Collection Title: Glamorgan Gazette

Provider: The National Library of Wales

Rights: The copyright status or ownership of this resource is unknown.

View full details

First Previous Image 2 of 8 Next Last
Full Screen
17 articles on this page
Advertising

11 THIS HAPPY COUPLE With tte beautiful goMs implied by BEVAri & COliÆI.I'Îl\.NY, 00 USE whicll has been so cimiostably MENISHUD by that well-known Firm Evormons Selecti., Newest Desi$i?s! free Delivery! 1 Everything for furi?ishii>§ Astonishing Prices! Catalogues Gratis! BEVAN & COMPANY LTD.,  .???'???w? ???? ;????- -?'s??/?.? m   ?  tM!????%??? ?/? ? ? ?  ??/ ? ????'? ?%? FELL DEEPLY IN LOVE And are confidently looking forward to a long and happy life in the The finest array uf DINING, DRAW ING and BEDROOM UITES, in the Principality fiom 31 to 35 guineas per suite! W W VV»nr w W VW Really reliable.Full compass Pianofortes in handsomely figured Walnut Cases from 15 guineas! Wonderful Value!! Queen Street and St. Mary Street, CARDIFF. C J ?j E ?j E j ?.F'.F'.

PEEPS AT PORTHCAWL

PEEPS AT PORTHCAWL. ) By MARINER. I The Council elections are to -take place in March this vear, according to information I have received, and m Porthcawl at any rate an exciting time is prophesied. The retiring candidates arc Messrs. David Jones, R. K Jones, and W. Francis, and against them, if all that cue hears is true, six candidates— tour of thara at least can be regarded, as strong men—will oome into the field. So the I electors will have the unusual opportunity of chosing three representatives out of nine as- pirants. If those whose names I have heard mentioned do seek election, then there is little doubt in my mind as to the result. Ine three old members will not be returned. They have probably performe d good work in the past, but Porthcawl is progressive, and the more up-to-date men arc in their ideas, the better will it be for our town. New blood is very much required on the Council at this period in the town's history to give extra stimulus to its work and to give added empha- sis to the nature .f its responsibilities. It would be a good thing, too, if the addition of new blood would enable the present minority f on the Council to get its way some times. As it is co-day men who have been sent to represent the public, by reason of the major- ity vote against them on practically every matter of importance, have begun to lose in- terest in the work of the authority and natur- ally the, section of ratepayers they represent must suffer. Another point which needs emphasising here is that concerning the Parliamentary Committee. There are now members on the Council appointed by the public to look after their interests who, from the beginning of the gas controversy have been kept in the dark concerning the negotiations in connec- tion with the purchase of the gas undertak- ing. Although members of the Council, sup- posed to have the confidence of their col- leagues, they have been as much in the dark as the smallest schoolboy in the town. The major- ity have persistently shunted them off. Of late, too, the old practice of referring to committee matters of public interest has been reported to with increasing frequency. These things must stop, -and the ratepayers, when the opportunity comes, should give a marked expression of their feeling in these matters. Their votes against the old members will not necessarily mean disapproval of those men, but it will mean disapproval of the Council's policy of autocratic majority rule. o I would like to refer to the men who, I am told,'are coming out to fight this election, but I am informed that the time is not ripe for any public announcement. I can, how- ever, say that they are men held in high esteem in the towrf, immensely popular, of more than ordinary influence, keen business men, intelligent, and with an immense capa- city for the work which a local councillor is called upon to perform. In nearly every case their sympathies are not confined to one section of the community. They know that to properly promote the best interests of the town they have to administrate for the town as a whole and not for a part of it, or for a class of its inhabitants. The rates have been lowered, it is true, thanks to thel economy of the surveyor, but real men of business will probably point a way to other economies which will not necessitate reduc- tions in staff and unemployment, and will open up sources of revenue yet untouched, and give much-needed impetus to drive Porthcawl quickly along the road to sound financial prosperity and increased popularity as a health resort. The war is affecting us a little, but after the war is over there will be a boom, and we want the right