Collection Title: Glamorgan Gazette

Provider: The National Library of Wales

Rights: The copyright status or ownership of this resource is unknown.

View full details

First Previous Image 2 of 8 Next Last
Full Screen
18 articles on this page
EXBRIDGEND TRAVELLER AND I HIS WIFE

EX-BRIDGEND TRAVELLER AND HIS WIFE. ARREARS L301 At Bridgend Ponce Court on Saturday, Stanley Elt, late of Bridgend, and now of Rugby Avenue, Neath, described as a tra- veller-who did not appear—was summoned by his wife, Annie Elt, 11 Fenton Place, Porthcawl, who alleged an accumulation of arrears to the extent of zE30 under a lagis- trates' order, made in November, 1912, to pay L2 a week for the support of herself and children. Complainant, vho appeared to be greatly distressed, said she received Ll a week for some time, until July, when the payments stopped. Mr. W. M. Thomas (for the defendant): Has ?Your husband regularly paid you ?1 a week?—Not regularly. Would you be surprised to learn that he is now earning only 25s. a week ?—I understand he is getting 3os. a. week. You said. at the time, that he reoeived C5 a week and commission. You know that in consequence of this case he was discharged, and was out of employment for a long period? —I don't think it was owing to this case. Aud during that period he lived with his parents at Neath?—I can't say. And that his parents assisted him to pay the JE1 a week?—I don't think so. I How do you think he could give you money when he had none in his possession ?-I had I nothing for the 12 months whilst he was out of employment. He has paid me nothing since July. The Chairman (Alderman Wm. Llewellyn): What is he doing now ?—I think trav-jlling as usual in the cigar trade. t Mr. W. M. Thomas: He writes to say his salary is 25s. a wook ?-I cannot say as to that. "Can he pay this £ 30?" persisted Mr. Thomas. Witness: I think I should have something; I have three children. Last week you had 15s. ?—I had a few shil- linght, I think. The Chairman: This is the first time you have proceeded against him ?—Yes. Mr. W. M. Thomas said defendant had re- cently taken up a position at a munition works at Newport, and he did not know what his salary was. The maximum order was mad when he was supposed to be earning more than £58. week. He had since lost his position, it had been suggested through this case. The Chairman: It was open to him to have come here. Mr. W. M. ThomM: He is hoping against hope that his wife will take him back. He is continually giving her money, and he sees the children as often as he has an opportun- ity. The Chairman: Will you make an offer? Mr. Thomas: I suggest that the arrears be paid at the rate of los. a week; that's the beat offer I can make. The Chairman: Your client has treated his wife very badly. The amount of the order is 22. We consider he should go on paying it, with JB2 off the arreaii— £ 10 monthly—or in default of payment, one month's imprison- ment.

PORTHCAWL MYSTERYI 0

PORTHCAWL MYSTERY. I -0 JEWELLERY OFFERS POSSIBLE I SOLUTION. What at first seemed likely to remain for ever an insoluble mystery has now been par- tially scdred by means of a quantity of finger rings. It will be remembered that about six weeks ago the body of an unknown woman, • in a very advanced stage of deoomposition, was found on the beach at Porthcawl, where it had been washed up by the tide. On the fingers were five gold rings. No evidence of identification was forthcoming at the inquest, at which averdict of "found drowned" was returned. The Bridgend police circulated a description of the body and the rings and the reBult is that information has been received which may establish the identity of the body. The description circulated by the Press was read by Mr. Robert Tough, a partner in a firm of tug and barge owners, of Blackfriars, London, who came to the conclusion that the body might be that of Mrs. Louisa A. Petit, of Trenteshoe, near llfracombe, a relative of his by marriage, who has been missing from her home since the 18th October. Mr. Tough communicated with his sister, Mrs. Wright, of Montgomery Street, Cardiff, who paid a visit to Bridgend and examined the rings, which are in the hands of the police. Mrs. Wright was able to identify two of the rings as belonging to Mrs. Petit, who was wearing them in July, when Mrs. Wright last saw her. Mrs. Petit was the wife of Mr. C. W. Petit, who, at the time of her disappearance, waa in Sierra Leone, where he had been for a con- siderable time in connection with the carry- ing out of a large water supply scheme by a leading firm of contractors. It is understood that Mr. Petit is now on the voyage home. The rings will be submitted to him for his in- spection on his arrival, to see whether he can identify them as belonging to his wife. They include a cat's paw and one bearing a foreign imseriptim.

