Collection Title: Carmarthen weekly reporter

Provider: The National Library of Wales

Rights: The copyright status or ownership of this resource is unknown.

View full details

Image 1 of 4 Next Last
Full Screen
4 articles on this page
Advertising

PLEASE CALL TO SEE our STOCK OF imm9mooo- ¡ r 'j( s '_c :, f f' AArm MACHINERY. Arm LO 11lle .L,fcCfORJ1£IOK Latest 11Î1)}Ove(1 21m^ If &j # BTBB MAD& tdt' H:-æ A '11 ..4 &¡, Ii Il MbK^fX'-—B^-T f '^TV 011RWID MAIN PBAMB. WP7 v7"' ~W STRONG DRIVE CHAIN. IBmp-i-f- g STEEL PLATFORM. §.y: ] wide range ojt adjustment ^m0 floating elevator, SIMPLE knotter. TETE MoCormiok WiMro'w Loader WILL PICK UP A TON OF HAY IN 5 MINUTES. f ."C ¥ ¡ •J' 'V <40/" f Built entirely of Steel. -+ I S\ • 1 Made to pass through ordinary | Easy in Action. •" '^A v •^ jf2 s' WiCTv#rA r^C% ?* • ;„ Tv <5^ H-V' fcM Light in Draught. ^^tw; ■> -C, 'zm mi'iiimiiir ninii | j|6 TIliM.tS & ■ SOI RUN iouss" ran. "m1 • @ ¡¡¡!;I, ,U U t. ¡¡¡¡ ä1 AGRSeULiyiM li £ "1-0 '?, ,i" Rr: Ii.. 0"11 'II CAR1VLAR' 'wl.t:> Ironmongery—io Hall Street and 9 Priory Street. Bedstead Showrooms-5, St Mary Street. Furniture Sliow i-ooms-.l,, St Mary Street, Farm Implements-Market Place, Carmarthen, Llaneily, Llandyssul, and Llanybyther. Telegrams-" Thona- Ironmongers, C^i rmarthen." Telephone-No. 19. i r. u ri P I L E GRAiE L B N PtLcLS 0 >4: "J, -1 A MARVELLOUS REMEDY* ..L _U -.4.. ,) ,) ji, .,J:- IL),LŸ c- :1..6 For upwards of Forty Years these Pills have held the first place in the World s a "Remedy for PILES nnd GRAVEL, and all tlie common disorders" of the Bowels, Stomach, Liver, and Kidneys; and there is no civilized Nation untiler tiie Sun that has not experienced their Healing Virtues, .=r- T THE THREE H URMS OF THIS HEMEDY No. ] -Ge(\rgE.'s Pile and Gravel Pills, No. 2 -George's Gravel Pills. c. No. 3- George's Pilla for the Files, Fold everywhere in Boxes. 1/3 & 3/- each. By Post, 1/4 & 3/2. f>HOPMEf0&~J. », PafmSS, EU!.I*.S<,V HIS? WAIN, ABEKIUgfl. PRINTING! JRINTINGlj (OOP CB -i-"jA.P AND EXPEDITIOUS PRINTING- EXECUTED AT THE 

