Collection Title: Glamorgan Gazette

Provider: The National Library of Wales

Rights: The copyright status or ownership of this resource is unknown.

View full details

First Previous Image 2 of 8 Next Last
Full Screen
15 articles on this page
Advertising

A ———— BEVAN & COMPANY, Ltd., Spacial Purchase of a Manufacturer's 

5 Peeps at PorLheaw

5 Peeps at PorLheaw By MARINER. I It was a good idea of Mr. T. E. Deere that secured the co-operation of Penybont Rural District Council in the matter of supplying water to the camps at Newton. The pro- posal, which has been agreed to, was that the Kenfig Hill main should be tapped at South Cornelly, and that a Hin. pipe should run from that and supply Tycoch Reservoir with surplus water from the Kenfig Hill supply. It was, I understand, stated at the meeting that a considerable quantity of water was run- ning to waste at night from the Kenfig Hill source, and with a desire to do Porthcawl a good turn, and at the same time render good service to the country, the Rural Council unanimously granted the application. We have to thank Mr. Deere therefore for having relieved Porthcawl of a source of considerable anxiety this summer. It is well known, and the fact need not be disguised, the muddling of the Council regarding the water ques- tion has placed our town in a serious position for some years past. Things are not yet I straightened, and under these circumstances it would have been a practically impossible task to supply the camps at Newton during the summer, and to, at the same time, main- tain an efficient supply to private houses and boarding establishments in the town. Even last summer, before the soldiers came, there were troubles regarding the water supply, and this year we could anticipate a renewal of them, only more serious. Penybont Coun- cil has come to our rescue, for which we sin- cerely thank them, and that a happy decision was arrived at. I understand, was due to the persuasive eloquence of the Chairman of the Council. < -Naturally, the Rural Council wanted safe- guards, and made it a condition that as far as is practicable the surplus water should be used only for the camps and not for the town. Of course, the justice of that was readily con- ceded, although personally I suggest that the loss of surplus water would not injure Kenfig Hill in any way, and in regard to this, I sub- mit to our Council a proposition that negoti- ations should be opened with Penybont Coun- cil for a continuation of the arrangement un- til the Council's schemes have been completed and are in thorough and satisfactory working order. Of course, Porthcawl would pay for the benefit, and would be pleased to. w Those who saw the Bantams, the 3rd Welsh, and the Cyclists lined up for inspec- tion on Sunday will admit that military train- ing makes marvellous changes in our young men, and even those of maturer years. We saw these lads come to the town eager to do their bit for the country, filled with a strong spirit of patriotism and anxious to don the khaki cloth. Many of them walked with a drooping gait, their faces were white and by aippearances they did not create an impression that they would make soldiers, even with twelve months' training. Two months have made great and remarkable alterations. The life in the open air, the constant drilling, the long marches, has tur- ned weaklings into strong, muscular, robust looking youths, with the flush of health upon their faoes, now becoming bronzed by the sun and the breezes at Pleasing Porthcawl. They like soldiering; they will candidly admit it. It is different to all their ideas of it, and now they are anxious to get as fit as 'they can in the shortest possible time. They are rapidly approaching the desired end, and military critics amongst us will tell you that thel Bantams now amongst us are the smartest lot of men that has paraded on the Esplan- ade. They want some beating—the Germans will never beat them, but when the Bantams get anywhere near the Kaiser we are prom- ised a good old cock fight, and my money is on the Bantam every time. But to get back to Zh: inspection, General McKinion expressed himself as delighted with the quality and the smartness of the men, And complimented them upon their rapid strides towards efficiency. Mr. T. E. Deere, J.P., and the ex-Chair- man of the Council, paid a visit to London on Monday in relation to loans which are re- quired just now for the carrying out of abso- lutely necessary works. The officials of the L.G.B. received them kindly, and I under- stand promised that all possible assistance should be given. w Porthcawl has been connected in some way or other with places visited by the baby- killers of Germany. At Scarborough an ex- Porthcawl resident narrowly escaped injury from a Zeppelin bomb, and at Westcliff-on- Sea, the scene of the latest raid by those cowards who "oome in the night" and are afraid to face the light, resides Mr. Hughes, a son of Mrs. Hughes, of Suffolk Place, Porthcawl. Houses on both sides of the one in which he was living were wrecked, but, I am glad to hear that Mr. Hughes escaped in- jury. ww* I am told that all the soldiers will be leaving the billets as soon as they can get sufficient canvas for the erection of tents. Other more important work is occupying the time of skilled workmen, but there is a like- lihood that all wants will be supplied in a week or two's time. < < There are people in the town to-day who are talking of the need of urging the Coun- cil to move with regard to certain schemes of improvement. I advise all such to hold their hand. This is not the time to spend, but to save, for the future will be hard enough without increasing local burdens un- necessarily. At the worst, we can afford to* allow some things to be shelved till better times. All resources must be conserved, and the more economical the Council can be in everything it does and in the use of everv- thing, the better will it be for the town when the bills have to be paid later on. It is the duty of all local authorities now to keep down expenditure to the lowest in preparation for times of stress that are sure to come. Porthcawl, I am sure, will not need this fact to be emphasised.