CEFN CRIBBWR I

CEFN CRIBBWR. I PENNY READING.—The "Penny Read- ing" held by the young people of the Calvary English Baptist Church last Monday week, over which Mr. Willie Hawkins presided, was again spent in a most enjoyable manner. The following contributed to the programme:- Solos: Misses Dorothy Edwards, Gladys Thomas, Gladys Jenkins, Amy Jenkins, and Mrs. Richard Jenkins. Rtecrfcations: Jenkin Jenkins, Gladys Howells, Amy Jenkins, Bessie Jones, Annie Kate Everton, Lily Went, Mary Jenkins, and OIwen Evans. Impromptu speech: Jenkin Jenkins. i

ILADY OF THE ATTIC I

LADY OF THE ATTIC. I I "GOES" FOR CHIEF BAILIFF. I I STATE OF SIEGE. I IN DEFENCE OF HER BELONGINGS." I One of the last cases in the unusually long list at Bridgend Police Court on Saturday was that in which there stood in the dock a woman with a will, who defied constituted authority as embodied in the person and dignity of Mr. Thomas Clanzy, the respected chief bailiff of the County Court. The lady was Mrs. Annie Weaver, a widow, latc, of Porthcawl, well dressed, and from her appearance, and manner, a person of refinement and educa- tion. Yet it was a startling story that was told about one outwardly so affable and demure. Mrs. Weaver was charged with a&- sault, and, asked if she committed it, she re- plied that "she did not think she did." Mr. David Llewellyn, for the prosecution, stated how his client was assaulted in the exe- cution of his duty. That morning he. went to Porthcawl to levy an execution, and defendant had assumed such an attitude that he deemed it prudent to call upon Police-Constable Law- rence to accompany him. He had to force an entry-which he was entitled to do in the exe- cution of his duty-and in the presence of the police officer, M. Weaver struck him a vio- lent blow on the arm with a hammer. Mr. Clmizy, in evidence, testified to the vio- lence of his reception, and to the strategy of the defendant, who was very much at home in her barricaded attic. His object, he ex- plained. was to put in an execution under a warrant. Mrs. Weaver had stored her things in an attic at 7 Victoria Road, and there he called, and asked if she was in. He wis informed she was in the attic, and thither he made his way. She refused to oyen the door, and threatened to smash hia 'h?X,With a hammer, with which instrument she was hammering nails into the door. Wit- ness was compelled to force the door, and he made an entry, preceded by the constable. Defendant somehow got behind Lawrence, and aimed at witness a blow which he received on the arm, and also his coat was caught and torn by a nail. Defendant (quietly): It was quite uninten- tional. P.C. Lawrence corroborated, stating that defendant hit the bailiff three or four times, and he had the "utmost difficulty in getting her to go away." The Chairma, (Alderman Wm. Llewellyn) said the Magistrates had decided to deal leniently with defendant, taking into consider- ation that there was nothing against her, and also her circumstances of distress. Still, she had no right to resist in the manner described and it was particularly wrong for her to have assaulted the County Court bailiff, as they were satisfied she had assaulted him. There would be no conviction, but she would have to pay the costs (4s.), and be bound over in j62 to be of good behaviour. "You had better be careful what you do, added the Alderman by way of admonition. Mrs.'Weaver: Cin't I have my personal be- longings P The Chairman: We cannot advis* you.

