Collection Title: Glamorgan Gazette

Provider: The National Library of Wales

Rights: The copyright status or ownership of this resource is unknown.

View full details

First Previous Image 3 of 4 Next Last
Full Screen
17 articles on this page
Advertising

  I    OL (D ce co Yes, I must have a New Costume even if I have to do without everything else. And after all there's no need to be thoughtlessly extravagant. I've never seen smarter or more useful Costumes so in- expensivejy priced- have you ? il Will you, Madame, verify this opinion by a visit to our Costume Salon ? The new Garments are now on view and it is not too much to say that there is a price to suit every purse. The favourite Materials, Tweeds, Suitings, Gab Cloths, Serges, etc., etc., are essentially good wearing Fabrics and your first glance win satisfy you that our new productions possess great distinction of style, however modest the price may be. G Stuchbery  I street., BRIDGEND. [([Îrffitrrnrr.rn i II ¡' i uii -'I. -oq-

Family Notices

BIRTHS, MARRIAGES, Mid DEATHS. — MAKKIAOESL REES—GRIFFITHS.—At St. Athan Parish Church, by License, on the 23rd inst., Lieutenant D. E. Rees, Welch Regiment, second son of Mr. and Mrs. Rees, Gadlys, Llangynwyd, to Hilda Katharine Margaret, only daughter of Mr. and Mrs. David Griffiths, West Hall, St. Athan. 102 DEATHS. DAVID.—April 25th, at Tudor House, Coity, Evan Ward, the only and dearly beloved son. of John and Catherine David. Funeral, Mon- day, 1 o'clock, and reaching Llanharan for in- terment at 2.30. 113 ACKNOWLEDGMENTS. JAMES.—Miss Esther James, of Warwick House, 63 Castle Street, Coity Fields, Bridgend, begs to thank her numerous friends for kind sym- pathy, letters, and floral tributes, in her sad bereavement. 1 108 WILLIAMS.—Mrs. R. Williams and Family, Glas- fryn, Derllwyn Road, Tondu, sincerely thank all kind friends for the heart-felt sympathy extended to them in their sad bereavement.

IINOTES COMMENTS

I NOTES & COMMENTS. Our readers will bear us out when we say we have up to now taken no side, or even expressed an opinion, on the great "drink during the war" controversy. This has been because we saw, or thought we saV, that there was a ten- dency on the part of the "temperance" people to rush matters—to impose restrictions on a country that did not want them, and was not ready for them. We are democrat enough to hold that the people must decide for themselves even in the matter of the drink, curse "though we hold it to be. You can't have it both ways. You can't have the advantages pertaining to a strong, self-restrained, self-governing democ- racy, and at the same time the advantages pecu- liar to an autocracy. You cannot (to come to the point) say that men shall govern themselves, and at the same time force them against their -will to abstain from alcoholic liquors. A Czar of all the Russias, or an Emperor of China could djo it, but you can't do it in England. It was on such reasoning as this that we have so far abstained fronw following our inclination to add our voice to those which have* been clamouring of late for "prohibition during the war." But it seems to us the thing is slowly but surely being taken out of our hands. A « new complexion is being put on things by the inexorable roll of events. It is now, evidently, a question of "Beer or Bread?" or soon will be, and under such circumstance it becomes eyery man's duty to throw his weight, such as it is, in the scale against "beer" and in favour of the staff of life. With every disposition to consider the other side—the point of view of the man who says, "Why should I have to, give up my glass of beer ?"—we think the tie has arrived when the country should tackle the whole question, on the ground of urgent national danger. If it is a question of "Beer or Bread?" then for heaven's sake—for the children's sake, at any rate-let us have bread.

No title

As an example of the expanding possibilities of Porthcawl, Mr. R. E. Jones, at Friday's meeting of the Council, stated that the town x sewers were big enough for a town four times the size.

