Collection Title: Llais Llafur

Provider: The National Library of Wales

Rights: The copyright status or ownership of this resource is unknown.

View full details

Image 1 of 8 Next Last
Full Screen
19 articles on this page
Advertising

.4 A Blue Serge Suit you can wear all the year round. But go in for a <. "Lierapnon" (Regd.) Serge which will stand sea or sun and will not  ? change colour. + The Suit tu order 37/6, 42/ 45/ 50/ 551, 63/ 70/ G. C. DEAN, The Tailor is prepnred to pay return fare ♦ within 20 miles of Swansea to = ♦ any customer placing an order ? for a Suit or Raincoat, upon production of Railway Ticket, ■w Please Note the Address X 22, Castle Street, Swansea. .4

Advertising

"We have had good results + from advertising In Labour + Voice"—Swansea Trades. man. Name on application. ?? ? Do you want good results 7 ? —— ? If so, Advertise In "LLAIS LLAFUR."

WORKING WOMEN AND THE PREMIER

WORKING WOMEN AND THE PREMIER. Suffragist Deputation Received. A HOPEFUL STATEMENT FROM MR. I ASQUITH. Mr Asquith received at Downing .etreob OK Saturday a deputation of six women representing the East London Federation of Suffragists. This was in .accordance with the promise given to Miss Sylvia Pankhurst while she was in a collapsed condition on Thursday night engaged in the fulfilment of her threat to remain at the doors of St. Stephen'* Hall either until Mr Asquith received the deputation or until she died. Downing Street was thronged half an ihour before the deputation arrived. There was a fair sprinkling of Suffragists, female and male, but the majority of those present were by no means sYIDi- j pathetic. The deputation arrived shortly after eleven o'clock in two motor cars. It .consisted of six women, apparently of the working class, who were < accompanied by Messrs. George Lansbury and J. E. Scurr. Miss Sylvia Pankhurst was not among them. WOMEN'S WAGES—7s. to 8s. PER 1 WEEK. I Icra. Scurr, who introduced the depu- tation, directed aittoention to the position of women wage-earners. "It is a common thing" she said, "for women to earn seven or eight shillings for a full week's work. The average wage of women throughout the country was eeven .shillings per week, and they were all sure that it impossible for a woman with onlv herself to keep to live decently on 7s." Mrs. Scurr finally made am ap- peal to the Prime Minister on behalf of Miss Sylvia Pankhurst. The five women who accompmanied Mrs. Scurr addressed the Prime Minister in turn. Mrs. Hughes, an elderly lady, handed to the Prime Minister a hair- brush, valued at haJf-a-guinea, and pointed out that for her share of making the brush she received 2d. She said she had to make 200 ho led for five farthings, and had worked 43 years at the trade. MR. ASQUITH'S REPLY. I Mr Asquith, in his reply, said he had heard very remarkable speeches from women workers, representing the textile trades of Lancashire and Yorkshire and other industries in various piirts of the kingdom, and had always listened with peculiar interest and peculiar sympathy to the considerations they had brought for- ward, but although that was the case, al- though it was not true to say that the voice of the working woman had not been allowed to make itself heard in this matter, yet upon consideration he was glad to have an opportunity of giving them a hearing that morning for two reasons. In the first place, he under- stood they and the organisation with which they were connected disgociated themselves altogether from those criminal members who had done so much damage to impede the progress of their cause; and next because he thought the working people in the East End of London, stood m gome respects upon a. peculiar footing, that they had, at any rate, a special case to which it was well to give atten- tion and hear first hand from the people who were actually concerned in it. He would give their case careful and mature consideration. No one felt more strongly than he that -conditions in the East End were d-eplor- .&Ile. He would like to see an increased number of women as factory inspectors. Eren if women had the vote they would atill find the legislative problem, he -would not say insoluble, but excessively difficult. ON THE SAME TERMS AS MEN. It was a difficult and complex problem which could not be solved by any short "cut or bv heroic remedy. On one point," he added, I am in complete agreement with you. I have always ,add, Mr. Asquith went on, that if you Are going to give the franchise to women, .give it to them on the same terms as to men. Make it democratic measure. It is no good paltering with it. If the discrimination of sex doea not justify the giving of the vote to one sex and withholding it from the other, it follows a. fortiori that the discrimination of sex does not justify and cannot warrant giv- ing women a restricted form of franchise while you give to men- an unrestricted form of franchise. If a change is to oan-jo it mU$t be democratic in its basiA." must be dommrat,