IAMOROUS OVR SIGNALMAN1

I AMOROUS O.V.R. SIGNALMAN. 1 I FATAL ADMISSION TO BRIDGEND I MAGISTRATES. Before the Bridgend Magistrates on Satur- day, Ambrose Bristoe, a G.W.R. signalman, living at Hendreforgan, was charged with an assault upon a young girl named Gladys Harris, living with her parents at 18 Nolton Street, Bridgend, Mr. Arthur Henton ap- peared for complainant, and Mr. David Llewellyn defended. In stating the facts, Mr. Henton said that on Saturday last, Dec. 2nd, the young lady travelled to Gilfach Goch by the 2.20 train from Bridgend. At Hendreforgan defendant entered the same compartment, and opened up a conversation with complainant. He asked her how she would like to have him for a husband, and she told him she did not want to talk about such matters. He gave the false name of James, and continued to molest her, putting his hand on her waist, and pro- ceeding to behave improperly. Defendant was in the employ of the Railway Company, which made it all the more serious, as things had come to a pretty crisis if a young lady, engaged in business in connection with the war, could not travel without molestation by one of the Company's own servants. The girl, in evidence, told her own story in similar terms. She said it was soon after passing the signal-box when defendant got into conversation with her. She pushed him away, and was about to pull the communica- tion cord, when he intervened, and said, "My God, don't do that." He then returned to his seat beside her, and said he would see her again, and take her to the pictures. She at once complained to the guard, and subse- quently to her parents. William Passey (Tondu), railway guard at Gilfach Goch, proved that the girl lodged the complaint with him; and Albert C. Harris, the father, declared that on the previous mor- ning defendant called at his shop, and ap- pealed to him "to settle it. It Witness's answer was, "Clear out before I lose control of myself." By Mr. Llewellyn: He did not come to ask what had been said about him. Defendant was called, and denied the charge, at the same time admitting the im- proper proposal as alleged. In answer to Mr. Henton, defendant said he had before seen complainant travelling in the train. Do you think he would bring you into Court for nothing?—There is another woman in the case, who has been making mischief. The Chairman (Alderman W. Llewellyn), to defendant: We are satisfied the charge is proved. Upon your own admission, you used words which might have been construed into an indecent proposal. Fined jC3, or one month.

PORTHCAWL PALS I

PORTHCAWL PALS. I Pleasant Saturday Afternson Club. I AN APPEAL. I Have you seen the wounded soldiers A-walking down the street ? Have you thought of what they've been through, And how you ought to greet The noble lads in khaki: These'lads so brave and true Who have borne the brunt of the battle, And suffered and bled for you? Have you clasped their hands in greeting? Have you spoke » kindly word To brighten the lives of these soldier boys, Of whose valour the world has heard? • These am the lads who have "been there"; Who have leaped the parapet, Who have been struck down by a cruel foe, Whose bodies have paid OUR debt. And if they have done their duty- Their duty for you and me, The least we can do is to say "Well done," And treat them gratefully. Have you heard what the Pals are doing On Saturday afternoons? Have you heard the clatter of tea cups, And the tinkling of the spoons As fifty wounded soldiers Sit themselves down to tea, Provided by loving hearts and hands, And served to them gratefully? Have you heard them sing at the concert When the eating and drinking's done, When soldiers and Pals, united, Contribute to the fun? Have you seen the glow in their faces, And the sparkle in their eyes ? If not, turn in some afternoon, And meet with a glad surprise! Th ese gallant lads are worthy Of the best that we can do, So I hope, dear friends, you'll join us la giving them welcome, too. It isn't much we are doing: Each Pal pays a shilling a week And if you want your money's worth You haven't far to see k. Here's something to bring you gladness, Something to bring you joy, For if it's not dona for your own dear am, 'Tis done for some "mother's boy." Will you hurry along and join uis The Pals—who are doing their best To cheer the lives of the soldier lads Who are stationed at the "Rest"? There will come to your heart a gladness, Born of the One above, And you'll realise that your "sacrifice" Is a lso that of love. Just think it over and join us, And your deeds shall shine like a gem; And then, with the Pals, you'll gladly say, I am proud to be one of them." ONE OF THE PALS.

