Collection Title: Glamorgan Gazette

Provider: The National Library of Wales

Rights: The copyright status or ownership of this resource is unknown.

View full details

First Previous Image 7 of 8 Next Last
Full Screen
23 articles on this page
GMBLER IN LIVES r I

"G&MBLER IN LIVES." r, I JUDGE AND MAESTEG WOMAN. SEVERE COMMENTS IN INSURANCE CASE. j Mr. Justice Scrutton, in the King's Bench Division on Thursday had before him for consideration the action heard by him at Swansea Civil Assizes recently, in which Mrs. Annie Hughes, of the Railway Inn, Maesteg, sued the Liverpool Victoria Legal Friendly Society, John Lloyd (a superintendent), and William Evans (an agent), employed by the society. Plaintiff's case was that she was in- duced by alleged misrepresentations on the part of Lloyd or Evans (or both) to pay off ar- rears on five policies of life insurance instiling people who were not related to her. She said she was told she would get the benefit of the policies, and she, therefore, paid the arreais. :and subsequently premiums. Her action was brought to recover the money so paid, and the jury at Swansea found that she was in- duced to act as she did by assurances on the part of Lloyd that "everything would be all right," that the payment of the premiums after the handing over of duplicate policies was induced by assurances on th-v part of *P"-t-nn guilt, the plaintiff could not recover either for misrepresentation or for total failure of consideration. That the mis- deeds of the defendants, if any, had nothing to do with the matter, and that the Court would be enforcing the public interest by de- clining to allow either party to succeed on a claim based on an illegal transaction. The plaintiff's counsel urged that the par- ties were not of equal guilt, as the defendants had obtained the premiums by the fraud of other agents. He declined to hold that in the case of a policy prohibited by law money paid under it could be recovered back even if the payments were induced by fraudulent re- presentation on the part of anyone. While he thought that the plaintiff was far from being an injured innocent, in the view which the jury took, she might have believed that the policies were valid. In the result, therefore, he found for the defendants on the ground that the policies were prohibited by statute, and he did not think the Court ought to enforce repayment of money paid under them. As, however, he was not satisfied with the conduct of the de- fendants, he gave judgment for them without costs.

POLLUTION AT MAESTEG I

POLLUTION AT MAESTEG. I COULDN'T OPEN DOORS BECAUSE OF I STENCH 12 MILES AWAY. r At a meeting of I'eiiybont Rural District Council on Saturday a report was read by the Sanitary Inspector on the state of the river at Llangynwvd by tne Maesteg Urban Dis- trict Council sewa,ge outfall works. He stated tha.t the tanks and filters of the existing works were not more than half capable of dealing with the flow of sewage for the population of the Maesteg area and that had been the case for many years. The result of that was that the tanks and filters were useless p.nd were used very little, the sewage being borne into the river, crude and untreated. About three years ago a Local Government Board inquiry was held in Maesteg when plans and estimates and guarantees were su bnlitted by tihe Council involving the expenditure of about £ 19,000 on additional tanks and filters at the outfall works. That grant be understood had since been obtained from the Local Government Board to proceed with the work, but un to the present no attempt had been made in that direction. Colonel! J. I. D. Nichol said after the long drought when the rain came down the stench from the river was something fearful: he had Trover smelt anything like it in his life. People could hardly open their windows at Merthyrmawr, 12 miles away. Crude sewage was coming down there and it was absolutely awful. He thought there was nothing being done and they were continually making repre- sentation to them and therefore he thought the only thing they could do was to write to the Local Government Board. They could say it w"S making the district insanitary and creating a very serious nuisance. He moved to that effect. Mr. Price second-ed and it was carried.

