Collection Title: Llais Llafur

Provider: The National Library of Wales

Rights: The copyright status or ownership of this resource is unknown.

View full details

Image 1 of 8 Next Last
Full Screen
15 articles on this page
Advertising

SPRING «^HOVl/. ♦ G. C. DEAN, i ♦ The T?amor, J is prepared to pay return ? ? fare within 20 mlls of ? Swansea to any customer ▼ ? placing an order for a Suit + or Overcoat upon produc- + tion of Railway Ticket. Z Ticket can be produced + after the. order is given.. Please Note the Address ")2, Castle St., Swansea. .+..+.++.4

Advertising

The Prosperous } Up-to-date Tradesman i Advertises.. ♦ ♦ Do You Advertise ? { If not, become pros- perous. t X Enquire for Rates.

MINERS AGREEMENTS I

MINERS' AGREEMENTS Prophecy of Industrial Upheaval. MR HARTSHORN AND NEXT YEAR'S CRISIS. —— Mr Vernon Hartshorn, addressing a meeting of miners at Pontycymmer on Friday night, said one of the tasks the working-class movement was setting itself to acoraplish was to force Parliament to adopt as its programme those measures of reform upon which the industrial masses had already set their hearts. He thought that next year would see the biggest in- dustrial upheaval or a bigger industrial upheaval that this county had ever wit- nessed. He wanted to say what he had never said before, but which he thought would be realised to the hilt. They ha,d made, he believed, the last agreement that would ever be made with the coaJowners in South Wales, except under pressure. He did not think there would ever be another agreement entered into in that coal- field, and he questioned whether there would be one in Great Britain as the result of mere negotiation between the miners' .representatives and the coal- owners. That was true not only in reference to mining as it related to every other industry as well. This year's business for the workers was to complete their organisations. Next year, for the first time in the history of mining, all the agreements through- out Great Britain terminated simultane- ously. In the past, when they hud had to make an agreement in Wales, and had gone to the Miners' Federation of Great Britain to ask them to join with them in making their demands successful, they had always been met with this position. The English representatives had said :— "We cannot take part in this movement with you because we have an agreement which does not termina,te for another two years." When England had been making ( arrangements they had been met witn ex- actly the same difficulty the Welsb; and Scotch agreements had overlapped. The position now was that they had all the agreements in the mining industry termin- ating in 1915. There was also the Mini- mum Wage Act to take into account. That measure was passed in 1912 for two years, and therefore, came to an end next year. The railwavmen's Concilia- tion Board agreement also terminated in 1915, and, fortunately, he thought, the lifetime of the present Parliament came to an end also. (Laughter and applause), "IN FOR STIRRING TIMES." ) So that they were in for stirring times. The Miners' Federation of Great Britain had expressed in resolutions at its annual conference its determination to have a higher wage agreement after this year than they had ever had in the past. They were prepared to proceed in two ways. They were willing to draft a Bill em- bodying their own proposals as to wages and hand that Bill to the Lab- our party to introduce into the House of Commons. If Parliament was pre- pared to give them their terms by legislative enactment well and good, but concurrently they would draft a aeparate list of proposals to submit (to the ooftlswners. If neither would agree, then they would bring their big battal- ion to bear on the situation, and pres- sure that would be obsoJutely ir- resistible. In 1912 they made mistakes, but they learned wisdom through mistakes. They had learnt that even a national strike of minors was a sectional strike, and the railwayman and seamen had been taught the same lesson. Now the three execu- tives were negotiating with a view to recing on common action in 1915. (Ap- p lause). No Government—Liberal or FL.z Dr resist the demands of united workers. LESSON OF 1912. I What did the miners by themselves do I the last time? A couple of weeks before they came out on strike the Labour party submitted a resolution to Parliament making the Government to introduce a Minimum age Bill, and the Liberal party did tnot even treat the matter i -seriou,sly. They only put up an under- ) secretary to reply, and dismissed the case from the House altogether. But when the strike took place the whole nation realised that the miners had raised a I question which must be dealt with to the exclusion. of everything elste. If the ), miners could d8 that of their own bat, surely, when the industrial workers united all their fofces, they could make I things hum. If the member for Mid- Glamorgan could get Mr Asquith to con- cede without a strike the demands they would be making, he, for one, would do I .all he could to get the miners) to Support I Mr Hugh Edwards, but h? knew perfectly well that a shipload of such membr81 could not bring presurb to bear on the ¡ Government unless there was an indus- trial upheaval behind it. (Cheers). NOTICES IN NON-UNIONIST I QUESTION. I Mr Frank Hodges, mwiors agent ior the Garw District, said ttie t called in particular in respect of the n Unionist question. They were not going j to talk to the non-U nionists as much as ¡ they had done in the past. One or two bludgeon methods had been iidopted, but the non-Unionists somehow or other jeeemed to have recovered from the bump. On this ocasion they hoped to Rive them a knock-eut blow from which they would never recorder. Notice forrm would' be given out on Mondy, and on Tueday h9 '-d the men would show a solid  by handing their notioœ in. Mr aodges ?ded that they were g<)in to 1^ hlh jinks in the Garw if Mr Hugh Edwards, took up Mr Hartshorn's challenge to de- bate whether the Liberal Government was directly responsible for the pass n^ of the Minimum Wage Act. Mr W. W. Craik, sub-warden of tile Central Labour College., addressed the meeting nt the educational side of the Labour movement.