THE RUM RATION

THE RUM RATION. HOW IT STRIKES A POETICAL TOMMY. We have received the following verse* from a private in a Welsh Regiment, who evidently wishes to remain anonymous. We do not think his strictures on the "Sky-pilots" are quite deserved, but we give the verses for what they are worth. I hear that the preachers in England— The pilots to "kingdom come," Are sadly disturbed aboufcfTomffiy out her., And want to stop his rum. Water, they say, is better; Water! Great Scot, out here! Why, we're up to our knees in water; Do i they think we are standing in beer? It sounds all right in a pulpit, To you in your cushioned pew; But try four days in the trenches, And see how water will do. Have they forgotten that Tommy Is fighting on their behalf? Perhaps they objeot to our smoking? P'raps it's a fault to laugh ? They ought to go through it themselves, sir, And meanwhile its very plain ï That what these snug gentry have got, sir, Is just WATER ON THE BRAIN!

PORTHCAWL

PORTHCAWL. BABY SHOW.—The Porthcawl and Dfs- trict Nursing Association arranged a baby show at the Central Cafe. Mr. Byass pre- sided, and Mr. T. James, chairman of the dis- trict council, opened the show. Dr. J. D. Alexander acted as judge, assisted by Miss Jones, district nurse, and Mrs. W. J. Phil- lips, B.A., wife of the hon. secretary. TRIBUNAL. — Porthcawl Tribunal on Monday (Mt. G. E. Blundell presiding) ad- journed several cases for the medical board. A head baker's application for exemption was rejected. Three ploughmen were given con- ditional exemption, and in the case of two farmers and a market gardener exemption was granted conditional upon their joining the V.T.C.

Advertising

TO DEAF PEOPLE. FRENCH ORLENE? absolutely v. Deaf- nma and Noi" im the Head, no matter how severe or longstanding the case may be. Hun- dreds of persons whose cases were supposed to be imcnrable have been permanently cured by this New Remedy. This Wonderful Preparation oes direct to the actual seat of the trouble, and One Box is ample to'effectually cure any ordinary case. Mra Rowe, of Portland-crescent, Leeds, says: The C Orlene' has completely cured me after twelve years' smfferimg." Many other equally good reports. Try one Box to-day. It onlv costs 2/9, and there is nothing better at any priec. Address: ORLENE" Co., 10 SOUTHVIEW, WATLING ST., DARTFORD, Kent. 9208

UNCULTIVATED LAND I

UNCULTIVATED LAND. I To tho Editor. 1 Two aspects of the order giving the Board of Agriculture power to take possession of land for the purpose of increasing food sup- plies need careful watching unless we are to have a repetition'of the familiar spectacle of reforms starting at the bottom instead of at the top. There are the powers given to the Board to take common lands, and the ques- tion of the amount of compensation to be paid when the Board enters into possession of occupied land. Now there can be no question that it is a Titall necessity for us to produce an enormously increased quantity of home- grown foodstuff*, but whether it is necessary at the present time to take common lands for this purpose is a matter which is open to serious dispute. Take our own district for instance. There is more uncultivated, unused land in the possession of farmers than would be necessary to supply every man with a good allotment. Scores of acres of land eminently suitable for this purpose have been allowed to run to a state of prehistoric vege- tation, and, an abundant crop of fern and igorse has taken the place of the valuable foodstuffs once produced by the land. Is it fiust then to ask the commoner to give up the commons, while this land is available. I ventue to think it would be most unreason- able, and commoners should resist by every legitimate means any attempt to seize the commons whilst there is an aere of land lying waste in the possession of the farmer. Every foot of land that labour cam be found for should be put to its utmost productive use but the common lands of the people, which after &11 are pitifully small, should only be taken when all other land has been taken for national use. Then comes the question of compensation, and here again if the order is to be a suocess and friction avoided it will be necessary for the authorities to walk warily. The comparative failure of allotment* in the past has been d'lle largely to the fact that the farming fraternity from whom land has been taken for small holdings have demanded the price of a farm for a field, with the conse- quent result that the smallholder has had to pay such a price for his holding that it has beon'Xmremunerative. Now there is no justi- fication for charging smallholders three or four times as much for land as waa previously paid by the farmer. The only compensation that should be paid either to farmer or landowner is the amount of rent charged at present. It should not be higher in any instance, and in dealing with the gorse and fern formerr re- gard should be given te the fact that it m the least valuable of his land that is being taken and payment adjusted accordingly. The authorities should also apply to allotment holders a sufficient supply of manures at eoet. Granted this and land at reasonable prices there is every reason to hope that allotments will be taken up in sufficient numbers to make a very appreciable difference to the food supply.— Yours etc. I MERVYN W. PAYNE. 1 HeollAethog, Dee. 9th, 1912.

