Collection Title: Carmarthen journal and South Wales weekly advertiser

Provider: The National Library of Wales

Rights: The copyright status or ownership of this resource is unknown.

View full details

First Previous Image 8 of 8
Full Screen
10 articles on this page
TRIUMPH OF BRITISH AIRMEN

TRIUMPH OF BRITISH AIRMEN Further Evidence of German Atrocities. Germans Bombastic Blockade. Letters from Welsh Soldiers. Friday. THE PIRACY DECREE. The Notes of the United States to Great Britain and Germany now been Bent. Both are friendly in tone. Neither is in any sense a protest That to Great Britain points out that the frequent use of neutral flags by British merchant-ships might endanger the safety of vessels entitled to fly the American flag. To Germany the United States Government gives the warning that any attack on a vessel flying the American flag without it being defi- nitely ascertained that such use it, fictitious will be viewed as a grave matter. But the attitude of the United States is not yet settled, and the request is made for more information from the German Government. More developments have taken place with regard to the two ships that have been the cause of so much controversy. The cargo of the Wilhelmina, which is lying in Falmouth Harbour, has been seized by the Customs authorities. The Dacia has sailed. In the Western theatre of war more fierce fighting has taken place in the Argonne. German forces amounting to about a brigade made an at^ck on .the Marie Therese work. The Allies held then- positions. On both sides there was heavy loss. Paris also mentioned specially yesterday the work of the airmen in the northern region, and summed up the results of an infantry engagement in the Ban- de-Sapt by the statement that the French, having at first yielded some ground, regained it a'mo.-t en- tirely by a series of countcr-attacks.. „ Petrograd reported on Wednesday that vhe Rus- sian forces engaged in the Carpathian b-.rtle were still pressing the enemy in the districts of the Dukla, Lupkow. and Uszok Passes, that is to say over two- thirds of the battle-front. The German wireless war news issued yesterday referred in pessimistic terms to this battle, grumb- ler at the difficulties caused by the enow which is confining operations to the valley roads. The same complaint was made by Vienna* on Wednesday. In the House of Commons yesterday the Prime Minister made a long statement on the question of food prices. t The Foreign Office has twice given warning of more stringent measures against German trade. The Prime Minister promised yesterday to announce shortly the nature of these measures, rendered necessary by the flagrant violation by Germany O'f the rules of warfare." A British merchant-ship, the Laertes, as ee* attacked bv a German submarine off "he DUTCH coast. The submarine fired machine-guns^ at her and tried to torpedo her. The Laertes, which flew the Dutch flag. succeeded in escaping. The King visited Cambridge yesterday. He in- spected the Welsh Division and the 11th (Cambrid^c- v £ &) Battalion. Suffolk Rogimcnt He;.lso, v^tel the 1st Eastern Territorial Force Genera. Hospit.. UNSPEAKABLE SAVAGERY. GERMANBI APPALLING BRUTALITV. A terrible account of the martyrdom of Belgian womanhood which accompanied the ^vance or the Kaiser's hordes has been compiled by Dr. Arthur Tacquin, one of the physicians-in-ordinary to King Albert, and surgeon in the Red Cross Ambulance in the Royal Palace at Brussels. Dr. Tacquin's story anpearea in last Field" as part of a special illustrated supplcmen on German atrocities in Belgium and i ranee which is to be circulated throughout the civilised world. I have been in the Belgian Congo and in Morocco," Dr. Tacquin says. "I know what savages are capable of. As a doctor I thought I knew what suffering the human frame can stand, but I had never seen militarism gornf mad nor known to what lengths blood lust can carry a whole army." CHILD OX A HLAP OF DEAD. Here are some of Dr. Tacquin s stories: A heap of dead bodies, in a terrible state, was piled up [at Dinant] and on top of it the German officer placed a little child-alive, mind you-with its little legs wedged in by t1. corpses. ihen they photographed the gruesome exhibit. An unhappy mother had fled to the street with her child in her arms. She was taken, and despite her supplications, her baby was killed before her eyes, and she was made to bury it for the amuse- ment of the soldiers who surrounded her. Cades of outrage have been so common that no single village or town has escaped. In many cases the frantic woman or girl has been held down by the soldiers for the pleasure of their officers. Often the members of the victim's family, the husbands, the mothers, or the children, were tied hand and foot and made to witness the outrages inflicted upon their loved ones.. Another and very prevalent form of cruelty, of which I have personal apd irreproachable testimony, is this: When the Germans are using their heavy siege guns, which are fired from a distance by electric contact, they have been in the habit of tying unfortunate civilians with ropes, etc., in close proximity to the gun, so that when the discharge takes place the concussion may break the ear-drums of the victims. Tt is only a doctor who can realise the excruciat- ing pain and refined barbarity of this "treatment. In one case, which I have myself authenticated, a poor Catholic priest was stripped naked and tied down astride one of the heavy siege guns. He died from the awful shock caused by the terrific detona- tion. The following fact, chosen from among thousands of similar ones, may give an idear of the raffine- ment of unheard-of cruelty with which the Germans pursued their work of destruction. M. Poncelet, a factory proprietor, who had revived at Dinant the old craft of wrought copper, well known under the name of dinanderie, was killed under particularly atrocious circumstances. Torn away from his home, he was dragged into the street in spite of the supplication of his wife and his numerous children, who cried out: Have pity on our father! Do not kill him; he is inno- cent-" The unhappy man implored the officer in command to take him further away in order to spare his dear ones the spectacle of his execution. "No, no; here in front of your wife and your children!" was the answer given, and a shot laid him out in the street. Such is tho character of the Prussian officers brought up according to the principles of German "Kultur." ALL OUR FBIENDfl KILLED." Dr. Tacquin describes a walk from Namur to a friend's house which he found in ruins:— At each step women and children speak to me and „ tell me of the terrible scenes they have witnessed. We have no longer a home, no longer a family; they have killed all our friends." J The unhappy creatures lead me to the places 01 execution, where their fathers, their brothers have been shot; the walls against which they have been hned up show still the bloodstains, and the traces of the bullets, which have smashed bricks and stone. People show me the traces of the projectiles in the gratings of the cellars through which the soldiers massacred from the street those inhabitants that had sought refuge in their basements. There is not a single spot in the town but has witnessed a bloody drama. A young man tells me; Tbey have knocked in the door of our house, my father gets killed in the hall, a