I MINIMUM WAGE ACT AND THE I BANKSMENS CASE I II

MINIMUM WAGE ACT AND THE BANKSMEN'S CASE. I I Federation's Decisions. Some rather important matters of general application were under considera- tion at a meeting of the executive council of the South Wales. Miners' Federation held at Cardiff on Monday. These questions had r,fereiic, (1) To the conditions of employment, and more particularly tho wages of banksmen. (2) The question of the averaging of tha rates of wages of piece-workers for the purposes of the Minimum Wage Act. (3) The general adoption of the cus- tom of the payment of six turns for five actually worked by men engaged on afternoon and night shifts. In regard to all these questions there was a. failure to come to an agreement at the last meeting of the Conciliation Board f?r the Welsh coal trade. In v iew, therefore, of this deadlock, and the dis- tinctive lead given by the South Wales miners' conference a few weeks ago that these matters should be disposed of, the council were confronted with the issue as to what action may now be taken. This led to a lengthy discussion, and the whole day was occupied by the coun- cil in their dclibNations. Tho re was a full attendance of the council, over which Mr W. Brace, M.P., presided, there also being present Mr J. Winsto-ne (vice-chairman), Mr A. Onions (gener: treasurer), and Mr T. Richards, M.P. (general secretary). It w.as finally decided to ask for a further meeting of the Ccncil:ation Board in order that another attempt might be made to arrive at a settlement prior to seeking the feeling of the whole of the workmen in the coalfield upon the matter. POWELL'S TILLERY GRIEVANCE. I A deputation of workmen employed at Powell's Tillery Collieries at.tendd be- fore the council with the request that the men be allowed to tender notices to ter- minate their contracts in order to resist the action of the management in the un- necessary dismissals of a large number of workmen. It was decided that' an interview be sought with the management, to investi- gate the matters. and Messrs. J. Mann- ing, Vernon Harts-horn, and G. Barker (agent) were appointed to represent the council for this purpose. GLENGARW MINERS AND SAFETY I LAMPS. A report was ■pooeivitd from the Cllen- garw Lodge stating th^t the owners of the local colliery were substituting safety lamps for naked lights in a. seam at the colliery, and refused to pay the increase in pc)rcc-iii-,i,ges demanded by the men in consequence of this change. It was re- sol ved that the workmen be financially supported in resisting this alleged en- croachment of their rights and of the general custom in the Welsh coalfield. WEST MONMOUTH VACANCY. n I A deputation from the West Monmouth- shire Labour Party attended and ex- plained that there were four candidatee nominated for the seat which will he vacated by Mr T. Richards, M.P., at the next general election. Inasmuch as the four gentlemen concerned were mirvcrs' re- presentatives, the deputation decided that workmen of all grades employed within that Parliamentary division should be allowed to take part in a ballot for the selection of a candidate. It was resolved that this request be accedffi to, and that the ballot be taken of all workmen en- gaged in he various industries in the di- vision. Mr W. P. Nicholas reported upon the tiTust de>:>d to govern the Senghenydd Re- lief Fund, and the council agreed to ac- cept the trust deed in its preeent form. NEAtrH MINERS AND PROPOSED I NEW DISTRICT. The monthly meeting of the Neath Dis- trict of Miners was held at the Waverley Restaurant on Monday, Mr John Jones, Resolven, presiding. Delegates repre- sent i ng 3,1 & ree, d i n g. Delegat?es re p re- senting 3,130 collieries were present. It was announced that arrangements were being made to receive a deputation from the central executive of the South Wales Miners' Federation in connection with the establishment of the new Neath district. f Full emaid-eration was given to the details in connection with the constitu- tion of the district, which was adopted wilia little aimendment. ♦♦♦«■■»