I LOCAL NEWST

LOCAL NEWS. T MISSION HALL.—Next Sunday, 11, 2.30 and, 6, Pilgrims Sutherland and Mowatt, from Scot- land. 109 Call at H. Woodward & Co.'s, Ltd., The Noted Wholesale and Retail Warehouse, Adare Street and Near Station, for your Tobacco and Fancy Goods. MOO WALLPAPERS.—Secure your Wallpaper BOW at last year's prices. There is no time like the present. Good selection.—D. Thomas, Deoerater, 11 Nolton Street, Bridgend. HERMON C.M.—Annual Preaching Services on Sunday and Monday next. Preachers: Rev. John Roberts, M.A., Cardiff; Rev. James Llewellyja. Psfetor. See Posters. Bridgend Soldier Wounded.—Mrs. K. David, 22 Queen Street, Bridgend, has received news that her son, Pte. E. H. David, was wounded in the attack on Vimy Ridge, and is now in hos- pital in Birmingham. He has been wounded in the left knee. Before enlisting Pte. David was employed at Bridgend by Messrs. J. C. Hitt and Sons as a plumber. Bridgend Canadian at Vimy Ridgg.-Council- lor and Mrs. Harris, Bridgend, have received the welcome news that their son, L.-Cpl. Gran- ,ville Harris, Canadian Expeditionary Force, has come safely through the fighting at Vimy Ridge, which, it will be recalled, was captured by the Canadians. L.-Cpl. Harris received his train- ing at Regina, Canada; landed in England last November (after five years' absence from the old country), ancv was drafted out to France in JI December. Bridgend Cinema.—There is another excellent programme at the Bridgend Cinema next week. Mice and Men," in which Forbes Robertson made such a hit some years ago, should be a great "draw," to say nothing of Charlie Chaplin in his "latest absurdity." For the second part of the week the star-piece is the six- act film, The Combat," adapted from E. J. Montague's book, with beautiful Anita Stewart in the principal r61e. A most enjoyable fea- ture of recent performances at the Bridgend Cinema has been the Paramount Travel films. These are exceptionally good of their kind, and really worth seeing. Bridgend County School.-The annual meet- ing of the Governors was held on Monday afternoon, when there were present: Rev. T. D. Bevan, Messrs. S. H. Stockwood, Michael Davies, George Harris, D. H. Lloyd, and Mrs. Powell, with the headpiaster (Mr. Jno. Rankin) and the acting clerk (Mr. S. T. Daniel).—Mr. Michael Davies had great pleasure in moving the re-election of Mr. S. H. Stockwood as chair- man for the ensuing year.—Mr. D. H. Lloyd seconded, and Rev. T. D. Bevan supported the motion, which was carried unanimously.—Mr.- Stockwood, on taking the chair, expressed the hope that the coming year would prove to be as successful and as prosperous as the last year, in spite of many disadvantageous circum- stances. (Hear, hear.)-On. the motion of Mr. George Harris, Mr. Michael Davies was re- elected vice-chairman.—The House and Finance Committee—consisting of the whole. of the Governqrs-was re-appointed-as also was the existing Games Committee.—Only routine busi- ness was transacted. Bridgend Man Wins Military Medal.-Corpl. F. Luttley Lloyd, Canadian Engineers, son of the late Mr. John Lloyd, chemist, Bridgendj and of Mrs. Lloyd, 69 Cowbridge Road, has*been awarded the Military Medal. Corporal Lloyd and a comrade of the Canadian Engineers volunteered to raid the German trenches, and demolish some fortIfied works. They were tic- companied kby a party of infantry, the demoli- tion work was carried out, and a number of the enemy were killed. The return journey was made under a terrific artillery and machine- gun fire, and it was found that one of the in- fantrymen had been badly wounded, and was lying in the middle of No Man's Land. Corpl. Lloyd and his Engineer comrade again crawled out from their own trenches, through barbed- wire entanglements and a foot of snow, and in turn carried the wounded man on their backs to the British lines. Corpl. Lloyd afterwards carried through the construction of half-a-mile of railway under heavy fire. He is a native of Bridgend, an "old boy" of Bridgend County School, aild was in the offices of the Glamorgan County Surveyor up to a few years ago, when he went to Canada. When he joined the Army after the outbreak of war, he resigned an ap- pointment as divisional engineer for the con- struction of a section of the new Hudson-Bay Railway.