bullet hits my mother in the chest; the madmen enter the kitchen, they butcher my grandfather in his easy chair, my grandmother sinks down in the corner with a smashed skull. I alone succeed in escaping across the roofs. In Brussels the Burgomaster Max himself had to interfere to put an end to the revolting orgies of German officers in the restaurants -on the boulevards of that city. At Charleroi similar scenes took place, and the officers did not even trouble to close the curtains that might have screened their actions from those on the outside of the houses. A father was compelled to look on at Op-den-Berg, near Raemsdonok, while ten German soldiers worked their hideous will on his daughters. In a country house near Antwerp the owner had done all he could to serve his hosts with what they wanted. At dinner he was lashe(I to a chair while his two daughters-were stripped and made to serve the dinner naked. WTien the officers had done with them the wretched girls were thrown to the troops. One committed suicide and the other went mad. Now it is easier, perhaps, to understand why so many husbands and fathers fled to England with their womankind, fled anywhere to escape the brutalities of these apostles of Kultur. Now it is easier, perhaps, to realise the inextinguishable thirst for vengeance which has inspired every Belgian (and every Frenchman, too) who can fight, or help to fight, these inhuman and atrocious wretches. This is why I have thought it right to speak out about facts which are generally not printed. But remember, all you Englishmen, that if the Germans ever can invade your country this is what they will do to English-women. It is to make you understand this that I have written, so that you, who may never have to suffer what we have suffered, shall never weaken in your noble task of joining us in the defeat, the utter destruction of the Ger- mans. And I would have the whole world know these things, too. I may seem to have said much, but I lave given only a few typical examples; I have written but a hundredth parrot Belgium's sufferings from the Huns; but I think I have at least proved the necessity for stopping the possibility of any repetition of such crimes against womanhood and humanity as they have so shamelessly committed. Let us see to it that never again shall they have an army to repeat them. Saturday. GERMAN BASES ATTACKED. RAID BY BHITISH AIRMEN. I A large British aircraft forcc--34 aeroplanes and seaplanes-has made a successful raid on the Belgian I coast towns occupied by the Germans. Great damage was done to Ostend and Blankenberge rail- way stations; bombs were dropped on gun positions at Middlekerke, and on the power-station and Ger- man mine-sweeping vessels at Zeebrugge. All the pilots returned safely, in spite of being exposed to heavy gun fire. Two machines were damaged and one pilot, Flight Commander Grahame-White, fell into the eea, but was rescued by a French vessel. The machines encountered heavy banks of snow. Additional details have now bee-n received of the Russian retreat from East Prussia, which was re- ported in The Times of yesterday. The official message from Petrograd says that four new German Army Corps have appeared on this front. ,t fact which necessitates tile falling back of Russian troops for rearrangement and concentration in the shelter If fortresses. The presumption is that we arc on the eve of a great and long operation which ought definitely to decide the struggle in East Prussia." The Germans claim to have inflicted heavy losses. The French official report is short, and reports little more than artillery duels in the various sectors. In the course of a message from an Eye-Witness with General Headquarters a graphic description of a British attack on German sapheads in the brick- fields south of La Bassee Canal is given. The account of the terrific effect of our howitzer fire is noteworthy. The text of the American Notes to Germany and Great. Britain have been published. That to Ger- many. in reply to the German decree that neutral vessels entering the German war zone round Great Britain and Ireland may be sunk, is to the effect that such an act is so unprecedented in naval warfare that this Government is reluctant to believe that the Imperial Government of Germany in this case con- templates it as possible." It would be difficult for the American Government to view such nn act in any other light than an indefensible violation of neutral riarhts, which it would be very hard indeed to reconcile with the friendly relations now happily existing between the two Coverimrnts. The Note tio Great Britain as to the WI" of the ¡ American flag on British ships as a ruse to deceive an enemy states that the American Government will view with anxious solicitude any General use of the flag of the United States by British vessels travers- ing these waters (the area prescribed by Germany). Monday. INVASION OF RUSSIA. Monday. INVASION OF RUSSIA. THE NEW GERMAN MOVE. There is little fresh news of the movement of the four German Army Corps pushing forward from the borders of East Prussia into Russian territory. The movement at present is being carried out on two linos converging on Kovno; first along the River Memel, where fresh fighting is reported at Jurburg, a few miles within the border, and secondly, 3CJ miles farther south along the main railway line from I c I Stalluponen. No decision is reported from either district, but in the region 01 Lyck. to the east of the Msurian lakes, the attacks of the Germans have been I repulsed. German forces on the Bzura front, facing Warsaw, have suffered a further battering, and the combined Austro-German armies have failed to dislodge the Russian forces holding the main passes, of which Tucholka is the key, of the snow-swept Carpathians. A forward movement of German forces in Alsace in the valley of the Lauch has been discovered by the French troops. The movement was delayed by the ski patrols of the French, whose advanced line, according to the French official report of yesterday, ftis now in touch with the enemy. Verdun has been attacked from the air by 10 aeroplanes, without damage, according to the French report, and. in the wide line half encircling the great French fortress, there has been renewed activity on the part of the enemy, nowhere with any measure of success. Farther west, in Champagne, a forward move by the French at Souain has received a check beo^iso, owing to a snowstorm, the French were move by the French at Souain has received a check beoatugo, owing to a snowstorm, the French were unable to get the support of their artillery. I At the western angle of the line, the French guns have reached Noyon, and farther north, beyond the I daily artillery and mining duels, there is little to report. At ^or, a port on the eastern shore of the Gulf of Suez, at tho extremity of the Sinai Peninsula, of Suez, at the extremity of the Sinai Peninsula, which the Turks had thought to be undefended, and were preparing to attack, a small force of theirs was accounted for in a very thorough manner. It was surprised by a landing party which had worked round to its rear; over 100 prisoners were taken, 60 of their dead were counted on the field, and it is believed that none of the force got away. We had two casualties only. The German threat to sink, our merchant ships without warning has not caused any alarm to