I NEW VALLEY RAILWAYI i I

NEW VALLEY RAILWAY. I —— —— I EXPENDITURE OF £ 25,560. I' The annual report of the Great Wes- tern Railway Company states that I £ 33,000 will be.laid out at Swansea Hamp Yard, besides which there is work to be carried out on new lines I at Clvdach, Pontardawe, and Cwm- gorse,. Neath Loop, and Newport and Severn Tunnel Junction, the cost of which is included with that to be spent in various other parts of the country. The following are' some of the items of capital expenditure during the past year:—Additional accommodation at Newport and Cardiff, £ 21,506; addi- tional loop lines and refuge sidings in South Wales, £ 21,383; additional ac- commodation Swansea and district, £ 54,640; Western Valleys improve- ments, £ 60,505; new line Clydach, Pontardawe and Cwmgorse, £ 25,560; Neath Loop, £ 28,189 widenings of and additions to existing lines Newport and Severn Tunnel Junction, £ 15,022; Pen- nar Branch, £ 20,989.

REV HUGH EDWARDS MP BACKS OUT

REV. HUGH EDWARDS, M.P., BACKS OUT. EVADES MR HARTSHORN'S CHAL- LENGE DISAPPOINTMENT AMONG MID-GLA- MORGAN LIBERALS Rev. J. Hugh Edwards, M.P., after accepting Mr. Vernon Hartshorn's challenge to debate with him on the attitude of Liberals towards the Miners' Minimum Wage Act, lias now turned tail and fled. He refuses to meet Mr. Hartshorn, and declares that "it is useless dis- cussing matters further." The challenge had aroused great in- terest. and Labour men and Liberals in Mid-Glamorgan and elsewhere were looking forward to the debate with keen and eager expectancy. The rev. gentleman's ignominious withdrawal has caused intense disappointment to manv of his Liberal friends and sup- porters in the division, who were re- lying on him to vindicate the action of the Government. Labour men, while no less disappointed at being baulked of what they confidently expected would be an exposure of Liberalism, are "laughing in their sleeves" at the sorry picture of a Liberal M.P. who is never hesitant to attack Labour at Liberal meetings, but runs to coyer when there is a prospect of thrashing out differences before a mass meeting of miners, with an impartial chairman. Replying to the last letter of Mr. Hartshorn in which the miners' leader points out that the Rev. Hugh Ed- wards, M.P., did not vote on the third reading of the Minimum Wage Act, despite his election promises to "follow Brace and Tom Richards" on Labour matters, the member for Mid-Glamor- gan writes to a contemporary: Mr. Vernon Hartshorn challenged me to a public debate on the accu- racy of the statement made by me in my recent speech at Pontycymmer that the Minimum Wage Act was in- troduced into the House of Commons by the Liberal Government and was passed into law as a Government measure. I accepted his challenge in respect to that specific and definite point. Under cover of the letter, which he has since contributed to your columns and which teems with ill-natured snarls and sneers, he now runs away from that original issue, and he seeks to raise a whole series of purely hypo- thetical questions. It is useless discussing matters further under sucli conditions of ut- ter evasion. Mr. Edwards sneaks out of the con- test seeking to cover his pusillanimity by a pretence of anger at Mr. Harts- horn's "snarls and sneers." In much the same way the cuttle-fish when es- caping from its enemies hides its whereabouts by ejecting an inky fluid. This method of Mr. Edwards' might have gulled an ignorant body of elec- tors, but the miners of the Garw and of Mid-Glamorgan are too wide-awake to be taken in by such a ruse. In their view the rev. gentleman stands con- victed of political cowardice, and that is a failing that even Mid-Glamorgan Liberals will not tolerate. ——————