rO NEW RECTOR OF LLANMIHANGEL

-rO- NEW RECTOR OF LLANMIHANGEL. Bridgend Presentation Meeting. On Wednesday night there was a crowded and enthusiastic gathering at the Nolton Institute, Bridgend, to bid farewell to 'Rev. J. Price Davies and Mrs. Davies; and the presentations made, and the manifestations of good-will, afforded abundant proof (if such were needed) of their personal popularity, and of the feeling of affection that goes out towards them, not only on the part of Churchpeople, but from all classes of the community. Rev. J. Price Davies has been eight years curate of the parish of Coity with Nolton, and he is leaving upon his preferment as Rector of Llanmihangel (near Cowbridge), so that the ties that bind Mr. Price Davies (and his not less popular wife) to the parish and people will not entirely be severed.— On Tuesday evening, at Coity, the presentation was made of a splendid case of cutlery. On the following (Wednesday) night it was Nolton'¡: turn, when the rev. gentleman was presented with a wallet of notes, and Mrs. Davies with a silver salver in Royal purple-lined glass-fronted case (supplied by Mr. Edmund M. Needham, wa (?h--V?,r and silver,,mitb, Dun ra,t. Place, Bridgend), and engraved as follows:—" Parish of Coity with Nolton, Bridg- end. Presented, with a wallet of notes, to the Rev. J. P. and Mrs. Davies, by Nolton friends and others, as a token of esteem and good-will, on the occasion of their leaving the parish, where Mr. Davies served diligently and accept- ably for eight years. April, 1917.Rev. T. P. Price (the esteemed Rector) filled the chair with his customary gemality. In opening the pro- ceedings he said there was about them the srr.- gestion of 8ad, which feeling was ntinimiM by the fact that Rev. Price Davies was not going far from the parish in which for eight years he had laboured. Passing on to another note (the note of congratulation), they wished them every happiness in their new home, and warmly congratulated Mr. Price Davies upon the fact that so early in life he had received preferment, and with Mrs. Davies and their little daughter, were going to a spot where the sea was a finer tonic than could be found anywhere within 30 miles of Bridgend. (Hear, hear.) His (the Rectors) gift was a small one (the silver- amounted inkstand on the table before him), and was intended as in some sense the expression of his regard and warmth of feeling. Person- ally, he was full of regret. Ope's colleagues were not always the best. Sometimes they did not play the straight game. During the four years he (the Rector) had been there, -he had always had the most implicit trust and confi- dence in Mr. Price Davies's thorough loyalty, which woul4 always be a pleasant remem- brance to him. He was a big fellow—(laugh- ter)—but he (the Rector) had never been afraid of him physically, which, however, was not the reason why he had never had a cross word with him. Honestly, he never had, and, honestly, it was not because he was afraid. (Laughter.) In conclusion, he said it would be difficult to get anyone to fill his place. He expressed the greatest gratification that he had received pre- ferment, and in their behalf tendered to Mr. Price Davies, and to Mrs. Davies, the best of good wishes for-their happiness in the future.— Mr. W. Rees (hon. secretary) explained the circumstances under which the presentation had been promoted, and spoke also of the will- ing and very generous response.—The Ven. Archdeacon Edmondes, in presenting Mrs. Price Davies with the silver salver, said it was the earnest desire of everyone that life in the new home might be happy and successful. For Mr. Price Davies, the Archdeacon went on to say, he had. a sincere affection and regard. It was his nature to like everybody else, and a disposi- tion of that kind was most helpful and most hopeful. They looked forward with confidence to his getting on in a most friendly and happy spirit with those he would ferve in God's name in the future. He then shook hands heartily with Mrs. Price Davies; and wished the couple every happiness and God's blessing.—Mrs. Price (wife of the Rector), in a few well-chosen and happy sentences, then presented Mr. Price Davies with the wallet of notes to,the.value of £ 53 5s.—Mr. W. Rees (hon. secretary), in a warm tribute to Mr. Price Davies, said he had always found h,ita pleasant and practical: one who performed, as well as promised-a very re- liable man. He took not merely a casual or a curious interest, but a deep and very real in- terest, in other people's affairs. (Hear, hear.) It was a pleasure to talk to a man who was never absent-minded. (Hear, hear.) The social side of hie character was very highly de- veloped; and now more than ever, they wanted men of that type and temperament-men who could touch the hearts and minds of the people. Concluding, he referred to the rev. gentleman's catholicitv, nd said that in his outlook there was nothing that was narrow or circumscribed. (Hear, 4ear.)-Rev. J. Price Dav.es received an ovation. Evidently deeply touched, he said be was sure they could realise his feelings. His wife and himself, he assured them, felt very grateful indeed for their great kindness in pre- senting them with these magnificent gifts. He hoped the salver would bring good news many a time. He would be glad to receive visits from any of the friends in the quiet and peaceful abode at Llammihangel, and would always be .happy to entertain them. The Rector's silver- mounted inkstand would be a reminder to him to attend to hie correspondence far better than in the past. (A laugh.) He had been amongst them for eight years, and he could assure them they had been very happy and pleasant years. His wife and kimself looked back at the time they had spent in Bridgend with great joy and pleasure. He said with all sincerity that in the parish there were excellent workers, who at once loyally responded to every appeal. His one prayer was that the dark cloud of war would soon roll away, and that peace would be restored once again; and of them he asked this— that they would pray God to help him in his new sphere to be able to say, by word and deed, that He has "set the feet of us all in a large room." Again he thanked them from his heart for their very great kindness, and fully endors- ing the Rector's observations, added that the re- lationship between them had always been of the best and most cordial -character. (Hear, heal.) —Upon the motion of Mr. W. M. Richards, the usual votes of thanks were accorded and ack- nowledged.—The proceedings closed with the singing of the National Anthem.