the shipowners of this country. Sailings will be un- altered before and &fter February 18. The Ad- miralty have shown their appreciation of the .exploit of the captain of the Leartes and her crew. America is still awaiting anxiously the develop- ment o £ the war zone situation. "The Times" Washington Correspondent says that the German Ambassador called on Saturday on the State De- partment and virtually demanded that in return for assurances as to the safety of American vessels in the war zone the United States should insist upon Great Britain allowing the free importation of American food supplies into Germany. Tuesday. BRITISH STEAMER MIXED The second Russian retreat to the Niemcn from East Prussia, where the troops are covered by the line of fortresses, Kovno, Olita, and Grodno", has line of fortresses, Kovno, Olita, and Grodno", has Jeve4oped faster than expected, and a movement, proDaDiy concerted, is in progress further to the South. The real Russian line of defence from in. vasion from East Prussia is north-east from War- saw along the River Narew, and so to the Niemen dofenoes. Along the Narew from its junction with the Bug, north of Warsaw, are the fortresses of Sierok, Obryte, Pultusk. Roschnn, Ostrolenka, Lomza, and Osowiec. These fortresses flank the main line of communication from Petrograd to Warsaw. Two of them, Lomza and Ostrolenka, arc threatened by movements of German troops from East Prussia, by way of Kolno and Myszyniee, but a move on Osowicc from Lyck has already been checked. In the Central Carpathians, between the Bcskid and Wyszkow Passes, and in the Western section at Szvidnik Austrian attacks have been repulsed; but in the Eastern section and in the Bukowina their advance continues. The German attempt to relieve the pressure in Alsace by an advance on both banks of the River Lauch has failed, according to the French report. In a snow blizzard a brilliant counter-attack was carried out by ski patrols, and the German troops remain checked by the advanced line of the French. There is no other news of immediate importance from this side. Desultory fighting continues in Lorraine and in the Argonne. On the Aisne and in Belgium there have been heavy bombardments, and mother line of German trenches has been seized by the Allies on the La Bassee-Bcthune road. Albanians in some force have invaded Serbia. The British steamer Wavelet, of West Hartlepool, was mined on Saturday night fcff the Kentish Knock. Twelve of the crew were lost by the cap- sizing of a boat in which they had put off. The vessel, bady damaged, was beached in Pegwell Bay. According to a Reuter message from Washington, Count Bernstorff has presented a formal Note that Germany is ready to consider the abandoning of her intention of attacking British merchantmen if Great Britain will cease her efforts to prevent food- stuffs being conveyed to civilians in Germany. Wednesday. ANOTHER AIR RAID. GERMAN PIRACY DECREE. Forty British aeroplanes and seaplanes bombarded Ostend and other German posts on the Belgian ooast yesterday. Meanwhile eight French aero- planes attacked the German aerodrome, preventing German aircraft from interfering with our sea- planes. To-morrow is the day set apart by Germany for war upon the merchant ships of Great Britain and neutral States. "The Times" Naval Correspondent, discussing the German notice, points out that in several cases non-combatant vessels have already been sunk by German submarines without regard for the fate of their crews. British shipowners regard the situa- tion with complete equanimity. Insurance rates have not been affected. Danish and Norwegian ships are being painted with special marks blazoning their nationality. The first of the bi-weekly reports from Sir John French promised by the Prime Minister in Parlia- ment a few days ago was issued yesterday. It makes no startling additions to our knowledge of recent operations in the west, but states that the British troops are doing well in the La Bassee and YprNi districts, commends the efficiency of the artil- lery, and shows that bad weather has not affected the "conspicuous success" of our aeroplanes. The Paris report issued yesterday afternoon sup- plied more recent information about the doings of the British troops. They recaptured on Monday two portions of trenches, lost on Sunday, between St. Eloi and the Ypres Canal. Dispatches from Sir John French were published last, night. They carry the official account of the operations of the British Army down to the be- ginning of February. Territorial battalions now form part of nearly all the brigades at the front in the first line." Their I behaviour has been admirable. Sir John French reports that it has far more than justified the most sanguine hopes that any of us ventured to entertain of their value and use in the field." The German wireless war news claimed yesterday that operations in East Prussia had asumed a very favourable aspect for Germany. "The Times" Corespondent at Petrograd reports to-day that he finds no trace of nervousness or depression among eur Russian Allies, civilian or military, concerning the German advance. Thursday. "JtSLOCKADE/' GERMAN POSITIONS ATTACKED BY AIRMEN. The notice given to neutral States by Germany as to the danger of sending their snips into British waters expires to-day. British shipping is totally unaffected by the Ger- man decree. Insurance rates are unaltered. Neu. tral States have been told ty Germany that their only safe course is to stop sending goods to Great Britain. They are unlikely to take much notioe of this. A French merchantman was sunk by a German submarine on Tuesday after the crew had been given 10 minutes to leave her. A Norwegian ship ■us also pursued by a German submarine, but escaped owing to the arrival of a squadron of tor- pedo-boats belonging to the Allies. Admiral Behncke, C'hicf of the German Marine St.;¡ff, has admitted that Germany no longer has sufficient food to feed her people,' and has declared that her life depends on her putting into effect the only means she has of saving herself, without regard to the possibility of damage to neutral shipping. The reply of Great Britain to the American Note o I British interference with American cornmeroo vms published yesterday. The British and French airmen who attacked the German positions on the Belgian coast on Tuesday all returned safely, though they were subjected to an intense cannonade." Berlin describes with enthusiasm the fighting in E«st Prussia. It announces that the Russian 10th Army was completely defeated in the Masurian Lakes district, losing more than 50,000 men. In another announcement Berlin mentions suc- cesses for German troops north of the Klemen, in the district east of Augustowo, and near Kolno. "Bitter fighting" is said to be developing in the region of Plock, on the right bank of the Vistula, All these places are north of Warsaw, and no German effort has recently been made on the front that runs south from the Vistula west of Warsaw News of tho progress of the battle in tbe Car- pathians is scarce. The Germans also assert that the Russians have been thrust farther back in the Bukowina. There was considerable fighting at various points on the Western battle-front on, Tuesdav. In Cham- pagne, Paris reported yesterday, ten counter-attacks by the Germans were repulsed during the night. '.laris also spoke of a further advan

