Collection Title: Glamorgan Gazette

Provider: The National Library of Wales

Rights: The copyright status or ownership of this resource is unknown.

View full details

First Previous Image 2 of 8 Next Last
Full Screen
14 articles on this page
CONCERT T CAERAU j

CONCERT &T CAERAU. j ———- -——— "SOWING AND REAPINC." On Wednesday evening last at Sdioo Chapel, Caerau, a fine performan'. ü. J" sacred cantata, "Sowing and Reav• y F. W. Peaoe) was given by the Seicil v.oral Society, und .^r the leadership of Mr. iiua Grimths. Much interest was taken in ti? event, the chapel being overcrowded hme be- fore the advertised time to oommwoa, The artistes enga^t-cl for the occasion were prano, Miss Gladys Morgan, Dowlais; oon- tralto, Madame Griffiths-Jonea, Newbridge: te»r>r. Mr. Thomas Bonnell, Pexitre; baes, Mr Glanville Davi. Mateg: violinists, Meeers. | G. F.Knowles and J. W. Maurmg; flautist, Mr. Josiah Thomas; double bus, Mr. loan Rees, all of Maesteg; accompanists, Miss Blodwen Morgan, Caerau. and Miss Maggie Esther Davies, Caerau. The chair was occu- pied by Dr. Hector Jones. The first part of the concert was of a mis- cellaneous character, and was opened by the choir singing "God Save the King," which was followed by Mr. Glanville Daviee with a rendering of "Sweet at> her Rotes" (Cowen). quite a new composition. Mr. Davie6 pos- sesses an excellent baritone voice, and a ice, ture of his performance was hifl varied and expressive interpretation of au excellent song. Miss Gladys Morgan made her fir4 appearance in the Llynfi Valley, and gave a nice rendering of R. S. Hughes' "Llam y Cariadau." The duet which followed, by Messrs. Bonnell and Daviee, was a good per- formance. The Rosary," sung by £ adame Jones, who was also making her first appear- ance in the district, was really fine, and she was loudly encored. Mr. Tom Bonnell fol- lowed with a fine rendering of "Deeper and Deeper Still" and "Wafb her, Angels" (by special request). This singer has certainly been heard to better advantage; nevertheless be gave a descriptive rendering of the recita- tive the air was also very pleasing. In re- sponse to an encore, Mr. Bonnell sang Yr Hen Gerddor." The chorus terminated the miscllaneous part of the #>v*ninc with a fine and spirited rendering of "La Marseillaise," which was aung in Welsh. The introduction of the cantata, whl; con- sists of 48 measures instr irt n al was very well given, the inaii uiii«nukl:».s dis- playing variety of tone which really was de- lightful. The tempo taken by the conduc- tor was also admirable. The opening solo, Hearken unto this, my people," by the bass, was very well rendered. Mr. Glanville Davies was to be admired for his excellent de- livery of tone; his articulation was also good. The first chorus by the choir, "Lord of the Harvest," was a fine performanoe;.th-a tempo chosen was good, and allowed for a broad and majestic opening. The entry by the bass was excellent, but the tenors following were not 90 good. The entering quartette, sung by the artistes, was very pleasing. The latter rrart of the chorus was fine, careful attention being given to expression. The recitative, "While the earth remain- eth," by Madlame Jones, was intelligently given. The rendering of the quartette, "Be not deceived," by the artistes, was also good. The following chorus by the choir, "Let us not be weary," was commenced a little too loud; the entry by the tenors might have been a little more compact. There was a decided improvement towards the end. Mr. Bonnell next gave a good interpretation of the recit and air, "He that reapeth." Hia enunciation could have been clearer; his phrasing