I INDUSTRIAL CONDITIONS AFTER ITHE WAR

I INDUSTRIAL CONDITIONS AFTER I THE WAR.. I To the Editor. Sir,—The question of industrial conditions after the war should be engaging the atten- tion of all wags earners. Every great social calamity in tke past has had an effoot en the condition of the workers. The present war is causing incalculable loss of life, of capital, and property, and creating a huge army Off maimed and disabled men. The effects of it will be profoundly and acutely felt in all in- dustrial oountriee. It is essential, therefore, that the workers should be prepared to meet new conditions that will be created in an in- telligent manner. And to do that they must be looked at in the light afforded by the in- dustrial history of our nation. The best way of obtaining that light is to take advantage of the facilities for study offered by the Central Labour College, owned and controlled by the S.W.M.F. and N.U.R. The various Trades Unions in the district should take immediate step* to form provincial classes and have an accredited teaeher of the College to instruct them in such subjects as "Industrial His- tory," "Booaemiee," and so forth. If this is impracticable owing to the scar- city of teachers, discussion claeses should be formed and difficult points submitted to the C.L.C. Also these who possibly can should take up correspondence courses on the differ- ent subjects taught. Many of the great poli- tical questions of our day derive meet of their difficulty from economic causes, while inter- matiomial politice tend more and more to centre round matters of commercial and in- dustrial importance. And as De Gibbens says in his "Industrial History of England" "The meant by which we gain our daily bread form for the majority of mankind the most pressing of problems, and what is true of the individual is true on a larger scale of the j nation alao. Youra etc., G. E. HILL. I Dryadwwon, Coytrahen. G. E. HILL. I

I OOUQRE VAIE I

OOUQRE VAI-E. I FIRM AT COlilERT — A.. renlt of a serious fire tkat broke out on Friday last in the Lamp Roes of the Rhondda Main Col- lieries, Ognor-a Yale, the building was almost completely destroyed, and between 300 to 400 lamps were readered useless. Fortunately a fredh supply ef lamps was immediately forth- coming, whack mabled the men to resume work on the following day. PRESENTATION.—An interesting presen- tation took place oo Wednesday of last week at the Leaser Hall, Ogmore Vale, when Mr. W. H. Cape4 and Miss G. Jones were made the recipients of & handsome oak table and a music cabinet respectively. The presenta- tions were made by Mr. Perkins, Glyn Street. Both Mr. Capel and Miss Jonee are popular in Ogmore Yale musical circles, and the hall was crowded with admirers. Mr. Capel a.nd his choir have done much for local charities in the past, and they are now busy rehears- -ing the opera "n Trovatore." I I