WATER FOR TROOPS I

WATER FOR TROOPS. I I PORTHCAWL DEPUTATION to PENYBONT I COUNCIL. APPLICATION TO TAP KENFIG HILL I MAIN. At the meeting of the Penybont Rural Dis- troct Council on Saturday, the Clerk read a letter from the Pyle and Tythegston Higher Joint Parochial Committee with reference to an application by the Porthcawl U.D. Coun- cil for a supply of water for the troops at ParthcawL The letter stated that the joint commitee met and considered the application made by representatives of the Porthcawl U.D. Council for the assistance of the Peny- bont Council in supplying the troops at Porthcawl with water. The application was that the Kenng Hill main should be tapped at South Cornelly with a li inch pipe, to connect to Porthcawl's new 8-inch main and thus supply the Tycoch Reservoir with any surplus water which the Rural Council might be able to give during the night. The condi- tions under which this would be done would be that the Porthcawl Council bear all the cost of the connection; that it should be en- tirely under the control of the Kenfig Hill water man; that no supply of water should be guaranteed, only that which was surplus, and that the Penybont Council should make no charge for the surplus. A letter was also read from the clerk to the MaTgam Estate stating that he thought the consent of Miss Talbot to the work would be forthcoming. A deputation from the Porthcawl U.D. Council, consisting of the Chairman (Mr. T. E. Deere, J.P.), Mr. T. James, and the sur- veyor (Mr. Oborn) attended. Mr. Deere said Porthcawl Council had a diffiulty with regard to the water supply owing to the number of military men in the town, and as their next-door neighbours they had come to the Penybont Council for assist- ance. They understood that the Council had a pipe carrying water to Cornelly which ran side by side with their own, the Porth- cawl Council's, pipe. As it would take some time before they got their own scheme com- pleted, they had come to ask the Penybont Council to come to their assistance, and allow them to take some of their surplus water. Unless that was done, they would have to close down the supply, and that would be a serious matter. In the ordinary course of events they would have had sufficient water to tide them over the season, but for some months now, and during the winter months when they should have been conserving water far the dry season, it had been drawn in order to supply the troops which they had billeted on them. They had had 4,000 bil- leted with them until about two months ago and now they had 2,000 there, and, further, he understood there were likely to be more there. It would not only stop the military coming to camp in the town, but it would injure the town as a health resort if they could not get water. He trusted the Coun- cil would give the matter their careful con- sideration, and so relieve them of the tension they were now suffering from. He wished to point out, too, that from a sanitary point of view it was dangerous, as in some houses they had as many as fourteen men billeted. The Clerk said the only point in the matter to be cleared up, supposing the Council was willing to do as suggested, was as to whether there could be some sort of guarantee that the water would be going to the military. The Council would, he thought, be perfectly willing to supply the military, but they did not want to supply it free to the houses. Mr. Deere pointed out that all the water they could get from the surplus main would not be sufficient without some of their own water to supply the troops. Mr. Price proposed that the Council grant the request of the Porthcawl U.D. Council on the terms given. They should look upon that not as any favour to Porthcawl as Porthcawl, but as a patriotic lead on their part in doing their share for the general good. Mr. Wood seconded, and said the matter was thoroughly thrashed out by them at the Parochial Committee. It was found that after 10 o'clock at night there was a large quantity of water going to waste. They thought'it was their duty to do all they could for the troops at Porthcawl. The resolution was carried unanimously. Mr. Deere thanked the Council for the manner in which they had been received, and also for the assistance, and he trusted that the matter would never be overlooked by Porthcawl if ever the Penybont Council got into difficulties.

GENERAL MACKINNON AT LLANTI WIT MAJOR

GENERAL MACKINNON AT LLANT- I WIT MAJOR. INSPECTION OF THE D COMPANY 7th CYCLIST BATTALION. On Sunday the D Company of the 7th Welsh (Cyclists), stationed along the coast from Porthkerry to Nash, were inspected by the General in command of the district, at Llantwit Major. They formed up in line at the headquarters of the Company, the Post Office, to receive the General and his staff, who arrived punctually to time in motor cars. The men were marched off to the inspection ground, where they were put through several drills, and, together with the staff, the General made a minute examination of their machine guns, accoutrement, etc., after which he addressed the commissionad officers and the non-commissioned officers on various points of vital importance in the making of an efficient Company. He expressed himself satisfied with the progress made by officers and men in preparing themselves for active service.

No title

Before the Cardiff Coroner (Mr. W. L. Yorath) on Friday, the jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death" in the case of Samuel Page (67), of Brighton, who died at the King Edward VII. Hospital on May 4th as the result of injuries received in slipping on the pavement at Porthcawl.

Advertising

Up-to-date appliances for turning out every I class of work at competitive prioes, at the "Glamorgan Gazette" Printing Works. I )