and general treatment left but little to be desired. The next nnnrber, Come, labour on," by the Choir, was ex- cellent. The opening largo movement was very definite. The bass, in taking up their lead into the following passages, were very ne, their attack being decisive, and the voices combined. The spiritoeo movement was delightful, and the delivery of tone in the last few bars on the words "Go work to- day," was very effective. Madame Jones was again heard at her best in the following solo, her rendering being very pleasing. The solo, Come, labour on." by Mr. Glanville Daviee, was another fine effort on his part, the last few passages being particularly good. The opening of the chorus, Come, labour cm j no time for rest," was admirable. The contraltos, who must take first place in the choir for production of tone, were beautiful, but the sopranos were also very good. The general treatment of this chorus was fine. Miss Gladya Morgan followed with a nice ren- dering of The field is the world." The duet, "Let both grow together," by Madame Jones and Miss Morgan, was also very well given. The next chorus, This is the field," was an excellent performance. Miss Gladys Morgan next shone in her ren- dering of "Most awful Truth." This was certainly the best contribution of the e-Y n- ing. Her enunciation was good, and sue showed much dramatic force. The choir in opening the chorus, The Lord shall roar out of Zion," were brilliant, the base doing remarkably well. The accelerando passages towards the end of the chorus were really dectrifying. The following recitative, sung by Mr. Glanville Daviee, was fine. "But all who truly righteous be," was sung in fine I style by the choir, a feature in this chorus being the steadiness of the tempo through- out. The Pastorale," an instrumental movement of 28 measures, was nicely played by the orchestra, and Madame Jones followed with a pleasing rendering of the recit and air, "I will feed My Flock." The next chorus, "Gird on thy conquering sword," was another fine achievement by the choir. There might have been a little more variety introduced into the performance of this particular chorus; nevertheless, it was sung in good marching time, which was main- tained throughout. The bass were again pro- minent, their rich tone being very much ad- mired. Mr. Tom Bonnell gave a nice ren- dering of the solo, And the Word was made lfesh," and particular attention was given to phrasing. The quartette, Then shall the righteous," sung by the artistes, was nicely given. The chorus by the choir was also good. The final chorus, Sing, heavens," was opened by the contraltos in good style; the other parts took up their leads splendidly. The tenors, perhaps, were a little erratic. The utterance of the words, Sing ye, 0 Heavens," was indeed very taking. The spiritoso movement was excellent, being sung in quite a joyful manner. Praise must be given the sopranos for their magnifioent sing- ing of this particular chorus. The conclud- ing bars. Hallelujah, Amen," were particu- larly brilliant. ) Heartiest congratulations must be accorded to Mr. Dan Griffiths for such a musical treat. Undoubtedly this is the finest performance ever given by the above society. Praise must also be given to the instrumentalists and accompanists for the able manner they carried out their duties. Rev. T. Bryniog Thomas proposed a hearty vote of thanks to the chairman; also to the instrumentalists for fi their kind assistance. This was seconded by Mr. Dan Evans. The Chairman suitably re- Bponded. The singing of ,.Hen wlad fy nhadau" by Mr. Glanville Davies, brought an axoeQent oonoert to a close.