men it the right time to do the right thing. I do not apologise for again mentioni: the work of the Porthcawl Y.M.C.A. One cannot mention it too often, but this week I have to record an enterprising moved by the Secre- tary. Mr. D. J. Rees. He has obtained permission to open a branch of the Association from Danygraig House to Porthcawl makes it leted with Major Masterman. The distance from Danygrieg house to Porthcawl makes it somewhat trying for the men to tramp to Porthcawl in wet weather to enjoy what an usement Porthcawl can give. In a conver- sation with Major Masterman Mr. Rees pointed out the disadvantages the men were under, and securing permission from the owner of the house the Major soon made pre- parations for the Y.M.C.A. to commence work. On Thursday, last week, the Y.M.C.A. commenced their work there, when a concert < party gave an excellent entertainment, the Major presiding. Mr. J. E. Davies rendered appropriate solos. Mr. J. Hendry Dr.vies con- tributed elocutionary items, and other num- bers were submitted by Miss Morgan and Miss Morris. Altogether a splendid. time was spent by the men, who showed their appreciation in no unmistakable manner. I understand that Major Masterman has since sent a letter of thanks to Mr. Rees for all his good services. The annual meeting of the Y.M.C.A. was held last night, but I am unable to deal with the satisfactory repo.rt that was submitted by the Secretary this week. It is to be hoped, however, that the appeal that was made for support will be heeded so that this very valu- able may be helped forward. o o The last or a series of whist drives organ- ised by the teachers of All Saints Sunday Schools, was held at tho Bon Marche on Tues- day evening, and like the previous ones was very well attended. The. winners were as fol- lows:—Ladies, 1, Miss F. A. Jones; 2, Miss F. B*yant; 3. Miss K. Hillier. Gentlemen: 1, Miss E. Green (playing as a gentleman); 2, (playing as a gentleman). Rev. D. J. Arthur acted as M.C.. to whom a presentation of a silver pen- cil case was made during the evening. o The second annual entertainment under the auspices of All Saints' Band of Hope took place at the Pavilion on Thursday. The success of the event will be realised when it is stated that last year the National Schools proved too small to accommodate those desir- ing admission, and this year the Pavilion was crowded. A splendid programme was provided, a: d, thanks to the efforts of the Rev. D. J- Arthur arad Miss -Roberts, who had trained the childxen, everything pro- ceed-ed smoothly, and the children acquitted I themselves admirably. Owing to the success of the event, it was found possible to devote part of the proceeds to the Church of England Wains' and Strays' Society, the rest being placed to the Band of Hope Fund. An in- teresting incident occurred at the tea on Monday night given to the children who took r-art in the concert. Prizes were given a number of children, but, enthusiastically col- lecting funds as they are towards the pur- chase of a new font for the church, they handed their prize money over for the pur- pose. The programme at the concert was:- Musical play, Members of the Band of Hope song, Miss M. Lewis; recitation, Junior Members of the Band of Hope: flag drill; action song, Junior Members of the Band of Hope; song, Miss P. Miles; action song, Junior Members of Band of Hope; recita- tion; song, Miss M. Lewis. Dramatic sketch, "Aunt Sarah's Choice": "Mrs. Griindry," Miss L. G. Mably "Delia," Miss May Allen; "Celia." Miss Evelyn Farrow; "Amelia," Miss Doris Mably; "Aunt Sarah," Miss Clarice Rowc. "The Nigger Soldiers," Boys of the Ba-nd of Hope.

KENFIG HILL COLLIERSI

KENFIG HILL COLLIER'S I CLAIM ALLOWED. JUDGE AND DEFENDANT COMPANY'S HARSH CONDITIONS. In the Cit of London Court on Friday, Judge Atherley-Jones, K.C., continued to hear the casl t in which David R. Edwards, miner (24), Park- street, Kenfig Hill, made a claim against the Mexican Light and Power Co., Ltd., Toronto, Canada, and London, to recover .£50 13s. lOd. for damages for alleged breach of contract. Mr. Slesser was counsel for plaintiff, and Mr. W. Stewart for defendants. The dispute arose out of plaintiffs employment in Mexico in connec- tion with tunnelling works for defendants. When plaintiff arrived at New York he was given a new contract, which he found contained several grave alterations of terms agreed to in this country. He later fell ill, and was dis- charged. Mr. Stewart said he could not call any evi- dence until the revolution in Mexico ended. Judge Atherley-Jones said defendants' agree- ment contained onerous and harsh conditions, and he found for plaintiff for the amount claimed, with costs.

