Collection Title: Glamorgan Gazette

Provider: The National Library of Wales

Rights: The copyright status or ownership of this resource is unknown.

View full details

First Previous Image 8 of 8
Full Screen
25 articles on this page
COl i WALLIA COMMONS

COl i WALLIA COMMONS. MR. W. A. HOWELL AND THE "OBSOLETE COURT." COL. NICHOLL'S REFERENCE TO LORD OF THE MANOR'S CONCESStONS. A meeting of the Penybont Rural District Council on Saturday was presided over by Mr. George Jeanes, J.P. COITY WALLIA COMMONS. A letter was read from Mr. Ivor M. Howell with reference to the scheme for the regula- tion of Coity Wallia Commons, in which he stated that he was directed on behalf of the Parish Councils of Coity, St. Bride's Minor, Coychurch Higher, and Pencoed to convey to the Council the result of their conference and their observations on the proposed order as it was at present drawn out. The four Coun- cils, he stated, had gone to the expense of obtaining the opinion of Mr. Alex. Mac- Morran, K.C., on the position, and they had also had an interview with Mr. Lawrence Chubb, the secretary of the Commons and Footpaths Preservation Society. He also de- tailed the grounds upon which the parishes concerned objected to the proposed order, the final clause being to tha effect that a levying of a rate was unnecessary in view of the fact that the Commoners Committee had a large sum of money at their disposal, and that one of the parishes—Coity—had only a very small portion of its boundaries within the Manor. The objection was being prepared, embodying all the objections for presentation to the Board of Agriculture at an early date. He was directed to express the hope that the Council would give their strong support to the case against the order, with the view of finally disposing of the scheme, which was not acceptable to the great majority of the people living in the Manor and of people using the Common. It was decided not to agree to the pro- posals. Colonel Nicholl said it was well known that Bryncethin Schools would have to be re-built and that would be an expense on the rates for many years. Mr. W. A. Howell said personally he felt very thankful for the support Mr. Nicholl had given in the case; he thought it was a democratic attitude. He wished to point out in connection with the encroachments that there was a body, he thought, at present to deal with that-the Leet Court, or, as some people called it, the obsolete court. (Laugh- ter.) The residents had no Common rights, but the point remained that they were enjoy- ing the Common rights-that was the prin- cipal objection. Colonel Nicholl said one thing which really induced the committee to go in for the order was the handsome way that they were met by the Lord of the Manor. He had practically let the thing go and given over all his rights with regard to the matter. SANITATION AT LLANGYNWYD. I The Sanitary Inspector (Mr. Eiryn Davies) reported that with reference to the complaint made by Mr. Evans as to the insanitary condition of the village of LIangynwyd during the last twelve months, it had been in a better and cleaner sanitary condition than it ever had been previously, because the scavenging cart had been employed there once a fort- night to clear away any refuse found on the waste land adjoining the roads. Further im- provements could be (effected by building a small retaining wall on the road waste at the rear of the old house, for the purpose of pre- venting the refuse from spreading. It was agreed to attend to that matter. To the Editor. I Sir,—That Mr. Evans still continues to labour under illusions is shown by his two fur- ther letters which appeared in your issues of the 16th and 23rd inst. Upon these illusions he has built up an elaborate fabric of objections to the regulation scheme, which fabric must collapse if, as I contend, its foundations are un- sound. I do not intend to be deflected from the main issues by Mr. Evans' plausible habit of draw- ing red herrings across the trail. The most important of the illusions referred to are:- 1. That every inhabitant of each of the four parishes concerned is, in the eyes of the law, a Commoner. 2. That the regulation scheme will deprive the inhabitants of their rights of Common. 3. That if Coity Wallia is not a Manor the legal position is altered. 4. That regulation schemes should be op- posed because, to use his own words, "inhabi- tants or their relatives have had bitter experi- ence elsewhere, and for that very reason our opposition to any regulation here is uncompro- mising and immutable." I think you will agree that this is a fair summary of Mr. Evans' cardinal objections. On the first point Mr. Evans most uncharit- ably and unj ustly assumes that the sympathies of the Commons and Footpaths Preservation Society are against the inhabitants and re- stricted to the Lord of the Manor, copyholders and customary freeholders, Frankly speaking, fcr, he is either writing in utter ignorance of the history and policy of the Society, or is cast- ing upon it a slur which, I suggest to Mr. Evans, comes perilously near the border-line of libel. Let me make my meaning clear. Judges have, times out of number, decided that, savei in very exceptional circumstances where incor- poration exists, inhabitants as such do not and cannot enjoy rights of a profitable nature over a Common. That legal axiom applies equally to Wales as to England. It is an elementary proposition, the truth of which every lawyer in the country will subscribe to, and it is idle to pretend that the opposite is the case. Yet Mr. Evans persists in deluding himself and those who look to him for guidance into believ- ing that all inhabitants as such enjoy a right of Common. As inhabitants it is quite incon- ceivable that they can enjoy such rights, thought I repeat that very many of the inhabi- tants are Commoners, not because they are in- habitants, but because they are customary free- holders, copyholders, or occupiers or owners of tenements in respect of which prescriptive rights can be set up. At the same time I have not the slightest doubt that all that Mr. Evans says as to the longevity of local customs is per- fectlv true. Your readers, nevertheless, will have observed that Mr. Evans declines to ac- cept my challenge that he should personally proffer a claim to the enjoyment of a right of Common as an inhabitant. He would inevit- ably lose. It is intelligible that Mr. Evans should doubt my views. I am not a lawyer, but merely one who, for twenty years, has been specially en- gaged in the work of preserving Commons in