Advertising

IMPORTANT NEWS FOR FURNITURE BUIf ERST A. E. LOCKYER, Complete House Furnisher, COMMERCIAL STREET, MAESTEG. Begs to aanavno* tkat he has now opened Extensive Showrooms at Market Building's, Talbot Street, Maesteg, With a New and Up-to-date Selection of FURNITURE, CARPETS, BEDSTEADS, BEDDING, Etc., Etc. < Including all the Latest Designs and Styles. You are covdially iavited to inspect Showrooms at your leisure. Customers can rely upon making their choice from a magnificent and comprehensive stock. Every faeility is pro- vided to enable you te get just that pretty home you have in your mind. Bvery meed is met and every taste catered far. Once you become a sastomer you will discover why LOCKYERS" has beooiae a household word. and merited the oonndence of the Public. Your wishes will-be observed to the smallest details; you will get FURNITURE WORTH HAVING at Moderate Prioes. NOTE ADDRESS OF NEW SHOWROOMS: I LOCKYER'S FURNISHING EMPORIUM, Market Buildings, Talbot Street, MiESTEG. I" A VISIT OF INSPECTION WILL PAY you.

I A FORMER LANDLADY

I A FORMER LANDLADY. I CAERAU PORTER AND THE TICKET. I At Bridgend Police Court on Saturday, Alrinia Powell, Victoria Street, Caerau, was •aitiiiioiied for harmg travailed on the G. W I Railway without a ticket. Mr. Vacheii, junr., for the Railway Co., said this was a particularly bad case. Defen- dant travelled trom Caerau to Maeeteg, and at Maesteg pasted through the barrier, pay- ing Id., and saying she had travelled from Nantyffyllon. Unfortunately for her, a porter who boarded the train at Caoerau was close by her, and told the ticket collector that she had travelled from Caerau. Defen- dant was brought back, and when told how she had been found oat, ahe said to the por- ter, "All right, my boy; you are smart, but I will have you." She afterwards wrote to the superintendent of the line, giving her ex- planation of the matter. She said that owing to her excitement after running for the train she got absent-minded. Then she alleged that the cause of the bitterness on the part of the porter was the fact that he had lodged with her, and had brought home the cream from the milk in the churna at the station, and had also brought home excess fares. She had, she said, complained about the man to the station master, and he had done this out of spite. The Company made inquiries into the matter, and found there was not the slightest foundation for the allegations. The porter gave evidence bearing out the solicitor's statement, and the ticket collector at Maesteg was also called. Defendant said she suffered from heart trouble, and when she hurried she got con- fused. She had travelled 12 years from Nantyffyllon and three from Caerau, and that was the cause of the error. She was very sorry. Defendant was fined R.I.

GiflBaAESTEG REFUGEE I

I ONE NOT "OVERFLOWING WITH I GRATITUDE." A meeting of the Maesteg Refugee Com- mittee was held on Friday evening, Mr. Gomeir Davies presided. A letter w?a read from Mr. J. R. Morgan, solicitor, resigning the secretaryship of the Finance Committee. The resignation was ac- cepted, and it was decided to ask Miss Boucher ..e.9 up the duties in his stead. j v The Rev. D. Johns on behalf of uta tion appointed to arrange new terms with one of the Belgian families, reported that one of the men said he could not afford to pay 7s. 6d. per week out of his earnings towards the rent, but offered to pay 2s. 6d. per week, or providing he was granted the use of the furni- ture, he was prepared to pay rent for a small oottage. He regretted to say that this man was not overflowing with gratitude for the generous treatment meted out to his family by the people of Maesteg. The deputation recom- mended the latter offer, which was unani- mously accepted. A letter was read from the War Refugee Committee regretting the trou- ble and annoyance this family had caused the committee, and recommending that as they were in receipt of wages sufficient to maintain themselves, that the committee should have nothing more to do with them. The chair- man, secretary and treasurer were asked to arrange to get a small cottage for the family, and ailso to prepare a house for the other family, and to make arraaigements to bring the tenancy at Castle Street to an end.

I CAERAU POLICE CASES

I CAERAU POLICE CASES. At Bridgend Police Court on Monday, be- fore Messrs. Oliver Sheppard and D. H. Lloyd, Elizabeth Adams, Tonna Road, Caerau, summoned Alfred Couch, Tonna Road, for having assaulted her son, William John Adams. Violet Pritchard said she saw defendant smack the child across the face and knock him to the ground, and then pick him up by the throat. She saw marks on the boy's throat afterwards. The boy's mother said she saw marks on the child's face. Defendant said the child and other boys were down on their knees throwing stones at some chicks which were feeding inside the cot. He caught this boy, and gave him a t'flip. Fined 10s. I MARRIED AFTER DESERTING CHILDREN. Elias Pitts, Tonna Road, Maesteg, was charged with having run away and deserted his three children. Warrant Officer Thomas said the family had cost the Guardians LIS,9 odd since the child- ren were admitted. Witness was going to ask the Justices to adjourn the case for defen- dant to take the children from home, but defenri-mt had no place to keep them. The man had been married since he left the child- ren. Defendant said he left the children with his daughter, who was stated by the warrant ofifcer to he only 12 years of age. Mr. Oliver Sheppard: This is a very bad You deserted your children, and, in of that, you got married acain. Your family has cost the ratennvers £ 188. It is a I serious case, and you will hi* pent to prison for two months. If we could make it more we would. ABSENTEE. 11 William Cronin was charged with having been an absentee from the Munster Fusiliers, and was remanded to await an escort. DRUNK AND, DISORDERLY. Idris Lewis, haulier, Aberkenfig, was fined tl or 14 days for having been drunk and disorderly. Morgan Morgan, collier. Garth, was fined 15s. for having been drunk and disorderly, j