MUMBLES RAILWAY FATALITY

MUMBLES RAILWAY FATALITY. MAN KILLED. WOMAN SERIOUSLY INJURED. A shocking fa-taHty occurred on the ISwan? ? Mumbles R?dway on 6unday night. lock train from Mum- ^iSh/tfn' o'clock train from Mum- ?nsea entered Blackpill Sta- ? ?.? ?n and woman fell from the platform which was crowded, between the carriages. The man was run over and Ana?it-t-i and the woman was Seriously injured, and was taken to It tra.nspired later that she i6 a th S°S Mi* Bannister, of Cardiff, and had been staying at Swansea. Her condi- tion, however, was so senous that fur- ther particulars could not be gleaned. On the body of the man, who was well dressed, was found a pendant at- tached to a gold watch chain, and on this was an inscription showing that the pendant had been present to "J Beaton bv his fellow-workmen on his r)f Jolill Shea mil xmi "t;le Clan TLuie."

THE GREAT ALLIANCE I 4

THE GREAT ALLIANCE I -4. Mr. Keir Hardie on the Issues. A CALL TO ACTION. I Three thousand persons assembled on Saturday in the public recreation ground at Beeeton, Notts, where a great Labour demonstration was held, and stirring ad- dresses were delivered by Mr. J. Keir Hardie, M.P., and Mr. W. C. Anderson. Mr. Keir Hardife referred to the cohesion which existed in the Labour organisations, and reminded his audience that there was a time when to organise a strike meant transportation or imprison- ment. This had been changed, and the combination of the railwavmen's, dockers', and miners' Unions would have a far- reaching effect. This was only the 00- ginning of a great combination when all workers would stand shoulder to s houlder. The day which the pioneers had longed and prayed for in the great Lahour move- ment was nigh, and it now time for the workers to prove themselves worthy of what their forefathers had done for them. In appealing to non-Unionists to join a Union, Mr. Keir Hardy said he hated camp followers who were in the fore- front of the loot after a battle, and urged them not to sponge on those who did the fighting. Pointing to the banners of the Socialists and the Women Workers' Fed- eration Mr. Hardie said that the hope of the future was in those two organise tions. They were out for equal political rights, equal votes for both sexes, equal pay for equal work. He appealed strongly to his hearers to give up Liberal. ism or Toryism and to support their own party. Mr. W. C. Anderson, prospective can- didat3 for East Nottingham, _said that a revolution was coming in their social and political life through the Labour move- ment. The railway workers were start- ing well. Their demand for the reduc- tion of the hours of labour to eight a day would mean the employment of 25,000 more men. He was pleased to see the hopeful sign of the rising of agricultural la-bourera and he was gratified to .see this discontent spreading from rural parish to parish

CHILDREN STARVED I

CHILDREN STARVED. I I CARMARTHEN FATHER SENT TO I PRISON FOR A MONTH. My husband has starved me and the children off and on for years. He is drinking every day. I have to beg all the children's clothes. If I didn't get food from a neighboxir we should have starved. He is very cruel to Bessie, the two-year- old child, and even pulls her hair out in handfuls. We cannot starve like this any longer. This was the statement made by Margaret Parry, Tabernacle Row, in a case heard at Carmarthen, when her husband, Walter Parry, was charged with neglecting his children. Inspector Idris Jones, of the Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Chil- dren, said the defendant was drunken and idle, and oomplaints wore received about him almost every week. On visiting the house on May 25th, witness found three of the four children ill, one being in a fit. There was no food in the house but a quarter of a threepenny loaf as hard as a soone. The wife com- plained that not only did the defend- ant starve her, but abused her. Defendant was sentenced to one one month's imprisonment.