England and Wales. He, however, doubts the opinion of the Society, of which many of the most distinguished lawyers in the country are supporters. He even discredits the considered i judgment of Mr. Macmorran, a King's Counsel of the first rank. Let me offer him the views of one of the most eminent Judges, the late Chief Baron Kelly. Perhilps he will also throw doubt upin tIle Chief Baron's know- Your readers, however, will know how to appraise it. Nearly 40 years ago the Commons and Foot- paths Preservation Society fought a case for the inhabitants of the Dorset Pari-h of Tollard Farnhaiu who, from time immemorial, had been in the habit of cutting furze and hazel tops from Tollard Farnham Common for the purpose of fuel. Such user was exercised freely, openly, continuously and as a right; and was fortified by very exceptional documen- tary evidence. There could not be a clearer case for testing the rights of the villagers, and the Society took up their claim, and Sir Ed- ward Clarke was briefed to represent them. Notwithstanding the evidence, the Judges of the Exchequer Court decided against the in- habitants, and the Society had to pay a heavy sum in legal expenses. In delivering judg- ment of August 8th, 1878, Chief Baron Kelly said, If su'ch a right could be claimed by custom, there is evidence of user which, coupled with the evidence of reputation, might raise a question whether the custom did not exist. But the right claimed is a 'profit a prendre' in the soil of another, and the authorities are uni- form, from Gateward's case in Coke's Reports, that such a custom is bad in law. Many sound reasons are given in the authorities for this conclusion. It might be added that where inhabitancy is capable of an increase almost indefinitely, and if the right existed in a body which might be increased to any number, it would necessarily lead to the destruction of the subject-matter of the Common. There cannot therefore be such a custom." The reference to the case is "Rivers v. Adams," 3 Exch. Div. 361. You will thus see, Sir, that whatever we may all desire, it is a mere waste of time to persist in asserting that inhabitants as such can be classified as Commoners. On the second point-that the regulation scheme will deprive Commoners of their rights, Part 5 of the draft order states that" This Provisional Order is to be without prejudice to (1) any rights of the Commoners in or over the Commons." If, as Mr. Evans claims, the inhabitants are Commoners as inhabitants, their rights will thus be amply secured. If they are not their position will be vastly improved in a legal sense. Nevertheless, without question, many will be able to establish that they are Com- moners. They will do this not by long law- suits, by which Mr. Evans seeks to frighten them, but by appearing at Bridgend before a legal assessor appointed by the Board of Agri- culture and by proving to him that rights have been exercised in respect of their tenements for the statutory period under the Prescription Act. Those who cannot maintain a legal right in this simple way will still enjoy everything they now claim. The order makes full provi- sion for this. On the third cardinal point raised by Mr. Evans-that Coity Wallia is not a Manor and that the legal position is thereby altered—I would observe that the researches of scholars into the history and origin of Manors in Wales, and in England too, are intensely interesting to the antiquarian, but they have not the slight- est bearing upon the issue in regard to the re- gulation scheme. It is immaterial whether Coity Wallia is a Manor or not. What is material is that there is a legal owner of the soil of the Commons v ho is willing freely to confer upon the parishes the right to manage their Commons under an admirable regulation scheme. I know nothing of the origin of Coity Wallia Manor, but I make Mr. Evans a present of the information that if he wants to get beyond Lord Dunraven's title he will have a long journey to travel. There are at Coity customary freeholders and copyholders, and all the usual incidents of the most ancient Manors in the Kingdom. More- over, the fact that customary freeholds exist proves that Coity Wallia must have been a re- puted Manor before sub-infeudation was stopped by law. As to the fourth point, it is evident from Mr Evans' last letter to you that he has hopelessly confused regulation schemes with inclosure schemes. That I always suspected. You will recollect, Sir, that I challenged Mr. Evans to give the names of the regulated Com- mons in respect of which he and his friends "have had bitter experience." He cannot do so, for the simple reason that regulation schemes have been successful wherever they have been carried out. Instead, he asks me to inform your readers how the Common lands of Cardiff, Hirwaun, Stallingdown, Penllyn, Col- winston, and Golden Mile were lost. I gladly comply with his request. They were lost by iniquitous Inclosure Acts, the very enemy of Commons that regulation schemes are designed to defeat! 1,200 acres of Common land in Cardiff wee enclosed by Inclosure Act in 1801. Hirwifiii was enclosed in a similar way under an Act of 1837; 3,370 acres of Common land disappeared at Hirwaun, of which 130 acres were set out for recreation and 30 for allotments. The Commons of Penllyn were 215 acres in extent. Upon their enclosure in 1855, the inhabitants received 1k acres as a recreation ground and 10 for allotments. The Colwinstone Commons, of 65 acres, in- cluding Golden Mile, were partitioned under an Act of 1868. The public only received 4 tc",es I for recreation and 2 for Allotments. It was to f'top such unjustifiable raid? upon Commons I that this Society was formed. On the other hand, under the Coity Wallia r scheme the entire range of Commons will be preserved for the inhabitants and public. At the outeidp, only 25 acres can be sold to pay expenses. The rest will remain public for ever. It is to defeat this splendid object that Mr. Evans is straining every nerve. I pass over his failure to withdraw and ex- press regret for his many mis-statements, and can only trust that he will see the error of his ways, or that in any event your readers w;ii be able to feel that they may, with the fullest peace of mind, concentrate every energy upon securing the passing into law of a r,ch ?me which in facts aims at giving them an irrevoc- able charter of inestimable value.-I am, Sir, your obedient servant, LAWRENCE W. CHUBB, Secretary, Commons and Footpaths Preservation Society. 25 Victoria Street, Westminster. 28th July, 1915.