WAR JOTTINGS

WAR JOTTINGS DwV^ n H M.S. Charybydis, » on leave at Ferrvside. Ho Canada.Cn aCting a convoy for troopships from Mr. S. T. Hanks has been appointed additional assistant superintendent to the Carmarthen Tem- > porary Remount Department, with effect from the 1st inst. Tjlle captain of the German armoured cruiser ^erVWhlch W:iS SUnk in the North Sea. died at li,din burgh of pneumonia and heart affection. Private T. Hamlin, 1st Welsh Regiment, eon of Mrs. A. Davies, Cambrian-place, Carmarthen, is now at the British General Hospital, Versailles France, having been wounded in the fingers by shrapnel. Two Henllanites 'in the Welsh Horse, now etationed at. Diss, Norfolk, have been promoted,- Mr. T. Griffiths (postman, Henllan to Llangranog) has been made lance-sergeant; and Mr. Llewellyn Evans (water bailiff) has been prometed lance. corporal. The report of the death of Private A. M. Barnett. 2nd Welsh Regiment, and of DnnvKanL- then, is now officially confirmed. Barnett was kicked on the head by a horse and he died on a train from syncope. He leaves a widow and one daughter. Mr. Jack Havard, of the Eden Arms, Cilrhedyn, has just returned from Newtown, having been accepted for the Welsh Horse. Mr. Havard's ex- tensive knowledge of the continent, (having resided there for some 15 years), together with his excellent proficiency in the languages, will prove an acquisi- tion to the regiment, and will undoubtedly be the means of h:s securing his due place in the regiment. Sergt. Singer, of the Royal Fusiliers, who is re- ported to have been wounded on two previous occa- sions now lies in hospital, having been wounded for In th0 third time. Serjrt. Singer is a Carmarthen man, and his family resided nt 15, Cambrian-place. 'He has been removed from the base hospital in France and is now recuperating at a hospital in Leicester. Mr. Winston Churchill, questioned in Parliament the other day, gave some interesting particulars of a new find" in connection with the war in the person of Mr. Graeine Thomson, one of the dis- coveries of the war," as the First Lord called him. Mr. Thomson has proved to be a Kitchener of Mr. Thomson has proved to be a Kitchener of transports. From clerk lie rose to director in three months, and it was he who arranged for the trans- port of 1 ■000,000 across the sea without accident or loss of life. The many friends of Mr. F. R. Smith, son or the former Chief Constable of Carmarthen, will be pleased to learn that he has obtained a position as ')uartermaster Sergeant in the 43rd Brigade, 4th iiattery, Royal Field Artillery, Welsh Army Corps, now in training at Pwllheli, North Wales. Quar- termaster-Sergeant Smith was for a period of three and a half years on the reporting staff of this paper. He is a good athlete, and an all-round sportsman. He enlisted at Cardiff, on February 5th, and pro- ceeded to Pwllheli on the 6th, where he took charge of his new office under Colonel Paget. We wish him every success.