MINERS AND EDUCATION I

MINERS AND EDUCATION. I SOUTH WALES FEDERATION AND CENTRAL LABOUR COLLEGE. The agenda for the special delegate conference of the South Wales Miners' Federation on July 13th contains the following:— To consider proposals for the pur- chase of the buildings, and the man- agement and control of the Cent-ul Labour College by the South Wales Miners' Federation and the N1- tional Union of Railwaymen. The subject is likely to give rise to an interesting discussion, especially in view of a suggestion that the miners should acquire a financial interest in another undertaking. The opinion is strongly held by several of the men's leaders that everything possible should be done to conserve the finances of the Federation between now and next vear, when negotiations will be opened for a new and improved wage agreement and for amendments to the Minimum. Wage Aet. A report of the negotiations with the coalowners for a revision of the rates of wages and hours of colliery banksmen will be presented, and the conference asked "to consider further course of action." The application of the banksmen for permission to t-ender notices for the termination of contracts was recently referred to the coalfield. The reply was undecisive; only a comparatively small percentage, of the Federationists evidenced nnv active interest in the r. ox- rw-v• -1 the policy to be re- coaimeudtxl .o, and by, the conference.

SOCIALIST BAKERY I

SOCIALIST BAKERY EXPERIMENTAL FACTORY OPENED IN LONDON. MR. RAMSAY MACDONALD'S SPEECH. I The Socialist bakery commenced by the Bermondsey I". L.P. to which refer- ence was made in our London Letter last week, was opened by Mr. J. Ram- say MacDonald, M.P., on Saturday. The future of the co-operative movement," Mr. MacDonald urged, is going to depend on the future of the Socialist movement. If you read some of 'the antiquated and obfuscated speeches delivered at the conferences of the Co-operative Unions you would imagine that co-operation and indi- vidualism were one and the same thing. You hear delightful gentle- men, at least a hundred years behind their time, saying that co-operation must have nothing to do with politics. There is not a single "father" of the co-operative movement of any repute who has done any substantial work for that movement who holds that view. We are going to have in this country the same sort of arlliance between Co- operation and Socialism which has been established so well in Belgium. From the day the Independent La- hour Party was born, Mr. MacDonald proceeded, it was painted red, and it had to remain Socialistic. They must keep the red flag flying and conquer new territories. They must maintain representative institutions, although at the present moment there was a very decided attempt to destroy repre- sentative institutions. So long as rich people had control of these insti- tutions they were willing to rule through them, but when they could not control those institutions they fell back on disorder, anarchy, and vio- lence. REVOLUTION BY REPRESENTA- TIVE INSTITUTIONS. What they saw at the present mo- ment meant an attempt to smash up the great democratic working-class movement in order that interested people might get back on the saddle as firmly to-day as they were 25 to 30 years ago. They knew that under the conditions of a Labour Party, go- ing straight ahead, giving them no chance, not being lured either to the right or to the left, they would never have the opportunity to get on that saddle again. I am in favour," the speaker said. of revolution by representative in- stitutions. That is the whole philo- sophy—the idea that is underlying all the work and policy of the Labour Party at the present moment." In conclusion, Mr. MacDonald re- ferred to misrepresentation in the capitalist Press of the Labour Party and its attitude with regard to postal workers. Dr. Alfred Salter, Mr. Squires (Planet Friendly Society), Mr. R. M. Gentry (Bakers), Mr. Craigie, Mr. Percy Scott, and others delivered in- terest ing speeches. ———— t t. <-—————