Advertising

I FRONT Keep Buying&Keep BUSINESS AS USUAL' We are at the FRONT KaepBuying&Keep NM??T3E5 Bs? VM?'W B J Y?"?%Vt T)?\Y) tT???? r? ? A ? ? & Value. thoF!ag Pty.ng. r A CALlx TO DUTY. Ktt A THE RIGHT HON. JOHN BURNS, M.P., writing on Sept.-nth, 1914, says: I hope that the great army of Housekeepf rs will not only have their renovating done now, but J??"????? ?? also RESUME THE BUYING OF FURNITURE. By so doing you will help to    relieve the distress and prevent unemployment, on which the GERMANS ARE COUNT- XwvS ING TO WEAKEN GREAT BRITAIN. Be Patriotic and carry out Mr. John Eurn's I WJLJvy* i advice! Every purchase needlessly with-held is equal to a vo

TRIBUTE TO MAESTEG I SOLICITOR

) TRIBUTE TO MAESTEG I SOLICITOR. PRESENTATION BY YOUNG LIBERALS. On Wednesday a presentation meeting was held at the Young Liberals' Institute, Maes- teg, when, on the occasion of his marriage, Mr. Arthur King Davies, solicitor, was pre- sented with a photograph of the Young Liberals' Executive Committee. Mr. Davies has been a very active member of the Young Liberals, and for the past three years has acted as president of the Maesteg League. There was a large muster of members. Councillor John Hocking was in the chair, and he was supported by Councillor David Morris and Mr. Edward Hopkin, Liberal agent, Tondu. In a short opening speech Mr. Hocking re- minded those present that the duties of a good chairman were to get up, speak up, and shut up. Mr. Hopkin (Tondu) referred to the useful work done by Mr. King "Davies. He was a man of high principle, who was not afraid to speak out, and who never hid his convic- tions under a bushel. Councillor David Morris referred to the ex- cellent services rendered by Mr. Davies to the Young Liberals' League. He had always found Mr. Davies courteous and willing at all times to do everything in his power for the good of the League. Shooting and billiard playing were all very well in their way, but he was not at all sure that that was the best way to keep the members together, and to spread the cause they all had at heart. He suggested that a male voice party be formed in connection with the League. lJ. David Williams spoke eulogistically of the sci-vices of the president, and urged that the pl,owvt r»i3nibers should work to get new members. He wish Mt-. aiici Mrs. Davies every happiness. Councillor Socking, in making the tation, referred to the fact that he was not exactly a "young" Liberal in years at any rate, but in spirit he hoped he was young still. He appreciated Mr. Davies as a man and for the great service he had rendered to the League gratuitously at all times. He .i-as delighted to be present, if it were only for the respect he had for his father, the fate Mf T. King Davies. He held Mr. i^avie* in t4io highest esteem because he was ncjt afraid to stand up for his principles. He held that athletics were good for the body, and IP, Tn'ged that every Young Liberal should hep fit mentally and physically for the great work that was undoubtedly ahead. Mr. King Davies, who was enthusiastically received, said it was difficult to find words to express his deep gratitude. He wished to thank the members very sincerely for the kind way in which he had been received that evening, and for the honour he had received at their hands. He assured them that no present he had received would be more valued than the one just given him by the League. Young Liberals had gone through three General Elections successfully, and this i.t thought was something to their c-cs dit. Verv few Leagues hrtd had a more successful career than the Maesteg Liberal League. A vote of thanks to the Chairman for so ably presiding was proposed by Mr. Morris, and seconded by Mr. D. M. Thomas, and a most enjoyable evening was brought to a close by singing "God save the King." At the same meeting a beautiful bust of Mr. D. Lloyd George was presented to the Maesteg Young Liberals by Mr. J. L. Jen- kins. sculptor, Maesteg. The following contributed to the musical programme:—Mr. A. Lloyd, Mr. W. R. Jen- kins. Mr. Irvon Evans, Mr. Day Jones, and Mr. E. Jenkins.