PORTHCAWL SOLDIER IN WRONG I IHOUSEI

PORTHCAWL SOLDIER IN WRONG HOUSE. I COURTING A GIRL AT NEWPORT. Private William Lark, of the Welsh Regi- ment, Porthcawl, was charged at Newport on Monday with having been found inside a room at No. 1 Manchester Street for an unlawful pur- pose, at 2.10 a.m. on the 14th inst. Police Constable Bowen said he found a front window of the house open. Inside the room witness found prisoner asleep. Prisoner told the magistrates that he was "courting" a girl at Newport, and he thought it v. _.s her house, but he entered the wrong house. The Magistrates discharged prisoner so that he cculd return to his regiment at Porthcawl.

I FOOD PRICES

I FOOD PRICES. ————- 0. ————— I TRADE UNION'S RESOLUTION. I TRUCE AT AN END. Delegates from Trade Union and Socialist organisations held conferences in London on Saturday, and simultaneously at Leicester, Liverpool, Portsmouth, Birmingham, and Bradford, the principal object being the pas- sing of resolutions of protest at the refusal of the Government to take any steps to deal with the increased prices of food and fuel caused by the war. At the London meeting, Mr. W. C. Ander- son, M.P., said that some of the increases were perhaps inevitable, but there 'were cer- tain interests who were able to, and did, take advantage of the existing conditions to enrich themselves at the expense of the community. When any attempt was made to ascertain the cause they found shipowners, farmers, and everybody concerned protesting that they were not to blame. Mr. Asquith's speech was very disappointing, and could not be accepted as the last word. Resolutions expressing deep indignation at the refusal of the Government to take effec- tive ^measures to deal with the alarming in- creases in the cost of fuel and demanding Government intervention was adopted. An- other resolution was adopted "that Trade Unions and the labour movement generally declare the truce at an end and demand an increase of wages if the Government persists in the refusal to intervene." Mr. Ramsay Macdonald said that a man who needlessly put up the cost of living was just as much an enemy as the German himself. There was no excuse for what they were asked to suffer. It was not due to war causes, but to interests which were manipulating the situ- ation in order to increase private profits. It was not the fact that there was a shortage of wheat and flour. During the last six months we had imported upwards of 100,000 tons more grain than in the corresponding period of the previous year. The Labour party were going to make one more appeal next Wednes- day and give the Government another chance to do its duty. Mr. Snowden, M.P., speaking at Blackburn, said as an application of collective principles, New Zealand and Australia, were showing use- ful examples to the old country. The Labour Government of New South Wales showed cour- age in the early days of the war which our own Government still lacked, and they com- mandeered the wheat supply and appointed a Commission to fix prices. In that way a great deal had been done to keep down the prices of necessaries.

Advertising

Up-to-Date Appliances for turning out every class of work at competitive prices, at the "Glamorgan Gazette" Printing Works.

AN AEEItKEXFIG ROAD I

AN AEEItKEXFIG ROAD. I To the Editor. I Sir,—Kindly allow me a small space in your widely-circulated paper to draw the immediate attention of the members of the Newcastle t Higher Parish Council to the deplorable state ) iof part cf the road from the Bridge to the nlyd. A large sum of the ratepayer's money was spent in order to improve it, yet in face of the money spent there is a stream of water running through the middle of the road near the river Bridge,, and people have had to spend a, whole day with wet feet, through walking over that part of the road on dark mornings, while in several other places pools of water are to be found. Pcs- silffv the members of the Council will under- take to open out several new drains at their own expense, as the people who use that part of the road have a right to expect a dry road to walk on. I have yet to learn that throwing loose and soft soil on top of a road to improve it is economical, or that it is likely to make a good foundation. If members responsible for this so-called improvement think of ever getting back on the Council they will be well advised to see to this disgraceful state of affairs, a Ad have same remedied at onoe. Yours etc., I INDIGNANT RATEPAYER.