LETTERS FRlM SUft DEFENDERS

LETTERS FRlM SUft DEFENDERS PTE. FRED DAVIES. We are pleased to be able to reproduce two inter- esting letters from Pte. Fred Davies (son of Mr. and Mrs. Griffith Davies, Albion House, Llandyssul), who is at present with the Australian Expeditionary Force at German New Guinea. Dear Parents,—Our inward mails are few and far between; however, we get all our letters safe, which is the main thing. Rabaul is still quiet, and our military chiefs are having a few alterations made. A large store has been converted into a barracks, which comfortably accommodates 300 men,—the re- mainder of us carry on as before, occupying the best houses. We are in the same place, and do not want to leave. We still have the same four niggers work- ing for us. All niggers are called boys, women are Maries. I am getting to speak pigeon English quite fluently. If we want a parcel or bucket sent anywhere it takes two boys to do the job. They walk one behind the other with a long bamboo pole resting on their shoulders, and suspend the load from the pole. To give an example of how we talk, suppoilJg we want our usual morning bath for which we require two large buckets full of water irom the well, we command as follows:—"Two boys take em along big feller bucket two times, catch-em plenty water, put-em along in wash wash quick." Then It they march slowly away and return with about half bucket-full with the result that they have to go a third trip, but such trifles never worry them. If you speak ordinary English, it's like French to them and they no savvy." In conversation the word feller Ifellow) is placed before every noun. For instance, suppose we want a chair taken out of a room on to the verandah, we say, Kibilleo (boy's name) you catch-em feller chair take him along verandah." Food of any kind is called Kai Kai." When we sit down to meals two boys stand behind us waiting if we want a second helping of anything; we give the boy the empty plate and say, You oatch-em plenty more all same feller Kai Kai." Off he goes with chest extended to kitchen where the other two boys assist. They simply love to wait at table. The more we ask them to do, the more they like it. They even walk round the table with the teapot and pour out practically before a cup is empty. If we have a. large parcel to take or bring from anywhere, they come along with parcel on shoulder and walk behind; they do everything except sleep for us. which we do ourselves. Each boy receives a salary of 6s. per month and all found. You must not think we are lazy. The heat, as you expect in a tropical oountry, is terrific. I admit we could do a little work. The town is swarming with niggers who do nothing but stand and stare about, and if one of our officers saw us carry a weight he would at once tell us to call the first nigger stand- ing about, who would willingly go a couple of miles for a pipefull; every boy smokes from a very young age; they grcov their own tobacco, but simply dote on our quality. Skilled labour here-oarpente, builders, tailors, etc., are all Chinese. We have just learnk that no white man has ever penetrated the interior of this country, about 40 miles is the greatest distance attempted. Beyond that are tribes that hate eteb other—canibals, scalp hunters, and man-eaters. They liye in villages which, once a man enters and sees the mystery of their gods, he never returns. If a raid was made (which is not likely) no doubt thousands of pickled human heads would be found. They have war canoes, and heaven only could helti a party that attempted to aproach their homes on the rivers. Nature has provided them with wonderful eyes, ears and noses. They can smell an enemy, or even a strange tribe, miles aw-.iy. They set poisoned man traps hidden in the grass and use poisoned spears, the slightest touch from which man could never recover. It sounds like a story book, but is true. Niggers tell us that the canibals when they get a victim tie him with ropes- of straw, throw him into a dark oave, smelling of death, and swarming with rates, leave him there until ne-ir dead, then bring him out for the children to play with. then to be tortured and finally pd into the religious bowl over a fire. Well, they do not worry us. We intend leaving them severely alone. Your letter containing list of names of people who wished to be remembered to me was the best I ever received from you; the names read like poetry. I laughed and read it over and over. Love to you all.—Your dear Son. F. DAVIES. A. M. C., Rabaul, New Guinea, Nov. 3/14. Dear Parents.—I am enclosing few cuttings which yon may find interesting. You will notice one small picture showing a tree house. This is how the mountain tribes live, as before mentioned. The various tribes are always at war with each other, always someone's wife stolen, or someone killed. When trouble is near, the family get into their house and pull up the ladder behind. The, week before last all the fresh meat in our cold store went bad, and we are now living on bully beef for breakfast, bully beef for dinner, always bully feel. However, we are lucky things are not wnrse. and we are in hopes of getting a little fresh meat per stores from Sydney by Christmas, which will be with us in six weeks. We have huge stores of bully, so will not starve. We a almost on the equator, and the climate is hot and humid. We continue to have a happy time, still in the same comfortable hou?e. nnd not too much work. We do not know for certain how long we will stay here; verv likolv till February. The only trouble here is malaria fever, which is carried about by the mos- quito. All of us sleep every night undo* mosquito nets. We are like tamed lions in a cage. We also take five grains quinine daily, which is a great pre- ventative, also every man has been inoculated. Many of the soldiers, hajre had a slight attack of the fever, but am pleased to cav that I am keeping R fit as a fiddK and I look after myself. You may be sure when Christmas and New Year's Day are with us. I will think of you all at home, when the church bells are ringing in t.he New Year. and this year has passed leaving so many broken homes, so many children left without fathers, and mothers de- prived of their sons. I will pray and our thoughts will be together. There is no church in the town of Rabaul, but in the distance Llandyssul bells will ring in my ears. If all is well on Christmas Day with a small partv I will journey to the little native church which is five miles' walk. and join in the service, among the niggers sitting on the floor, in the little bamboo and straw church. The climate is very hot —too hot for a white man to be comfortable—and when you have your turkey o. goose, we will be simply frizzling, eat.ing as little as possible—a small piece of meat, and plenty of fruit. All iq well; am quite happy serving my country. Wishing you all, Father, Mother, Ben, Dewi, and Artie. a Merry Christmas and a bright New Year.