IMr Asquith on the Coming Victory

Mr Asquith on the Coming Victory. PROSPECTS NEVER SO BRIGHT. A meeting was held on Tuesday night in the Queen's Hall, London, when the Prime Minis- ter. with Mr Bonar Law, the Earl of Derby, and other statesmen occupied the platform, the occasion being the celebration of the second anniversaryof the declaration of war on Ger- many. The Earl of Derby presided. The vast hall was filled some time before the commence- ment of the proceedings, a.nd the utmost enthu- siasm prevailed. Lord Derby read the following telegrams from Admiral Jellicoe and Sir Douglas Haig: Admiral J elJ icoo, The second anniversary of the commencement of the war finds the British Empire full of confidence in the final result (cheers). This confidence is due to the f Tact that the cause for which we are fighting is just. as well as to the knowlwedge we possess of tho fighting qualieies displayed by the forces of the Mother Country and of the Empire beyond the Seas (cheers). Sir Dottglas Haig.—The second anniversary of the war finds the British Army, which now comprises units from all parts of our Empire, on the offensive. The great army of working men and women at home and overseas have contributed very grr-tly to this result. Their continued hard work and their decision to take no general holidays until our objectives have been obtained will certainly decisively effect issues of the war in the coming year of the struggle. Two year' desperate warfare in the trenches have still further inceased the feel- ing of comradeship which binds us to our Allies, and makes us still more inflexible in our j determination to carry through to victory this war which was none of our choosing*. AVe look forward with confidence to success and a tri- umphant peace (loud cheers). Lord Derby said when Sir Edward Grey, as he then was, used the expression, "We cannot stand aside," he was right (cheers). Honour prevented us from standing aside then. Honour prevented us from standing aside now. We were firmly united in the determination to see the militarism of Germany crushed once and for all (cheers). He referred to German outrages, and said one should talk less of se- curing vengeance and and more of placing our- selves in a position by which we could secure the vengeance (cheers). The Government and the country were united in a common cause, with a common object, and we ought to give the Government our complete confidence (cheers). Do iet us have unanimity and con- fidence in those who are in office, he pleaded (cheer)). Mr Asquith was ioud'y applauded on rising to move the following resolution:— Thnt on the second anniversary of the de- claration of a righteous war this meeting of the citizens of London records its inflexible determination to continue to a victorious end the struggle in maintenance of those ideals ot diN j ucitict i<» 0 .« — /-I sacred cause of the Allies. He said that two years ago in the week or weeks preceding the outbreak of war Germany was the victim of a double delusion. She was absolutely certain that, whatever we here might do or say in the way of protest, we shou'd never join France and Russia in arms. And she was equally sure that the weak and, it seemed to be. the defenceless kingdom of Belgium could be cajoled or coerced into allow- ing her what she most needed—a right of way into France. The calculation was that we in Great Britain, having devised some formula to escape from treaty obligations would watch as detached spectators, with folded arms, the giadua'ly unrolling spectacle of the devasta- tion. if not the enslavement, of Belgium, the spoliation of the whole system of free states in the west of the European Continent, and the setting up at our very doors of a dominating 11 isni. and menacing despotism. That was a mistake (laughter and cheers)— and as it turned out a very costly mistake, for in the two years that had since passed, this Empire, the most peace-lamily of units on the face of the civilised globe (cheers) had raised and sent into the field five millions of its sons to frustrate those designs (cheers). Never even in the tangled and bungred web of German diplomacy had there been all error so crude in conception and so disastrously fatal to its authors cheers). When the glove was thrown down two years ago and was taken up by the Allied Powers they very soon re-organised, and they knew it well tolday, that we had reached one of those epoch-making issues in which the test was between separate and irreconcilable ideals (cheers) between the forces which stood for freedom and variety of type of organisation for the unfettered progress ot humanity, and the foces which were bound sooner or later to suppress and to all the possible seeds of a transformed and regenerated world (cheers). It was the growing consciousness that this war was something more than a clash of aruns that accounted for the new spirit which had been breathed into our nation (cheers). He would like to call particular attention to the unbroken unity of the Alllies. Nothing had been more remarkable the last year than the success with which the Allies had developed and pursued a common policy. At this moment there was a complete concert between them. There could not be a better practical illustration of the fact than this con- current offensive which was being now pushed with such vigour and success on no less than three fronts of the theatre of war. Next, coming to ourselves, lie thought the most conspicuous and encouraging feature of the last year had bean the enormous growth, 1 bolh in number and quality, of our fighting forces. He would not revive the varied con- troversies about recruiting, but thought all would agree that the most glorious and stimu- lating fact in the creation of our new armies was tbe vast number of men who had come forward to risk life in the service of the State. Lunl Kitchener more than any other man called that marvellous force into being. welded it into a compact and disciplined mass (cheers) and these new armies had been gaining for officers and men alike immortal honour (cheers) What was lie to say of the debt of the Allies to the ?\ :t\? The Navy like the Army threa- tened to try conclusions with the enemy in the open field. The enemy took care that tJieir chance of doing so should be few and far be- tween. Let us never forget that it was the Navy which wa^ throttling the I if e of Germany There has never before been such a demons- trative proof of the supreme importance of the command of the sea. As to our enemy, he was everywhere on the defensive. In none of the theatres of war did lie retain or attempt to retain the initiative, and there are signs which could hardly be de- ceptiive of material weakening and exhaustion —all the more reason for the Allies to co- operate and maintain the struggle. There was one feature in the latter develop- ments of the enemy's methods which seemed to indicate a sense of desperation. He re- ferred to the recrudescence of deliberate and calculated barbarity. When this story came to be written, it would be found to blacken eTe-n the besmirched annals of the German Army. Nor could we forget the latest infamy directed against ourselves—the murder of Captain Fryatt-which has stirred the indignation and outraged the conscience of the whole civilised world. We, in concert with our Allies, went on Mr Asquith, are considering what are the most appropriate and effective methods of dealing with thes atrocities l(oud cheers), and thear authors (loud and prolonged cheering), and the nation which condones, and not only condones but applauds them (further cheering). But remember it is a condition of any action we take now or hereafter that if it is to be really effective we mus win the war (cheers). That is the supreme object to which everything else is subordinate. It is the united opinion of the Allied General Staff that our prospects of victory have never been so bright of so full of promise (cheers). We have seeh during the last six weeks the Brilliant Russian successes (loud cheers). We have seen the complete failure of the Austrian offensive in the Trentino (cheers). We have seen the Turkish retirement in Armenia (cheers). We have seen the check, and I hope I may say the failure, of the German attack on Ver- dun (cheers). We have seen the magnificent advance of the Allies on the Somme (cheers). This is not a time for faintheartedness, for petty criticisms (cheers) for the rather contemptible pastime of scapegoat hunting, certainly not for even the semblance of divided councils and of a broken and wavering front. All that we need, all that the Allies need, and ail that our cause needs is concentration of purpose, and so far as we in this country are concerned, the continued ex- ercise throughout the kingdom and the Empire of the same unselfish, far-sighted patriotism which, during this next week is leading hun- dreds of thousands, nay. millions of our best workers, men and women alike to forego their holidays (cheers). By the victory of the Allies the enthrone- ment of public right in Europe will pass from the domain of ideals and aspirations into that that cf concrete and achieved realities (loud cheers).

