Collection Title: Carmarthen weekly reporter

Provider: The National Library of Wales

Rights: The copyright status or ownership of this resource is unknown.

View full details

Image 1 of 4 Next Last
Full Screen
6 articles on this page
Advertising

PLEASE CALL TO SEE OUR STOCK OF — AGRICULTURAL^ MACHINERY, 2-HORSE BINDER '.7 THE LIGHTEST IC A6 EVER XADE. HFLR SOME POINTS- ■■ I N, RIGID MAIN FRAME. STRONG DRIVE CHAIN. STEEL PLATFORM. A WIDE RANGE OF ADJUSTMENT WI FLOATING ELBVATOR. SIMPLE KNOTTER. THE McCormick Windrow Loader WILL PICK UPA TON OF HAY. IN 5 MINUTES. "zh,: v- Built entirely of Steel. —— ^B | ade to pass through ordinary gatewavs. Easy in Action. Light in Draught. W. TBonlS & soi sasnBs. housi num. id am clam a& AGRICULTURAL ENGINE. HS, CJ-A-IRM-A-^THCEIISr. Ironmongery-lo Hall Street and 9 Priory Street. Bedstead Showrooms-5, St Mary Street. Furniture Showrooms—I St Mary Street. Farm Implements—Market Place, Carmarthen, Llanelly, Llandyssul, and Llanybyther. Telegrams—" Thomas, Ironmongers, Carmarthen." Telephone—No. 19. j I I EORGE LE to GMV l | PILLS VA A MARVELLOUS REMEDY. I "#- For upwards of Forty Years these Pills have held the first place in the World as a Remedy foi PILES and GRAVEL, and all the common disorders of the Bowels, Stomach, Liver, and Kidneys; and there is no civilized Nation under the Sun that has not experienced their Healing Virtues. THE. THBKE i5 ORMS OF THIS REMEDY: No. i George's Pile and Gravel Pills. No. 2 -George's Gravel Pills. No. 3- George's Pills for the Piles. ôld everywhere in Boxes, 1/a & 3/- each. By Post, 1/4 & 3/2. VHOPIUEtOR-J. «> «»!«>' ■• UWWA,N> ABERDAKEl PRINTINGI, PRINTING' GOOD CHEAP AND EXPEDITIOUS PRINTING | -t' EXECUTED AT THE "REPORTER" PRINTING & PUBLISHINGiOFFIOES IS B L-UFj-ST-B,EET, CAR-MARTHEN ORDERS BY POST receive prompt and careful attention. -r- p RIO E S ON AP P LIe A T ION. The Carmarthen Weekly Reporter PUBLISHED EVERY THURSDAY BVBNINO, Circulates throughout South Wales generally, and has the LARGEST IROULATION IN THE COUNTY OF CARMARTHEN PILIUM ONIN PtPlqY; POST FRix 119 PBB QOABTEB i THE BEST ADVERTISING MEDIUM FOR ALL CTA3SFS OF ADVERTISEMENTS. NOTICES TO QUIT FROM LANDLORD TO TENANT AND TENANT TO LANDLORD, May be obtained at the "RKPOBTEB OFFICE," Blue-street, Carmarthen. ')o.. HPRIOEIONE PENNY, '>" .h:> X STOP ONE MOMENT X Oh Dear Doctor MUST My Darling die? There is very little hope, But try TUDOR WILLIAMS' PATENT BALSAM OF HONEY. WHAT IT IS Tudor Williams' Patent Balsam of Honey Is an essence of the purest and most effica- cious herbs, gathered on the Welsh Hills and Valleys in their proper season, when their virtues an in full perfection, and combined with the purest Welsh Honey. All the in- gredients are perfectly pure. WHAT IT DOES I Tudor Williams' Patent Balsam of Honey Cures Coughs, Colds, Bronchitis, Asthma, Whooping Cough, Croup, and all disorders of the Throat, Chest and Lungs. Wonderful Cure for Children's Coughs after Measles. It is invaluable to weak-chested men, delicate women and children. It succeeds where all other remedies fail. Sold by all Chemists and Stores in Is 3d, 3s Od. and 5s 6d bottles. Great saving in purchasing larger size Bottles. WHAT IT HAS DONE FOR OTHERS. What the Editor of the "Gentlewoman's Court Journal" says :— Sir,—The result of the bottle of your splendid Tudor Williams' Balsam of Honey is simply marvellous. My mother, who is over seventy, although very active, every winter has a bronchial cough which is not only distressing but pulls her down a lot. Its gone now. With best wishes for your extraordinary preparation. W. Browning Hearden. YOU NEED NOT SUFFER! Disease is a sin, inasmuch that if you act rightly, at the right time, it can, to a great extent, be avoided. Here is the preventative The first moment you start with Sore Throat tae a dose of TUDOR WILLIAMS' PATENT BALSAM OF HONEY. It has saved thousands 1 It will save you! it is prepared by a fully qualified chemist, and is, by virtue of its composition, eminent- ly adapted for all oases at Coughs, OoIds, Bronchitis, Esthma, etc., it exercises a dis- dinct influence upon the mucous lining of the throat, windpipe, and small air vessels, so that nothing but warmed pure air passes into the lungs. It's the product of the Honeycomb, chemically treated to get the best results. The Children like it. THEY ASK FOR IT So different from most nedicines. Nice to Take Ouies Quickly For vocalists and public speakers it has no equal, it makes the voice as clear as a bell. Manufacturer Tudor Williams, MEDICAL HALL, ABERDARE. TO POOR RATE COLLECTORS, ASSISTANT OVERSEERS, &c. FORMS of Notice of Audit, Collector B Monthly Statement, &c., Poor Rate Receipt Books, with Name of Parish, Particulars of Rate.Stc., printed in, can be obtained at the REPOBTEB OFFIOB at heap Rates. Send for Prices. THE CARMARTHEN BILLPOSTING COMPANY, NOTT SQUARE, CARMARTHEN, BILLPOSTINGand ADVERTISINGS all its Branches, throughout the Counties of Oarir* then, Pembroke, ana Cardigan R. M JAMES. Manager. Carmarthen County Schools. THE GRAMMAR SCHOOL. HBADMASTEB E. S. ALLEN, M.A. (CANTAB). COUNTY GIRLS- SCHOOL HBADMISTBESS Miss B. A. HOLME, M.A., Late Open Scholar of Girton College, Cambridge. Fzzo:-R. I 9s. per Term (inclusive). Reduotion when there are more than one from the same family. The Term began Wednesday, September 13th Boarders can be received at the Grammar School. 1/lj WE CLAIM THAT 2/9 ID:R,. Thiers > DROPSY, LIVER, AND WIND PILLS] CTTRB Constipation, Backache, I n di ge stion, H e art W e ak- ness, Headache, and Nervous Complaints. Mr. John Parkin, 8, Eden Crescent, Wedt Auckland, writes, dated March 12th, 1912 "I must say that they are all that you represent them to be, they are splendid, indeed I wish I raa known about thein sooner. I shall make their worth known to all who suffer from Dropsy." Sole Maker— S. J. COLEY & CO, 5 HIGH ST, STROUD,GLOS. .n_ WEDDING CARDS. _6 NEW SPECIMEN BOOK CONTAINING LATEST & EXQUISITE DESIGNS Sent to intending Patrons at any address on receipt ot an intimation to that effect. PRICES TO SUIT ALL CLASSES. < REPOBTEB OFFICE," 3 BLUE BT