No title

In a certain position near an awkward salient (says a correspondent) nocturnal oper- ations had brought our lines within a few yards of the Germans'. In order to prevent an attack from them at dawn a wire-entan- glement was hastily begun in front of our trenches, but its continuation had to be aban- doned owing to the proximity of the enemy's lines. Next morning it was discovered that the entanglement had been completed, and that a notice had been affixed to it conveying the intimation that the Germans had finished the obstacle, seeing that it was of equal ser- vice to both sides, but they hoped the British would keep it in repair. In a similar in- stance, where the lines were brought close to- gether under 'cover of darkness and we had been guarding against a counter-attack for some hours by burning Bengal lights, a weary voice was heard from the German trenches, Oh, go to sleep, Mr. Englishman, do go to sleep.

Advertising

f' p- t(, 1) sk t' [IT' I I a fl(- t,, r rllrn)n out every class of work at competitive prices, at Lb. "OlamorjjKfl G*aetie" Printing Works.

ICONCERT BY MAESTEG PARTY

I CONCERT BY MAESTEG PARTY. FOR THE SOLDIERS. I The Fairfield Ladies Choir, Maesteg, visi-ed the Seaside Camp, Aberavon, on Wednesday week and gave a concert. They were assisted by Mr. T. Pryce Jones (tenor), Mr. T. Lloyd (baritone), and Mr. E. J. Thomas (elocu- tionist). The choir came with a good repu- tation, which they maintained, for the men thoroughly appreciated their efforts, while at the conclusion several of them spontaneously expressed their admiration and thanks for the fare provided. The chair was occupied by Captain J. E. Jenkins, and the conductor was Mr. J. Sims Davies. The choir's initial selection was the "Soldier's Chorus" from Faust, in which they acquitted themselves well. Their subse- quent pieces were "Love's likeness," "Old folks at home, (encored), "Comrades song of hope" and "National Anthems." Perhaps the most successful individual item was a musical sketch entitled "A Novel Divorce," by Miss M. Watts and Miss S. A. Pees. Miss M. Watts was also joined with Mr. T. Lloyd in an acceptable duet, "Tell me gentle stranger." Mr. Pryce Jones sang excellent tenor songs, and Mr. E. J. Thomas recited effectively. Mr. T. Lloyd was a welcome con- tributor with baritone songs. Miss S. A. Rees also sang "Only once more" with success. Miss Dolly Powell played a pleasant piano- forte solo and also accompanied the various items. At the end of the concert Captain Jenkins proposed a vote of thanks to the choir and artists. The proposition, which was seconded by Lieutenant Weddel, and supported by Lieutenant Stone and a number of the men, was carried.

I PARISH COUNCILS I

I PARISH COUNCILS. I HEOLYCYW. I At the monthly meeting of Heolycyw Parish Council on Monday, the members pre- sent were Messrs. C. Gore, G. Edwards, and E. Griffiths. TYNEWYDD FOOTPATH. I The Clerk read a letter from Mr. Dd. Griffiths, Tynwydd Farm, who stated that the repairs were nearly completed, and he invited the Council to inspect the work. NATIONAL COMMITTEE FOR RELIEF I IN BELGIUM. A circular was read from the above com- mittee asking the Council to co-operate with the Chairman of the Local District Council to organise a fund for relieving the destitute people in Belgium. The question was allowed to stand over until something definite had been received from the District Council. I GRAIGDDU FOOTPATH. I Mr Griffith Edwards reported that the work of repairing the broken culvert had been car- ried out most satisfactorily. It was agreed to pay the bills in connection with the same, which amounted to 19s. 6d.

I DEATH OF EXINSPEC MACDONALD I

I DEATH OF EX-INSPEC. MACDONALD I I MARGAM MURDER RECALLED. I We regret to announce the death of ex- Police Inspector Alexander MacDonald, of King Street, Port Talbot, from heart failure. Deceased, who was 72 years of age, was a native of Ross, Scotland, and joined Glamor- gan Constabulary on July 4th, 1868, as con- stable. He was promoted by various stages until he reached the position of Inspector, when he was appointed to Pontypridd, subse- quently being shifted to Llandaff and to Port Talbot in 189-5, and it was while at Port Talbot that he retired on a pension. De- ceased was a zealous and much respected officer. He was connected with the sensa- tional murder at Margam, when a game- keeper named Scott was shot by a man named Lewis, who paid the extreme penalty with his life. Deceased traced the murderer from Brombil Mountain, where the murder took place, to a cottage in Taibach. I MAGISTERIAL REFERENCE. I At the Aberavon Police Court yesterday (Thursday), the Bench made reference to the death of deceased, and the Chairman said it would be fitting if they passed a vote of con- dolence with the widow and relatives. De- ceased endeared himself to a large circle of people while he was in Port Talbot and Aber- avon, and they were sorry to hear of his de- mise. Mr. C. Jones said while the late Inspector was in the district he had always found him a straightforward officer and always ready to help others. Mr. L. M. Thomas, on behalf of the solici- tors practising at the Court, expressed his sympathy, and Supt. Ben Evans associated himself with what had been said.

LLANTWIT MAJOR

LLANTWIT MAJOR BOYS' BRIGADE.—Two companies of the above are now in camp at Llantwit Major. The Pontypridd Company are in a field near the Old Place, urid§? th £ charge of Comman- der Organ, who for some veart has visited Jhis town with his company of boys. Many of the boys ot former years are now officers under him, and are doing all in their power to make the stay of the boys of to-day as pleasant and profitable as possible. The Cardiff Company are in camp on the Barons Close. Unfortunately the weather on Sun- day and Mondiv was very unfavourable, but the lads seemed determined to be cheerful, and with singing and games thoroughly en- joyed themselves under canvas. The two Companies joined on Sunday, and, after par- ading the streets, headed by the I)rum and Fife Band, proceeded to Wesley Chapel, where the chaplain of the Cardiff Company, the Rev. George Byron, preached an appro- priate sermon to the lads and a large congre- gation. A drum-head service was held in the evening in the Barons Close camp, which was well attended. The lads of the joint companies gave a splendid concert on Wed- nesday, which was well patronised, and on Thursday evening a display in Swedish and other drills, showing the amount of attention and labour bestowed on them during the year.

NANTYFFYILON I

NANTYFFYI,LON. I *Mr. David Lloyd's Prize Drawing, Nanty- ffyllon.-Winning numbers:—1st prize, 2063; 2nd prize, 794; 3rd prize, 20008.-W. J. Thomas, Secretary.