PENYBONT RURAL DISTHICTI COUNCIL

PENYBONT RURAL DISTHICT I COUNCIL. WATER SUPPLY IN THE PYLE AREA. I COMPLAINTS OF SHORTAGE. I A meeting of the Penybont Rural District Council was held at the Union Offices on Sat- urday, when Mr. George Jeanes presided. ISOLATION HOSPITAL COMMITTEE. The Clerk read a letter from the Glamor- gan County Council with reference to the Bridgend Isolation Hospital, in which it was stated that the number of representatives on the Joint Hospital Board might be increased from eight to sixteen, the Bridgend Isolation Hospital Committee to elect ten and the Og- more and Garw Council to elect six. NO REPRESENTATIVE. Mr. D. H. Price moved that no representa- tive be sent to the Conference of the Rural District Council's Association this year. They did not want to spend more money than they were compelled to.—Agreed. PYLE AND DISTRICT WATER SUPPLY. The Clerk read a letter from the Tytheg- ston Higher Parochial Committee, in which it was asked that a Committee be appointed to go into the question of water supplies, as it affected the parishes of Pyle, Tythegston Higher and Newcastle Higher. Mr. T. Davies asked if that was an answer to the application made by a Mr. George Thomas. He understood that the Council had referred the report back for the consider- ation of the Committee as to whether Mr. Thomas had been unfairly dealt with. Mr. Wood said it was about a month ago that a Committee was appointed to go into the question of the water supply at the Graig, as it was said it was absolutely impossible to get water for the farmers. The Committee found that the charges that were brought by the farmers were substanti- ated, and it was thought by the Parochial Committlee that a Committee of the Council should be appointed to go into the matter, as it affected the whole of the area- Mr. T. Davies thought that no answer to the complaint made by Mr. George Thomas which the Council asked the Joint Committee to consider. Mr. Thomas said he had a com- plaint, and Mr. Butler had said at a previous meeting that he had a grievance. Mr. Wood said it was found that it was ab- solutely impossible to get water through the present source, therefore what could the Com- mittee do. Mr. W. A. Howell thought the Committee would have recommended something to the Council. As to this recommendation it was a wise one, but it said nothing with reference to Mr. Thomas. Mr. Wood said the Committee thought the man had no right to pay if he did not get the water. Mr. Butler said he understood that they had appointed a Committee to consider the means of supplying water to the upper part of Cefn. That was the question. Now he took it that the committee had gone so far into the matter and could go no further themselves. They now thought the Council should appoint a special committee to go into the matter. Mr. Price thought that would go a long way towards doing away with the grievance. The complaint was not only with regard to Mr. Thomas. There was a general com- plaint. He moved they appoint a commit- tee to go into the matter. Mr. J. S. Jones said they had nothing to hide down there; they wanted everybody to see what was going on. The recommendation was agreed to. The representatives of the parishes concerned- Mr. Rees John, Colonel J. 1. D. Nicholl, Mr. W. A. Howell, and Mr. J. T. Salathiel-were elected on the committee.

CHARGE OF HORSE STEALING

CHARGE OF HORSE STEALING. LLAMPHA FARM LABOURER REMANDED. At Bridgend Police Court on Tuesday (be- fore Mr. D. H. Lloyd), Thomas Thomas (24), a collier, of Treoes, and George Evans (28), a farm labourer, of Llampha, were charged with having stolen a chestnut mare, valued at jE50, from a field at St. Mary Hill Court Farm, on the 10th September, 1914, the pro- perty of Edmund D. Lewis. Inspector Rees Davies gave evidence to the effect that from information he received and from enquiries made, he arrested Thos. Thomas at his residence at Treoes. When charged with the offence, he started to cry. He then went into the back kitchen, and said, "I will tell you the truth about it." Continuing, he said Evans fetched the mare to his house, and told him to take it to Neath Fair and sell it, and he would give him L8. He sold the mare for £28, and gave the money to Evans, and Evans gave him iCS. George Evans, who was arrested later, was brought to the station, and when charged he said he knew nothing about it. Witness then brought Thomas Thomas from the cell, and in his presence witness told Evans what the former had said. He then charged them jointly, and Thomas Thomas said he gave Evans R20 and kept the LS. George Evans said that was not right; they were in the field together and they took the mare and walked together to Treoes. He stopped at Treoes, and Thomas went on towards the fair. He (Evans) was to meet him at the Star Hotel in the evening. The prisoners were remanded until Mon- day.

BILLIARDSI

BILLIARDS. I COYTRAHEN v. ABERKENFIG I.O.G.T. I Coytrahen: A. Lewis, 100; N. Vicker, 100; C. Davies, 82; R. Popkin, 100; T. J. Mat- thews, 92; A. Berry, 100; T. Butler, 92. Total, 666. Aberkenfig I.O.G.T.: L. Jenkins, 74; J. Duckett, 75; T. Thomas, 100; P. Butler, 23; W. D. Watkins, 100; J. Williams, 90; E. Hopkins, 100. Total, 562. Coytrahen won by 104 points.