—From your loving son, F. DAVIEB. PRIVATE TOM LEWIS. Private Tom Lewis, postman, of Glanamman I (attached to the Somerset Light Infantry), in a letter to his wife from hospital, written on Christmas evening, says: —" I,wonder what sort of a Christmas day you have had. Hope you had a pleasant and en- joyable one. Mine has been a very excitable and en- joyable one. I had two nice presents given me in hospital—Princess Mary's, and a nice little writing- case from some old folk in Scotland. Princess Mary's consists of a nice little box, pipe, fags and tobacco. I simply tell you how I got wounded. Our company wa.s selected to make an attack on some trenches to our front, about five hundred yards. The gunners bombarded them for a few hours before we com- menced, and, my God. what a si:?ht; we hadn't been able to see the effects of our guns before. Their tanglements, in the left buttock. I was very fortu- being hit to pieces, and hundreds of the enemy must have been killed. Then we had it hot for a while. However, our boys went at them like tigers, with thoughts of revenge for the many comrades their snipers had hit over. I didn't get right up myself; I ■».- were under fire the whole time, and our boys had to hold on to what they had gained like grim death. However, I managed to drag myself back on my elbows to the edge of a wood—about 300 yards then. I got picked up by stretcher-bearers, and here I am in bed, and very tired, too." The following is from a letter written by a mem-' ber of the Headquarter's Staff at the Front:— The fighting line in Flanders has not changed to any great extent for quite three months. Generally speaking, the fighting around here has been con- fined to the artillery and snipers." The infantry in the trenches aro being relieved regularly, and as often as possible. At present they put in six days in the trenches and six days in bil- lets. The relief is invariably curried on after dark, for very good reasons. The changing of relief is always a very dangerous undertaking, this being the time they are most exposed to the enemy's fire. Once in the trenches they are comparatively safe. Perhaps the men who run the greatest risks during this phase of the fighting are Field Engineers. These are the people whoso duty it is to make new trenches, improve the old, and put up entanglements in the neutral territory, between the enemy's trenches and ours, and are of necessity very much exposed. They are always on night duty naturally. The Monmouthshire Engineers have suffered pretty heavily now lately. The lot of the infantry- men in the trenches is not by any means pleasant, but every endeavour is made to make them as com- fortable as possible. In most of the trenches coke. fires have been introduced, and it is now possible fo- "Tommy" to have warm food during his weary "vigils" at the front of the "Front." On account of the very wet weather we have been having here, most of the trenches are in a lamen- table state,—in some cases they are knee deep In mud and water. Where possible the men sleep in reliefs, tarpaulins are arranged for them to lie on. Our Artillery have been doing splendid work out here. It is very rarely that the man behind the gun is able to eee the object aimed at. Connected with the battery by telephone is an observation station, conveniently situated for the observer to note the effect of each shell as it explodes. He telephones the result btck to the officer in charge of the battery, where adjustments are made if nec- essary. Quite close to us we have several batteries 'of heavy guns, and I spent a very interesting hour one day watching a couple of these gung firing at tho en- emy s positions. All men have to keep clear when the gun is being fired, on account of the recoil, which in this case was about two or three yards. The ground was so prepared that the monster settled back in its original position again, after each dis- charge. We could not see the shells dropping on account of high ground interfering with our line of view, but the observer immediately telephoned back the result of each shot. A good view of the whole district where the British Armies are operating can be had from a hil a couple of miles from this place. I was up there on a fairly clear day, a few days back, and watched the operations for some time.. It was nothing like the popular idea of a battlefield, not a soul could be seen, not a gun in sight, but the roar and flashes of the cannon and the puffs of smoke hero and there, where the shells burst, told of. the deadly work going on below. Occasionally the cruel rattle of the machine gun could be heard, but it was the boom of the cannon that turned one's thoughts to the terrible results of the war. This is an artillery war, and artillery is goiilg to tell in the long run. At night the countryside is flooded with searohlights, and quite a pretty effect is produced by the "star" shells, which are being fired continually on dark nights. These shells give a very powerful bluish light, which lasts about 10 seconds or so. This is a stage of the war in which caralrv are of very little use. In most cases they are held in re- serve behind the firing line. During the severe fight- ing, when the Germans made such frantic efforts to get to the French const, they were often sent to the trenches to support t.he infantrymen. Aeroplanes have ousted the Cavalry for reconnoit- ring purposes, as they naturally would during what is practically siegP warfare. It is most unlikely that the line now held by the opposing Armies will un- dergo much change for another two or three months. The roads, which are in an abominable state, are vc not conducive to easy movements of troons and heavy transport. When the fine weather is with us 8 w once more, things will liven up considerably, I dare- say. And with the help of the new army, I have no doubt but that the Allies will be able to advance all ainng the line, and eventually drive the Ger- mans back to their own country. TROOPER FRED DAVIES. Mr, J. B. Williams, hairdresser, Lampeter, re- ceived the following letter from Trooper Fred Danes from France =-"Dear Joo, Thanks so much for your kind letter. I am sorry I have not written sooner to thank you for giving all the news. It is ili very cold and wet here. I see from tho papers you are having a bit of snow. We are still in the trenches, and we played ructions with the Ger- mans on Friday afternoon, January 26th. W«L shelled them all out of their trenches, and they were running in all directions. They are very quiet here to-day. We have not lost many men; what we have lost has all been done by the snipers. The first battalion is on our right in theso trenches, and it it the first time in history that two battalions have been fighting side by side, but we do not seem to agree with each other very well. I have no more news at present. Write back soon, and give me all the news. Give my best love to your mother and sister and all my pals. Did you get that cigar case I sent you last week; let me know. With best lovo from your old pal, FRED Mr and Mrs. Davies, Cet'ncanol, Llangcler, re- ceived the following letter from their nephew, Pte. T. Jones, of the South Wales Bordererr. r, r. Havre, France, 7—2—15. Dear Lucie and Aunt.—I am writing you a few line. hoping that you are all quite well as I am here at present I am glad to say that my arm is getting better, but it won't right for some time yet. I daresay you have heard all about it bv now. 1 am very lucky that I got off so well, for about 15 yards away from me a shell buroted-a Jack John- son they call it here. It biew a pair of horses, a cart, and the driver to pieces, so I think I got off very lucky.. ° The builet that caught me went first through a horse's nock. Witer) it entered my arm J thought it was clean off. Dear Uncle, I haven't a lot of news to inform you this time. But we are still fightin- for all .we are worth. The Germans are 