I WEftBlftG AT ST ATHANI

WEftBlftG AT ST. ATHAN. I Rees—Griffiths. I At. St. Athan Church on Monday, in the pre- sence of a large congregation, the wedding took place of Lieut. D. E. Rees, Welsh Regiment, son of Mr. and Mrs. Evan Rees, of Gadlys, Llangynwyd, and Miss Hilda Griffiths, only daughter of Mr. and 'Mrs. David Griffiths, of West Hall, St. Athan. The ceremony was per- formed by the Rev. M. H. vJones, M.A., Vicar of Llangynwyd ,assisted by the Rev. G. M. Jen- kins, Rector of St. Athan. The bride, who was given away by her brother, Mr. David W. Griffiths, was charmingly attired in a gown of pink silk ,hemmed with silver and trimmed with silver filet lace, and wore a necklet and pendant of pearls and aquamarines, the gift of the bridegroom. SJhe carried a magnificent shower bouquet, which was afterwards nt to Maesteg Hospital. The bridesmaid was Miss Amelia GrikifAs, daughter of Mr. James Griffiths, of Penylan, Pencoed, and cousin of the bride. She,was prettily dressed in cream crepe de chine, with large picture hat, and wore a brooch, the gift of the bridegroom. She car- ried a basket of white carnations and heather, tipd with the national colours. The bridegroom was supported by a brother officer., The village of St. Athan was en fete for the occasion, where the bride is held in affectionate esteem. A re- cption was afterwards held at West Hall, at which the immediate relatives of the bride and bridegroom Jwere present. Several telgrams of congratulation were received, amongst them one from the; C.O. and officers of the 2/3 Mons., to which Regiment Lieut. Rees is now attached. The honeymoon is being spent in London.—It will be recalled that details of Lieut. Rees's career have previously been published in our columns. The gallant officer is one of the younger,school of regular officers, having passed through Sandhurst. He has neverthleas seen much active service in the present war. He has been twice wounded, and has been mentioned in dispatches for gallant and distinguished conduct Oil tue fit-lid.

No title

Accident.—William Millford, son of Mr. W. Millford, of Manest Farm, Bridgend, met with an accident while cycling on Thursday last week, and*fractured his leg.