A Gathered Comments ON THE WAR k to II II 1

A* Gathered Comments ON THE WAR. k to II. II. 1. The Promised Land. M. Leon Bourgeois, the veteran French statesman, addressing an Irish deputation in Paris, said :—"Gentlemen, some time before the outbreak of this awful war it seemed as if the Promised Land was very far from us. To-day, even amid the worst sufferings, do you not think that we have come nearer to that land? I can- not help remembering the popular 6ong hich came from that Ireland of yours, and which is on the lips of our soldiers as it is on those of yours, It's a Long, Long Way to Tipperary.' Tipperary! Did you not mean by that the Pro- mised Land where Paddy was to find peace and happiness? Perhaps the way from here to Tip- perary is not so long for all humanity." I German Defeat in America. I A remarkable German defeat has taken place in a Chicago election. "The Democratic candi- date for the mayoralty, a German named Schweitzer, ruined his party's cause by allow- ing his backers to placard the city with appeals to German patriotism on his behalf," says the "New Statesman." "Public indignation was aroused; the loyal American voters rolled up, and the result was the transformation of a large Democratic majority into the biggest Re- publican majority ever known in Chicago. The plain moral of this event is that masses of Americans will be ready to sink their party dif- ferences the moment they are confronted by an organised attempt to run local elections upon international issues." I The Englishman. I Mr. John Galsworthy, the novelist, has a Diagnosis of the Englishman" in the "Fort- nightly Review." Mr. Galsworthy thinks that for the particular situation which the English- man has now to face he is "terribly well adap- ted." He does not look into himself; he does not brood; he sees no further forward than is necessary; and he must have his joke. These are fearful and wonderful advantages. From an aesthetic point of view the Englishman, devoid of high lights and shadows, coated with drab, and superhumanly steady on his feet, is not too attractive. But for the wearing, tear- ing, slow and dreadful business of this war, the Englishman-nghting of his own free will, unimaginative, humorous, competitive, practi- cal, never in extremes, a dumb, inveterate opti- mist, and terribly tenacious-is equipped with Victory." I Learn to Endure, I  Dean Inge, preaching at St. Paul s Cathe- dral, said that to bring an indictment against the spirit of the age was always rash. Be- sides, our chief danger, it seemed to him, might be checked by this war-he meant that love of comfort and the dread of pain which were so widespread in all classes. "The modern Englishman," he continued, "is a sentimentalist in religion, in politics, in charity, and in everything else. He hates doing or seeing anything unpleasant. His social Utopia will be a farmyard of tame animals. This and the attempt for intellect, which goes with it, seem to me to be pre- paring a legacy of trouble." We should all have to learn to endure hardness now. We had a rough time before us, and he believed we were preparing to meet it nobly. "The last nine months, for all their sadness," he added, "have brought pure joy and pride to all lovers of our country. Our descendants may look back upon our generation as one which preserved and still further ennobled the best traditions of the English race." I A Red-Tied Soldier. I A striking letter from a Socialist soldier- "somewhere" in Northern France—is published by the "Leipziger Volkszeitung" :In front of me lies a Scotsman, a giant in stature, pic- turesque in his dress. I had four cartridges. The cry for water is harrowing-louder even than the whistling of the bullets. The groaning and the whining become weaker as morning approaches-a cry and a murmur ap- proaches-a cry and a murmur here and there. Terrible and icy is the silence which greets the morning. And when the victims of death are so uncannily still, then they speak the loudest. I experienced that more than once. The rain comes down faster and faster. We freeze like young dogs and chatter like geese. An at- tempt is made to count the dead. An impos- sible task. There lies a young officer, beautiful as a god. The head is bare, black locks form a frame round the high, noble brow, the face is pale, and the breast is covered with blood. There he is lying, quiet and friendly. At home, perhaps, there is a faithful wife, a lov- ing sweetheart, an old mother, weeping their eyes out. Who knows? Who can describe the tragedy of a battlfield?. I For the Time They Return. I 'Mrs. Wedgwood makes a charming suggestion which should put heart into many a homeless Belgian to-day. In brief, she suggests that as far as possible Belgian refugees should be set to making things of use when their home-going build houses, but also to rebuild a nation, I comes along! If we are not merely to re- would urge that, in addition to any communal scheme, we should supply each refugee family of the industrial and labouring classes with material to make for themselves-in accordance with their own ideas, not ours-a little store of household properties, against the day of return; with such things, for instance, as linen for sheets, tablecloths, towels, etc., and tick for the flock-stuffed mattress covers. Let even the children dress their dolls for the home-coming. In working for the future, belief in it will re- vive. Further, each family should be provided with a private box and key for storing what they make. These boxes would be handed over to their owners on the day they return to Bel- gium, and, if funds suffice, to the contents of each might then be added the primary tools of the breadwinner's trade, and a few simple uten- sils, such as saucepan, coffee-pot, etc. These 'dower-chests' would mean more to the posses- sor than any grant of supplies from the State, and would remain a personal relic of English friendship when the Great War shall have be- come a tale of history."

Advertising

Uo-to-Date Appliances for turning out every class of work at competitive prices, at the "Glamorgan Vazette" Printing Works.

