Collection Title: Glamorgan Gazette

Provider: The National Library of Wales

Rights: The copyright status or ownership of this resource is unknown.

View full details

First Previous Image 2 of 8 Next Last
Full Screen
7 articles on this page
SUCCESSFUL FUNCTION IN SPLENDID I WEATHER

SUCCESSFUL FUNCTION IN. SPLENDID I WEATHER. OCCASION MARED BY SERIOUS I ACCIDENT. A successful agricultural show and jumble sale, in aid of the British Farmers' Red Cross Fund, was held on Tuesday under the auspices of the Pyle and District Ploughing and Agri- cultural Association. The promoters of the show set themselves deliberately to outdo their efforts of former years, and they undoubtedly succeeded in this laudable design. Whether it was the weather —which was all that could have been wished- or the ca^ise, which also was as good as they make 'em, the fact remains that the show scored a thorough and well-deserved success- a success of which the joint secretaries, Messrs A. M. Maddock and W. G. Loveluck, may well be proud, since it was, of course, largely due to their own indefatigable and painstaking efforts. Up to the luncheon hour the attendance was somewhat thin, but this was only to be ex- pected, and in no way damped the ardour of the officials, who, having evidently squared our old friend the Clerk of the Weather, were quite easy in their minds as to the rest. And sure enough, luncheon was scarcely over, and the business of judging, etc., resumed, than the field gradually but surely began to fill, until at last it presented quite a gay and fes- tive appearance, with its white canvas tent. its moving throngs of people—the fairer por- tion of them in gay summer attire-its pranc- ing horses, and smart turn-outs. Of course, you are not to imagine a Shrews- I bury or a Royal Agricultural Show. There were only three tents—one the secretaries'. another occupied by the lady managers of the jumble show, and the third sacred to the cause of the inner man-and woman: videl-i cit, feed- ing. In this latter pavilion was held the plain but excellent luncheon, to which a goodly company of local agriculturalists (in- cluding a certain humble but hungry press- man) sat down at about 1.30, and to which it is scarcely necessary to say they did full jus- tice. The genial and ample countenance of Mr. C. C. John (Grove Farm), at the head of the board served to heighten the impression of joviality and good cheer that pervaded the feast. THE SPEECHES. The knife-and-fork business over, the Chair- man rose to propose The King." Knocking with the handle of his knife on the tablecloth to secure attention, Mr. John began by re- minding his hearers that on that occasion they were "out for making money." And they had made a good beginning in that direction-they were on teetotal lines. (Hear, hear.) He hoped he was not giving any secret away when he said that the committee was very much di- vided on the question, .and, in fact, he was afraid it was a sore point with some people that the thing was only decided by the Chair- man's casting-vote. (Laughter.) Well, as he had said, they were out to make moneys and he hoped that when the jumble sale com- menced they would all dip their hands deep into their pockets. They made JE250 by their show last year, and this year they were look- ing forward to doing much better. For one thing, they had ladies helping them this year, and, as everyone knew, when the ladies put their hands to a thing it was always done thoroughly. (Hear, hear.) Then there was another thing. Last year the show was well supported by the butchers of the district-and he (the Chairman) hoped to see more of them on the present occasion before the day was much older-but the farmers, he was sorry to say, did not come up to their expectations. He sincerely hoped that this year it would be different. Let them remember that the money that was got to-day was for the Red Cross. Most of his hearers could not shoulder a rifle, but they could all do something in the way of contributing to the noble cause. Money was urgently needed just now by the Red Cross Society. They knew how their boys were fighting at