IBELGIAN REFUGEES AT COWBRIDGE I

BELGIAN REFUGEES AT COWBRIDGE. I To the Editor. I Sir,—I think it time that we as subscribers to the Belgian Refugee fund should put our house in order. I have no desire to impute any mo- tives, but the fact is that one lot of Belgian Refugees were brought to Cowbridge and promptly provided for. There is no doubt in my mind that what is termed the West End Refugees have been well provided for. I fully intended a few months ago to put this before thelpublic. There is now a further develop- ment. In connection with another party of Belgians who Mrs. Ebsworth maintained until the end of last month—which was the time Mrs. Ebsworth undertook to maintain them-a meet- ing was called, and it was thought desirable to have one fund for the lot, but, unfortunately, the original committee have decided not to identify themselves with the High Street Bel- gians. We have now in Cowbridge two separ- ate Belgian Refugee funds. As I am one of the subscribers to the first fund, I think it suicidal. I am glad -Alr., A. Evans, of Eastfield, is the chairman of Committee No. 2, and hope he will have the financial help he deserves. In conver- sation this day with a lady who has subscribed handsomely, she absolutely intended the money for the Belgian Relief Fund, and never in- tended a penny to be ear-marked for one party, but for the general relief of all the unfortunate refugees in our midst. I do hooe that common- t sen will prevail. sense will prevail.—Yours, etc., PRO. BONO PUBLICO. Cowbridge, Feb. 10th, 1915.

IAGRICULTRAL COOPERATION

I AGRICULTRAL CO-OPERATION. I To the Editor. Sir,—A meeting of agriculturists was held at the Swan Hotel, Llantwit Major, on Feb- ruary 1st, 1915. Mr. Osmond-Smith, who pre- sided, informed us that the County Council were anxious that all farmers, small holders, and labourers should know that feeding stuffs, seeds, manures, and implements purchased through a Co-operative Society could be ac- quired far cheaper than if bought individu- ally, and that the action of the Council in convening meetings in various centres was, to a large extent, due to the desire of the Gov- ernment that the County Council should give as much help and encouragement to agricul- turists during this present war as possible. Co-operative Societies have proved of enor- mous financial help to the Irish farmers, anJ there is in Carmarthenshire an Agricultural Co-operative Society for the purchase of re- quisites with a turnover of over £ 90,000, and a membership of 1,273. In the county there is, in Gower, a Society with a membership of 159, their turnover in 1913 being over zC5,000, and the Society made a profit of over L200, There are also successful Societies in the Swansea Valley and at Pyle, Llangynwvd, Pontardawe, and Birchgrove. All these So- cieties are doing well, an

No title

M. Briand, the Minister of Justice, has tabled in the French Chamber the draft of a Bill providing for the rehabilitation of con- victed persons who have fought bravely and have won mention in Army dispatches. In France a criminal conviction is recorded on the prisoner's "livret" or birth certificate, and the stigma of condemnation accompanies him throughout after life even if he makes an honest effort to amend. By M. Briand's law those men mentioned in dispatches will have this dishon- ourable mention erased from their civil papers.