Llandebie Breach of PromiseI

Llandebie Breach of Promise I The Deputy-Sheriff for Carmarthenshire (Mr W. W. Brodie (conducted a Sheriff's Court at Llanelly on the 8th ult., when Elizabeth Price, 4. Oak terrace, Llandebie, claimed damages for breach of promise of marriage from Gomer Owen, Garnllwyd, Tycoed, Brynamman. Mr Walter F. Smith, Ammanford, appeared for the plaintiff and Mr T. R. Ludford, Llanelly, defended. Plaintiff said she was 22 years of age, and the defendant was 30. She first met the de- fendant in 1911 when 6he was employed at the Square and Compass Inn, Llandilo-fawr. They courted until December, 1915. She gave birth to a. child on March 2nd, in respect of which defendant, by agreement, was paying 9 4s 6d a week. He first mentioned the question of marriage a year last Easter, and he accom- panied her to the Llandilo Registry Office on October 30th, when the banns were put in. it was arranged that they should get married on November 27h. When she asked him why he had not turned up he replied that he had sprained his ankle and wanted to "earn a few more quids" so that they might go to Cardiff on their honeymoon. She saw him again on January 2nd. when he refused to marry her, but promised to maintain her child. In anti- cipation of her marriage she had bought the wedding cake as well as tk..Iiat and costume, a.nd also the household linen, th expenses amounting to t9 7s. Cross-examined, plaintiff dnied having mis- conducted herself with other men. Defendant alleged that on November 5th he saw a man named John Rogers misconducting himself with the plaintiff on Tycroes road, and he went up to them. He added that he asked Rogers whether he knew that witness had put in the banns to marry the plaintiff, and he replied "No" Witness told plaintiff then that he had finished with her. Cross-examined: After what he saw on the oth November he had doubts as to the pater- nity of the child, but thought it best to pay after putting up the banns. John Rogers, collier, Lletty. Derwydd road, Llandebie. alleged that he acted improperly with Miss Price on November 5th. after which defendant appeared on the scene. The jury awarded plaintiff 1:15 damages and costs.