this time, and they knew in what a state many of them were coming back. Concluding, the speaker gave The King," and The Army and Navy," which were cordially drunk in such beverages as were going—lime juice, lemonade, or plain water. The second toast, "The Judges and the Show Generally," to which the name of Mr. Rees Thomas was coupled, was proposed by the Rv. D. J. Arthur, Vicar of Pyle, who said that the probable reason why he had been chosen to perform the office was the poorness of his vocabulary, and the fact that he scarcely knew a horse from a cow-by which combination of qualifications the judges hoped to escape any catigation they might really deserve. Speaking seriously, however, the show had already turned out to be a really successful show. He was sorry to see that the judges of poultry were not with them. But the poultry part of the show was housed in the Church Hall, and the judges could not be in two places at once. It was fitting that the appeal to the farmers of the district should come from the Chairman. He endorsed what the Chairman had said about the cause Wing a. good one. This fight they were engaged in was a fight between European civilisation on the one hand, and Prussian mili- tarism on the other, and at the present time their very existence as free men depended on how they supported the Government. (Hear, hear.) Mr. Rees Thomas, replying to the toast on behalf of the judges, said that it gave him great pleasure to come among the Margam farmers, most of whom lid had known for many years. Speaking as one of the judges of the show,, he might say the entries were on the whole very good. There were some very good cattle, but the entries in this class were not as numerous as they ought to have been. Perhaps, however, this was due to the com- paratively early date of the show, which caught the farmers between the hay and corn harvests. And as far as the actual entries were concerned, they were a credit to those who showed them. He need not say anything about the horses, because the Margam farmers had always been noted as horsey men. (Laughter.) Speaking for himself, he might say that he always preferred the breeding of cart horses to the. lighter breeds, because.cart horses always paid. With this interesting confidence on the part of one of the most experienced farmers in the tent, the luncheon came to an end, and the company rose, and sought the open air, there to resume, having well fortified the inner man, the serious busines of the show, which in truth -1 had as yet scarcely begun. THE JUDGING. I The work of judging the various classes of horses-the other entries of live stock on the field, cattle, sheep, etc., were far less numer- ous than the horses, and had already been dis- posed or-was now resumed in good earnest. The judges in this class were Messrs. D. Rees, Ferndale, and W. E. Baker, Longlands, Mon., and their office was no sinecure. There were altogether 25 classes of horses to be adjudi- cated on, and well and patiently was the work got through. Class by class, the sleek, glossy, high-spirited animals were led into the ring, and walked and trotted up and down for the benefit of those two pairs of critical eyes; with the public standing or sitting round in lazy placid enjoyment of the spectacle. There were glossy "cobs" that seemed simply burst- ing with beans, and there were placid "British matrons," with their frisky foals' at foot-foals who were so scandalously oblivious to the solemnity of the occasion as to seek maternal refreshment while under the very eyes of the judges! But, as we are constantly being told, there is no reverence among the young nowadays. The "fun o' the fair" now became fast and furious. About 2 o'clock the field was in- vaded by a cheery little grey-clad army in the shape of about fifty wounded from the Rest at Porthcawl, unr the escort of a number of their nurses. The sight of their bodies- maimed and halt in many cases—was pathetic to a degree, considering their youth, but a glimpse of their cheery, shining faces, from which the tan of Egypt and Mesopotamia had which the tan of Egv not yet entirely faded, was