Advertising

 11 eootalø JØ04e rII imP roVemeaJ are (;ait ..tba.ct the lØstnaj1eatSo Pod ftm i, WAD DIN OTO,} aISON.S. (ESTABLISHED 1888J STATION ROAD koppuaite ihe County Schools) PORT TALBOT. POUNDS SAVED BY DEALING WITH THB ACTUAL I IANO MAKERS SELLING DIRgCT to the PUBLIC TELEGRAMS: MORGAN, IRONMONGER. TELEPHONE No. 5. W. MORGAN & CO., (LLANTWIT MAJOR,) LTD., Wholesale and Retail Furnishing and Buildere Ironmongers, Implement Agents, EAST STREET, LLANTWIT MAJOR, Hold a Good t; ,ck of Wearing Parts for MOWERS and BINDEK-" CULTIVATORS and PLOUGH FITTINGS. Inspect our Stock of Barn Machinery, Chaffcutters & Grinding Mills*, Sole Agents for Homsby's Ploughs and Machinery. II II Sentatile Chaffcutters & Mills, &c. 0-_0-

EISTEDDFOD AT HFIOLYCYW

EISTEDDFOD AT HFIOLYCYW. ( I MANY COMPETITORS AND KEEN COWlciTS. The sixth annual eisteddfod held on Satur- day last at Ainon Baptist Chapel, Heolycyw, attracted a large number of competitors. Each item was keenly contested. A musical treat in itself was the ohajnpion solo. The president was Mr. G. Abraham, M.E., Raglan Collieries; and the coiftuotor, in the unavoid- able absence of Mr. W. A. Howell, Penooed, waa Mr. M. Rees, M.E., Raglan Collieries. The adjudicators were: Music, Mr. W. P. Jenkins, Aberkenfig, and Mr. J. Simon Davies, Bridgend; elocution, Mr. J. Edwards- Evans, Penooed; prize bags, Mm. G. Abra- | ham, Heolycyw. The wards were as follows:— I Solo, for boys under 14: R. Stephens, Heolycyw. Pianoforte splo, for children! under 12; Gwyneth Owens, Bridgend. Reci- tation for children under 14: Kitty Morgans, Bryncethin. Solo for girk under 14: Prize divided between Sarah Jane Thomas, 106rd??- end, and Kitty Morgans, Brynoethin. Prizes for Heolycyw children: Flossie Gore, Cissie Lewis, Jolumy Llewellyn, and David Lewis. Solo, any voice, Mr. 0. J. Harris, Nanty- moel. Pianoforte solo ,under 16, Gethin Jones. Essay on The Life of King David" T. Owen, Heolycyw. Bass solo, "Y Melwi Dewi". Mr. O. J. Harris, Nantymoel. So- prano solo, Cymru Fydd": Miss Sarah Ann Rose, Bettws. Best love-letter: Prize divi- ded between Archie and William Thomas. Champion solo, Arm, arm, ye Brave": Mr. Glanville Davies, Maesteg. Open recitation (own selection): Mr. D. J. Morris, Tonyrefail. Open solo, She is far from the Land": Prize divided between Messrs. S. J. Lewis, Penooed, and F. Russel, Tonyrefail. Octette (two parties entered Nantymoel Music Lovers, and Pencoed Music Lovers. The prize was awarded to the Pencoed party (con- ductor, Mr. T. Jones). The adjudicators praised the standard of the musio rendered, and expressed their pleasure in the various renderings. The recitations also were highly oommended by the adjudicator, which, he said, had been very intelligently selected. The secretarial duties were ably carried out by Messrs. Dewi Thomas and F,. Jones. The usual vote of thanks was carried unanimously to all those who had so readily assisted, and m vote of condolence with Mr. W. A. Howell, in his bereavement waa passed. Miss K. Williams, L.R.A.M., Heoiycyw, who accom- panied throughout, is to be highly compli- mented on her able performance of her very onerous duties.