HISTORY OF THE YALE I

HISTORY OF THE YALE. I LLANTRITHYD VILLAGE AND PARISH. I HISTORICAL and CHARMING OLD-WORLD I VILLAGE. (By Mr. T. M. PRICE, Late of Boverton). I In response to the invitation of Mr. John Morgan (loan Trithyd), the worthy and vener- able well-known bard, historian, and veteran agriculturist of the Vale of Glamorgan, I paid a visit to the interesting, historical, old-world village of Llantrithyd during the Easter holi- days. Leaving the busy press and stir of Car- diff City, with its din and turmoil of traffic, it is indeed refreshing to escape occasionally out of the fever of business and industry to recuper- ate and enjoy the charms and quiet repose of the peaceful villages and hamlets of the pic- turesque Vale, where there rests a calm that allows the thoughts untroubled to wander through the past and call up the figures of by- gone days. The main country highway, and the old coach road which stretches in a westerly direc- tion from Cardiff City to Cowbridge, etc., inter- sects within its 12 miles course some of the most luxuriant and romantic inland scenery in the Vale of Glamorgan. On the right to the north the landscape often stretches to the foot of the mountains, and on either side there are fre- quently sweet landscapes and sylvan scenery, with a rare store of Norman antiquities, an- cient Parishes Churches and crosses, castles and mansions with pretty wooded parks, quaint and pretty rural hamlets famous in song and story; then there are refreshing shady dingles, feathered to the rivulet's edge, often ending by the shore of the Severn Sea. Midway between Cardiff City and Cowbridge we pass through the pretty village of St. Nicho- las, and two miles further westward is the charming village of Bonvilston, with many pic- turesque houses, cottages, and old-world gar- dens, and three old-fashioned wayside inns. Among the latter is the Old Post Inn, a well- known hostelry and retreat for tourists and ex- cursionists in the summer season. At this point an old parish by-roadway branches off the main country highway to the left, which leads from Bonvilston to the quaint and pretty old- world village of Llantrithyd, which is nestled in a peaceful and fertile sylvan dingle on a wide extent of country, in the midst of some charm- ing Vale scenery, with ancient farmsteads, sur- rounded by outbuildings, spacious barns and substantial hayricks, dotted here and there with quaint and pretty old-fashioned thatehod cot- tages and flower gardens, whilst flanking the centre of the village and looking down upon it from its eminence rises the lofty grey tower of the ancient little village church and the stately ivy-covered ruins of Llantrithyd Place, which in former days was a grand old mansion and was for many ages the seat and home of the Aubrey family at Llantrithyd. ITS GEOGRAPHICAL SITUATION, &c. The village of Llantrithyd is pleasantly situ- ated on the Cardiff and Llantwit Major road, li miles north-east from St. Mary Church Road Station on the Taff Vale Railway, 3 miles south east from Cowbridge, 91 miles west from Car- diff City, and 31 miles from Peterstone-super- Ely on the Great Western Railway, in the Southern Parliamentary Division of the county of Glamorgan. The parish of Llantrithyd comprises an area of 1,443 acres. The soil is clay and gravel, subsoil and mineral strata. The northern part of the parish rests on the mountain limestone, and is good soil, but the southern part of the parish is lias, and some- what inferior. The land is chiefly pasture, but wheat, barley, oats, etc., are also grown on some of the various farms. About 100 acres of woodland is included in the area of the parish, which is in the hundred of Dinas Powis, form- ing a part of its western border. Its northern boundary, or very nearly so, is the port way separating it from Welsh St. Donats Parish. Llancarfan parish encircles it on the east and southern sides, and the parish of St. Hilary completes the enclosure on the western extrem- ity. The eastern side of the parish occupies a pic- turesque, well marked valley, which commences immediately below the ancient deer park, which forms a landscape not easily surpassed, and the scene presents to the observant lover of natural scenery all that is sublime and romantic. Looking south and westward we see in the dis- tance several quaint old-world villages, etc., of the Vale, including Flemingstone, Llanmaes, St. Athan, and ancient Llantwit Major, and many other objects of interest besides some de- lightful glimpses of the Bristol Channel with the lofty, luxuriant hills and dales of Somerset and Devonshire looming far away in the dis- tance. The whole of Llantrithyd parish is enclosed, and has probably been so from a remote period, and the parish is not divided into hamlets. The village of Llantrithyd lies around and near the Parish Church, and the lower or western portion, called Tre Aubrey," is situated about a quarter of a mile distant, but it is generally called "The Dopry" by the villagers. ANCIENT PLACE NAMES ON ORDNANCE I MAP. Among the names recorded on the old Ord- nance map are Tair Owen (i.e. Three Ashes), which trees were replanted many years ago by the late Rev. Roper Trevor Tyler, the father of General Tyler, J.P., Llantrithyd; Pant y Lladron (or The Robbers' Hollow), speaking ill for the policemen of the neighbourhood in the old days; Garn, an old farmhouse; Ty Fry, Ty Draw, Grofach, Ystin Claid, Langton, Ruish- land, Stonyland, Coed Arthur, Coed y ffynon echo, a Choed Castell Moel, a woodland extend- ing about two miles in length; Cae Maen, an extra parochial farm of about 120 acres, "'hich was in the old days probably attached to the sinecure parish of Llanveithyn, but now in Llancarfan parish. In addition to these names may be noted the names of Adam Field, Bam- bury, Bryn Moel, Catch Me Wood, Cae Pren Cam, Caer Pant, Llthgan Field, Pant Meyric, Pant-y-fiynon, Waungay and Wimane Hill. THE OLD PARISH CHURCH, RECORDS I AND INCUMBENTS, &c. The benefice of Llantrithyd Church is des- cribed in the ancient Liber Regie" as Llan- trithed, alias Llan Truddid (St. Iltyd). Bishop 7/5, glebe £ 1 8s., value in the king's books t8 13s. 4d.; the yearly value at that remote period c £ 46. The benefice is not mentioned in Pope Nicholas' Records, A.D. 1291, but in the Valour Ecclesiasticus of 1535 it is entered in full and printed in Latin. Llantrithyd is also men- tioned in the Spenser Survey of 1320. The list of incumbents of the Parish Church, dedicated to St. Iltyd (or in Latin, St. Iltutus), is, as usual, very imperfect, as we generally find in most of the old Church records. Those whose names and succession have been dis- covered are as follows :— Edward Pritchard, T.B., B.D., Rector; mar- ried in July, 1605, Elizabeth John (spinster), of