enough to correct this impression. The gallant lads were (b. viously not going out of their way to be sorry for themselves. They had come to see and enjoy all there was to see, and they lay and basked in groups on the warm grass, looking on with interest at what was going, or strolling in cheery little groups about the field. SOME" JUMPING. The judging of horses was going steadily on when the stentorian voice of Mr. Hopkin Mor- gan was heard announcing that the jumping exhibition by Corporal George Wood, G.M.P., Swansea, would now take place in an adjoin- ing field (carefully separated from the show field proper by a canvas screen), and inviting the public generally to walk up and view the exhibition at the trifling cost of the "nimble tanner," which the said public proceeded to do in gratifying numbers. It may be said at once that they got their money's worth. Corporal Wood was not in- aptly described by a merry-eyed wounded Tommy on the field as "a reg'lar human flea, blest if he ain't." And, indeed, it did seem as if nothing short of a human flea could have done some of the feats performed by this tall, good-looking young soldter. All his jumps were "standing" jumps, and to jump "stand- ing" over twenty chairs, set 12ft. apart, one jump per chair, is a task few athletes would care to tackle. His greatest feat, and the one that elicited most applause from the spec- tators, was to spring-with the aid of a succes- sion of low ascending platforms—clean over a baker's horse and van, "from stem to starn," as an old salt would say. Corporal Wood, by ,the way, broke all world's records for 3 and 5 standing jumps at Swansea last week. GALLOWAY RACES AND AN ACCIDENT. I At length came the most popular and most eagerly-expected item of the day-the gallo- way races. The competitors and their beauti- ful mounts had been simply panting for the fray literally for hours, and one or two of them, unable to contain their superfluous energy, had been madly careering about in remote corners of the large field-to their de- triment, no doubt, in the race proper. The competitors were arrayed at last, the crowd shepherded—not without difficulty, in such a manner as to form a rough course for the horses—the signal was given, and—"They're J off!" was the cry (talk about the Derby!) They were well off, too. Ding-dong they came, four of them in a loose bunch round the judges' tent and into the first "straight." Mr. M. Davies' (Marcross) "Bob" led from the first, followed at some little distance by Mr. T. Tudor's (Nantymoel) "Teddy," with the loosely defined, and the crowd so unprotected —necessarily so—that some of the older hands rest a good way back. The course was so among the spectators were not long in pre- dicting an accident of some kind. And sure enough, it came. It was the third time round, and both horses and riders were get- ting excited, the whips going incessantly, when all at once one of the rear horses seemed to take things in his own hands—or rather mouth—and charged blindly, full tilt, into the crowd at its densest. In an instant horse and jockey were down, with half-a-dozen of the spectators under them, as it seemed. For a moment all was confusion and con- sternation, and when this subsided and it was possible to ascertain who was hurt, it seemed a marvel that the total casualty list was two people somewhat seriously injured and rendered unconscious, and two others slightly injured. The two seriously hurt were Mrs. Mills, of Penybryn, Kenfig Hill, and her son, Thomas Mills, aged seven. Both were temporarily attended to by ambulance men, and conveyed in a motor to the surgery of Dr. J. F. Twist at Kenfig Hill. The boy recovered consciousness before leaving the field, and Mrs. Mills gradually came to herself at the sur- gery. Mrs. Mills had incised wounds on the forehead and top of the head, and was badly bruised, while the boy had a bad cut over the forehead. The horse was The Kipper," owned by Mr. Harry Humphries, fruiterer, Nantymoel, and jockey, who escaped injury, was Tom Jones, Kenfig Hill. Ultimately, Mr. Davies' "Bob" won with ease, with Mr. Tudor's "Teddy" second.