I BRIDGEND URBAN DISTRICT COUNCIL

I BRIDGEND URBAN DISTRICT COUNCIL. I Rate of 2/4 in the An ordinary meeting of Bridgend Urban Dis- trict Council was held on Tuesday night, when there were present: Mr. J. G. Jenkins (chair- man),, Messrs. Ed. Preece, junr., J. T. Hitt, George Harris, W. Jones, Henry Abbott, with the clerk (Mr. J. T. Howell), the deputy clerk (Mr. Ivor M. Howell), and the Surveyor (Mr. W. Bevan). Member Congratulated.-The Chairman ex- pressed pleasure at seeing Mr. Edward Preece again in attendance, restored to a large measure ot health, and he was sure they all hoped he would be able to attend regularly in future. (Hear, hear.)—Mr. Preece. in reply, expressed thanks to all his colleagues, but said he feared he would not be able to fulfil their expectations. lie had thought of vacating the seat he had so long occupied, but he had a certain liking for the duties he had for 17 or 18 years discharged to the best of his ability, and those duties he was not wishful to give up without an effort. He felt it hardly fair to his constituents, or to the members, that his health would not permit of his regular attendance in the winter. In the summer months he felt very much better, and he would attend the meetings as often as he w-as able.—The Chairman: We know you will do the best you can.—Mr. Preece: Thank you.. The New Rate.—The Chairman (Mr. J. G. Jenkins), in recommending a rate of 2/4 in the £ for the coming half-year, said their indebted- ness was X28,460, and their part of the debt on the Penybont Main Sewerage Board tll,44G4, making a. total indebtedness of £ 39,924. The first of the Council's loans would mature in March, 1921, and- the Penybont Main Sewerage I lOitJl in 1929, so that they would have to wait some years for any relief from the burden of debt. The balance against them at the end of the half-year was £ 400 17s., making a total ex- penditure for the half-year of X3,720 3s. 7d. The estimated receipts for the half-year amounted to .£11'9 10s., so that the amount for which they had to levy the rate was £ 3,540. A 2/4 rate would produce X3,640, leaving about .£100 in hand for the end of the half-year. The adverse balance was caused by. the low rate of last half-year, the increased cost of materials, and the advance in the salaries of officials and the wages of workmen; the extra Fire Brigade expenditure, the appointment of a health visi- tor, and the?abnormal increase in the Isolation Hospital contribution, which meant -a rate of lid. in the X. The rate proposed would repre- sent an increase of 7d, in the £ but as a set-off the overseers had decided to reduce the poor rate by 2d. in the £ In tn-e course of his re- marks, the Chairman complimented the Sur- veyor (Mr. William Bevan) on the effi- j cient way in which he had prepared the estimate; and in conclusion, he for- ally moved a rate of 2/4 in the —Mr. Henry Abbott protested against the increased rate, especially at a time when they were urged by Government Departments to economise. If they had kept within the estimate, they would not have had a deficit.-M,r. Preece considered that a 2/4 rate was not excessive, and if they could keep it at that he did not think the ratepayers would have any reason to complain. (Hear, hear.) They'had complaints about the amount of the poor rate, and it was the poor rate that had crippled them.—Mr. J. T. Hitt, dissenting from a remark made by Mr. Abbott, pointed out that if anyone was to blame it was the Council, and not the officials.-Finally, the recommenda- tion was adopted. f Works Committee.-The plan of proposed ad- ditions for Messrs. Sheppard and Sons, Ltd., was presented, and recommended to be passed. —The Committee recommended that Messrs. J. G. Jenkins, J. T. Hitt, W. Jones, and the Sur- veyor act as censors of films, V directed by the circular of Glamorgan County Council on Mar. 20th, 1917.—Mr. W. Jones: I should like Mr. Preece to be on that committee. (Laughter.)— Mr. Preece: I don't know anything about it.- The report was adopted, on the motion of Mr. Geo. Harris, who submitted it to the meeting. Infectious Cases.—Mr. William Bevan (sur- veyor) reported that there had been two cases of infectious disease notified during the last month-one a case of enteric fever, a girl aged 10, isolated at home, and a case of pulmopary tuberculosis, a woman 60 years of age, removed to hospital. The dwelling-houses had been dis- infected, and every precaution taken. Diseased Meat.—The intestines of one beast slaughtered at the public slaughter-house were found infected with- tuberculosis.—The Surveyor reported that he had all the diseased portions removed, and destroyed in the boiler furnace at the electric works. Allotments.-During the* month (the Sur- veyor reported) two acres of land at Cemetery Road, 2 acres at Cefn Glas Road, and 2-1 acres' at Cowbridge Road had been laid out for allot- ment gardens, thp greater portion of which is already in course of cultivation. The Sur- veyor further reported that he had laid out for I allotment gardens, 3,241 perches (378- plots), whilst 410 perches (49 plots) had been laid out by private enterprise, which worked out at half a perch r head for every man, woman, and child in the town, according to the estimated population.—Mr. Henry Abbott said they had nearly 400 allotment holders, which was very satisfactory, and taking the population, it ap- S eared to him the Council was very closely in the running for a record. (Hear, hear.) Seed Potatoes.—Mr. Bevan, reporting upon the disappointment re seed potatoes, said the 6 tons 4 cwt. dispatched from Scotland on April 4th arrived in Bridgend on the 7th inst., and he found the greater portion of them "frosted." He refused acceptance, and notified the Board of Agriculture and Glamorgan County douhcil. In the course of a few days representatives from both the County Council and the Board of Ag- riculture inspected the consignment, and agreed that the seed was "frosted" before loaded into the railway truck. They advised him (the sur- veyor) to discharge the potatoes at once, and to distribute all that were good and not "frosted" amongst those that had ordered, in accordance with the quantity sold, together with a de- tailed account of all expenses incurred in the sorting and loss of frozen seed. The amount of seed found good (1 ton 14 cwt.) had been distri- buted in i cwt. lots to the several small- holders. The remainder of the orders will be made up immediately on the arrival of a fresh supply, which fehe Council (County) Agricul- tural Committee is now procuring with all speed.—Mr. J. T. Hitt said people should know that if they returned unfit potatoes to the sur- veyor, it would be credited to their account. To Lie on the Table.-A letter was read from the Free Church Council appealing for support to the resolution for the prohibition of the manufacture and sale of intoxicating liquor during the wjir and six months afterwards.—Mr. W. Jones moved that the communication lie on the table.—Mr. George Harris I move that we comply with the request.—Mr. J. T. Hitt: And I second Mr. Jones. This is a matter which I think we may safely leave in the hands of the Government.—Mr. Harris: A large amount of grain is used in the distilling and brewing xof beer, which might be employed in food stuffs for the people.—The Chairman dissented from the six months embargo, and failed to see why, if a man who had fought in the trenches pre- ferred a glass of beer six months after the war any should say him nay. (Hear, hear.) The men mostly concerned had ho voice and no vote in. the matter.—Mr. W. Jones: Quite right!— Mr. Preece: Is it worth while to pass a pious resolution? The Prime Minister has said we shall not have prohibition unless there is an ex- pression of opinion from the people in favour of prohibition.—The Chairman considered that barley should be conserved.—Mr. Preeoe: There is no more barley to be malted.—After further discussion, Mr. Jones' resolution was adopted. Horses' .Rations.—Mr. Preece raised the ques- tion of the dietary of the Council's horses, which he thought might very well be reduced. Their horses worked steadily, and in his opinion were too fat.—Mr. Jones: I quite agree.—Mr. Hitt begged to differ, and thought the matter should be left to the surveyor.—Mr. Preece It rests with us.—It wars agreed that the question be relegated to the next meeting of the Works Committee, and that the Surveyor make en- quiries into it..