Llantrithyd. The Rector was buried 5th March, 1638. Elizabeth, his widow, buried 22nd June, 1664; Elirtlbeth, their daughter, married William Gibbon, 20th Feb., 1637. Laomedon Fowler, also Rector of Sully, near Barry, the two livings of Llantrithyd and Sully yielding him < £ 200 per annum. This rev. pre- late was a staunch Royalist in the Civil War during the reign of Charles 1., 1625-1649, and he is said to have been ejected. Walker's Book, p. 248, records that he was severely handled, but he does not appear to have left Llantrithyd, as he was buried there April 17th, 1649, in the same year that the ill-fated mon- arch, King Charles I., was beheaded at White- hall, London (January 30th, 1649). Jenkin Williams, a Rector, buried 17th Dec., 1670. Patron of benefice, Sir John Awbrey, Bart. Edmund Waters, Rector; died 29th March, and was buried March 31st, 1684. Lewis Awbrey, Llantrithyd Place; married March 24th, 1691, Jennet Havard (spinster), of Llantrithyd. Rev. Edward Powell, instituted Rector 26th March, 1702, and on the 15th of May he walked the parish bounds. He was buried 14th March, 1707. He married Catherine Lewis (spinster), of Llantrithyd, on the 1st June, 1707, who was a member of a Penmark family. Rev. William Hopkins, instituted 1707 or 1708, buried 22nd April, 1726. He walked the bounds of the parish on Whit-Tuesday, 1718. His wife Ann was buried 18th September, 1745. Rev. Hugh Hughes, instituted 20th June, 1726. Rev. Robert Cooke, instituted 14th November, 1736. Rev. Thomas Williams, instituted 1st Decem- ber, 1741. (Sir John Aubrey, Bart., Llantrithyd Place) was patron to all those Rectors just referred to). Rev. Nehemiah Hopkins, instituted Rector 4th July, 1744, buried 30th May, 1790. (Patron of living James Edgecombe, D.D., H.V., Llan- daff). The Rector walked the bounds of the parish on Easter Monday, 1747. Mary, wife of Rev. Nehemiah Hopkins, buried 18th Septem- ber, 1770. Rev. George Williams, instituted Rector 24th June, 1790; buried 24th December, 1815. (Pat- rons of living Margaret Aubrey and Thomas Savours). Bloom, son of the Rev. George and Sara Williams, baptised 22nd September, 1790; George, son of Rev. Geo. Williams, buried 2nd August, 1792; Julia, daughter of Rev. George Williams, buried 27th May, 1796; George, their son, baptised 27th March, 1793; Julia Frances, daughter, baptised 13th October, 1794; Philip, their son, baptised 16th December, 1795; Julia Frances, baptised 28th July, 1797; Thomas, their son, baptised 17th September, 1798; Owen Glendower, son, baptised 23rd February, 1800; Frances, their daughter, baptised 28th March, 1801. Rev. William Bruce (Knight), A.M., resigned, and was afterwards appointed Dean of Llandaff Cathedral; no date given. Rev. Roper Trevor Tyler, A.M., instituted Rector 14th July, 1838. (Patron, Sir T. D. Aubrey, Bart.) The Rev. Charles Davie was curate in 1726, and Rev. Edward Lewis was officiating minister in 1784. Rev. William Thomas, curate of Cowbridge, was officiating minister 1792, and Rev. Richard Williams, his successor in this curacy, was offi- ciating minister in 1796. John Roberts, clerk to five incumbents of Llantrithyd Church, was buried 23rd July, 1719. I THE PARISH CHURCH REGISTERS. I The ancient Parish Church register dates back to the year 1571, and is probably one of the oldest in the Vale that is preserved. The earliest volume is a thin parchment folio, 14 inches by 6 inches, and contains 52 leaves, besides three at the beginning of the book which have been cut out. The records of christenings extend from the 21st January, 1597, to November 4th, 1810. The burials date from the 16th February, 1571, to 27th June, 1810, and the marriages from 24th February, 1571, to the 18th June, 1752. The register was reprinted in the year 1888, with all records from 1571 to the year 1810. The earlier entries in the old register are in plain ink, but all are eligible, and the old book has been well preserved. It will be observed that most of the names are Welsh, and only a few have any territorial distinctions. They are chiefly Matthew, Ilowell, Jenkins, Lewis, Thomas, and John. The name of Dawkin appears in several places, and also the name of Haward or Havard, pro- bably imported from Breconshire and here cor- rupted and passing into Howard-a name we often hear in these days. There are also several entries of Courtney, all in humble life. The name of Bassett appears in nearly 60 in- stances in all ranks of life, and several bearing the name of Deere. The names of Turbervill, of Greenway Farm; Fleming, Gamage, Gibbon, Wrelwyn (Knight), Bussy, Portrey, and Spenser (St. Athan Village) also occur periodi- cally at various dates. The first Mansell entry recorded is the burial of Rice Mansell, son of Anthony Mansell, who was married 8th November, 1583; and the first Aubrey entry is the marriage of Mr. Thomas Awbrey with Mary Mansell, the heiress of Llan- trithyd Place, 24th January, 1598; and there are entries of the Gwyn family, Llansannor Court, intermarrying with the Aubreys, of Llantrithyd; and also the, Denham, Jephson, Kerneys (Knight), Button of Worlton (now called Duffryn, near St. Nicholas), and Rudd (Knight). The last entry of the Aubrey family is the burial of Colonel Richard Aubrey, 9th April, 1808. Cissil seems to have been an early Christian name in the parish. It appears no less than nine times in the first 14 entries of christenings, and the Aubreys maintained it in several gen- erations. Christopher Scipia (otherwise Scippio, rather a peculiar and uncommon name) occurs in 1681-88 and in 1708-9. In the year 1806 a boy, in addition to the stain of illegitimacy, had imposed upon him the unenviable name of Aesop Charidemus, but, happily, he died in his infancy the same year. There are also several later entries of Aubreys who apparently do not appear to be connected with the Aubreys of Llantrithyd Place. The names of several officiating rectors and ministers are frequently inserted inciden- tally, and there are various records preserved of gifts of money and church plate, etc., by the Aubreys, Llantrithyd Place, in the year 1637, and the walking of the parish bounds by the rectors in 1685, 1702, 1718, and 1747, an old custom which is now obsolete. Among the notable marriage entries at Llan- trithyd Church is Sir Nicholas Cheniys, Kt. and Baronet, who married on the 4th Novem- ber, 1644, Jane Herbert, widow. This Sir Nicholas is said to have been Sir Nicholas Kemeys, the gallant defender of Chepstow Castle, who was killed in action in the year 1648, during the Civil War, but the wife usually assigned to him is Jane, daughter of Roger Williams, of Llangibby Castle, near Usk, Mon. without any record of her first husband. The name of Cheniys was probably corrupted into Kemeys after his marriage. (TO BE CONTINUED.)

