quan- tities. Mr W. Harries, Dryslwyn, said that the butchers complained now that the calves did not get enough cake. He knew a farmer who fed his cattle according to the books and who always gave them the quantity of food which the books recommended. That farmer bought a number of hullocks in October at 1:16. After feeding them all the winter he sold them for jE12 each in March. Mr Herbert Williams, Llanginning, said that agricultural experiments taught farmers to make two blades of grass to grow where one grew before. Many farmers thought that the more manure they put on a meadow the better the return. Beyond a certain limit, the manure was wasted as it was washed away by the weather. Mr Daniel Johns, B.Sc. (agricultural or- ganiser for Carmarthenshire) said that suffi- cilent attention was not paid to experiment. If one had the soil analysed, one got a certain amount of useful information, but the infor- mation was not so reliable as a field experi- ment. A field experiment is within the grasp of every farmer. It was easy to set aside a corner of a field for an experiment. Mr J. J. Bowen said that there was one matter to which he wished to call attention. The Board of Agriculture stated the price of sulphate of ammonia was £ 14 10s a ton. That was the price at the works. It cost another Is 6d per cwt. delivered at the Stores at Carmarthen. v Mr S. H. Anthony asked the President if he would advise farmers who had not been starred to enlist in Class B. If the farmer left, the farm could not be carried on. The Chairman said that farmers who were unstarred should be attested at once. Then they could apply to be included in Section B. Before however they could make any such application they would have first of all to be attested. Care would be taken not to call up such men until the very last. By that time we should all have to go. The Government realise the necessity of keeping sufficient men on the land, and if the reserves in Group B were called up, it would be time for us all to be grasping swords and bayonets. Mr S. H. Anthony said that there was a brickworks in his neighbourhood. The em- ployees were all starred. Would the farmers have to go before them. The President said that the whole matter of "starring" was subject to appeal. Men might ask to be starred, and the Recruiting Officer might ask that starred men should be "unstarred." It was for the various tribunals to decide the appeals then. Mr Hopkin Jones said that before men could make any appeal they must first of all be attested. He thought "President" an even better potato than "King Edward." The President advised farmers to go in for poultry at the present time. Mr D. Hinds, Ownin, said that the farmer was always spoken of as "yr hen ffarmwr." People forgot that the farmer was carrying on a business like any other tradesman. The Red Cross Sale showed that farmers were as ready to help with a good cause as any other class. Farmers paid their men 15s to 18s a week and their food. That was better than 22s to 24s a week and no food, which they got from employers in town. Mr S. H. Anthony: One word, Mr Chair- man. I hope you will try to get practical men at the head of affairs instead of a lot of swanks as we have at the present time.

Stitch in Time

Stitch in Time. Thore is an old saying "A stluh In tim« aayw nine" and if trpon the first fymptome ol anything being wrong with our health we were to resort to some simple but proper meana of correcting th6 mirchiet, Idne-tentba of the suffering that invades oar homea would be avoided. A dale of G rilym Eram1 Quinine Bitters taken wten y f-a feel the least bit out of sorts is jost th» t "stitch in time." You can fet Gwilyra L ans' Qiunine Bittei-a at any Chemists or Stoi 

Carmarthen County Council

Carmarthen County Council. Mr W. J. Williams presided at a meeting of the Carmarthenshire Main Roads and Bridges Committee held at the Carmarthen Guildhall on Wednesday. THE BRECHFA CHEMICAL WORKS. A letter was read from the Llandilo Rural District Council asking the County Council to main the road between Nantgaredig and Brechfa. There was a good deal of traffic over the road now as the Chemical Works were manufacturing material which was re- quired as muniitions of war. The Chairman said that that would have to go to the January meeting. Mr Dudley Williams Drummond paid that it was not necessary to refer it to the January meeting seeing that they had adopted a reso- lution some time ago not to main any more roads. Mr Mervyn Peel stid that they would have to wait until the scheme for the classification of roads was completed. Mr D. Davies, Llandebie: Clault you make a grant to it until then? Mr Dudley WiMiams-Drummond: It had better be referred to the Minister of Muni- tions. BIG EXPENDITURE. Mr Dudley Williams-Drummond called attention to the fact that they had spent C1173 on improvement at Garnant although the contract was only for L954. Mr W. N. Jones said that in the course of the work an old colliery working was dis- covered and it had to be culverted. Mr Drummond said that, between this and that £ 1000 at Tro Derlwyn it was time to stop extravagance of thus sort.

I landovery County School

I landovery County School. ANNUAL PRIZE DISTRIBUTION. The annual prize distribution took place on Monday at the Llandovery Oounty School. The chairman of the governors, Mr C. P. Lewis, presided, and the prizes were distrif- buted by Mrs Edmondes-Owcn, wife of the vicar. The school was congratuloa,ted on its success during the year, the number of pupils having increased from 68 to 81. The head- mistress mentioned that several of the old boys and three of the masters had joined H.M Forces. Mr Lleufer Thomast, in the course of an interesting address, dwelt oif the func- tions of intermediate schools, and said in a rural district such as theirs they ought to de velop a strong bias towards rural life and interests generally. They should aim at meeting the needs of the district. Llandovery being an agricultural centre should naturally have an agricultural side, and lie impressed upon governors who lived in the town to keep this phase of the children's' education well in view. He was glad to notice that they were already specialising here along certain lines in the direction he had indicated. They had established something of a reputation in domestic subjects. In the past Wales had been neglectful in this respect, with the result that they had very poor cookery. It was a bye word and reproach. He also laid stress on manual instruction, and mentioned that we were going to have a Royal Commission on higher education in Wales. Its chief function ought to be to focus public opiiiiion in Wales itsclif and not try to impose on Wales some model scheme which migh suit England hut not the Principality.