BEEKEEPINGI

BEE-KEEPING. I GLAMORGANSHIRE ASSOCIATION I MEETING. The annual meeting of the Glamorgan Bee- keeper's Association was held at Llantrisant on Saturday. Mr. W. Meyler Thomas, J.P., presided over a good attendance. The Right Hon. the Earl of Plymouth was re-elected President, Mr. John Jenkins auditor, Mr. F. Gravil treasurer, and Mr. W. Wiltshire secre- tary. In moving the adoption of the report for the year ended December 31st, 1914, the Chairman said it showed the Association to be in a very satisfactory position. There was an increase in the number of members and afeo in the amount of the subscriptions. Referring to the quantity of honey, 39,4221bs., gathered in the country, he found that 19,1321bs. more had been harvested this year than in the previous year. As a member of the Central Chamber of Agriculture he had opportunities of considering reports from all parts of the country, and while so many of their represent- atives were members of the House of Lords and about eighty of them members of the House of Commons, still it was a matter to be regretted that the Government refused to legislate to prevent the spread of disease among bees. and deal with it as in the case of sheep scab or swine fever. Their Chamber had passed resolutions in favour of the legis- lation. Referring to the lecturer and demon- strations with live bees given by the Associ- ation at meetings and shows throughout the country, the Chairman said he considered these of great value and resulted in many beekeepers taking a more intelligent interest in the management of their bees, and inducing them to adopt more modern and recognised improvements. Rev. H. Morgan, C.C. expert, was satisfied that the Association was doing important work and making substantial progress. He attributed the outbreak of Isle of Wight dis- ease in the county to be due to diseased bees being imported from affected districts, and gave instances where the disease could be so traced. Many beekeepers opposed legislation because they objected to having their bees inspected. Give them appointments and they would very quickly accept an Act. Mr. R. Thomas, Cowbridge, pointed out the necessity of local experts and inspectors being very careful to use every effort to prevent the carrying and spreading diseases. It would be a serious matter to him in case an unscrupulous visitor neglected to disinfect himself when necessary, and thereby cause the loss of some twenty stocks. After tea, Mr. Dyche, B.A., gave a lecture on "Some Personal Experiences in Beekeep- ing," dealing especially with Isle of-W&it disease. Minute details were recorded of the outbreak of the disease in several stocks. These were compared, contrasted, and con- sidered in detail in connection with the report of the Board of Agriculture on the disease and the symptoms evident were described. The lecturer said he could not explain the cause of the outbreak, neither could he advise any cure. He could only express the hope that other beekeepers would be spared the experiences he had gone through for the last two years, resulting in the loss of five stocks and a decrease in surplus honey from four hundredweight to barely one hundredweight. The Rev. H. Morgan strongly advised local experts to thoroughly wash their hands with carbolic soap before commencing manipulating the bees when paying visits to different apiaries, and to get the owner of the bees to do the opening and lifting of the frames while the expert inspected them. Mr. William Morgan questioned whether it was worth while attempting to save stocks which wereaffected with Isle of Wight disease. The safest course was to burn them at once. On the proposition of Mr. Meyler Thomas, seconded by Mr. C. Spiller, the lecturer was accorded a vote of thanks for his able and instructive lecture.

I GIRL MOTHERS

I GIRL MOTHERS. A DIFFICULT PROBLEM NEEDS SOLVING. From a north-country town (writes Mr. Max Pemberton in the "Weekly Dispatch") there comes the veracious story of the father of a I little English girl of sixteen who was last August at a convent near Malines. The Ger- mans occupied the place and the children were sent home. Upon their way German officers burst into the train, and these children were violated. One of them is about to become the mother of a child by an unknown German officer. What is to become of it? What is her father to do? He has made public his declaration r that he will not permit such a child to live! It is a terrible story, from which the mind recoils. Yet we have to remember that it is the story of more than a thousand Belgian women who are in England to-day. Some of these are nuns. The "Lancet" supports the statement that from one particular convent of 60 nuns 29 are expecting children. No pen could depict truly the horrors of such an admission. Nor would any pen dwell upon them but for the problems they raise. Who is to help these poor women? What lead have the churches to give us? Is it not their function to come forward and say, "This or that must be done?" Is it not their duty to give counsel which shall be the answer to the gospel of despair or worse which some are only too ready to preach? Writing some time ago in. the "Echo de Paris," M. Maurice Barres proposed a law that the woman who fell a victim to the violence of an enemy should have her child registered as born of "an unknown father or mother. Drastic, more terrible, alternatives were offered by M. Louis Martin, member of the Senate for the Department of the Var.

No title

The death has occurred near Mac room, County Cork, of Michael Curten, who was re- ported to be 112 years of age. He was an agricultural labourer, and preserved his facul- ties up to a year ago. Owing to a shortage of male labour in Edin- burgh, a scheme has been discussed by the Edinburgh Tramways Company to employ women as conductors on the cars, and it is expected that it will shortly come into oper- ation.