No title

— ———————————————— Up-to-Date Appliances for turning out 1 every class of work at competitive prices, at I the "Glamorgan Gazette" Printing Works.

iNANTYFFYILON

NANTYFFYI.LON. S-A-RON.-A sueeesbiul competitive meet- ing was held on Wednesday evening last week at the above place under the aiispioee of the Band of Hope. Credit must be given to the present committee, of which the Rev. T. J. Rees (pastor) is president; Mr. D. J. Davies, oonductor; Mr. Fred Morgan, treasurer, and Miss Blodwen Griffiths (secretary), for the very flourishing condition -of the Band of Hope. The adjudicaton were --Musk, Mr. Hopkin Hopkins; map drawing, Miss Agnes Saer. The competitions were numerous and very keen. The prize winners were:—Mor- fydd Powell, Sally Jones, Ivy Maud Davies, W. J. Evans, Daniel Price, Hannah Jane Jones, Percy Phillips, Maggie Williams, Gwenfyl Jo. Idris Watkins, M. J. Jones, and Martha Thomas. Two choirs competed in the chief choral, viz., Heol Undeb United (conductor, Eos Eurin) and Mid-Rhonddft (conductor, Ap Watkins). After a most ex- cellent competition, the last-named won. The lady "members of the church made a very fine assortment of prize bags. The proceeds were in aid of the Band of Hope funds. COMPETITIVE MEETING.—A oompeti- tive concert was held at Siloh Chapel on Mon- day eveming. The entries for the respective items of the programme were numerous, and the renderings of a high standard. The ad- judicators were:—Music, Mr. Daniel Waldin, Caerau; drawing, Mr. D. L. Evans, Caerau; recitations, Mr. Thomas Roes (Ap Wengar), Nantyffyllon, and their awards, which were as follows, were well received by an apprecia- tive audience:—Pianoforte solo: Divided be- tween Miss Hannah Jenkins, Nantyffyllon, and "Arianwen," Caerau. Recitation (under 12 years): Brinley Richards, Nantyffyllon. Recitation (over 12 years): Divided between Gwynfryn Richards and May Akerman, N&n- tyffyllon. Drawing of horse: Wengar 14m, Nantyffyllon; a special prize, awarded to the second beet by the adjudicator, was also captured by Wengar Rees. Children's solo: Gideon John, Nantyffyllon. Tenor solo: Mr. Benjamin Williams, Nantyffyllon. Bari- tone solo: Mr. Silas Morris, Nantyffyllon. Contralto solo: Miss P. A. Davies, Maesteg. Soprano solo: Miss Elizabeth Bevan, Nanty- ffyllon. Duet: Mr. Gladstone Howells and friend, Nantyffyllon. Quartette: Mr. Glad- stone Howells and friends, Nantyffyllon. Chief Choral, "Moab" (from the Congrega- tionalist Hymn Book): Three choirs com- peted, the winning choir being conducted by Mr. William Rees, Nantyffyllon, to whom a gold medal (given by Mrs. H. M. Jones) was awarded, in addition to the: prize money. The accompanist was Miss Myfanwy Rees, Nanty- ffyllon. Mr. Henry R. Evans, Nantyffyllon, performed the duties of chairman. The trea- surer's office was filled by Mr. Ben H. Davies, whilst the secretarial duties were carried out by Mr. D. Cambettie.