PONTARDAWE STRIKE i

PONTARDAWE STRIKE. SEVEN HUNDRED STILL IDLE. 1 Fourteen mills and the galvanizing department at Messrs. Gilbertson's Pontardawe Works are still on stop, about 700 men, boys and girls being idle in consequence. As reported last week the galvanizers decided to accept the advice of the officials of the Dock- ers' Union, and agreed to return to work, but a letter received by Mr. Tom Jeremiah, secretary of No. 2 Branch of the Steelsmelters' Union, from Mr. John Hodge, general secretary of the Union, caused the members of the Dockers' Union to intimate to Mr. F. W. Gilbertson that they could not re- sume work before the millmen did so. The No. 2 branch of the Steelsmeltè •vt a meeting on Friday decided that Mr John Hodge should visit Pontardawc and explain certain matters before they resumed work. Correspondence has since passed be- tween No. 2 Branch and the General Office of the Steelsmelters, and Mr. Hodge has promised to come to Pont- ardawe on Monday, his other engage- ments precluding his earlier arrival. The strike which has now lasted over five weeks is bearing somewhat heavily on the lower paid workmen and their families, but there are no cases of dis- tress which cannot be met out of the funds at the disposal of the Distress Committee which has been formed. On Tuesday a few cases were relieved. No doubt, tra.desmenand employers would be glad to know that the men had decided to re-start, but unless more satisfactory assurances are forth- coming from the employers' side the probabilities are that the stoppage will continue for some time. A sacred c oncert will be held at the Glolie Cinema, Clydach, on Sunday evening for the purpose of augmenting the distress fund. Councillor J. M. Davies, and Mr. E. Skidmore are mak- ing the necessary arrangements.

DEATH OF JOSEPH FELS

DEATH OF JOSEPH FELS A Man Who Gave of His Best to Help the Poor. Men and women of all shades of opinion will hear with profund regret that Joseph Fels, the disciple of Henry George and ardent social reformer, died on Sunday last in Philadelphia after a few days' ill- ness. News was receivtfe- in London on Thursday last that he w-If suffering from pneumonia, but no one expected so sad an end. There are literallv ttafMsands of men ?11? women who will mourn his loss, for he was one of "nature's noblemen," who did good by stealth; and on both sides of the Atlantic there are people of many races who have cause to" remember him for his open-handed generosity. Ten years ago he backed the unemployment move- ment in this country, and spent thou- sands of pounds striving to arouse pub- lic opinion to the seriousness of the prob- lem. He lent the unemployed body for London a.nd Poplar Board of Guardians some L35,000 between them for three years free of interest in order that they might experiment in labour colonies. He spent another 930,000 en estates in var- ions paa ts of the country for similar pur- poses under his own management. I ESTABLISHED SCHOOL CLINICS. He subscribed r.nd made possible the first school clinic m; London, and in scores of other directions helped move- I ments for the benefit of the people. The Labour movement and tue Socialist move- ment have lost a great friend. Many a candidature would have failed but for his aid, and when the Russian Social Democratcs, driven from their own land, came for refuge to London, it was Joseph Fela who went down to the Brotherhood Church and made their financial position I secure and safe. He was best known as an out-and-out advocate of the "Single-Tax," and spent many thousands of pounds each year in every country of the world for the pur- poses of propaganda on behalf of that movement. Disciples of Henry George the world over will mourn the low of a leader and a friend. The above are only a few facts about him publicly, writes Mr George Lans- bury in the "Daily Herald." I would like to put on record this of him from my personal knowledge. 1 met him first ten years ago, and from that day to this we have been as brothers. I never saw ''Single-Tax" sts he did lo him it was the one and only thing worth working for. He wi.s big onough and broad enough to work with me in many another cause, and I enjoyed a friendship which is only broken now by his death. He taught me how a rich man should live, end by his own life inspired me to a greater belief in my fellows and human notura No trouble was too great for him to take on behalf of a fellow creature in distress and trouble, and he would give up time and energy to serve the very poorest. f THE WORLD THE POORER. Now he is gone I want to say to all who read this, the world is much poorer by his death. A great, good man has passed away. Those of us who knew him can give him the "glory of going on" by catching his spirit, and giving ourselves to the service of mankind, Suffragist or Socialist. Syndicalist cr Single-Tax er. The world needs. to-day men and women who will strive and work for the beet they knew, regardless of what it may bring them One ether word. Left behind are his brothers and eisteirs, and his almost life- long coninpaa-Lion-Iiis wife, who was his comrade and helper in every piece of work he engaged in. She is left alone, and allot us will wish for health &nd strength to boar her loss, and courage and hope to continue the work which he gave his life for, that it, the "Redemption of the Race" by and through the common people.