Advertising

LONDON-, HflUSEi .I .p, SALE L NOW PROCEEDING! NUMEROUS BAKGAINSIJi LL DEPARTMENTS. REMNANT DAY EVERY DAY. HUGHES & SOHS, Bridgend. d.

THE PRIZE WINNERS I

THE PRIZE WINNERS. The following ifc a list of the prize winners: I HORSES. I Brood Cart Mare with Foal at Foot.-I, W. B. Loveluck, Kenfig; 2, W. J. Maddock, Cefn Ydfa, Aberkenfig. Two-year-old Cart Gelding or Filly.—1, G. Thomas, Stormy; 2, W. J. Maddock, Cefn Ydfa; 3, J. David, Longland Farm, Kenfig Hill; 4, M. T. Evans, Llanmihangel, Pyle. Mare or Gelding, not exceeding 14.2, suit- table for Colliery Purposes.—1, Cribbwr Fawr Collieries, Ltd., Pyle; 2, T.,D. Bevan, Dany- lan, Porthcawl; 3 and r., T. Jones, Gadlys, Llangynwyd. Cob Brood Mare, with Foal at foot.—1, T. Price, Tyfry, Kenfig Hill; 2, G. Thomas, Stormy Farm. Mare or Gelding suitable for Colliery Work, not exceeding 13.3.-1, W. J. Maddock, Cefn Ydfa; 2, T. D. Bevan, Danylan. Cart Brood Mare, not exceeding 15,2, with Foal at foot.-1, W. J. Maddock, Cefn Ydfa; 2, T. Jones, Gadlys, Llangynwyd; 3 and r., W. T. Evans, Llanmihangel, Pyle. Mare or Gelding not exceeding 15 hands.— 1, Cribbwr Fawr Collieries, Ltd.; 2, Ton Phillip Rhondda Colliery Co., Ltd. Two or Three-year-old Mare or Gelding, likely to make Saddle Horse suitable for Mili- tary Purposes.—1 and r., G. Thomas, Stormy 2, Miss Talbot, Margam. One-year-old Cart Colt or Filly, by "Black- thorn Kingmaker."—1, G. Thomas, Stormy. Sucker, by "Blackthorn Kingmaker."—1, W. B. Loveluck, Kenfig; 2, W. Thomas, West- field, Nottage. Sucker, got by any of Mr. Board's (Mer- thyrmawr) Horses.-I, D. Hopkin, Ty Talbot, Nottage. Sucker, got by Tandridge Midnight."—1, W. B. Loveluck, Kenfig; 2, M. T. Evans, Llanmihangel; r., W. B. Loveluck. Sucker, got by any of Mr. W. J. Maddock's (Cefn Ydfa) Horses.—1 and 2, T. Jones, Gadlys, Llangynwyd; r., W. J. Maddock, Cefn Ydfa. Yearling Colt or Filly, got by any of Mr. Maddock's Horses.—1, Thomas and Morris, Bryncynnan; 2, W. J. Maddock. Horse, Trap and Harness, owned by a Working Man.—1, Emrys growniitg, 43 Cefn Road, Cefn Cribbwr; 2, Reuben Wilcox, Bryn- coch; r., T. Hold, Ffald Cottage, Stormy. Cob, Mare or Gelding, any height.1, Thos. Heatley, Brynheulog, Pyle; 2, W. Thomas, Westfield, Nottage. Trotting Handicap. -1, J. Mon-is, Little Monkton, Wick, "Little Dot"; 2, T. Bryant, White Hart, Llangynwyd, "Nancy." Galloway Handicap.-I, M. Davies, Tyny- caia, Marcross, "Bob"; 2, T. Tudor, 35 Ogwy Street, Nantymoel, Teddy." CATTLE. J Dairy Cow, in Milk or in Calf.—1 and 2, I Miss Talbot, Margam; r., J. Davies, Kenfig House, Margam. Pair of Heifers suitable for Dairy Purposes. i ■ • •- -1, Miss Talbot; 2, W. Thomas, Westfield, Nottage; 3, W. Maddoc-ks, Brombil, Port Tal- bot. Pair of Fat Bullocks.—1, W. Maddocks, Brombi. Calf not exceeding 12 months old.—1 and 2, Miss Talbot. Bull, any age.—1, Ben Jones, Caegarw, Pyle; 2, G. Thomas, Stormy. SHEEP. I Pen of Three Lowland Ewes.—1, Miss i Thomas. New Park, Pyle; 2, Morgan and Son, Marias. Pen of Three Highland Ewes.-l, W. J. David, Farmers' Arms, Nottage; 2, Morgan and Son, Marias. Pen of Three Lowland Ewe Lambs.—1, J. Davies, Kenfig House, Margam. POULTRY. I Old English Game.—1, 3, and specials, P. Pendry, Ferndale; 2, John Morgan, Metz, Ystradgynlais; r., J. H. Jenkins, Creigiau. Leghorn, Minorca or Ancona—1 and special, W. J. Thomas, Wood St., Taibach; 2, J. L. Evans, Ammanford; 3, W. T. Sherlock, Llan- elly; r., W. Harper, Garndiffraith. Plymouth Rock.—1, Harris and Pugh, Ken- fig Hill; 2, W. J. Llewellyn, Lower Brynam- man; 3, D. B. Chesterfield, Glyn Neath; r., Mrs. T. Bassett, Kenfig Hill. Rhode Island Red.—-1 and r., George Lewis, Godre Graig; 2, D. J. Davies, Upper Bryn- amman; 3, Idris Jones, Lampeter. Indian, Malay, or Aseel-1, 2 and r., Harris and Pugh, Kenfig Hill; 3, W. Graves, Nanty- m