THE HOUSING QUESTION

THE HOUSING QUESTION. To the Editor. Sir,—On behalf of the South Wales Garden Cities and Town-Pla.nning Association we de- sire to emphasise the supreme importance of preparing without delay for social reconstruc- tion after the war and more especially for the provision of an adequate supply of dwellings for the working classes. We do not urge the actual construction of houses at the present time, as the demands of the nation in regard to labour and capital are so great that any considerable cottage-building activity is for the moment both undesirable and impractic- able. The impossibility of building at pre- sent, however, should not blind us to the growing seriousness of the housing problem and to the great need of preparing for its solution as soon as conditions become more favourable. It would assuredly be a very shorted-sighted policy to postpone the con- sideration of after-war problems until we are brought actually face to face with them. Owing to the great shrinkage of building activity the housing problem in South Wales has become exceedingly acute. Before the war there was a shortage, on the lowest esti- mate, of not less than 25,000 dwellings in the coalfield area, and ordinary building agencies were quite unable to cope with the housing demands of the increasing population. Since the war this shortage has increased by pro- bably not less than 5.000 dwellings per annum, and it will be exaggeration to say that, when peace is restored, the aggregate deficiency will amount to over 40,000 while the condi- tions created by the war will greatly handicap ordinary building agencies in catering for the need. Bearing these considerations in mind, it will be evident to all who realiae that good housing is absolutely essential to national well-being that it is impossible to postpone all, consideration of housing development until the war has ended. Leading authorities prophesy that, when munition work ceases and our armies are de- mobilised after the termination of hostilities, there will be a most serious dislocation of trade and industry, and a wide-spread preva- lence of Unemployment, unless foresight is exercised and schemes are prepared immedi- ately for the absorption of labour An construc- tive undertakings. This has been forcibly pointed out by Mr. Seebokm Rowntree in a widely noticed article in the Contemporary Review" of October, 1915. He states: "Mak- ing full allowance for all possible exceptions, and likewise those whose return will not affect labour, I believe we shall be well with- in the mark in assuming that considerably over a million men will be thrown on the labour market within three month of the ter- mination of the war, And that work will have to be found either for them or for the indi- viduals whom they will displace. Moreover, the labour market at that time will be singu- larly unqualified to ,absorb this additional labour. Vast numbers of workers to-day are engaged in manufacturing goods, the demand for which has been created directly or indirect- ly by the war. When peace is signed the great bulk of "this demand will cease, and consequently there will be a very serious dis- location of mdustry apart from that caused by the demobilisation of the army." The building trades constitute the second largest industrial group in the country, amd thousands of the returning soldiers will be skilled men who have spent ail their lives in, ibuilding work. To provide employment for these men at their own cooupations is sound economy, and we strongly urge that employers of labour, local authorities, housing societies and companies, as well as individual specula- tors will be doing work of the highest national importance if they prepare estate develop- ment and housing sohemes now, so that actual building work can be commenced immediately, after peace is restored. The opinion has been widely expressed that demobilisation should take place gradually so that, the labour marbet shall not be glutted. This poKcy we beQdeve to be unsound; the provision of con- structive work for soldiers will surely be more economical than maintenance in the army when the need for their services has ceased. It is estimated that to retain 200,000 building workers with the colours en order to avoid flooding the market will ooei the nation half a million a week, a sum which in six months will defray the cost of 65,000 badly needed dwellings. Much preliminary work is necessary before actual building can be commenced. Land has to be leased or purchased, road and cottage plans prepared and submitted to the local authority for approval, and these and other preliminaries often occupy many months. If they are postponed until the war is ended, much distress may result before actual build- ing operations can be commenced. We recog- nise, of course, that many local authorities, public utility societies, and similar agencies, hesitate to proceed until they know what financial assistance by way of loan or grant they can expect from, the Government. That some such help must be forthcoming seems inevitable, and we trust that a Government pronouncement on this subject will be made at no distant date. It is obvious, however, that the agencies which have their schemes matured will receive speediest consideration from the State when the proper time arrives. In conclusion, we desire to state that our association, which is a purely propangandast body, will gladly render information and ad- vice gratis to any persons, associations, or local authorities which contemplate the pre- paration of town-planning and housing schemes.—Yours etc, D. LLEUFER THOMAS (Chairman), J. A. LOVAT-FRASER (Hon. Treasurer), Edgar L. Chappel (Secretary). 18, Queen Street, Cardiff.