GLORIES OF CARDIGANSHIRE

GLORIES OF CARDIGAN- SHIRE. WHEN THE MILK TRADE PROS- PERED. Mr. Thomas Jones, M.A., secretary of the Welsh National Insurance Com- mission, speaking a.t a dinner of "Cardi's" in Cardiff, said that Cardi- ganshire had a more distinctive per- sonality than any other county in Wales. He would not sneak of Carmar- t,henshirc--C,a,rma,rthenshire only exist- ed by stealing the heroes of other countries. (Laughter and cheers.) There was a real unity about Cardi- ganshire, and a providential arrange- ment had secured her boundaries, which guarded her from the corrup- tion and adulteration of the other counties. (Laughter and applause.) The lines upon which Cardiganshire had de- veloped were commerce and education. Cardiganshire folk, he believed, were not great administrators, although they had iflie Aberystwyth Town Council. (Loud laughter.) They had made a great impression on the milk trade, which he was told prospered very greatly before the era. of Couaty Councils and inspectors. (Laughter.) Her glorias after all was I. the hospitajble character of her people. (Applause.) I 1

No title

Miss Mary Howarth, of the Bury Association, an d Mieo Alice Smith, of the Oldham Provincial Card- room Association, la.te residents of Bebel House, Lexham-gardens, London, have each been grant-ed six-months scholar- ship by the Women's League of the Cen- tral Labour College, at the college.

ITKYING TO BRI HE LABOUR I

ITKYING TO BRI HE LABOUR I — I MR KEIR HARDIE AND BAG OF £ 500. How money a.nd influence have been exert-ed--amd "spooks" even invoked-to bribe the British Labour Party is told by Mr J. Keir Hardie, M.P., in this week's "Labour Leader." When, in 1893, the first Home Rule Bill' after passing the Comniittee sta.ge., was bfrloje the nouse of Commons, Mr Keir Hardie received a communication from one who was wtill known at the time as a writer on social reform ai- i is now frc-I quently in evidence as a11) advocate of a | big Na.\ y. Would Mr Keir Hirdie meet him and talk over the question of unem- ployment and what action could be taken to force the hand of the Government ? They iunched together at a, club, talked about the unemployed and the social question generally, and then Mr Keir Hardie's companion worked the conversa- tion round to Home Rule. He thumped the table as he declared that, rather tnan permit the dominion of Rome in Ulster, t, h, (,- English people would back their Ulster brethren in a rebellion. "I pooh-poohed the whole idea, but he persisted and finally pointed out that I, as the representative of Labour, had it in my power to save the whole situation. WeTO I to vote against the, third reading of the Home Rule Bill that would be tanl%mount to a declaration that the working class of England were opposed to I the measvire-and if I came to the Terrace from the division lobby after voting there would be a bag containing 500 sovereigns on a certain part of the ledging waiting mv arrival. I hope it is needless to aid that the interview came to a vti v sharp and, I fear, for him, unpleasant termina- tion. A NIGHT WI' BURNS. "About the same period the prospect of an interview with Robert Burns through a. spiritualist medium, was opened up to Mr Keir Hardie. He went by invitation to the studio of an artist, but took the precaution of having with him half a down friends, among whom were Messrs. Bruce Wallace, Frank Smith, and S. G. Hobson. "The medium delivered messages from Parneil, Bradlaugh, Bright, and others, including Robert Burns, all of whom asked me to vote against the Irish Home Rule Bill. The thing was very amusing and exceedingly well planned. I never got to the bottom of who was responsible for the seance, but there is no question about it that the whole incident was pre- arranged, and I was very glad indeed that I had taken the precaution to have a. number of friends present."