PYLE I

PYLE. I V.T.C. CHURCH PARADE.-On Sunday last the Pyieancl, Kenfig Hill platoon of the V.T.C. attended divine service (morning) at St. James'. The Vicar, Rev. D. J. Arthur, who officiated, preached an appropriate ser- mon to a crowded congregation, and there were special intercessory prayers, the occasion being the second anniversary of the war. There was a good muster of the V.T.C.

Advertising

THERE IS REAL BENEFIT In every box of Kernick's Vegetable Pills Because each individual- one of its daintily and proportionately blended vegetable ingredients has a very DEFINITE proved medicinal value in the successful treatment of Indigos- tion, Biliousness and allied disorders* There is no "make weight"; even the white powdery coat has a curative purpose. Do not be put off with ANY Vegetable Pills. SeVthe wofcte Kernick's Vegetable Pills on tht. x. Of all good Chemists, at 9d. and Is. 3d. per box. | Puritan Pictures No. 2. "—————————————— —      ?? 

PORTHCAWL

PORTHCAWL. FLAG DAY.—The Russian Jews Flag Day at Porthcawl on Monday resulted in about £52. HOME ON LEAVE.—Private E. B. Wil- kins, of the Australian Imperial Forces, youngest son of Mi-. Hy. Wilkins, Nottage, Porthcawl, Is home on leave for a few days. He arrived at Salisbury Plain a fortnight ago with the Australian forces. He has been in Western Australia about three-and-a-half years, and has now eome over to do his "bit for his King and Country." PORTHCAWL N.C.O. KILLED.—News was received at Porthcawl on Monday that Sergeant Curwen M. Lewis, of the South African Infantry, only son of the late Mr. Thomas Lewis, M.E., formerly of Maesteg, was killed on July 16th. Sergt. Lewis en- listed at the commencement of the war, and went out to German Wet Africa. He had seen service at Khartoum and in the Boer War. He was a smart soldier and very popu- lar. Mrs. Lewis, the bereaved mother, and Jour daughters reside at Porthcawl. • VISITOR'S SUDDEN DEATH.—Mrs Mary Ann Williams, wife of Mr. William Williams, á." Cardiff consulting engineer, staying at Mary Street, Porthcawl, went out shopping on Sat- urday, and upon returning to the housQ fell forward into .V' Alexander was called, and found the lady dead. Mrs. Williams was 54 years of age, and usually enjoyed good health. She had not complained of any illness during the day. She was a sister of the Rev. A. Azariah Rich- ards, of Gilfach Goch. Two of her sons are in the Army.—Mr. Lewis M. Thomas district coroner, held the inquest at Porthcawl on Monday, on the body of Mrs. M. A. Williams, 242 Newport Road, Cardiff .-The husband', Mr W. Williams, said they had been in Porthcawl a week, and on Saturday morning he went to bathe while his wife did some shopping. On her return she put her parcels on the table and Exclaimed in Welsh, "Oh, William, it is all over with me!" She fell forward and collapsed. She died before the arrival of a doctor.—Dr. Alexander, who was called in, at- tributed death to syncope accelerated by the heat.—Verdict accordingly.

KENFIG HILL

KENFIG HILL. MUSICAL SUCCESS.—The following pupils of Miss Margaret Richards, L.R.A.M., T1- Gwalia, Prince Road, were successful at thfl recent examination held in connection the London College of Musi,,c-Prinlarye son: Miss Etta Thomas, Penybryn Dairy, in the 1st Glass Grade; also Master AtwtD Lougher Greystone, Pisgahi Street, passed tia Primary Division 1st Class. <