Advertising

HYARCHER&C. I GOLDEN RETURNS I I L L REG|STEREDE^- ?==?  S_?__   Fac.simile of One-Ounce Packet. Archer's Golden Returns The Perfection of Pipe Tobacco. COOL. Swcrr n -.o- f PRINTING 1 v.. V I THE GLAMORGAN GAZETTE HAS THE < LARGEST & BEST EQUIPPED FACILITIES FOR TURNIXU OUT Printing of every description IN CENTRAL GLAMORGAN. SATISFACTORY WORK AT LOW PRICES. WE DEFY COMPETITION, AND WILL SURE TO PLEASE YOU. POSTERS A SPECIALITY. Call, Write or Ring up 119, Bridgend. 0 Jy

MEMORIAL SERVICE AT PENCOED

MEMORIAL SERVICE AT PENCOED. ♦ TO A LOCAL SOLDIER WHO HAS FALLEN. On Thursday evening a united memorial service was held at Salem Welsh Calvinistic Methodist Chapel, Pencoed. The service was,, held to honour the memory of a young sol- dier who was the first from the village to give his life for his country in the present war. An account has already been given in the "Gazette" of the death of Private W. Jones. After a few weeks at the front with his regi- ment, the Somerset Light Infantry, life's fit- ful fever ended for him swiftly and suddenly, as it has done for many another brave man in the great war. A representative congrega- tion came together on Thursday evening to pay its tribute of honour where honour was due. The introductory part of the service was taken part in by Mr. Owen James. The Rev. R. C. Lewis, B.A., the minister of Salem Church, who was the first speaker, said that all were indebted to the life that had become a sacrifice. He wanted to view the circumstance calling them together from the standpoint of the Gospel. Other institutions had their particular view point. The press sought to do justice to circumstances like these. The King and Minister of War had their standpoint. They sent words of condo- lence to the families of every soldier fallen in the war, but they were there that evening to look at the death of the young soldier from the standpoint of the Gospel. He (Mr. Lewis) then spoke of his own personal contact with Private Jones. The first time was when in the after-meeting at the close of a Sunday evening service early this year he was told that a young soldier had remained with the intention of giving himself to Jesus Christ and to His people. He had had several let- ters from the deceased. In one he had said, "I am going out to do my duty.What- ever happens I shall have done my duty." At the end of the letter were the words, "God be with you till we meet again." The death of the young soldier was the death of a hero. He (Mr. Lewis) could say more. He believed that Private Jones' death was the death of a Christian. Rev. D. W. Howell followed with an ad- dress in English. Mr. J. Edwards-Evans, the headmaster of Pencoed Council School, said that they met. under gloomy circumstances to commemorate the death of one whc was at the threshold of life. Whenever Private Jones came home on furlough he always called at the Council School, where he had been educated. He was strongly attached to his parents. He (the 0pgaker) had read a Jarge number of lelter, from young soldiers belonging to the village, and in nearly every case they began with "Dear Mother and Father." The mother came first—a well-deserved primacy. He was informed that the young soldier was a favour- ite in his regiment. He had a beautiful voice and his favourite song was "Cartref." The deceased soldier called to see Mr. Evans just before leaving for the front. The impression produced upon Mr. Evans was that the other world's demands were receiving every atten- tion from Private Jones. He died oYi the path of duty, of service, of sacrifice. He j (the speaker) hoped that the young soklier's death woul d prove a stimulus to all to live a better, a higher, and a nobler life. The Rev. D. Davies, of Penuel Baptist Church, said he had but slight acquaintance with the deceased. The latter h^cd attended a few services at Pen uel Chapel. DaX'im) h&d received a letter frofti a yoririg soldier in the same regiment expressing sor- row at Private Jones' death, but adding: "He died an honourable death, fighting for the right." Deceased had done his duty, not only towards his country but also to his God. His life had been given in sacrifice for them. Were they making that sacrifice a cloak for themselves ? He hoped the service would con- vey a special message to the family. They would feel that they were honoured in giving their son. If the young soldier had fought for the right, was it right for us at home to fight for the wrong? If the call had not come to all totfight on the field of battle, we were. nevertheless, called to fight sin in our own country. He wanted the memorial ser- vice to be a recruiting meeting for Christ. Mr. D. Jenkins, Ardwyn, expressed his ap- preciation of the effort to connect the death of Private Jones with religion. Family ties counted, but there were higher considera- tions. The church mourned the loss of a member, but the father and mother's grief would be a lasting one. The sympathy of the church was only a little lower than the sympathy of God Himself. The Rev. R. C .Lewis, B.A., in bringing the meeting to a close, said that the people present would go out of the service hating war. That was one difference between Eng- land and Germany-England hated war; Ger- many loved it. They would go from the meeting loving the objects of the war so far as our participation in it was concerned. The singing of a hymn, and prayer by the Rev. R. C. Lewis brought an impressive meet- ing to a close. The following were the chief ourners present:—Mr. and Mrs. David Sfcones (father and mother), the Misses Blod- wen, Charlotte, Ruth and Elizabeth Jones (sisters), Masters Rees and Taliesin Jones (brothers) and a large number of other rela- tives.