Advertising

W. T. JONES' SALE NOW PftOCEEOING. «S»K SSf REAL WELSH FLANNEL SHIRTS, Full Men's Size, from 4s. td. each. Boys' REAL WELSH FLANNEL SHIRTS, from 2s. 3d. each; 10 Sizes in Stock. All Made en the Premise* ef Reliable Quality Flannel; about 2,080 to choose frem. Reliable WELSH FLANNELS, Full Width, from Is. 2d, per yard. Hundreds of Pat- terns to choose from. ALL COLOURS in STOCK FAST DIES GUARANTEED. Also BARGAINS IN DRAPERY. BLOUSES from Is. each. UNDERSKIRTS from Is. each. TWEED and SERGE DRESS SKIRTS, from 2s. lid. each; and OTHER BARGAINS too Numerous to Mention. NOTE ADDRESS- I W. T. JONES, Manchester House, NOLTON STREET, BRIDGEND.

About the War W

? About the War. « W WHAT PEOPLE SAY. I I I [ Baronet M. P. and His Salary. Sir Charles Nicholson, Bart., M.P., speak- ing at Doncaster on Saturday night, hoped we should never descend by reprisals to the barbarism of Germany. He reviewed the prospects of attacking Zeppelins in the air, and added that he had been informed that, the raider which captured the Appam wouldl not be in the Atlantic a fortnight henoe. He had no intention of refusing his Parliament-! ary salary. For him and others to do so would be to place those who could not afford to lose their salary in an awkward position. Reprisals. The Bishop of Lichfield, in an address issued to the diocese of Lichfield on Satur- day, referring to the recent air raids in the Midlands, said that there were people who were advocating what were oalled reprisals; that our airmen should be ordered deliber- We rightly regarded the Zeppelin achieve- ately to drop bombs on unarmed people. ment as the murder of women and children, but he did not believe that even those who had lost loved ones would desire anything of that kind done in Teturn. Let us smash the Zeppelins and Zeppelin sheds and bombard Essen and other arsenals, but not disgrace ourselves by asking our airmen to slaughter women and babies. Mr. Bonar Law on Part Played by Colonies. I Mr. Bonar Law opened on Saturday the Ontario Military Hospital at Orpington, Kent, and said our enemies had had many surprises, but none greater than the discovery of the part which the great Dominions of the British Crown were going to play. They had looked on these Dominions as a weakness to the Mother Country, but they knew better now. After the war many thinga would be changed; among them, the relationship of the different parttf of the Empire to each other. The deeds of the Canadian soldiers were household words in every part of the Mother Country. We, here, were as proud of them as Canadians themselves would be. But if we were proud of what the Canadians had done. the Canadians, too, had seen the men of this country in the field, and they had formed a higher opinion of them than they had before they were their brothers in arms. I t I What Our Airmen Could o. I ) Mr. Pemberton Billing opened his cam- paign in the East Herta bye-election on Saturday. Addressing an open-air meeting, he said he was not a politician, but desired to bring pressure on the Government property to develop its service. If the Government took the matter seriously in hand in six months we should be supreme in the air. If the airmen were given ia proper chance they could blow up all the military depots and sheds in Germany. Change in Conditions. Speaking at Cambridge, the Hon. E. S. Montague, M.P., Financial Secretary to the Treasury, emphasised the need for the strict- est economy from top to bottom. There were, he added, two subject* of enormous im- portance about which every man, Liberal or Conservative, would have to keep an open mind for new conditions. The first was the fiscal system under which we at present lived; the second was State ownership and State control. He implored them to try to avoid controversy for the present. Their business was to beat the Germans and keep oool. Re- ferring to Germany, Mr. Montague said that country had pursued the tasks and objects of peace, and had taken part in the strides of civilisation only on the surface, whilst under- neath the peaceful arts she practised the arts of Her civilisation was, after all, only a mask, for her idea was that, where right came into conflict with might the latter had to win. Some thought we were at war with the Prussian Government, and-not with the German people, but be was of the opinion that war was deeply ingrained in the people of the Germanic nation. Therefore she must be taught a lesson and be reformed. We must have a complete and overwhelming vic- tory. With regard to the Military Service Bill of the Government, he said there was no Liberal who liked military service or who liked war. He told them as a responsible Minister of the Crown that whatever differ- ences there might be, the Bill was necessary to keep our armies at the front at the strength necessary to beat the Germans and to hold our position. If they accepted that view and they could bring the war to the right conclusion, what did it matter for a few years, although he hoped it would only be for a few months ? Aerial Defence. I Lord Derby, speaking at Liverpool on the subject of aerial defence, said it was one of the biggest proofs that the German air raids had had no real effect on this country that the German Government had not the least idea what their aircraft had done here. He appealed to the newspapers not to agitate the public mind unduly because of the effect such agitation would be likely to have upon our airmen. It was not true that air squad- ron commanders had sent up men under atmospheric or olber conditions of gravest danger, but if newspapers were not careful publi opinion would make those comman- ders, for fear it should be said they were doing nothing, take action which they would not otherwise take, while if they were always decrying our aeroplanes our airmen would lose confidence in their own machines. He had always believed that a raid on this country would come by sea, and that, how- ever well organised the Navy was, it would not be able to stop it. But he believed the Army and Navy to be so co-ordinated that even if the raid oame it would be practically inoperative, and those who came would be wiped out. That was all the assurance they should ask for. They should not press the Government for details, which could only be of use to the enemy. The war was going to be won and lost in France and Flanders, and not by the flying of aeroplanes. They had no right to take it for granted that the Gov- ernment in their efforts to bring about peace were less patriotic than themselves. They should trust the Government, and believe they were doing all they could to secure vic- tory.