MAYORS WAR RELIEF FUND

MAYOR'S WAR RELIEF FUND Amounts already acknowledged .—Red Cross, JEM 12s. 6d.; Prince of Wales, 3223 4s. 4d.; General Fund, £ 783 18s. 5d. Proceeds of (oncert- at T.lanfihangel-ar-arth, per Mr. G. H. Thomas— £ 1 15s. 6d.. Red Cross. Railwaymen at Carmarthen Town and Junction, 11th contribution—18s. 8d., General. MAYOR S BELGIAN REFUGEES FUND. Amount already acknowledged:—J0475 8s. 6d. (This amount includes subscriptions that have been paid in advance. in some cases up to one year). Parish of St. Peter's— £ 4. Parish of St. David's— £ 4. Tabernacle Chapel— £ 2. Welsh Wesleyan Church— £ 1. Students at the Presbyterian College—8s.

No title

Messrs. Carreras, Ltd., the well-known t-oba-eco manufacturers of Black Cat filme. havo hit upon a novel method of benefitting our Tommies at the front. The smokes arc good, and in addition they enclose in the packets neat, and complete little volumes of English-French Dictionaries, Phrase Books, and Grammars. These will prove of the greatest use to our soldiers and contain the very words and phrases which will be most likely re- quired. j

RECRUITING IN WEST WALES

RECRUITING IN WEST WALES. [To the Editor of the CARMABTHEX JOURNAL.] SIR.-I see that references are still being made to shirkers who are likely to remain a blot upon the splendid recruiting record of Wales. Some strong remarks were mado at a meeting at Haverfordwest the other day and various reasons given why there are still young farmers in Pem- brokeshire who will not enlist.. That there are many families there and in Carmarthenshire who c( lilil spare a stalwart or two is undoubted, but let me suggest another reason. Is it true that there ar-* a number oF members of the Pembrokeshire Yeomanry who have steadfastly refused to consent to servo abroad and who rather than do that have returned to their homes." If that is true what explanation is there of such amazing lack of patriot- ism? Also if it is true, how can we expeot young men in the countryside to como forward with such an example before them? I am, &c., HOME GUARD.

THE CORACLE FISHERMEN

THE CORACLE FISHERMEN. [To the Editor of the CARMARTHEN JOURNAL.] SIR,-I feel myself impelled, though with very great regret, to desire you will allow me a small portion of your space for a few words on the above subject. It appears to bo the wish of the "Riparian Owners' Association to do away entirely with the ancient, interesting and even picturesque calling of coracle-fishing with nets in the Teify fishery district.' Or at least in the non-tidal waters of the same. Thero is a largo portion of tho countryside, including the villages of Cenarth, Abercjch and Llechryd, which will be very seriously affeoiwl by this decree. There are a great number of men with their families who depend upon this industry for their subsistence —a few entirely, and most of them to,a great extent. If this move will be practically oarritxl out, as at present threatened, most of theeo workers will be compelled to leave their native placo, where they and their ancestors have lived by the eixercise of this calling from time immemorial. The landowners offer them various small sums of money, which they are pleased to designate compensation," but which the men cannot bring themselves to consider as llc-h. There is not a single sum above a hundred pounds. There are other sums of fifty, thirty. twenty and even ten pounds. And they wish the men to regard these small sums as adequate "compensation" for themselves, their children, and children's children for all time. Yet, from all historical probability, this ancient, trade was plied upon our rivers, centuries before there was an acknowledged class of riparian owners. What can be done? Is it possible to get the land-owning- class to exercise a little more feeling towards their fellow-men? It. means livelihood and therefore life for these men, but only recreation or pleasure for the land-owners. It. is difficult to see what course can best be adopted But it should be much leBR difficult for the Riparian Owners* Asso- ciation to withhold their interference in this old- time industry than for the men to sell their birth- right, which has been sanctioned by immemorial periods of time. Will you be so kind as to allow any of your readers to express their feelings upon this most important affair? We shonld be extremelv grateful to you for a portion of your space for this most necessary and deserving cause.-Yoiirs, &c., D. D. WALTERS (Representative). .>