COWBRIDGE SIFTINGS

COWBRIDGE SIFTINGS. (By VELOX.) Many thanks to "the three Vale farmers" for their kind appreciation; thanks also for the basket of mushrooms sent for the dis- appointed mushroom jpytherers, who, I need hardly say, will be dHRppointed again when they read this. The temptation to keep was too great to resist. I will however tell them how delicious the mushrooms were. www In regard to the other matter mentioned by my correspondents I do not take it seriously. I prefer looking at the humorous side. What's the use of troubling? "Never trouble trouble, till trouble troubles you." If we apply that to our everyday life many of our little worries will disappear and we shall be all right till the doctor sees us, without claiming any close relationship to the "Assini" tribe. We may in one respect be like New- man's donkey. He "does not say much but he thinks a lot." WWW In watching the passing show some pictures amuse us, some perplex us, some surprise us, some pictures we can only look at with admir- ation mingled with sorrow. Here is one: It is called "Patriotism," or in other words, "doing their bit." From every town and hamlet in our beloved Vale scores of our brave lads have donned the King's uniform, not for the Is. 2d. a day, but because the Clarion call to duty has stirred all that is best in them. Home comforts, the circle of friends, and position cast a-side for the grim stern work of the soldier. Some of them have returned home for a brief respite, bearing upon them the marks of the bloody conflict, only to re- turn again; others again are at this moment on the high seas ready, aye ready, to "do their bit," whether it be to face the foe at the Dardanelles or any other place. Others, we shall never see again. They are lying "some- where in France." Perhaps in an unknown grave. Like soldiers they went to battle, like soldiers they fell; they are quietly sleeping now till the last Roll Call. At home there are aching hearts, there are tear-bedimmed eyes, there are anxious fathers and mothers. They too are "doing their bit. We honestly believe our cause is a just one, and as the great heart of the Universe throbs in its an- guish, we thal!k G .d for the brave lads who have done an-: are doing their bit. Let us Contemplate this picture seriously; then per- haps we may discriminate between being anxious to do our bit for personal gain and being willing to do our bit for King and country. I. On Sunday last the members of the C-ow- bridge branch of the National Union of Rail- waymen held their annual parade on behalf of the widows and orphans fund. A procession w.-t4s formed outside the Club room and headed by the Talyga.rn Silver Band, the men match- ing through the town and then to Cross Ways and Llianblethian, calling at several well- known houses en route. The beautiful banner belonging to the Pontypridd branch was car- ried in the procession and was in itself a silent but strong appeal for the cause. As the men stepped out to the m-artia.1 strains of the band street collecting boxes became prominent. Not content with soliciting aid from the by- standers motor-cars were held up, and it is gratifying to hear that very few refusals were met #ith. Returning to town the men par- took of tea at the Club room, where an eJo- quent and appropriate sermon was preached by the vicar (the Rev. Isaiah Roberts), whom the men desire to thank and all others who so kindly and sympathetically received them. The amount collected en route was £ 13 8s. ltd., collected in church £2 4s. Id., sale of surplus food 9s. 10d., members contri- butions jEl 5s. 6d.. making a grand total of £ 17 7s. 6Jd. < < w w On Friday last the 2 7th Cyclist Battalion, Welsh Regiment, gave a concert in the Town Hall on behalf of the Cowbridge District Kur-I sing Association. The hall was packed to I overflowing. The programme was one of un- doubted excellence. Every item from start to (Continued on bottom of next column.)

COWBRIDGE SIFTINGS

(Continued from Previous Column.) finish was well received and a good sum was realised. We would certainly be pleased to become better acquainted with the men of this Battalion. On Wednesday a jumble sale was held in the • m • Town Hall for the benefit of the same worthy object. Almost every conceivable article was on sale there, from a twopenny bunch of car- rots up to a live pig. and from the latest creation in hats and bonnets down to penny bundles of mysterious laces, etc. Stalls were presided over by Mrs. Gwyn, Mrs. Torney, Mrs. C. Edmondes. Mrs. Humphrey. Mrs. Thomas (Red Farm). Mrs. Williams (Stall- court). Mrs. A. T. Spencer. Miss Llewellvn. Mrs. Miles, Miss Jones, Miss Morgan. Mrs. D. Thomas. Miss Davies; refreshments, Mrs. Shepherd, Miss Edmondes, Mrs. Canard and Mrs. Edmondes.

I PENCOED

PENCOED. ) MUSICAL SUCCESS.—At the recent ex- amination of the Associated Board, R.A.M. and R.C.M., Miss Maud James, of Pencoed, was successful in passing the Primary Division in Piano Playing. Mias James is a pupil of Miss Canna Davies, Pencoed. 5856 LOCAL FAMILY BEREAVED. The funeral took place at Penarth last week or Mr. Thomas Edwards. The deceased was a son of Mr. John Edwards, Velindre Mill. He was a native of Brynsadler, but resided for a while Pencoed. The latter part of his life was spent at Penarth. He leaves a widow and two dawghters and a son. The local mourneff were Mr. John Edwards (father) and Ntr. John Thomas (brother-in- law). BUTTER-MAKING CLASS.—On Friday the second butter-making class conducted by Miss Williams, St. Athan, came to a close. Mr. R. Hedger Wallace, of the Glamorgan County Council examined the class. The prize-winners were :-First prize, Miss Jones, Pantruthin Fawr Farm; second prize. Miss Llewellyn, Rhiwceiliog; third prize, divided between Miss James, Heolycyw, and Miss Williams, Glanmudrydd Farm, near Llantri- sant; fourth prize. Miss Iveturah Edwards, Pencoed. PRIVATE EVAN LEYSHON.—We are pleased to find that Private Evan Leyshon has withstood his long journey from Norwich Hos- pital wonderfully well. A large number of friends called to see him during the week, and in addition to those previously named who received this young man on his arrival home were Mr. John Rees, J.P., C.C., Mr. T. Wil- liams (London House), Mr. William John (Maesyrhaf), Mr. Wrilliam Griffiths (Groes Shop), Mr. J. Thomas (Torbach), Mr. Owen James and Mr. J. E. Evans (Gwynfryn). BELGIAN RELIEF COMMITTEE. A general meting of the above committee was held on Tuesday evening, under the presidency of Mr. J. Rees, J.P., Chairman of the local Relief Committee. It was unanimously re- solved that a balance-sheet be issued in con- nection with the funds and that a copy be given to all contributors. On the proposition of Mr. J. T. Salathiel it was unanimously re- solved that a reception committee be formed to receive the wounded sailors and soldiers on their arrival home at Pencoed. It was further proposed that the committee should consist of three representatives from each place of worship (one of whom was to be a lady) and two representatives from each of the three Benefit Societies in the place. On the proposition of Mr. J T Salathiel, seconded by Mrs. Howell, the various representatives were then named. Mr. T. J. Jenkins, the corresponding Secretary, was instructed to send the list of names to the churches and to the Benefit Societies, the representatives of the latter being the President and Secretary of each Society. Each minister in the place was elected members of the Reception Com- mittee. )