AGRICULTURAL NOTESI

AGRICULTURAL NOTES. I Suggestions for the Cultivation of Catch Crops I and Home Grown Feeding Stuffs. The enhanced prices obtainable at the pre- sent time for corn, beef and other products, the high cost of feeding stuffs, the shortage of labour, and other circumstances, must in- ev-itably tend to some readjustment of exist- ing agricultural methods and practices even if only of a temporary character. While an increased production of corn and potatoes is of the greatest importance, it is also very desirable that steps should be taken to ensure a larger supply of home-grown food for stock. It may be useful, therefore, to discuss briefly some of the ways in which an increased quan- tity of useful produce may be obtained with- out seriously disorganising the normal farm- ing methods. The relative cheapness of most artificial manures affords a ready means of profitably increasing the output of both arable and grass land. Judicious expenditure on in- ferior grass land would almost certainly re- sult in both immediate and lasting benefit. In the case cf arable land, moderate applica- tions of suitable manures should not only re- sult in bigger crops but in cleaner land. Bare fallows should, as far as possible, be dis- pensed with, or where absolutely necessary, be replaced by bastard fallows. It may be desirable in some cases to modify the exist- ing rotation. Much of our arable land is farmed on the Norfolk four-course system, which may result in the soil being without a crop for nearly as long a period during the rotation as it is cropped; after corn crops, after roots, and after potatoes, the soil usu- ally lies idle throughout the winter, and more than one crop per annum is seldom harvested from the land. In the case of soils in wet or late districts more intensive cropping may be impractic- able, although even in the northern counties the plan of sowing some clover along with oats has given profitable crops of late autumn fodder for sheep. In the southern districts of England successional cropping might well be more extensively followed. After early potatoes, after peas, and even after an early corn harvest, catch crops are often possible, and may prove invaluable by providing green food for stock in the late autumn, winter, and spring following. These catch crops would be specially useful when prolonged drought may have diminished the ordinary hay and root crops of the season. In dis- tricts which are specially affected by dry, hot summers much less reliance should be placed on pastures and root crops than at present, and more attention should be given to the cultivation of other forage crops. Poor crops of roots are much too common in the south, and on many farms it would be a distinct gain if a proportion of the root "break" were set apart for the growth of other green crops. When appropriate green supplementary crops are selected they need never be wasted, for they may be grazed, fed green, or made into hay or silage, as found convenient. It is not generally realised that in many districts a mixture of corn and votchesi with perhaps a few beans for support, will produce about as much green food per acre as the average crop of roots. Converted into silage this mixed crop would yield a highly nutri- tious winter fodder. In a modern silo of the American stave pattern practically no waste occurs, and the somewhat elaborate precau- tions in regard to pressure and temperature hitherto considered essential in connection with older methods of ensiling may be largely disregarded. Filling may proceed at conveni- ent opportunities, and no pressure other than that incidental to spreading the green stuff appears to be necessary. In addition to supplementing or replacing roots in dry districts, silage, as has long been recognised, may prove a useful addition to hay in grass districts subject to a heavy rain- fall. The special uses of the crops available for the purposes above referred to are briefly in- dicated in the notes which follow. The total number of suitable catch crops is con- siderable, so that in arranging a scheme of cropping for any particular district a selec- tion can be made to suit the varying local circumstances of soil and climate. CATCH CROPS. Rye will usually prove most serviceable when sown in July or August. If sown before the end of August it is generally advisable either to cut or to graze the crop in October and allow the second growth to come in for the following April and May. When sown early, rye will grow too rank to stand over the winter if the grazing or cutting is omit- ted. If in spring the rye is grazed or mown be- before the ear appears in the stalk, and the land is then well bush-harrowed and rolled, the rye will grow again and ripen into a grain crop. For this purpose the St. John's Day Rye, owing to its greater tillering capa- city, is more suitable than any other kind, but it has been difficult to obtain seed of this variety in recent years. It will usually be advisable to follow green rye with another green crop, e.g., turnips, rape or kale. For green forage rye should be sown thickly, at the rate of at least four bushels per acre. Rye is a drought-resisting plant, is capable of growing at a high alti- tude, and succeeds on almost any class of soil. For the production of the maximum amount of forage, however, it is necessary that the land should be in good condition. livhere the soil is poor a spring dressing of I- to i cwt. of nitrate of soda or some other ni- trogenous manure should be applied. Italian Rye Grass when sown very thickly in July or August is fit, under favourable con- ditions, to graze in late autumn. In the fol- lowing spring it might again be grazed or left for early mowing. It starts growth early in spring, and, if encouraged by dressing of ni- trogenous manures, will prove an excellent stand-by for dairy farmers who may be short of forage in the late spring months. On sewage farms or where irrigation is possible, Italian rve-grass will afford several cuttings a year. The usual rate of seeding is from 2 to 4 bushels per acre. With a view to pro- viding early keep for ewes and lambs in spring, a few pounds of Italian rye-grass may be included in a clover seeds mixture. This practice is recommended for districts in which clover is apt to fail. On the other hand, there is a risk of injuring the succeed- ing wheat crop on some soils if the grain crop is not suitably manured. Western Wolths Grass resembles Italian rye-grass, and is cultivated in the same way. It grows faster and reaches maturity in about two months. It might be utilised as a means of filling up blanks in a thin clover plant, or for sowing after early potatoes for autunm grazing. White Mustard grows very rapidly, and may be sown where turnips and mangolds have failed, or it may be broadcasted upon stubbles broken up by the cultivator or disc harrow. If 141b. to 161b. of seed be sown, together with 1t-2 cwt. of superphosphate, there should be good sheep food in six weeks or less under the most favourable conditions. Sown as late as the end of August, mustard will usually yield good food by the end of No- vember. If not required for sheep feeding the crop may, with advantage, be ploughed in as green manure. This crop does not stand a hard winter. (TO BE CONTINUED.)