No title

On Saturday afternoon the body of Sapper W. Lees, of the R.E., stationed at Llan- dudno, was interred at Newton. The funeral was headed by the local police, followed by. the band of the 23rd Pioneer Battalion under the charge of Lieutenant James. Deceased, who was only 21 years of age, leaves a widow and one child. Usually, states Dr. Robinson, medical officer of Birmingham, the proportion of births is 1.020 to 1,040 boys to every 1,000 girls. For the last quarter the proportion was 1,110 boys to every 1,000 girls. There has been a fall in the birth-rate, which, if it continues a year, will, he says, represent a decrease of 4,000 babies.

Advertising

i? For o?M, Piuft, Puddings a ORWICK"S ?? EAKtNQ POWDZR. /g „ .„„ FASHIONABLE NOVELTIES FOR SPRING WEAR ■ at E LflVlERS IIF THIS WEEK. !<))!!) SEE OUR SHOWROOMS for Smart and Up to-dste Miliinery, for the newest productions in Ladies' & Maid's Costumes, Coats, Skirts, Rainproofs, etc. BABY ROOM. Children's Pretty Costumes, Bonnets and Hats. Ladies' and Children's Underclothing at practically old prices. DON'T MISS OUR BLOUSE SHOW. A choice selection of all the latest productions in Silk and Voile Blouses. JAP BLOUSES, SPECIAL, 19 Momme, 3/11t (Worth your notice BUY YOUR CORSETS NOW. All the Celebrated Makes at very little advance in prices. Lace and Casement Curtains, just in, and at Old Prices, New Gs in the Print, Delaine, and Flannelette Departments, received daily. GENTS' OUTFITTING and BOY'S DEPARTMENTS. Call and See our Men's, Youth's and Boy's Suit3, Overcoats, Showerproof Coats etc. We are Agents for burberry Coats, Christy's Hats, etc. 38, 39, 40, wmamKMasamammmmmmmmtmmmmmmtmmmmmmKmmmmmmmmtmm MAESTEG.  38, 39, 40, 41 & 42, COMMERCIAL STREET, MAESTEG. _j c Complete House T•. lH ie t?t? t?"! ? 4? c?mjpi?te u?M 8, '8 en Ins, __rnJ:=_. Successor to W. Jenkins & Sons, 14 and 15, Qommorciai Street, MAESTEG. We are now thowing xnany new designs in BEDROOM SUITES Solid Oak, Walnut & Mahogany. Prices: 6 Guineas 8 Guineas 10 Guineas Y IS va 25 v It has always been our object to sell the newest & best designs at prices well within the reach of everyone. ;¡¡¡;' It will be a positive pleasure to us, to show you round our show- rooms.,whetbep buying or not. Accept this as an invitation when next In the vicinity. I i ????????? ? ? ? ? ? ? e ? e Have You Seen the Display of P Spring Costlime5 I. AT- th ei It a d s Realm"? They are so much different to usual styles. Prices range from 18/11 to 24 15s. Od. Will YOU CAUL ? d. SIMS DAVIES, THE LADY S REALM, 17, Commercial Street, MAESTCG. II ■——imuii, L -MILL!. ■ llll—IHII., ——^