No title

News Wanted.-Sergt. F. Gibbs, 016956. 123rd Co. A.S.C., 28th Divisional Train, Salonica Forces, has not'been heard of since the begin- ning of the year. Any information as to his whereabouts will be welcomed by his mother, Mrs. S. Gibbs) 28 Quarella Road, Bridgend.

Advertising

u- WASTE PAPER. SCHEME FOR "GAZETTE" READ-ERB. Help the Country, and Make Money at the Same Time. IN view of the grave shortage of paper in the country, the "Glamorgan Gazette" has arranged with the Ely Paper Works for the purchase, and re-pulping, of all waste paper sent in from the district. Readers are, therefore, invited to send old books, newspapers, magazines, wrapping paper, cardboard boxes, and odds and ends of paper of all description and in any con- dition. The following conditions should be noted <1) Parcels must not be tess than 561bs. in weight, and must be firmly packed and tied with strong cord. (2) Parcels must bear a plain label show- ing sender's name and address. (3) The price paid for waste paper of any description will be 3/6 per cwt. (4) Parcels must be carriage paid, and directed to "THOMAS OWEN and CO., ELY PAPER WORKS, CARDIFF." Earlier in the war the Boy Scouts collected an immense quantity of old newspapers, and the proceeds went in aid of war charities. Here is another opportunity for this and other energetic organisations. It is also an opportunity to help finan- cially such organisations as the local Soldiers' Funds, the Red Cross Society, Dr. Barnardo's Homes, the Waifs' and Strays' Society, and such-like deserving institutions:

4IBOARD OF GUARDIANS ANNUAL IMEETING

,4- BOARD OF GUARDIANS ANNUAL MEETING. Col. J. 1. D. Xicholl was re-elected chairman for the ensuing year, and Messrs. T. J. Job and D. H. Price "vice" and "second vice" respec- tively.—Col. N icholl, in acknowledging his re- election, said he hoped the Guardians would set their, faces resolutely against men invalided out of the Army being brought before that Board. Such mqn had given their all for the country, and they should not be allowed to come any- where near the Board. (Applause.)

IPENYBONT RURAL DISTRICT COUNCIL

PENYBONT RURAL DISTRICT COUNCIL. Annual Meeting. The only business transacted by the Penybont Rural District Council at their annual meeting on Saturday was the election of chairman, com- mittees, etc. Mr. Rees John (Laleston) was unanimously elected chairman, and .Mr. W. A. Howell as vice-chairman. In "humbly and earnestly" acknowledging the honour conferred on him, Mr. Rees John said he felt still more I its Tesponsibilities. When he examined him- self, he could not but feel how unworthy of the post he was, and how unfitted to preside over the deliberations of "such a jolly body of amicable gentlemen." (Laughter and ap- plause-.) But he felt sure they would always ex- tend their support to the chair, irrespective of the merits of its occupant. (Hear, hear.)—Mr. W. A. Howell said he was in the happy posi- tion of having an office, but no responsibility. The chief advantage of that office was, that in the winter time he would have the right to sit near the fire. (Laughter.)

MINIATURE RIFLE SHOOTING NOTES

MINIATURE RIFLE SHOOTING NOTES. -I (By Sharp-Shooter.) Queen Alexandra's Cup.—The shooting by local teams for this annual competition began last Wednesday, when the Tondu Club shot their first round, under the supervision of two members of the Porthcawl Club. There are four rounds in the competition, each consisting of 10 shots deliberate and 10 shots rapid (in 90 seconds). Tondu's scores were: A. Saunders, 95 deliberate and 95 rapid; total, 190. A. Cloke, 95 and 91; total, 186. J. Power, 92 and 92; total, 184. S. Mead, 89 and 90; total, 179. J. T. Hopkins, 91 and 87; total, 178. J. Moles, 92 and 89; total, 181. J. Tapp, senr., 94.and 88; total, 182.—Mr. J. P. Leat, the skipper of the defunct Porthcawl Club, having previously en- tered a team for the Queen's Cup, decided to complete the competition. Club having been evicted from their range by the local V.T.C., had to shoot their round "somewhere" in Porthcawl, which was done last Saturday, under the supervision of Mr. J. H. Tapp, of .Bridgend, secretary of the Glamorgan County Association, with the following result:—J. P. Leat, deliberate, 97; rapid, 97; total, 194. Hy. C. Riley, 99 and 93; total, 192. A. W. Thorne, 95 and 95; total, 190; D. Stoot, 94 and 90; total, 184. J. F. Bedford, 95 and 78; total, 173.—The second round will be shot in May, when the top six in Glamorgan will be selected to shoot for their county. Hard Lines.—I hear, with some surprise, that Mr. G. Stradling, of the Mitre Inn, Bridgend, and a vice-president of the Glamorgan County Association, has been "called up," and is now in training with the R.A.M.C. at Blackpool. It seems hard lines that a married man with three children, and past the age of 41, should have to join the colours, while there are younger and single men about. Concert at Porthcawl Rest.-I note, by the way, that Mr. J. H. Tapp was one of the mem- bers of the "Bridgend Uniques" who enter- 'I tained the wounded soldiers at "The Rest" last Wednesday with a sparkling programme of classical andhuniorous music, which was highly appreciated by our wounded heroes. The item which was most popular was the musical sketch, "Popton Parish Council," the humorous part of which waS well rendered by Mr. Tapp. The items went well under the excellent accompani- ment of Mr. W. Leyshon and Miss Morgan. I understand that the popular "Uniques" will shortly, give a concert in aid of that deserving institution, the Y.M.C.A. Hut at. Bridgend.