Gathered Comments ON THE WAR 0

Gathered Comments ON THE WAR. 0- Garibaldi and Italy. t Speaking in Italian to a mass meeting of his compatriots in London on Sunday, General Ric- ciotti Garibaldi, son of the great patriot, said he was convinced Italy would join in with the Allies; at the present rate the war would last for years, and a supreme effort on the part of the Allies and Italy would be required to bring it'to a close within a few months. The Next Battle of Waterloo. The Bishop of London, addressing a recruiting meeting in London on Saturday night, said that we were fighting for the freedom of the world. The devastation of Belgium was one of the blackest crimes in history, and no Englishman should he unwilling to come forward to right that wrong. If you want to defend your wives and mothers," he said, "just slip across, the silver stream and fight there, so that the in- vader's foot may never stain the soil of Eng- land. It will be the time of your life to be present at the next battle of Waterloo, and if you enlist to-night you may be in time to take part in it." Nun Mothers. Early in January a Belgian priest, in a sermon to the Nuns who had been violated by German soldiers, said Yes, my sisters, for it is to you alone that I desire to speak now in the name of the God of vengeance who condemns and of the God of pity who absolves. You will not wish to perpetuate the abominations of which you have been the innocent and holy victims. The dregs of darkness must not appear in the light of day. Let each of you become the pitiless Herod of the opprobrious line which the in- famous Amalekites have raised up in their bloody paths. Prescribe, extirpate, extermin- ate without scruple the filthy and criminal tares which would dishonour one day the pure wheat of our plains upon which blows the breath of liberty. It is I, the man of God, strong in the cry of the revolt of my conscience and the supreme sense of the Divine Word, who confer boldly upon you the right and calmly indicate to you the duty of letting no impure blood cor- rupt the treasure of your veins in which you sleep." The Welsh Gbards. Colonel Murray-Thriepland, who has been appointed to command the New Regiment, the Welsh Guards, says:—"I need not tell you that I count it a great honour to have been selected to command the Welsh Guards be- cause they are Welsh Guards. Latterly I have been on the Reserve of Officers, but when I was with the Grenadiers I had considerable experience of what the Welsh soldier is like, for, as you know, we have always had such a large proportion of Welshmen in that regi- ment. I fought with them in South Africa, and, believe me, I have never known any fel- lows who could fight better than the Welsh. Pick out some of the best of them and form them into a regiment and, well who would not be proud to command them ? I am convinced that the regiment that is coming so rapidly into being will maintain the highest military traditions of the little country whose name it bears. This regiment is going to be a great success-a credit to Wales and an honour to the King. I Turks Surrender. The first' Turkish deserters, who have ar- rived at Cairo," says the "Times" corres- pondent, "are now under a guard of Terri- torials, who find a natural difficulty in believ- ing that anyone ever thought of employing the deserters as soldiers. Soldiers, indeed, they never were, but whether they were cab- men, peasants, or professional beggars, the gendarmes netted them, and thus one day they found themselves toiling over .the sand with one or other of the Turkish columns crossing the Sinai Peninsula. Their stories vary little. They did not want to fight, and did not understand the German oiffcers, and when approaching the Canal they threw away their rifles and uniforms and arrived at our outposts either in civilian dress or robed simply in their underclothing. They were very glad to be in safe keeping. If many Turkish battalions are composed of such material we may expect surrenders on a large scale as soon as the enemy, who for the pre- sent is inactive, decides to approach our de- l fences. I Without England. Here is a notable comment on the war by the "Chronicle" of the Protestant Epi; .-opal Church of the United States:—"Without England, we could not have been; without Germany, our best thought and most ad- vanced science would be impoverished; with- out France, some of our finest ideals would not be. Our blood as a nation is componded of their blood, one and all. We are, to-day, not so much New England as new Europe. Yet there was a time when England herself was but a new low-Germany, as France her- self was a new .high-Germany. There is to- day an Angeln on the north German shores, the old homestead of the English; and a Franconia in the south German mountains, the old homestead of the French. North of the Seine the French are a Teutonic race. South of the Main the Germans are more than half Celtic in blood. It is a brother's war. There's the pity of it! Even when we come to governmental systems there are arguments pro and con. The western Gov- ernments seem more democratic, but the Ger- man administration seems the better. We should like, if possible, to combine their di- verse excellences. We might even yet learn something about democracy from western Europe and much about administration and municipal government from Germany. All these thoughts have no bearing on the issues of the war. They do, however, argue for the open mind. There is an answer to every argument the combatants put forth and a surrejoinder to that. The calmer judgment of the future alone can duly appor- tion praise and blame. Meanwhile the tra- gedy of the nations calls for our impartial sympathy. It may be found that the ques- tion after all is not merely national. Great underlying social and economic wrongs may be avenging themselves on the nations, as in I our own civil war. If so, our people are not free from the guilt of the oppressor. The war should rouse us to more earnest effort to right wrong, to abate privilege, to work for a better worl" d. A School master. I Earl Grey, speaikmg at Newcastle, said that the war woufcl prove a schoolmaster that would teach people more in a flash than had been learnod in centuries. Tho result would probably be to arouse a desire. in all civilised peoples for some organisation which would make a repetition of the present horrors im- possible. The Old Powder Monkey. Describing the Tiger in action in the North Sea battle, a correspondent of the "Western Morning News" reports that after Engineer- Captain Taylor and four stokers had been killed by a shell "the periscope glasses of a turret were fogged by smoke and spray. A volunteer was asked for—would someone ven- ture outside the turret and wipe the glasses? A boy, 1st class, climbed outside and cleaned the periscope. Firing recommenced, and the boy was forgotten. He remained on the tur- ret and cleaned the glass throughout the action, being practically deafened by the roar of the guns." A Kingdom for a Miiton. Where is the utterer of golden words who shall send ringing down the grooves of time something of that high spirit which animated England when she went to war in August, 1914—who shall in a. golden mesh of eternal words fashion out the form of that inward MUST which send millions of peaceful men to war at the bidding of their souls? Even if we do not continue to live up to that high call it will be well for us and for generations yet unborn to dwell upon that moment of high inspiration and to realise all that was behind it. Who, then, shall be our Milton, to chant once more the eternal liberties of England and of the world of free men?—"Public Opinion. I Stain Not the Sky. "Ye gods of battle, lords of fear, Who work your iron will as well As once ye did with sword and spear, With rifled gun and rending shell- Masters of sea and land, forbear The fierce invasion of the inviolate air! With patient daring man hath wrought A hundred years for power to fly, And shall we make his winged thought A hovering horror in the sky, Where flocks of human eagles sail. Dropping their bolts of death on hill and dale ? Ah, no! the sunset is too pure, The dawn too fair, the noon too bright, For wings of terror to obscure Their beauty and betray the night That keeps for man, above his wars, The tranquil vision of untroubled stars. Pass on, pass on, ye lords of fear! Your footsteps in the sea are red, And black on earth your paths appear With ruined homes n::d heaps of dead. Pass on, and end your transient reign, And leave the blue of heaven without a stain. The wrong we wrought will fall to dust, The right ye shielded will abide; The world at last will learn to trust In law to guard and love to guide The Peace of God that answers prayer Will fall like dew from the inviolate air." By Dr. Henry van Dyke, United States Ambassador to Holland, from the "Independ- ent.