MAEHTFG WEDDING

MAEHTFG WEDDING. DAVIES-LAKE. A protty wadding was solemnised at the Tabernack. W?Ml B?pt?st Chapel, Maesteg,  on Tuesday morning, the contracting parties ] being Mr. Emrys Davies, son of Mr. and Mrs Davies, of Coegnant House, Maesteg, and Miss Marie Lake, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Herbert Lake, of Court Street, Maesteg. The bride, who was given away by her father, wa,s attired in a navy blue silk dress, and wore a white hat to match. The bridesmaids were Miss Dilys Davies (sister of the bridegroom), Miss Susie Lake (sister of the bride). Miss Phoebe Morgans and Miss Cassie Davies, all of whom were dressed in white embroidery. Mr. W. Bryn Davies acted as best man, and he was assisted by Mr. Dan Williams. The officiating minister was the Rev James Lewis, of Tabernacle. After the ceremony the newly wedded couple and party returned to the home of the bride, in Court Street, where breakfast was partaken of. Mr. and Mrs. Davies afterwards left by motor car en route for Chepstow. where the honeymoon is being spent. The presents were very numerous and costly.

ICOAL STEALINGI

I COAL STEALING. I At Bridgend Police Court on Saturday, Elizabeth Ann Thomas, single, Maesteg, was I summoned for having stolen coal value 2s., the property of the Celtic Colliery Company. Fined 10s.

Advertising

LADIES. READ THIS. A DVICK FREE toi Stamp. Mrs. E. ™ Stewart's Famous Female Remedy Dever 1 fails.—Addrem: 9. Guinea Street. Bristol. 6M

I CAERAU BOYS ROBBERY I

I CAERAU BOY'S ROBBERY. I I BROKE INTO A SCHOOL. I I STEALS HIS MOTHER'S RINGS AND I PAWNS THEM. I At Bridgend Police Court on Tuesday, Benjamin Jones (13), a schoolboy, of 27 Rail- way Terrace, Caerau, was charged with having done damage by, it was alleged, having broken certain windows and locks at the Caerau Schools, the property of the Gla- morgan County Council, valued at 15s. Samuel R. Maddocks, schoolmaster, Caerau Mixed School, said on the 2nd July about 4.30 lie left the school premises secure, but when he visited them on the following Mon- day he found that someone had entered the school by means of one of the windows in the cloakroom, and in doing so had broken two panes of glass. When he got upstairs he found both the locks on the teachers' cup- boards broken open, and the drawers had been broken open and the contents of the cupboards were disarranged. As far as he could see, however, nothing had been taken. Downstairs in the hall he found one of the drawers of the sewing table forced open, and upstairs in the teachers' room the sewing basket had been broken open and the scissors taken. With the help of the scissors the master's drawers had been forced. On the following Thursday the boy admitted the offence. The Chairman What is the conduct of this boy I-fi) the school? Witness-: I am sorry to have to say be is 11ntruthf1119¡1í19 dishonest. P C.$11 said 1,4p, saw the boy with refer- ence to the matter, 'nJ1d asked him if he was the boy who broke )ftlg the school, and he said, "Yes; I went in by myself. I broke the windows with a stone, tmd went to the master's room and broke the master's door and also the sewitig drawer downstairt^ 1he: boy was further charged with hJî¥1ng stolen two gold riij^s, to the value of £ 3 15s". > from Railway Terrace, Caerau, the property of Sarah Jane Jones, the boy's step-mother. Sarah Jane Jones said on Saturday. litb July, she missed two gold rings from off the mantelpiece and afterwards she saw them at the pawnbrokers. The boy was living at the house, and when she accused him ot the theft he said he had taken them. She could do nothing with him. He would go away and she would not see him for ten days at a time. JP.C. 311 gave evidence of arrest, and said, "Y T Vii reply to the charge the boy sAi ".Ye' stole the rings and took them to a Maesteg pawnbroker's." Witness went to the pawn- shop and there saw the rings. The pawn- broker had become suspicious and gave infor- mation to the police. The boy said he took the rings because he wanted money. He was remanded for one week, during which time he was to be sent to the Dinas Powis School. The Clerk was asked to make arrangements for his entry to an industrial school.