FOOD COSTS MORE I

FOOD COSTS MORE. I STARTLING INCREASE IN FIFTEEN I YEARS An interesting leaflet, showing a comparison of prices of general gro- ceries during the last fifteen years, has been issued by the Co-operative Whole- sale Society Limited. An average weekly family grocery order has been taken to include: lib. bacon, 21b. butter, ilb. cheese, 121b. flour, ilb. lard, lib. meal, 41b. sugar, and lb. tea. These provisions, according to the figures, could be bought in 1898 for 5s. 3.85d. By 1906 the cost had risen to 5s. 7.28d., in 1908 to 5s. 10.21d. The top price of 6s. 2.28d. was reached in 1912, and last year there was a slight fall to 68. 0.45d. The increased cost, therefore, for 1913 over 1898 was 13.47 per cent., and the decreased cost for 1913 on 1912 was 2.46 per cent. Wholesale prices of general groceries given for relative comparison from 1898 to 1913 are as follows:— Goods. 1898. 1908. 1913, Per lb. Per lb. Per lb d. d. d. Bacon And hams 4.96 6.15 8.21 Batter 11.35 13.08 13.51 Cheese 5.24. 6.68 7.05 Flour 1.39 1.29 1.22 Lard 3.24 499 6.13 Meal. 1.23 1.33 1.36 Sugar 1.49 1.86 1.69 Tea 16.17 15.65 IS-77 The price of coal shows a large m- crease for the fifteen years. In 1898 a ton of average house coal at pit-mouth prices could be purchased for 9s. 11-21d., but the price rose rapidly, until, in K)13, 15s. 9d. was asked for the same class of coal, the increased cost for 1913 over 1898 being 58.16 per cent. —————— J

SHOCKING ACCIDENT AT BRYNAMHAN

SHOCKING ACCIDENT AT BRYNAMHAN. BOTH LEGS CUT OFF. Whilst prooeeding to his work at Glynbeudy Tinplate Works, at Bryn- aminax on Tuesday evening, George Overland (21), pickler, a native of Wol- verhampton, was run over by a goods train and sustained such serious in- juries that after removal to the Swan- sea Hospital both legs had to be am- putated. Overland was near the Brynbach bridge when the aocident happened and valuable first aid was rendered by several railwaymen before the arrival of Dra. J. W. Lewis and Corkey.

No title

One of the amusing incidents which arose out of the arrival of the Nine at Gravesend was & case of mistaken identity upon the part of a. representative of an extreme anti-Socialist morniing paper. Be- cause he heard a "Daily Citizen'' repre- sentative c hatting in ihe Taa.1 to Mr. Poutsma the jomrnaliat at on eta assumed that the other newsgettcr wag oiv cf the Nine, And for a long time refused to be- lieve h'm whffl he denied Hmt he had c«me in the Umgeni.