ILLANHARRANI

I LLANHARRAN. I CARMEL BAPTISTS. At the Sunday School anniversary services of Carmel Baptist Church, the Rev. W. H. James (pastor) preached in the morning. The afternoon and evening services were of a varied kind. The president for the day' was Councillor S. R. Jones (Barry Dock). The renderings of the children's choir, under the skilful conductor- ship of Mrs. Dan John, were much appreciated, as also was the singing of the Sunday School Choir, under Mr. James Madge. The organist throughout was Master Willie Madge, to whom much praise is due. The following contributed to the programme :—Recitations, Miss James, Miss Gwilliam, Miss A. Williams, Miss Dorothy Mortimer, Misses Doris Chandler, Kitty Davies, Evelyn Gwilliam, Florence Rowe, Ethel Rowe, May Summers, Rachel Davies, Nancy Han- cocks, Sarah Williams, Olwen Davies, Elsie Roberts, Blodwen Howells, Gladys Owen, Mas- ters .Thomas Mortimer, John Williams, Willie Chandler, John Williams, Willie Madge, Naun- ton Lewis, Elvat Lewis; dialogue, Jenny Davies and Jennet Baker; solos, Misses Agnes Williams, Edith Gwilliam, Kitty Davies, Bessie Pyne, and Gladys Williams, and Mr. Albert Chandler; duets, Miss Gladys and Master John Williams, Mrs. Dan John and friend; Misses Sarah and Agnes Williams; quartettes, Mr Wil- liams and party. Mrs. Lewis and part y. The children's Choir rendered "Courage, Brothers," Let it pass," "Whither, Pilgrims, are you going?" "He will hold me fast," "Kind words shall never die." The Sunday School Choir sang Blessed Saviour," "Jesus High in Glory," Sweetly Sing, ye Children," "Lift up your voices," The sun is tinting in the West." The superintendent of the Sunday School is Mr. Albert Chandler.

IBRYNNA I

I BRYNNA. I MINING EXAMINATIONS, 1914-1915.- The following examination results in connec- tion with the County and Board of Education examinations ar6 to hand: County- Mining: Stage 3. Class 2, John Wintl; Stage 2, Class 3, Josiah Phillips; Stage, 1, Class 1, I Tudor Jones. Mine Surveying: Stage, 1, Class g, Ebenezer T. Cogbill, John Wintle, Tudor Jones, Josiah Phillips, and Emrys Walters. Geology: Stage 1, Class 1, Eben. T. Cogbill (highest on County list); Stage 1, Class 2, D. G. Winslade. Board of Educa- tion—Mining: Lower Stage, Eben. T. Cog- bill, D. G. Winslade.

No title

Major Ivor Bowen has been appointed to the command of the 18th Service (2nd London W elsh) Battalion of the Royal Welsh Fusi- liers, being granted the temporary rank of lieutenant-colonel in the Army. A volunkoer officer of many years' standing Colonel Bowen sacrificed an extensive legal practice at the outbreak of war in order to join the colours. He took an active interest in the raising of the London Welsh Battalions. Mr. Oscar D. Morris, Maesteg, has been promoted to a first lieutenancy in the South Wales Borderers. Lieut. Morris is the son of Mr. and Mrs. David Morris, of Nanty- ffvllon, and joined the new battalion on its formation. He obtained a commission some months ago. Lieut. Morris, who is well- known in the Maesteg district, was educated at a private school in Carmarthen and at the University College, where he obtained his B.A. degree.

I BLAENGARW t

I BLAENGARW. t OBITGARY.-The funeral of the late Mrs. Mary Elizabeth Stoneham, of Railway Ter- race, Blaengarw, who died after a short ill- ness on July 27th. took place at the Ponty- cymmer Cemetery on W ednesday of last week. Rev. J. T. Jones, Mount Zion, offi- ciated. The chief mourners were:—Mr. J. Stoneham (widower); Masters John, James, and Edgar Stoneham (sons) Mrs. E. Thomas (mother); Miss M. Thomas (sister); Mr. Brin- ley Thomas (brother), Swansea; Mr. and Mrs E. Thomas (brother and sister-in-law), Swan- j sea Mrs. M. E. Davies (grandmother). Swan- sea; Mr. and Mrs. J. Stoneham (brother and sister-in-law) Mr. Richard Stoneham (brother-in-law); Mr. and Mrs. W. Davies (sister and brother-in-law); Mrs. Brewis (sister-in-law), Abertridwr. Wreaths were sent by the widower, mother, friends, and Mrs. Stoneham, Victoria-street, Pontycym- mer.—The funeral of the late Miss Elizabeth Ann Davies, of Blaengarw Road, Blaengarw. who died on the 29th July, took place at the Pontycymmer Cemetery on Tuesday. De- ceased was very faithful in Sunday School and Band of Hope Work at Tabernacle C.M. The members of the Band of Hope attended. Revs. E. Moses Evans, Tabernacle, and Rev. James Davies, St. James' Church, officiated. The mourners were:-Mi-. and Mrs. J. Davies (father and mother); Miss Irene Myfanwy and Messrs. Joseph, Afan and David Bryn Davies (sister and brothers); Messrs. David and Wm. Davies (uncles), Aberystwyth; Mr. Morgan Davies (uncle), Abertridwr; Mr. Isaac Davies (uncle), Portheawl; Misses Blodwen and Ivy Davies (cousins), Portheawl; Mr. and Mrs. Belton (uncle and aunt), Abertridwr; Mr. Richard Rees (uncle), Rhymney; Mrs. Davies (aunt) Mr. and Mrs. Arthur Richards (cousins); Messrs. Stanley and Cecil Richards (cousins) Mrs Edwards (aunt), Ogmore Vale; Mr. and Mrs. Gough (cousins) Miss Davies (aunt), Porth Mrs Probert, Porth. Wreaths were sent by the Band of Hope members, Sunday School Class, and Mr. and Mrs. Belton. i