CAERAU BOXERS HOPES I

CAERAU BOXER'S HOPES. I HIS MEETING WITH JOHNNY BASHAM. I Dai Roberts hopes to beat Johnny Basham, the welter weight champion of Great Britain, on August 12th at Liverpool. Writing in "Reynolds," Roberts says:—"My punch has developed considerably, whilst my speed and footwork are better than ever. I must con- fess that prior to meeting Billy Williams over at the Ring a few weeks ago. I had at- tempted to alter my natural style. Dis- covering that it was a mistaken notion I worked out on my proper lines, with the re- sult that Williams was knocked out in a con- test which I am told showed me in my old form. That is the form I hope to reproduce against Basham, and. although not boasting, an asset I've never attempted to possess, I believe that I shall prove successful in defeat- ing Bashani."

ACCIDENT TO MAESTEG COLLIERI

ACCIDENT TO MAESTEG COLLIER. I Whilst following his occupation as collier at the Tonhir Colliery, Maesteg, on Thursday a young man named Henry George Algar, age 23 years, of Riverside Cottages, Maesteg, met with a severe accident. It appears that Algar was in the act of securing the roof of his stall when a large stone gave way and caught him before he had time to get to safety. He was immediately conveyed home on a stretcher and attended to at the house by Dr. Roberts, assistant to Dr. Sinclair, and upon examination it was found that several ribs were fractured.

MAESTEG I

MAESTEG. I ABANDONED.—Owing to the inclemency of the weather, the- fete and gala in connec- tion with St. Michael's Church was aban- doned as far as the outside events were con- cerned, but the tea was held under cover. The best was made of very disappointing cir- cumstances. The tables were nicely laid and presided over by active workers.

No title

Mr. and Mrs. Robert Davies, of Brynteg, Llanharan, celebrated their golden wedding on Thursday last week. They were married at Sardis Chapel, Pontypridd, on July 29tli, 1865. Both are well and hearty. Mr. Davies was born at Pandy 80 years ago, and Mrs. Davies, who is four years his junior, is a I native of Dinas. They have six children and eighteen grandchildren living. Most of the family were present at the celebration, and there' were many gifts.

I MAESTEG COLLIER GETS A MONTH

I MAESTEG COLLIER GETS A MONTH I FOR ASSAULT ON A WOMAN. At Bridgend Police Court on Saturday, John Davies, collier, Maesteg, was charged with having wounded Mary Lewis, of no fixed abode, at Maesteg, by striking her with his fist. The case had been adjourned, as complainant was too ill to appear. She now appeared with a covering over a badly discoloured eye, and bore signs of ill- treatment. Sworn, she said she met defendant in a public-house. A soldier came in and wit- ness went out with him. Defendant followed. As they were going towards Oakwood Colliery the soldier gave her money and defendant offered her 5d. She refused it, and then de- fendant struck her blows in the face. As a result of her injuries she had been unable to appear. She was blind for a week. Defendant said complainant put her hand in his pocket and took some money from him. As she refused to give it back, he struck her. P.S. F. Evans said he arrested defendant, who said he lost his temper because the woman took money from him. The woman was suffer- ing from wounds on the face and was blind in both eyes. The Chairman said this was a serious charge, and defendant would go to gaol for a month.