I THE ORDER OF ST JOHN

I THE ORDER OF ST. JOHN. I FOR WELSH DIVISION RED CROSS I COMMISSIONER. A signal. compliment has been paid to Wales, and in particular to the St. David's Centre of the St. John Ambulance Association, by the appointment of Mr. Herbert Lewis, the Deputy Commissioner of the Welsh Division of the St. John Ambulance Brigade, as Commissioner of the Order of St. John of Jerusalem in France. Mr. Lewis will represent the Order and take command of tho stretcher bearers, nursing, and general duty orderlies, now doing duty in all hospitals raised by private effort in France and Belgium. These include the Australian voluntary hospital, the Duchess of West- minster's, te Duchess of Marlborough's, and the Duchess of Sutherland's hospitals, which have done so much for the relief of wounded soldiers. The appointment has been made in response to a request of the War Office to the Order of St. John of Jerusalem and to the Red Cross Society to nominate some prominent official to proceed to France to overlook the work of the members of those two bodies now on active service. Mr. Herbert Lewis has been nominated by his Order, and Sir Arthur Lawley has been asked to act in a similar capacity for the Red Cross Society. It is probable that both these gentlemen will proceed to France at the end of next week. Sir Arthur Hazlerigg, of Nos- ley Hall, Leicester, has placed his motor-car at the disposal of the St. John representative. and will drive it himself. Mr. Herbert Lewis has been connected with the St. John Ambulance Association for the last fifteen years, and held the postion of assistant commissioner of the No. 7 district when it embraced the whole of Wales and the border counties. In 1911 the district was divided, and Mr. Lewis was appointed deputy- commissioner of the Welsh district. During the last ten years ambulance work has made rapid strides in South Wales, and Mr. Lewis has at his back a body of between 3,000 and 4,000 men and women, whom he has spared no effort to thoroughly train in times of peace, and who have now nobly responded to the call made upon them by their country for service in the naval and military hospitals.