CORRESPONDENCE I

CORRESPONDENCE. DISCRIMINATION IN "CALLING UP." To THE EDITOR. Sir,—Is not the time ripe for some sort of organised protest against t t, unfair discrimin- ation made in calling men to the colours? Where the fault lies I do not know, but every- one knows that men are being, passed over who ought to go, and others taken who never ought to be called up till every available man has gone. I do not like* to call this favouritism, or to sug- gest the "unseen hand," but what are we to think when we see married men of compara- tively mature years called to the colours, some- times from businesses that can ill spare them, to say the least, while hale, fit young men well within the Military age are seen everywhere walking about the streets? I hope others of your readers will add their protest to mine, so that this condition of things may be put a stop to.—Yours, etc.. PATERFAMILIAS.

BLAENGARW AFFILIATION CASEI

BLAENGARW AFFILIATION CASE. Pastor's Protest. I Hard swearing was the predominant feature in an affiliation case that came before the Bridgend Magistrates on Saturday, in which the com- plainant was only 17 last December. She was Annie E. Roberts (Blaengarw), and she sum- moned John Williams, collier, of the same place. to show cause, etc. Mr. Harold Lloyd (Cardiff) was for complainant; Mr. David Llewellyn, Bridgend, defended.—At the outset the crowd of witnesses in attendance was or- dered out of Court. The female child, which was the subject of the proceedings, wts born on February 6th. Defendant for two years lodged with the parents of the girl what time she was in service at Blaengarw. 'The paternity was strenuously denied. Among the witnesses was the Rev. Moses Evans, Calvinstic Methodist minister, called for complainant, who said that in his capacity as pastor he spoke to the defend- ant about the rumour that he was the father of complainant's child, and asked him whether it was true. Defendant denied emphatically that he was the father of the child, but admitted that he had acted improperly with-complainant. Witness then told defendant that as he was a member of the churcji he must report that to the deacons. Mr. Evans added, in cross-exam- ination, that he thought it was unfair that he should have been called upon to give evidence in the case.—Defendant denied having made any I admision.In a searching cross-examination by Mr. Harold Lloyd, he said he had never kissed the girl, or put his arms round her.—Finally, the Bench made an order for 5s. a week, with I costs' £ 3 19s.