ICOLLIERY ENGINEMEN AND OWNERS

I COLLIERY ENGINEMEN AND OWNERS. I THE WAGE RATE. A meeting of the South Wales and Mon- mouthshire Association of Colliery Engine- men and Stokers was held at Cardiff to fur- ther discuss the proposals to be placed be- fore the cC(9.il:Iwners. The following were the prop's#!?- '.l^iid before the coalowners:— (1) all :lJJ,e employed in the mechani- cal def> £ rtnie#t§ of tle collieries now receiv- t iflij a standard rate 4d. per shift be advanced to 3s. 4d-? the st#4rd rate to be altered by adding 50 per cent, thereto, with an additional 10 per cent. upon the bame, (2) That all men now being paid the stand" aId rate of 3E3: 44, per shift and above be granted an advance of 4d. per day, and that the respective standard rates be site red by adding 50 per cent. thereto, with an addi- tional 10 per cent. (3) That a bonus turn be paid each week to ( all men employed in the afternoon and inght shifts, (4) That all workmen now employe don 12 hours' shift shall have the same reduced to eight hours. Subsequently an interview v.s obtained with the coalowners, over whom Mr. T. H. Deakin presided. The interview was a favourable one. and the Coalowners pro- mised to give the questions early considera- tion, it being understood that whatever ar- rangements were come to they should be re- trospective, The following is the official report supplied by Mr. Findlay A. Gibson:- A meeting of the committee appointed by the Coalowners' Association to deal with any question in regard to the wages and conditions of employment of enginemen and stokers was held at Cardiff to-day (Fri- Jay), Mr. T. H. Deakin presiding. The Committee met the representatives of the Monmouthshire and South Wales Engine- men's and Stokers and Craftsmen's Associa- tion. over whom Mr. W. Hopkins presided. The meeting was held in order that the re- presentatives of the enginemen might place before the owners certain prorosals in regard to improvement in the wages and hours of the enginemen and stokers ad men em- ployed in the mechanical departments at the collieries. These proposals were fully explained by the Enginemen's representatives, and Mr Deakin. on behalf of the. owners, promised that they should receive consideration by the owners. and that a reply should be given at a future meeting to be arranged.

ITHE NEW MINERS AGREEMENT

THE NEW MINERS' AGREEMENT MR. STANTON EXPLAINS. There was a large attendance of the night men engaged at the pits in the A berdare dis- trict at the local Market Hall on Fridcy for the purpose of hearing Mr. C. B. Stanton (miners' agent) explain the terms of the new agreement as they would affect the grade of colliery hands in question. Mr. Stanton spoke of the advantages which would accrue, and reminded his audience that the least they could do was loyally to recognise the Feder- ation, which had been the means of improving their positions. There would, however, be no more shuffling in the coalfield with regard to the non-Unionist question. What steps would be taken in order to solve the problem once and for all he was not at liberty to disclose at the moment, but lie might say that the mem- bers of the executive council were quite unani- mous upon a, plan of campaign, which would1 be instlantly put into force unless the present wage were to cleanse the ranks

No title

Speaking of Germany's attempts", to obtain "honourable peace terms," M. Leon Bailby, writing in the paris "Intransigeant," says: Overtures have not been wanting. We } have rejected them all and are resolutely preparing for a winter campaign, though it is not certain that one will be necessary. That is the best reply to make to the crafty German advances."