I DISABLED SOLDIERSI

I. DISABLED SOLDIERS. I I SCHEME FOR THEIR WELFARE. An adjourned oonf4rence of gentlemen re- presenting Glamorganshire and Monmouth- shire interested in Brigadier-General Owen Thomas' scheme for the welfare of disabled and discharged aoldiera was held at the Law Courts, Cardiff, the Lord Mayor (Dr. R. J. Smith) presiding, to further consider the scheme and to appoint representatives for the two counties to attend a Welsh national con- ference, to be held at Shrewsbury on Feb- ruary 25th. The Lord Mayor said that in December last they agreed to the principle of General Owen Thomas' scheme. He was glad to see that Wales was taking a lead in this matter, and was taking time by the forelock in putting a scheme into operation. It was highly desir- able that they should endeavour to make the lot of the disabled soldiers happier and better than it otherwise might be, and show them that the country appreciated their sacrifices and was determined to see that the men who answered the call in the country's hour of need should be its special care when they re- turned. (Applause.) Lieut. Henry Davies said it was better to have a recognised scheme throughut Wales for dealing with disabled soldiers and sailors than rely upon benevolent societies and char- itable institutions. They wanted to deal with disabled men not from a charitable standpoint, but from the standpoint of pat- riotism and business. He hoped there would be no squabbling or worrying as to the repre- sentation of a particular county or parish. Mr. Lynn Thomas, C.B., said he was interested more particularly in the ortho- pedic side. The number of people crippled in this war was already stupendous, and the surgical aspect was an important one. He could be of greater service in suggesting that some means should be adopted in Wales for dealing with the men who would be crippled. He hoped that Wales would take a very active part in that work, and see that the conditions for it were the very best possible. On the proposition of the Lord Mayor, seconded by. Lord Pontypridd, the conference approved of the scheme, which has previ- ously been described, and instructed its dele- gates to vote for it at Shrewsbury. The delegates appointed were Mr. W. C. Jenkins (chairman of the Aberscychan Council), Mr. David Jenkins (chairman of the Pontypridd Council), Rev. Jonathan Evans (secretary of -the East Glamorgan Congregational Asscia- tion), Mr. Herbert Lewis (of the Order of St. John), and Councillor E. England (Cardiff), with Lieut. Davies and Mr. Cyrus J. Evans, the local secretary. It was decided to pro- pose that the Red Cross Society, the Order of St. John, and'the Welsh National Move- ment for the Technical Training of Disabled Soldieries should be represented on the govern- ing body.

Advertising

ADVIICE FREE.-Mrs. Stewart, Herbal I Spceiaiist, 9 Guinea Street, Bristol. 6871 i The Glamorgan Gazette" would be pleased to publish letters from Maesteg Soldiers on Active Service or sent home wounded. iiaiiiiiiiilftiii HAYMANs l N)!ft)t )Mfmtn ? ?? BALSAM4 i TT I"? 1CP Gl Hilr CuUuHS &COLDSS 111 tBvaiuabteinth