BREAD AT LAMPETER

BREAD AT LAMPETER. [To the Editor of tho CARMARTHEN JOUBXAL.T SIB,-In reply to your Lampeter Correspondent re price and weight of bread at Lampeter, I as a baker, wish to be permitted to make the follow- ing reply FIRST, Rs PRICE OF BREAD. A sack of flour makes 94 loaves of 4 lbs. each. Before the war, this loaf was sold bv myself and other Lampeter bakers at 6d. and to-day it costs 8d., showing total increased receipts to a baker of 15s. 8d. per sack of flour. As flour has gone up in the meantime 24s. a saok, it means that the baker is 8s. 4d. a sack worse off. notwithstanding the rise complained of. Baking 15 sacks a week, as some of us do, it means a weekly loss of Lb 5s. Even were we to receive 9d.eaoh for the 41b. loaf instead of 8d., as at present, wo would still be 6d. a sack worse off lhan we were before the war, as the increased price per sack would then be 23s.' 6d. as flour"8*' n8e 24S" Per SaCli in the P"ce of SECONDLY, RE WEIGHT OF BREAD. All I can say is that I have not knowingly sold any bread under weight, and I do not believe this of any Lampeter baker. Further, my bakerv was visited last Friday by Deputy-Chief-Constable David Wi Iliams, the Inspector of Weights and Measures for South Cardiganshire, when ho weighed 2d loaves both fresh and stale, and all wero from loz. to I I oz. 2 over-weight. I had not at the time seen your cor- respondent s paragraph and the stale bread weighed had been baked before your issue had been pub- lished, so that the samples were quite representative of my usual weight. THIRDLY, RE A 21D. LOAF. Before I road your correspondent's paragraph I was not aware that any baker in Lampeter made any loaves to sell at 21d., and I still find it difficult to believe it. Speaking for myself, I have not made such a loaf for the last eight years. Before then. mvself and other Lampeter bakers, sold th9 21b. loaf at 2d., but were forced years ago to leave that price behind JIV"' kaye now to complain of 4d. for the same loat not being enough. I agree that every contumei- of bread should be well protected, and as a baker, grocer, and corn and flour merchant I shall be very pleased to welcome any enquiry and to satisfy all concerned that as far as profits are concerned, these days are ruinous, and must of necessity prove a calamity to all business men like myself.—Yours truly, V.LP]. T 0I CHARLES EVANS. Mirk Lane. Stores, Lampeter 15th February, 1915.

METAL ON THE ROADS

METAL ON THE ROADS. [To tho Editor of thu CARMARTHEN JOURNAL.] SIH,—I want to make public the carelessness with which the roads are sometimes metalled in Car- marthenshire. The other day I motored to Llan- stephan, and I had to negotiate two stretches of road, each about 50 yards long-, which had been left covered with raw un-rullod rnotal. Aow. who is responsible for this? Is it not monstrous that the public should have to suffer from acts of neglect which in the case of oUu,r forms of employment would earn the man responsible the instant "sack"? m nocf Llanstephan road, but numerous in- stances of the samo uuiswi .■» upply to other parts of the main roads in Carina rt heiigh ire. -Yours etc., ROLLS-ROYCE.

BELGIAN REFUGEES AT CARMARTHEN

BELGIAN REFUGEES AT CARMARTHEN The Mayor of Carmarthen haa received the follow- ing letter of appreciation from one of the refugees who writes on behalf of his compatriots. A trans- lation of the same follows:— MONSIEUR LE BOLRGMESTBE. Je tiens a vous presenter nos remerciements pour 1 accuiel qui nous a etc fait a Carmarthen. Jo m addresse a vous en tant (lue President du Comite, eu vous priant de vous faire notre inter- prete aupres do ses mcmbres et leur transmettre 1 expression de notre gratitude pour la facon delicate uont lis s acquittent de leur t-ache. Je m'address egaleinont au Bourgmestre de Car- marthen pour les preuves de sincere cordialite que journellement nous recevotis de la population. Veutllez avec nos sentiments de gratitude, agreer Monsieur Ie Bourgmestre, r assurance de nos senti- ments distinques. R.. ALFRED WEIMERSKERCH. Carmarthen, 12 Feiner, 1915. To THE MAYOR. I beg to present to you our thanks for the welcome which lins been given us at Carmarthen. I write to you, as President of the Committee. asking you to make it known to the members, and to convey to them tho expression of our gratitude for the tactful way in which thev have carried out their task. I would also mention to you. as Mavor of marthen. the proofs of sincere kindness) which we receive, daily, from the inliabi tantii. o Kindly accept. Mr. Mayor, with the exores^ion of tii- gratitude, the assurance of our respectful regards. r, ALFRED WE MERBKERCH. ( armarthen. February 12. 1915. Printed and Published for the Proprietors by LEWIS GILER at the Carmarthen Journal" Printing Works, 8, King Street, Carmarthen.