RUGBY CUP MATCH AT YSTALYFERA

RUGBY CUP MATCH AT YSTALYFERA Local Team Badly Handicapped The greatest interest was evinced in the match played between Ystalyfera. and Amman United on the Wind-road Ground on Thursday in the second round of the Welsh Union Rugby Cup Competition. This was to be seen in the remarkably large crowd which as- sembled and followed the proceedings with the greatest attention. It will be remembered that Ystaly- fera were victorious over Glyn Neath in the first round of the competition, and it was confidently hoped that Thursday's match would be won, but the issue was unfortunately, greatly jeopardised by the dispute at present in progress between many players and the club committee. It was in conse- quence of this fact that several players, including Tom Davies, Dai Thomas, Tom Jenkins, J. A. Davies, and Dai Griffiths were absent, and in addition D. W. Griffiths, the popular full-back, was also unable to appear. The Ystalyfera team thus turned out as follows:—Full-back D. H. Hopkin threequarter-backs, W. J. Lewis, Alf -Landgon, Harry Jenkins. and Tal Ed- wards half-backs, Geo. Langdon and C. Price; forwards, Joe Evans (capt.), Tom Richards, Edwin Langdon, Willie Langdon, Dai J. Jones, D. Ll. Thomas, T. Morgan, and W. Taylor. On the other hand the visitors had a strong team in the field as follows:— Full-back, J. Rees; three-quarters, Allen Williams, Ellis Williams, Rhys Ree6, and Garfield Thomas; half-backs, R. Thomas, H. M. Fuller; forwards, D. B. Rees (capt), Will Ward, Evan Bevan, G. D. Davies, M. Williams, W. D. Llewelyn, Evan Rees, and Will I Thomas. THE GAME. I There was a large crowd on the en- I closure when the home side kicked off I about 4.30, fully 1,000 making the journey to Ystalyfera from the Am- man Valley. The weather was delight- ful, and the ground in splendid condi- tion. The teams have met on two pre- vious occasions this season, Ystalyfera I defeating the strong Amman fifteen on their own pround by a try to nothing, whilst at Ystalyfera the game ended in I a draw. It was unfortunate that again the Ystalyfera team was not represen- tative. Ystalyfera kicked-off, and play went to the visitors' 25. A fine rush by the Amman forwards took play into the ,home half, and W. J. Lewis made a lovely save. Ystalyfera continued to press, but a mark by G. Phillips gained relief. Geo. Langdon put in a fine screw kick, which kept play in the Amman half. Ystalyfera continued to press, but could not break through a stern, unbending defence. Relief was ob- tained by Thomas. ma.king a mark. This was followed soon after by a mark by Hopkins, and then W. J. Lewis was seen to advantage in a fine run and kick, which took play right across the field to the other oorner of the Amman 25, near the line. Joe Rees gave relief to his side by kicking the ball into the Ystalyfera half, and but for a good pick-up by Geo. Langdon the rush of the visiting forwards would have taken the ball right through. It was a plucky and an exciting save, and George was "outed" in the effort. On the resumption one of the Am- man backs threw the ball out but the pass was rorwara &ng rrom tne scrum- mage which followed Alf Langdon sent the oval down the field,. and Thomas and Geo. Langdon raced for possession, but the ball went int* touch near the Amman 25. Ystalyfera were penalised for a scrummage infringement, and Amman gained ground. The referee was keeping a stern eye on the game and allowed very little to pass him, and was conducting affairs with confidderaJble skill. Harry Jen- kins got in a beautiful kiek just as he was tackled by Fuller, and then Joe Evans made headway, which again placed the visitors on the defensive. Offside play by the home side was met with its just reward, and what looked a grand attack was nipped in the bud. The kick sent play to the home 25, and Will Thomas made a good but in- effective run to gain possession, but was too late. After D. H. Hopkins had sent down to half-way G. Phillips secured and made a magnificent run from mid-field to near the home line, and was almost through when Jenkins^stopped his pro- gress. It was a moment of excite- ment, and the crowd breathed hard. The tackle was a plucky and as clean as the effort made by Phillips. A free-kick brought relief to the homesters, and then Joe Rees returned and gaining possession on the right of the Ystalyfera 25 line, Harry Fuller dropped "what appeared to be a goal. The ball soared magnificently, but caught the cross bar and looked as if -it would bound over, but it rebounded into play, and D. H. Hopfilns secured before the Amman men were able to overcome their chagrin. It was a fine kick, and fully deserved theo points. Play followed at half-way, and Hy. Fuller getting possession from the ecrum passed to EII16 Williams, who threw to Rhys, who them gave to G. Phil- lips, and the most interesting piece of play up to this paint was londly ap- plauded. W. J. Lcwfis returned the oval to half-way, and several scrim- miages ensued. A rush by the home fmw,ai,db- was stopped by Joe Rees, who was playing a very safe, sound and re- I liable game. Nothing passed him. G. Phillips got the ball at half-way, punt ed and tackled Hopkins as he obtained the ball, but that player was able to elude three of the Ammanites before he was grounded. A free kick to Amman, and play continued in