W elsh Nationalism

W elsh Nationalism. Brigadier-Genera; Owen Thomas, when pre- siding at a crowded concert in aid of Belgian wounded at Pwllheli on Monday, said that the brave Allies would redeem their pledge to utujiiuLu auu i fULv.il iu (ivm long. Small nations, he said, were the salt of the earth. The enemy might kill the people, but could never kill their soul. which lived for ever. Small nations were not afraid to stake the fate of their countries in the cause of justice, honour and humanity, America, on the other hand. was a greailo country, with a great population and great jj wealth, but, as a nation. American people had no soul. Other wise they would not have allowed their solemn obligation in Belgium to <■ go by the board. He was a great believer in small nations. The British Empire was made up of such. It might be compared to a fine old oak tree, with its branches sheltering and pro. j' teeting all who came under it (appla l < ). This old tree would flourish so long as it continued { to protect the rights of nations, justLe and <" humanity. But they must have mei who thoroughly understood it and not cosnupo itau 1 statesmen who thought all roots alike. They wanted men who respected the national senti- ment, traditions, customs, language :tnd the religion of the different nations of the British I; Empire. He was all for encouraging national i; sentiment. He was an ardent nationalist. The true nationalist was non-political, non-denomina- tional. and loved his native country, its people language and traditions. He had lived among many nations, and admired much that was goo many nations, and admired much that was good in them, but his magnetic compass always pointed to Wales. Nationalism had been a great force in Wales at all times, but never so much as during the last two years. The martial spirit of the Welsh people seemed for centuries to have been dead. but when the national call echoed through the hills Wales responded magnificently (applause). Young men roiled up in grand form, and in the course of the first twelve months no less than 200,000 men joined the colours. They were full of fight, and there was no sacrifice too gwat for them (applause). He lei a great moral re- sponsibility in regard to these men. He visited their homes and saw their wives, mothers and children, and knew what it meant to these i people to take away their breadwinners. He knew instinctively that these men's one thought concerned those depending upon them He pledged the nation's honour that they would not be allowed to suffer great hardship on their return. It was a duty to see that the Government looked after these brave men, and with the voluntary fund now being raised lie hoped to render assistance to those in j special need and outside Government relief. The men who volunteered a.t the beginning of the war and their dependents were. the best ) as-set to the country. „ j On the proposition of Mrs Lloyd George, the general was wamrly thanked for his address.' ?

PliMBREY FATALITY

PliMBREY FATALITY. An inquest was held at Uanelly on Monday by Mr W. W. Brodie on Earnest Chester (14). Als street. Llaneily, who died at Pembrey on ? Saturday, a number of trucks having passed [ over him. John Hy. Rees (14), Als street, | I Llaneily, said he and deceased were in a truck, j 1 being conveyed with other workmen to Der- 'i wydd Crossing, where the usual custom was for the men to alight and proceed to the G.W.K-. station at Burry Port. On Saturday deceased jumped from the truck on to a passenger train i -which was stationary on the siding. Witness | then heard shooting, and fh-> trucks were brought to a standstill, after which he saw a crowd around the deceased. About 50 men jumped off at the sinie time. John Bevan, foreman, who travelled in the trucks, said lie found the lad lying across the metals with both j legs broken. A verdict <)f '*Accifl,(,ii till death" was returned. i J