Another Zeppelin Destroyed

Another Zeppelin Destroyed The brief communique issued at 12.30 a.m. on Monday regarding Sunday night's air raid was amplified during the day by the following reports by the Field Marshall Commanding- in-Chief Home Forces:— Monday, 10.30 a.m. Ten hostile airships crossed the East Coast last night between 9 p.m. and midnight. One airship approached the north of London about 10 p.m., but was driven off by our gun fire and pursued by areoplanes. She attempted to return from the north west, but was attacked by guns and aeroplanes and brought down in flames in the neighbourhood of Potter's Bar shortly before midgnight. A second airship attempted to attack Lon- don from the north-east, bu was driven off abou 1 a.m. A number of bombs were dropped, but no reports of casualties or damage have yet been received. The remaining airships wandered aimlessly over the Eastern Counties and Lincolnshire. Bombs were dropped promiscuously, but most of them appear to have dropped in the open country witrout doing any damage. The airship destroyed was of the latest type. Police reports show that the total casualties as the result of the raid were one man killed and one woman injured. The material damage was insignificant, al- though the raiders covered a wide area and dropped a great number of bombss. Four houses were seriously damaged, tome glass houses were demolished, and a number of windows broken. Although portions of the Zeppelin fell on the country.side for some two miles, the main structure fell in two parts, the second, consist- ing of the propeller, petrol tank, and other portions, falling about fifty yards from the main portion of a tree IThe first body to be recovered was that of the commander, who stuck to his post to the last. His face was quite recognisable. Ano- ther was, apparently a lad of 17 years of age. All the bodies recovered were reverently con- veyed to the mortuary. Count Zeppelin was to have accompanied the raiders on this occasion, but at the eleventh hour declined owing to pressure brought on him by his family. Information from Germany regarding the i destruction of the Zeppelins in England has caused most painful surprise and depression i —

Llanelly and the National Eisteddfod

Llanelly and the National Eisteddfod. A meeting of the Llanelly burgesses was held on Friday evening to consider the advisa- bility of inviting the National Eisteddfod to Llanelly in 1918. The Mayor (Lady Howard) presided. Mr Owen (Labour Exchange), as president of the Cymmrodorion Society, moved a resolution in favour of such an application being made, and Councillor K. Willis Jones seconded. Councillor Dan Williams moved as an amendment that the application be made in respect of the 1920 Eisteddfod, saying the pre- sent time was not opi),ortiine.ille Deputy- Mayor (Aid. D. James Davies) in seconding, said that inasmuch as Neath was in advance of Llanelly. and that Neath made a claim at Aberga vveny in 1913, there was a. possibility that Llanelly's claim would not be successful. Mr Owen then withdrew his motion, and it was unanimously decided to invite the National Eisteddfod to Llanelly in 1820.

FAIRS FOR OCTOBER

FAIRS FOR OCTOBER. 11. Lla nfiha ngol-ar-arth. 12-13. St. Clears. 15. Letterston. 17. Haverfordwest. 18. Narberth. 19. Lampeter. 20. Newcastle Emlyn and Adpar. 23. Llandovery. Llangeunech. 25. Newcastle Emlyn. 27. Abergwili. 28. Llandilo. 29. Kidwelly. 30. Llanybyther. Kidwelly. 31. Llanybyther, i-leacader,, Fontardulais.