NANTYMOELI

NANTYMOEL. I SUNDAY SCHOOL TREATS.—The war has this year interfered with the usual Sun- day School outings, and each school has de- cided to have a quiet half-day treat at home. Last Wednesday was selected for a such a treat by the following four schools:—Saron Welsh Baptist, Bethel Welsh Congregational, Soar Welsh Congregational, and the Salva- tion Army Corps. In each case there was a tea, followed by innocent games and distribu- tion of sweets, etc., on the mountain. The weather was fairly favourable. THE SEWING CLASS.—This class is quietly at work preparing comforts for the sailors and soldiers, and last week a parcel was sent to headquarters, consisting of 74 pairs of socks, 28 shirts, and 2 scarves. On Thursday last week the members of the class were invited to tea by Mrs. (Dr.) Thomas. of Brynbedw. The party consisted of over 60 ladies, and tea was served on the lawn. All enjoyed themselves immensely, and it is hoped that the class will be able again to do I much good work in the autumn and winter months. FUNERALS.—We regret to record the death of two old inhabitants of Nantymoel who had resided here for a very long period and were respected by all. Mrs. Rhys Thomas, of Nantymoel Row, was one. Her husband died about 11 months ago, and she was taken on Monday morning to be buried at the graveyard at the Baptist Chapel of Penyfai. The service at the house was con- ducted by Rev. E. A. Evans, curate, and at the chapel by Rev. J. Hughes. Saron. The other was Mr. John Jones, of 10 Commercial Street. He was a native of North Wales, but came here when quite a young man. He was buried on Monday at Blaenogwy Ceme- tery, when Rev. John Hughes, Saron, offi- ciated. Much sympathy is expressed with the relatives of these friends in their be- reavement. Both had reached a ripe age.

I TONDU AND ABEKENFIG I

I TONDU AND ABEKENFIG. I MUSIC SUCCESS.—At the recent examin- I ation held in connection with the London I College of Violinists, the following pupils of Miss Blodwen Hopkin, Derwcn Deg, Aberken- fig, were successful in violin playing:—Frank I Wools, Wildmill, 2nd grade; and Willie G. Howells, Penyfai, 3rd grade, both having ob- tained a high percentage of marks. 5848 EBENEZER.—The annual tea meeting in connection with Ebenezer Sunday School was held on Monday, and despite the inclement weather, a large number sat down at the tables, which were profusely decorated with choice flowers. The following ladies presided at the tables and otherwise assisted :—Mrs. E. Hopkin. Mrs. Bryan, Mrs. E. Davies. Miss C. Jenkins, Miss May Butler, and Miss B. Rees, assisted by the Misses Blodwen Hopkin, Gwladys Grant, Edith Daniel, B. Davies, E. Cobley, G. Williams, Messrs. W. G. Hurley, E. Hopkin, Mrs. Owen, Mrs. Grant, and Mi. M, Maisey. After the tables had been cleared various games wei'e indulged in in the vestry, and thoroughly enjoyed. A concert was afterwards held, and there was a large audi- etlcti present. Mr. D. Davies (superinten- dent) presided. The programme was:—Spell- ing Bee: Best Miss Gwennie Cobley and B. Matthews; violin solo, Master Willie G. Howells; recitation. Miss May Bryan (en- cored); solo, Miss Winnie Thomas; recitation. Miss V. White; solo, Mrs. D. Phillips; reci- I tation, Miss Maggie Jones; violin solo, Miss ¡ BIodwen Hopkin pianoforte solo, Miss Irene Hopkin; recitation, Miss Gwladys Grant; duet, Messrs. D. Phillips and T. R. Daniel; solo, Mrs. R. Thomas; recitation. Miss Stella Cobley solo, Mr. Dan Phillips. The accom- panists were Miss Irene Hopkin and Miss G. Grant. Great praise is due to Mr. D. Davies (superintendent) and Mr. J. Stratton (secre- tary) for their untiring efforts during the day; also to Miss B. Rees and Mr. T. R. Daniel for the excellent programme provided. The meeting closed by singing Hen wlacf fy nhadau," by Mr. D. Daniel, senr.

CAERAU

CAERAU. MUSICAL SUCCESSES.—In connection with the London College of Music, the follow- ing were successful :—Pianoforte Playing: Diploma of Associate, James Williams. Glyn- corrwg, who has the right to append the letters A.L.C.M. to his name, and wear the cap and gown of the College. Theory of lusic: Junior Honours, 1st Class, M. RobHn, Port Talbot; Edith Jones, Treharne Road, Caerau; and Doris Francis, Port Talbot. The above are pupils of Miss Alice M. Thomas, L. L.C.M., Afan Villa, Caerau. 5851

KENFIG HILL 1

KENFIG HILL. 1 SUCCESSES.—At the recent examination for entrance scholarships held at the Bridgend County School, there were three successful can- didates from this district. Two of them, Stella Cobley and Ivor John Jury, attend the Kenfig Hill Council School. The forme. suc- ceeded in gaining a probationership, and the latter a four years' scholarship. The third successful candidate is Nancy Thomas, of the Bryndu School, who has gained a probationer- ship. Their success is the more creditable as I they are only 12 years of age.