I COST OF THE COAL STRIKE

I COST OF THE COAL STRIKE I 1,000,000 TONS LOST. Mr. W. H. Renwick, of Cardiff, ex-Alder- man of the City Council, has contributed an interesting" article to the "Nineteenih Cen- I tury Magazine," on "Tb^ Coel Industi-v 0 Under War Conditions." After giving a history of the negotiations which had already taken place in reference to the miners' wage bs in South Wales, he says: — "It is difficult to understand the action of these miners at so critical a period. They were working full time on a maximum basis of wage rate, and had the further benefit of a war bonus of 17 £ per cent. The alarming situation created by a strike in the coalfield from which our Navy and the fleets of our Allies draw their supplies necessiiated the strongest possible Government measures. On the eve of the stoppage a ':Royal proclamation placed the South Wales mining area under the provisions of the Munitions of Wair Act. which makes all disputes subject to compulsory ar- bitration, and' any a bstention from work pending such arbitration liable to severe pen- alties. "The strike was. fortunately, of short dur- ation, but the fact of even a few dtavs' cessa- tion of work is a grave reflection upon the patriotism of the miners of South Wales. "The annual quantity of coal raised at the South Wales collieries is about 56,000,000 tons, so that the stoppage has resulted in a loss of production of at least 1.000.000 tons, representing a, serious reduction during a, period of exceptional pressure, with attendant loss of revenue, to say nothing of the damage to national prestige at so critical a period of the- wair. "Since Mr. Runciman became President of the Board of Trade he has had a. series of very awkward and highly technical problems to handle in connection with the divergent interests of one of the mrst impor- tant of our national industries, and in .at- tempting to remove the deadlock in South Wales it was not an easy or even an agreoo,ble duty which he had to perform. It cro?Awllv took the combined efforts of Mr. LWu George, Mr. Runciman and Mr. Arthur Hen- dfi'son to arrange the terms for a new Con- ciliHtRin Board agreement, and those con- ditions, ttlien thdy defined and embodied in the new agreement, will operate from the date the men resumed work on the termin- ation of the deplorable strike, and will con- tinue in force until the expiration of six months after the termination of the war, and thereafter until the lapse of three months after notice has been given by one of the parties to terminate it. "A new standard of wages is to be estab- lished. at an increase of 50 per cent. above the old standard of 1879, the new standard I phu; ten per cent. operating as K. minimum. "The colliers have'now secured for them- selves that, no matter how prices may recede during the present temporary agreement, they are assured a minimum wage on a high basis. Also there will be no provision in t

No title

Large congregations attended the closing meetings of the Calvinistic Methodist Sassiwn at Tregaron, and the meetings throughout the day were a complete success. The final day was devoted to preaching, which took place on a specially-erected platform. The preachers were the Revs. William Davies, M.A., Aber- dare; Evan Price, Ebbw Vale; J. H. Williams, PoiTinxadoc; Dr. Cynddylan Jones, Cardiff; William Thomas. Maesteg; Philip Jones, Llandilo: Joseph Jenkins, Festiniog; and John Williams, Brynsiencyn. A feature of the meetings was the splendid rendering of hymn tunes.

No title

A curious discovery was made at Northwich on Saturday. In a field near the Crewe rail- way three boys found a tin canister, which, on being touched, practically crumbled to dust. Instead of a bomb, which the youngsters half expected, the canister contained thirty-eight sovereigns of Queen Victoria's reign, the most modern being dated 1883. They were handed over to the police, who believe that they must have been hidden at least a quarter of a century. One theory is that they were stolen by someone who decamped, and never found a opportunity of returning for the treasure.

Advertising

THE SALE OF ALL SALES w w w I ts • • • • I w • • • • HENRY LAVIERS WHICH IS NOW ON As usual there are wonderful Bargains in every Department. Send For Circular:— fl. liaviers, Commercial St., MAESTEG. TI—I f m 1| m Complete House • H J en kin s CO-s'ulle. jL i i < 