l ISerious Chargesby MunitionWorkers

#l I Serious Charges.by Munition- Workers. An applicant for a transfer at a Wttt Wale's Munition Court on Thursday alleged that in the controlled establishment where he wm em. ployed things wery loose, and he felt h4 was not earning his money. For two or three 4*74 at a stretch there was no work, although they were supposed to work ten hours a 4", ani men came and went as they liked. He and another applicant (pipe fitters) desired to go away to their homes in England for domestic reasons. In reply to the cimairman. ("Mr Yaflgkaa Edwards) he said that some days he did Bofcfe. ing at all. He did not pick up a tool, and this seme days would last for two or three days at a stretch. He gave the names of-three labourers who drew fifteen hours pay, and only cooked and washed up. The Chairman How do you account for this enforced idleness?—I can't say, air, nnless ¡ they are working on the "5 per cent." basis. Do you suggest that their percentage it made up on the baoin of expenditure, and that the firm is making profit by protracting the contract?—It must be so, sir. The work's representative produced a time sheet, signed by applicant, which showed that he had worked 79 hours in a week, -the normal time being 56 hours. The Chairman (to the applicant) How do you account for 23 extra hours if you allege idleness during the ordinary hours? Do yon say this sheet ie fraudulently mode outP-l shan't answer that question, sir. s • The Chairman You are not bound to answer v It is an incriminating question. The works representative denied the asser- tion as to idlenss, and said applicant mad no protest until he applied for this leaving certi- ficate on other grounds. "HIDE YOURSELF." J Several witnesses were called by applicant in support of the statements, one of these^ a fitter, declared ho had idled eight months of the eleven months he was employed there. The Chairman And you hare received eight months pay you have not earned P'- Yea, sir. Witness, examined, said he had protested to the foreman about it, but he was told thera was an inspector about, "Clear out of the way and hide yourself." Fitters were known te SO to the public-house threequarters of a mile away nearly the whole day. The Chairman: And return for their pay ticket? (laughter). 4 Another witness said he was- told c: bid« from the inspector. He believed they were idle waiting for material.. Did he ask you why you were walking ..t idle?—No; it was not necessary; he knew. He said, "If comes along, slip it." Have you been paid for the. timo you hare not worked?—Yes. You were quite satisfied to receive the money, whether you worked or noty-lt was not my fault.. Did you make any protestP-Oh. y. "1 said once I should be glad to get out of, it. Did you say why P -It was partly on aoconnt of the fumes; they were injuring-my health. The Chairman r That was how you appeased your conscience ? The Chairman at the conclusion of applic&nto case said he should adjourn the sitting for that day. The caee for the employers would be taken at the adjournment onTueday. The Works Representative said he had -frit- nesses to call at the adjournd meeting to rebut the men's statements. On Tuesday the 3rd inst., the case of vthe employers in reply to the allegations was heard The workc representative -said h was in a position to make a complete denial to tttegl&Te statements of the men. He contended they were not entitled to the leaving certificates they asked for, and if they wre given it would be taken that there was some truth in the statments. The men had not substantiated their statements by any proofs. They bad made no protests whilst employed, nor until tendering their notices. Some slacking was inevitable where a large number of men were employed; in all contracts there was waiting time fer material, especially in these abnormal timès. when supervision was more difficult than usual. It was a loathsome thing to suggest that a man put to work for his King and coun- try would loaf if a supervisor were not near him the whole time. The chief mechanic at the works gave evi- dence denying the charges. He had- no structions to prolong a contract. The Chairman said that in view of the state- ment made by the men that the contractors were prolonging the contract because they were paid by percentage on the expenditure, he would ask the witness if that was the basis of payment? Witness: I am not personally aware of the contents of the contracts. Was there no measurement of work, or some method of ascertaining what work men had (lone? -It would be most difficult to do so on this job. You have heard it said that men came and left the works as they liked. What do you say to that?—They are supposed to start at 6.30 and leave at 5.30. He denied that the men were irregularly employed. He could not rmember any case in which any shortage of material affected the. applicants or their witnesses. Can you give any reason why these men should say they had been idle for weka at a stretch?—No reason at all. One of the applicants elicited from witness that one of the men in charge had been die- missed sipce the. last hearing. It "Was not on account of that case; it was on aocount of "slacking." In reply to the works representative, he sa'd he was satisfied there had been no avoid. able inefficiency. He had an assistant solely attached to that particular building. These men were engaged by the sub-oontraotore, aud he agreed that if the men connived with ,tbe subcontractors lie would not be able to detect it. as he depended on their reports. 1 The assistant superintenden in the depart- ment aid that no doubt there had been a Certain amount of slacking, but not undnfc I slacking, but only sue-It as occurred on all con- tracts. They had waited for material on several occasions. He could not, conceive it j possible that men could be idle for the periods they said. He inspected the work at timee. j The homing wa? adjourned te Wednesday week.