CEFN CRIBBWR

CEFN CRIBBWR. NEBO TEA MEETING.—Excellent provi- sion wsa made for the Sunday School tea at Nebo this year, and, despite the unpropitious weather it can be said that it was the most successful held for many years. It was fol- lowed by an entertainment which crowned the day's enjoyment and afforded the reciters and singers an opportunity to display their talents. The Chairman was Mr. Richard John and the conductor Mr. John Watkins. At the tea the following assisted at the tables Mesdames D. Evans, W. Hold, Janet Thomas, G. Hold, T. Kingdom, M. John, J. Nalkin, R. Hopkins. D. Nakin, Misses M. Butcher, M. David, -At- Caswill, and others who assisted were Messrs. D. Watkin, D. Morgan, W. Watkin, G. Mor- gan, David Elias, T. Kingdom, Ivor Watkin. T. Richards and William Edwards. The con- tributors to the miscellaneous part of the pro- gramme were Messrs. Archie Williams, Howell Morgan, D. Watkins, R. Browning, Misses Maria Butcher, Ceid'wen Watkins, L. M. Harold, Bessie Grabham, Amy Jenkins, Mrs. J. Matthews, Messrs. Tommy Thomas, Eric- Harold, Archie Williams, Misses Mary Jen- kins, Florrie Taylor, Jennie Jenkins. Ethel M. Howells. Kathleen Jenkins and Lizzie Kate Howell. ANNIVERSARY. The a nnivei-sary of the English Baptist School was held' on Sunday, when the chapel was crowded with attentive and appreciative- congregations. The morning service was pre- sided over by Mr. John Brown, superinten- The younger children sang and recited" their several pieces, and prepared the way for the afternoon and evening services, when the pastor (Rev. J. Freear) presided. The conductor was Mrs. Ed. Sutton, who in the limited time at her disposal for practice. worked hard and with great success for the training of the children. Mr. W. Anthony -Nf r W. Anthony- proved a capable organist, and his place as Secretary was ably filled by Mr. W. Hawkins. Assistance was given by other friends, anions whom Miss Bevan, Miss John, and Mr. and Mrs. Cobley, of Kenfig Hill, deserve special mention. The meetings comenced with the singing of the Lord's Prayer and the recital of the 24th Psalm by Lizzie M. Baker. Recita- tions were rendered by Mr. and Miss Cobley, Misses P. Freear, Alice Scane and Bïílda Richards. The chief feature however was the rendering of the flower .service of song. Lessons from the Flowers." The musical portion by the children and choir with the- solos, duets and quartettes were taken by Miss May John, Miss Bevan, Mr. Cobley and Mr. Anthony. Recitations were well rendered by Mrs. Sutton (conductor), L. Grabham, L. Lewis, L. Davies, Ethel Bradshaw, Elsie Hart, L. Baker, Doris Edwards, Rose Baker. W. John Davies. D. J. Davies, S. Burnett; and Bertie Brown. The collections were sat- isfactory a,nd the anniversary was considered' one of the best held in connection with the school. On Monday the annual treat was held, when the scholars and friends gathered together for te-a in goodly numbers. The tables were tastefully decorated with flowers and everyone appeared to enjoy themselves in spite of the weather. The following ladies assisted at the tables and irr tll(- provisioning- of the same: Mesdames Anthony, Davies, Barley, Sutton, Griffiths, Walker, Misses Webster, Barwick, Evans, Lewis, Baker. Richards. Scanes. Hart and Davies. Mr. W. Baker had charge of the water boiling and Messrs. Sutton. Anthony, Griffiths and Brown helped to make the arrangements for the pleasure of all. As the weather was so un- suitable the field usually lent by Mr. Evans (Cefn Farm), could not be used to the best advantage. The chapel was well filled for an "impromptu concert," and it need hardly be said that the most "impromptu" effort was loudly cheered, and so the evening pased away quickly and enjoyably. Kindly thought was given to those members of the school who were at the front and in training, as well as those- who were too ill to attend. Greetings were- sent far and near.

PONTYCYMMER

PONTYCYMMER. SALE OF PROPERTY AND SHARES.— Messrs. Michael Davies and Co., F.A.I., held a sale of leasehold property and local Brewery and Gas shares at the Ffaldau Hotel, Ponty- cymmer, on Wednesday. Lot 1, comprising all that well built, commodiously fitted and arranged, and coflvenienty situated lease- hold premises known as Bridge House, Oxford Street, Pontycymmer, was sold to Mr. W. Thomas, butcher, Pontycymmer, for £ 260.. Lot 2, being No. 221 Oxford Street, let at the- low rental of 25s. per lunar month, was sold; for £ 160 to Miss Helen Prescott, Ponty-. cymmer. Lot 3, being No. 6 Blaengarw. Road, let at the rental of 25s. per lunar- month, was sold to Mr. J. Morris, Ponty-. cymmer for £156. Lot 4, No. 8 Blaengarw; Road, also let at 25s. per lunar month, was sold to Mr. A. Morris, Blaengarw, for £ 155. Lot 5, 40 ordinary, fully-paid shares in John; Bros.' Abergarw Brewery Co., was sold at £ 7 per share to Mr. Williams, of Wyndham Hotel, Ogmore Vale. Lot 6, 30 original! .shares in the Ogmore and Garw Gas Company. i wev £ .sold to Mr. W. M. Hughes, draper, ( Poiityeymmei\ at £ 8 5s. per share. The- auctioneers also sold the following brewery- shares:—Ten 6 per cent. cumulative shares, at £6 10s., £10 paid; 30 ordinary shares for £6 8s. per share to Mr. T. Morgan, Masons' Arms, Bryncethin. and 30 ditto to Mr. H. Leyshon, Bryncethin Farm. Messrs. Stock- wood and Williams were the solicitors for the vendors.

I OGMORE VALE

I OGMORE VALE. BAPTISM.—In the presence of a large con- gregation four candidates were baptised at, Philadelphia Welsh Baptist Chapel on Sunday last. The rite was administered by the Rev. L. J. Lewis, pastor of Betihlehcm. OBITUARY'.—We regret to announce the death of Mrs. Jones, wife of the Rev. J. G. Jones, of Bethania Welsh Congregational Chapel. Deceased had been ill for some years, and passed away on Saturday. She was a native of Cefn, but had resided in the valley form any years. Much sympathy is felt with the bereaved husband and daughters. ACCIDENT.—An unfortunate cur red at Tynewydd School on Friday morn- ing. While some boys were playing during recreation time one of them, by some means or other, fell on the asphalt yard and sus- tained a broken leg. He was carried home by one of the staff to the house of his father, Mr. HoweHs, 3 Oak Terrace, where he was attended by Dr. Gifford. Upon making in- quiries, we learn that he is making sat if sac- tory progress.

No title

Mr. E. Wynne Jones, Maesteg, has just been gazetted to a second lieutenancy in the 20th Battalion Welsh Regiment. Lieut. Jones is the son of Mr. J. Wynne Jones, late of Tondu, and now of Llynvi Lodge, Maesteg. He was appointed six weeks ago, and after being stationoo at Rhyl and St. Asaph, has now proceeded to Marlborough for a month or six weeks' course, after which he will rejoin his regiment. Printed and Published by the Central Glamorgan Printing and Publishing Com- pany, Ltd., at the "Glamorgan Gazette," offices, Queen Street, Bridgend, Glamor, gan. FRIDAY, AUGUST 6th, 1015.