SOUTH WALES RAILWAYMENI

SOUTH WALES RAILWAYMEN. I WAGE QUESTION. t A mass meeting of railwaymen was held at the Cory Hall. Cardiff, on Sunday afternoon to receive the replies of the Taff Vale Rail- way Co. and the Rhymney Railway Co. re- garding the payment of wages for the week of the coal strike. On the previous Sunday a resolution was passed calling on the companies to pay on the ground that the men had been guaran- teed payment for a full week's work should tiip,y be prevented from working by lack of traffic. During the week the matter had been set right, and the Board of Trade ordered that the payment should be made. Mr. Michael Fhay presided at the meeting on Sunday. and referred to the satisfactory agreement come to.. Mr. Bartlett reported on correspondence with the Minister of Munitions, the Prime Minister, and the headquarters of the National Union of Railwaymen. There were acknowledgments from the two former, and a letter from headquarters stated that the matter was taken up immediately with the Board of Trade by telephone, and they had received a reply that the matter would be put right. Mr. Clements, one of the deputation to Mr Prosser (general manager of the Rliymuey Railway Company), made a full report as to what transpired at the interview. In regard to the Bank Holiday week, they were looking for a guaranteed week again. It might be, he said, that some work of differ- ent grade would have to be done, but this was better than being idle. The Chairman reported, in regard to the Taff Vale Railway Company, that he wrote to the general manager ( Mr. Beasley) on Sunday night of last week, and on Friday re- ceived a reply stating that as the matter had been settled there was no necessity for the manager to receive a deputation. The Chair- man said the men had had their demands conceded. The meeting then considered the question of reductions which, it was alleged, had been made in the wages of certain T.V.R. drivers, and a long discussion ensued. Eventually a resolution was adopted call- ing the attention of the Prime Minister and the Minister of Munitions "to the fact that certain Taff Vale Railway drivers had been reduced in pay since April," and ttsking them to use their good offices to put this right."

No title

The sale of farmers and lands at Ystrad- gvnlais, belonging to the Tredegar Estate, which was announced to take place on August 5th is withdrawn. The whole of the lots, comprising 25 farms and the fully- licensed public-house, the Old Tredegar Arms." Cwmtwrch, have been sold to the tenants by private treaty.

Advertising

The Welshman's Favourite. MABON Sauce I VW As good to its Namm. DON'T FAIL TO GET rr. St P8III' St* CammL b:' WAR WAR I Has given a chance to show what CO-OPERATIVE FACTORIES (controlled by Workers, not capitalists) can do, many of our goods are the same priee as eforc the War Biscuits, Lards, Jams, Soaps, etc., not advanced. We are affiliated to the Co-operative Union and the C.W.S (who have an annual turnover of about £ "50,000000.) We pay 5% on Share Capital and 4% on Loan Capital Deposits (this can be withdrawn anytime. New Members joining are at once in benefit, under our Insurance Policy, and in the event of Husband's death 4/- out of every £ paid as a trading mem ber, is immediately paid the Widow, or 2/- in the £ to the husband if his wife dies, (this has nothing to do with the usual Dividends,) YES, it pays to be a Co-operative Member, think it over, you can join anytime, and costs 1/- only. Caerau & Maesteg Co-operative Society Limited. GIFT PARCELS for the TROOPS. For your Friends at the Front, nothing is more appreciated than something good to eat from Home, something to vary the monotony of ordinary service rations. "DOROTHY" TUCK BOXES. All Articles Home-made (not factory) are just the thing. The contents have been carefully selected to form a home-like Gift for a Soldier or Sailor on Service, especially during the summer months No tins to open, nothing to spoil in transit. Everything of the best quality, securely packed and forwarded Carriage Paid to destination. No. 1 Parcel, "The Pride of Wales," contains the following good things:- 2 lb. Territorial Cake (Almond Iced). 12 Assorted Chocolate Cakes lb. Shortbread 6 Welsh Cakes lIb. Real Galantine i lb. Old fashion Bull's Eyes." lIb. Swiss Roll prica 5s. ad. complete. lnclndinb Postage to France, Belgium, Egyvt, Mediterranean or British Isles. Other Parcels: 3/6, 6/6 and 8/6 each. Owing to the volume of Orders we are receiving, please Order Early. ALL ORDERS SENT OUT IN ROTATION. R. WILLIR & PSO NPS) (ON WAR OFFICE LIST) Dopothy Cafe, JV17SESTEG. SPECIAL QUOTATIONS FOR QUANTITIES. All Remittances acknowledged and Date of Despatch given. Please state clearly Full Address, Regimental Number, Battalion of Regiment, Rank or Ship. Be Patriotic Keep your Money on the move by spending wisely with our Advertisers.