SMALL TALK 0

SMALL TALK. -0 Writing home to thank the good people of Kenfig Hill for their weekly gilt of cigarettes, Cpl. George Stevens observed that "a smoke of the old Blighty Woodbines goes down grand, as we can't buy anything at all here." < It would seem as though the "valley" mem- bers of the Board of Guardians take consider- ably more interest in their work than do their colleagues from the Vale. < The Guardians at their annual meeting on Saturday, having decided, in regard to certain committees, to re-elect en bloc only those mem- bers who had put in a certain number of atten- dance.s: it was found in one case that no fewer than five of the six Cowbridge members were thereby unseated, whereas only one member, each from the Ogmore and Maesteg districts were afiected. This was an extreme instance, but by no means an isolated one. In another case, the veteran Alderman John was the only Cowbridge member who had put in the stipulated number of attendances. < The new chairman of Porthcawl Council, Mr. R. E. Jones, is, of course, the founder and man- aging director of the big firm of caterers of that name. A native of Liverpôol, Mr. Jones is 64, and has had a varied career, including a period of work ia Canada. At Saturday's annual meeting of tàe Peny- bont Council, Rev. T. D. Bevan (\ icar of Ewenny) roused great enthusiasm among the members by referring to it as "thie worthy and august body." It must be rather nice to hear oneself called "worthy and august." At the same time we seem to remember some (no doubt btupid) old saying about self-praise being no recommendation. • • Porthcawl is suffering from a plethora of prospective Flag Days. They have already on hand. a Russian, an Armenian, a Mercantile Marine, a John Cornwell, V.C., a French, and a Belgian Flag Day, and goodue-A knows how many more. < < Wherever Bridgend people go, there, it seems, goes the "Gazette." From a letter we printed in our last week's issue, from an Italian sol- dier, who was formerly a resident of Ogmore Vale, it will be seen that we have even pene- trated into the wilds of the Trentino. If only papet could talk, and we could collect our old copies, what stories we should hear of "moving accidents by flood and field" in France, in Gallipoli, Mesopotamia, Salonika, Egypt, and now it seems on the Italian front! < < The Porthcawl Allotments AjEisoc-iation now numbers nearly 200 members. < Mr. W. Williams, Blaenogwr (agricultural re- presentative)—from some remarks he made at the Ogmore and Garw Military Tribunal, is not much enamoured ef the scheme of Kubstitutiou. < < The Tribunal just mentioned resolved to make a representation—and a remonstrance—to Colonel Nicholl, in the case of a "C3" man whom the Tribunal had exempted, but whose certificate the Colonel was said to have can- celled. The man stated that be produced the certificate to Colonel Nicholl, who said, "We want you my man." The Tribunal now told him he should not have been put to the neces- sity of 'again appearing before them, and that his exemption holds good. Woman with) a will! She often assists the gentleman, presumably her husband, in the dig- ging and general cultivation of hie allotment, near Style's brewery. Dripping bridce again Some months back, Mr. W. Bevan (surveyor to Bridgend District Council) reported that the Great Western Rail- way Company had promised as scon as possible to stop the water dripping on to the roadway from Coity Road Railway Bridge. Nothing has yet been done. Consequently, Br. Bevan again bestirred himself, and on Tuesday re- ported to the Council that "the work is to be done immediately." If so, well and good.. But if it i& to be another case of "wait ana see"—the question arises "For how longr" • The longer we live; and the more we learn, the more we are impressed by the wisdom of the ancients, and the restrictions and regula- tions they imposed. By stern necessity, we have meatless days, and are even counselled to eat less bread. The habit of fasting, which in spite of its dietetic value, was derided and jeered at. is row peremp- torily imposed, and with as g" a grace as we may we all have to make a virtue of necessity. • Take again the Mosaic Dispensation, with its sanitary laws and its incomparable rules safe- guarding cleanliness and health. It was not pleasant to read in the surveyor's report to Bridgend District- Council, that "the intes- tines of one beast slaughtered at the public slaughter-house were found infected with tuber- culosis. "I," Mr. Bevan wrote, "had all the diseased portions removed, and destroyed in the boiler furnace at the Electric Works." • • The portions not diseased presumably were used as human food. Not being affected they were, perhaps rightly, not regarded as unfit. That is not the Jewish view even unto this day. The skilled Hebrew butcher uses his stetho- scope, and keeps on using it, so that whatever meat other people may be prepared to eat, ineat with the least taint of tuberculosis never finds a place upon his table, nor upon the tables of his co-religionists. Both the Bridgend District Council and the Allotments Association are to be congratulated upon the public spirit they have put into the allotments movement, and the community upon the enthusiasm with which they have re- sponded. < The decision of the Council to co-opt Mr. W. M. Powell (the versatile chairman of the Allot- ments Association), Mr. Frank Hodges (mjiierb: agent), and Inspector Penny (G-W.R.), is likely to be conducive to the best results, linking up the people with the representative body, pro- moting their common interests, and fostering amicable feeling and friendly relationship. • • • On Monday last two of the co-opted members (Mr." W; M. Powell and Inspector Penny) were in consultation with some members of the Dis trict Council. • • • Mr. J. G. Jenkins (the jQewly-elected chairman of the Council) was in attendance, and said his primary object was to welcome the co-opted members. < The Allotments Association was luckier than the Council in the matter of its seed potatoes, and it behoves allotment holders to "join up" if any are still unattached. < Mr. W. E. Hill (the energetic secretary of the Allotments Association), -cn Wednesday re- ceived the intimation that a further 4 tons of seed potatoes had been deposited in Bridgend from the North of Ireland, and very promptly the chairman (Mr. W. M. Powell) and his col- leagues made arrangements for their distribu- tion to the associated member- <* A further 4 tons is anticipated from Lincoln- shire, and in addition, Mr. Powell is expecting from West Wales two to four tons, which hf will place at the disposal of his follow mem bers. < < Through the kindness of a i pf,c d colliery proprietor, arrangements have been made for a full supply of pea and bean sticks for the members (lucky members) of the Allot- ments Association. Formed twelve months ago for the immediate purpose of competing in the annual Eisteddfod at Tabor Chapel (in which, by the- way, they managed to come second out of ten choirs in an open mixed contest), the Gwynti Ladies' Choir, Abergwynfi,-has during that period been instru- mental in raising no lees than RI74) fcr war charities.