OG1900 YALE MANS DEATH IN 1ACTION

OG1900 YALE MAN'S DEATH IN -1 ACTION.  PTE. JAMES WALLINGTON, WELSH .1 REGIMENT. t We sincerely regret to announce the death I of Pte. James Wallington, 0th Welsh Regi- ment, and of Bridge Street, Ogmore Vale, who is reported killed in action in France. The deceased soldier volunteered about 12 months ago, was rejected twice, but even- tually passed on th third application. He was the son of the late Mr. Thomas Walling- ton, of Cortett Street, Ogmore Vale, and a nephew of Mr. John Davies, Bfroad Ash. He had been in many engagements and was 84 years of age. He leaves a widow and six young children, and much sympathy is felt for the sorrowing family. Mrs. Wallington, the widow, is still under the shadow of the loss of her mother, who was buried on Wed- nesday of last week. In civil life Pte. Wal- lington worked' at the Rhondda Main Col- lieries, Ogmore Vale, and was much respec- ted by all who knew him.

PEN OED

PEN OED. VISIT OF SINGING EVANGELIST.The- visit of Mr. Griffith Hughes, the Welsh sing— ing-evangelist, to Penuel Baptist Chapel wa& a iiiaxked success. Large congregations earner togtheor to hear the Gospel spoken and sung. by an evangelist of evident earnestness and sincerity. In the evening the Chapel was. packed. MISSIONARY SERVICES.—Sunday was; observed at Trinity English Calvinistic Met- hodist Chape) as a missionary Sunday. In the evening there was a large congregation* gathered together to listen to Mrs. Branch,, a ladt, who served for years in the mission field in Assam. Mrs. Branch now resides at Pencoed and is the wife of the Rev. W. Branch, curate of Pencoed. The address was- earnest and thoughtful and should tend to stimulate interest in the work of missions. The collections throughout the day went te. the Foreign Mission Work of the Calvinietie- Methodist Church. M.I.S.—The last meetings of the Mutual Improvement Society have well maintained- the high standard of previous occasions. Mr. W. J. Walford's paper on "Oratory" was able and exhaustive. The papers read1 last Friday were by Miss Cana Davies, Mr. Windsor Davies and Mr. Chas. Soper, and1 dealt respectively with "Haydn" and "Bee- thoven," "The need of an Institute for the- village," and "What should be done for out disabled soldiers after the war?" The dis- cussion that followed was one of considerable,. interest. The Rev. W. Branch presided. At the suggestion of the rev. gentleman a vote- of condolence was passed with the family of the late Mr. W. Howell. SOLDIERS AND SAILORS.—The people of the village have had the pleasure lately off seeing several of the "boys" who have been. away serving their country. One, Stoker Joseph Page, is on a destroyer in the North. Sea. Stoker Page is a native of the district. Ho is a fine specimen of a Jack Tar and is. a credit to his family and to the service which he belongs. Pte. Tough is another- who looked well after close upon a year's sear- vice in France. He is in the A.S.C. A wounded soldier allowed home on leave was- Pte. Harry Powell, son of Mr. Wm. Powell, Penprisk. Pte. Powell had a spell of two months in hospital at Eastbourne. The- latest to come home is Cpl. Sidney Hiscook. son of Mr. and Mrs. Fred Hiscock, Penprisk*. The Corpl. has had a trying experience as aik artilleryman, but looks quite as well as could be expected. Mention must be made of Cadet Jack Phillips, who came home to train. for officershlp. Cadet Phillips is now in training at Dunstable, and at the end of his- course will probably receive a commission in. the Royal Engineers.

TOPL OF WAR V I m

TOPL OF WAR V — I m- AMONG THE GLAMORGAN CONSTABU- LARY. Reference was made at a meeting of the GTamorgan Standing Joint Committee oaa Monday to the members of the County Con- stabulary who had made the great sacrifice in this war. The list included P.C. H .M. Jones (Bridgend), Welsh Guards, and P.C. F. C. Lord (Cowhridge), Grenadier Guards. Among those reported missing were P.C. W. I Jones, Military Medal (Maesteg), Welsh Guards), and P.C. W. H. Loud (Maesteg), Welsh Regiment.

Advertising

Advertise in the "Glamorgan Gazettl. rI you want to sell, buy or exchange; you atnnot do bettor.