No title

Corporal Hughes, who is serving with the R.A.M.C. at the front, writing to his wife and daughter at Llanelly, says ;_H I was mentioned in despatches for bravery in the field on the 26th. As probably you are aware, the Germans made a general assault all along the line, in- tending to give a victory as a birthday gift to old Bill.' It was a regular hell. Although I refer to our enemy, it was horrible to see hun- dreds of dead piled up as they were. It is esti- mated that they lost over 20,000 that night. We only lost a few, about 800 all told, and we took 2,000 prisoners. As soon as we knew we were to be attacked all leave was stopped, as every man was wanted, with the result that the Ger- mans had a very warm reception, and Kaiser Bill had a splendid birthday present."

Advertising

.8 IIØ —————————— —. ) —— IMPORTANT TO PIANO BUYERS. THE BEST VALUE CAN BE OBTAINED BY PLACING THE ORDER WITH Thompson & Shackell, (Ltd.), WHO HAVE ALWAYS IN STOCK A GREAT VARIETY OF —— The CELEBRATED BRINSMEAD PIANOS, —— AND ALSO THE NEWEST MODELS OF Challen & Son, Ibach, Collard & Collard, Broadwood Player Pianos, Simplex Player Pianos, J. & J. Hopkinson, J. H. Crowley, Ernst Kaps, Schiedmayer, Moore & Moore, Justin Browne, Neumeye^, and many others to select from. Largest Discounts for Cash. SOLE AGENTS FOR the Celebrated ESTEY ORGANS. Our Terms for Cash are icw Our Hire System ie Equitable. ————— Beautifully Illustrated and Descriptive Catalogue pent on application, with full particulars of a splendid selection of F.COND.HAN 1) PIAftOS and ORGANS* rt-turiied from hire and taken in exchange-now offered at Bargain Prices. Quotations Given for Pianos and Organs by any Maker in the Kingdom. Written Warranty with Each Instrument. Turnings and Repairs a Speciality. Ropafrs of every description. Estsmatas Free.. THOMPSONand SHACKELL, Ltd., 1., WyjasdllaaMcx Street, EJEfcXJfcQiENIX ALSO AT:- 8, High Street, NANTYFFYLON, CARDIFF, SWANSEA, NEWPORT, BRISTOL, ETC A LARGE VARIETY OF RELIABLE WELSH FLANNEL From 1/2 per yard. Plain & Stripe Fawn Shirting. Plain & Stripe Grey Shirting COLOURED DRESS FLANNELS. Cream Stripe Shirting and Blouse Flannels. Home Made Shirts from 5s. each  ??'?" BOYS' SHIRTS from Size 1 to 9. Plenty of Patterns to ?t ? l\ Choose from. HUNDREDS IN STOCK. t M ? ? STOCKINGS and SCCKS of all kinds from 6d. per pair ? V | ■ W)t!B PANTS and VESTS from Is. each. Fleecy and Merino. m! HW Also a variety of Cashmere Pants and Vests from 213 each. I )! NOTE ADDRESS 1; :i:" t; ) W. T. JONES. Manchester House, t Not 5 minutes from Station. BRIDGEND. TEN REASONS Why you should Advertise in the GLAMORGAN GAZETTE The LOCAL PAPER FOR CENTRAL GLAMORGAN. BECAUSE it is found in practically every House in Central Glamorgan. BECAUSE it is the recognised medium for all local official advertisements. BECAUSE it circulates amongst people who have money to spend. BECAUSE it secures to every advertiser the greatest possible publicity. BECAUSE it is the Oldest Local Newspaper in Central Glamorgan. BECAUSE its rates are low compared with the 't extent and character of circulation. BECAUSE it circulates in a densely populated industrial district. BECAUSE no advertising scheme is complete without it. BECAUSE it has been used for years by all the most successful advertisers. BECAUSE it stands in the Front Rank of News- papers as a Business Bringer. Rates on application. HEAD OFFICES- Queen Street, Bridgend.