jGOVERNMENT AND FARMERS

GOVERNMENT AND FARMERS. FAIR PRICES TO BE PAID FOR HAY. The Board of Agriculture issued a notice on Friday that attention had been drawn to ru- mours circulated that the War Office intended to commandeer the stocks of hay in the country at any price they deemed reasonable. The Board have reason to suppose these rumours are causing uneasiness in country districts. If the average production be maintained the require- ments of the Army could be met without any serious interference with the needs of farmers or of trade and private horse and stockkeepers. It has been decided by the War Office, in or- der to equalise purchases, to make use of the powers vested in the Board of Trade under the Articles of Commerce Returns Act, 1914, and to require a return to be made of stocks of hay in the country. The War Office hope to obtain all the hay they require by friendly arrangement, but instances may arise in which individuals unreasonably withhold hay required for the use of his Majesty's Forces. In any such eases the War Office have decided to use their powers of requisitioning hay under the Army Act. It was not their intention to use these powers to ac- quire hay at a price below fair market value, and in arriving at the price to be offered for hay required due regard will be paid to the actual price paid in the immediate neighbour- hood for hay of similar class and quality and to the amount necessary for use on the farm. The Board would impress on landowners and farmers the very great importance not only of offering hay to military authorities, but also of maintaining, and wherever possible increasing, the acreage to be for hay this year. In a notice to farmers issued the Board of Agriculture say :—Attention has been drawn to the fact that prevailing conditions are causing farmers to experience difficulty in maintaining the normal standard of production of their hol- dings, especially with regard to live stock. The shortage of labour and the increased cost of feeding stuffs and high prices are tempting far- mers to make an immediate profit at the expense of future output. Many breeders are market- ing stock before maturity, and several dairy farmers were reducing or disposing of herds to a regrettable extent. The slaughter of female animals suitable for breeding was particularly undesirable. The Board possessed strong evi- dence that there was a tendency to fatten an unusual number of heifers, ewes, and sows, and send cows in calf and sows in pig to the but- cher. This practice, if general, would seriously reduce flocks and herds. The Board trusted the production of milk for market would remain a primary consideration, and with this object the employment of women milkers might be greatly extended. The cost of pig feeding might be reduced by allowing them to run on the grass. Another matter brought to the notice of the Board was the intention of some farmers to red uce the area of grass to be mown for hay. Any action of the kind would be most regrett- able when the needs of the farmers have to be considered, and also supplies for the Army, which must be maintained at all costs.

Advertising

Up-to-date appliances for turning out every class of work at competitive prices, at the "Glamorgan Gazette" Printing Works. LADIES BLANCHAP, D'S PILLS Are unrivalled for all Irregularities, etc., they speedily afford relief and never fail to alleviate all suffering, etc. They supersede- Pennyroyal, Pil Cochia, Bitter Apple. BJanchanYs are the Best of all Pills for Women. Sold in boxes lis. lid., by BOOTS' Branches and all Chemists, or post free, fiftme prioe, from LESLIE MARTYN. Ltd., Chemists, :J1, Dalston Lane, London. Sample and valuable Booklet post free Id.