the home half. Hy. Fuller had the hardest of lines in not drop- ping a goal from nearly half-way, from an acute angle. Gilbert Phillips was very prominent in the lines out and repeatedly gained ground. Amman did some pressing. Whilst Allan Wil- I liams was making headway on his own he v. as well tackled by Geo. Lungdon. Hopkins foozled the ball on his own line and the position looked serious, but he saved the situation by kicking into touch. Relief was obtained by the sturdy work of the home forwards who were arrayed against a stronger and a. more bulky eight. Haary Fuller made a mark on the Y^ stalyfera 25 line, and had the ball placed. His kick was charged by Tom Richards, and then a heterogenous mass of forwards engaged in a melee at half way. The Brothers Langdon had occasion to save repeatedly, and quick- ly. Geo. Langdon gained considerable ground bv kicking into touch into the visitors' half, after Rees Rees had put in a trickv punt. The charging of a return ki c from Hy. Jenkins placed the homes ers in an awkward situation but Lewis kicked into touch. Allan Williams next took a prettv pass from R. Thomas, but a fine effort was spoilt by the ball going into touch. Tal Edwards took a pass from Geo. Langdon after a scrimmage, and had he parted with the leather sooner a fine opening would have presented itself. At it was little ground was gained. Then followed a splendid bout of passing between the Amman backs, started by Fuller, and the ball was thrown across the field with lightning-like rapidity until G. Phillips got to the line, and in taking a pass from Rees Rees knocked forward, and an ex- citing phase of the game which deserved a better ending terminated in a. line scrimmage. Ystalyfera gained relief by means of a free kick, but Amman, began to assert their superiority, and the game was in their favour. At half-way Goo. Langdon made a desperate effort to break through, but the tackling was keen. A series of kicks were exchanged by the backs, auid then Ystalyfera gained ground in ail aniazing manner. Geo. Langdori secured at half-way, and kicked into touoh near the Amman line, and the homesters made a desperate attempt to get over, but it failed, and half-time arrived with the score I YSTALYFERA: Nil. AMMAN UNITED Nil. The second half opened with an ex- change of long kicking. Then the two teams set to wor k in In g. Then the two, teams set to work earnest, and Gil- bert Davies marked. Kicking from half way the stroke was a failure. Another mark followed almost immediately, but again Fuller was unsuccessful with the kick. A little later Phillips, of the. visiting team, was hurt, and had to leave the field. He returned almost immediately, and was responsible for the setting up of a pretty passing movement which Rees continued, but lost the ball at the crucial moment. Fuller got the ball in a favourable position, and made an attempt to drop a goal, but although creditable it was unsuccessful. More passing resulted in Amman nearly getting over, but the defence was sound. Fuller was onoe more prominent by a smart kick whioh saved the visitors in a difficult posi- tion. Then followed a forward rush by the home side, but the effort came to nothing. Following this incident the home side carried play to the visitors' goal, but the back marked, and his kick saved the visitors from what might have been a difficult position. Reoulting from a scrimmage Geo. Langdon was severely hurt about the head and in the stomaoh, and the game was de- layed for some time until his injuries had been attended to. Nevertheless he very pluckily resumed his place, and received a hearty cheer. From « series of scrummages on the line th m visitors several times appeared to be good for a score, but eventually the home side saved the posi- tion by a kick into the centre. Then a scrimmage followed liar the half-way line and Fuller geftting possession looked a certain scorer, but the Ystalyfera defence prevailed. The first really sensational in- cident of the g? followed. Play WU prooeedu? stall near th? visit?o?rs 7 goai at the corner, when Will Thomas picked up the ball at a favourable moment and ran over beautifully. The visiting specW tors were delirious with joyous excite- ment, and the enthusiasm was almost in- describable. Fuller's goal kick went wide by yards. 'A united dash down the field taken part in by practioally all the visit- ors, followed. Gilbert Davies secured possession and passed te others, the ball eventually reaching the hands of Evam Williams who danced over in beautiful style amidst soother icemlmdous aeor. FuHer again took the goal kick, But fai-lea to improve the score. A few minutes later a third attempt to get over wae made by Amman, but it proved abortive, the visitors being neatly pulled down by the line. It will easily be gathered thai up to this point the home side had been almost entirely on the defence during the second half. They did no attacking, and play hardly ever, reached their terri- tory, but a few minutes later they made quite a notable rush up the field and play remained in t-he home territory for some little time. At one period Ystalyfera looked cer- tain scoters, but the effort was unsuc- II cessful and it resulted in the visitors securiag pofisenvion and dashing down tho field. FinaL AMMAN UNITED 6 Points I YSTALYFERA Nil. I THE WASV.