SENGHENYDD PROSECU I TIONS j

SENGHENYDD PROSECU- TIONS. HOME OFFICE CHARGES AGAINST OWNERS. the defendants at the Caerplrilv Po- The management of the Universal Colliery, Senghenydd, where the dis- astrous explosion occurred in October last, when 439 lives were lost, were the defendants at the Caerphilly Po- lice Court during the weet-ond in regard to twenty charges brought by the Home Office alleging various of- fences against the Mines Act. Mr. Ivor Bowen, Mr. Clement Ed- wards, and Mr. Albert Parsons, in- structed by Messrs. Vachell and Co., Cardiff, appeared to prosecute; Mr. C. Kenshole, Aberdare, defended; and Mr. W. P. Nicholas watched the pro- ceeded on behalf of the Miners' Feder- ation. In his opening statement Mr. Bowen reminded the Court that the explosion caused the greatest loss of life of any such disasted in the United Kingdom. An exhaustive inquiry had been con- ducted by the Home Office, and there had been an investigation by the dis- trict Coroner, and as a result these proceedings were being instituted. On behalf of the Public Prosecutor, Mr. Bowen, after an adjournment, dealt with a number of alleged viola- tions against the Mines Act, such as the failure to appoint in the workings a properly qualified person to examine the safety lamps, and inadequate pro- visions for the immediate reversal of the air in the mine. The first charge dealt with was against Mr. Edward Shaw for neglect- ing to appoint in writing a person to examine the safety lamps on the sur- face. The defence was that the man carrying out the duties had held the post for 17 years. He had originally been given a note by the management describing the nature of his occupa- tion, and this was renewed when the colliery changed ownership. The Bench adjourned all the cases until July 4th nw?n? to a bereavement in the fa.?'1? 

FAITH OF FINLANDI

FAITH OF FINLAND. I I HOW SOCIALISM HAS BECOME I PREDOMINANT. Emile Vandervelde, the president of the International Socialist Burea, hav- ing returned to Paris from his visit to Finland and St. Petersburg, has been interviewed by a representative of L'Humanite." He was, he said, spe- cially impressed by lie fact that the 50,000 members of v \e Finnish partv possess 21 daily, weekly, and monthly organs, which have a total issue of 142,150 copies. Moreover, the Finnish workmen possess in Helsingfors two big Trade Union halls. with libraries, bil- liard roo-m, lecture and conference rooms, and restaurants, although the population of the city is only 150,000. Each village has an assembly hall of its own erected and supported by work- men. In all these places the sale of intoxicating liquors is absolutely pro- hibited. From inquiries among the women deputies in the Diet he learnt that their special efforts are directed to- wards the improvement of workmen's dwellings, the protection of childhood, and the regulation of women's and nhildren's work in the factories. —————— < If..4

Miners FdurDay WeekI

Miners' Fdur-Day Week I IMPORTANT MOVEMENT IN I SCOTLAND. Aitout 100,000 men. were represented at a conference of the Scottish Miners' Federation, held in Glasgow on Tuesday, to consider what step& should be taken to reduce the working week to four days. The object of the movement is to re- strict the output and keep up the prices upon which Wi;ges are based. Prices have recently been falling and the men have suffered two reduction of 3d. per day. The proposal has been approved by every mining district in Scotland. After discussing the matter for three hours, the Federation decided that those counties which have to give notice to ter- minate their contract of service, be in- structed to lodge such notice at the earliest moment, and that it be left to the executive to special conference within the next fortnight to finally de- cide when the four-day policy should be inaugurated. WAGES REDUCED. The wages of about 4°.000 Scottish miners was reduced by 3d. to 7s. from Tuesday, and all other Scottish pit- wcrkers come under the fame alterations.

I Western District Strike I

Western District Strike STOPPAGE AT PONTARDULAIS Owing to a dispute over the supply of house-coal to the men employed at the Brynlliw, Grovesend, Talyclun, and Mor- tal's Collieries, owned by Messrs. Thomas Williams and Sons, Pontardulais, work has been suspended at.the four pits on the termination of a fortnight's notice. Other issues to he settled before work is resumed arc* the settlement of a price for the five-foot seam, and the ernpmloyment of non- U iiicnisti. A mass meeting of the men was held at Haggar's Bioscope Pal-ce, Pontardulais, on Tuesday morn- i,ng, when an address was delivered by Mr John Williams, M.P. The men de- cided to remain out pending a settle- ment of their claims. 1 t I

IDOCKS FOR NEATH I

DOCKS FOR NEATH. NEW SCHEME COMMENCED. PROSPECTIVE COLLIERY DEVE- LOPMENTS IN DULAIS VALLEY. Progress is being made in connection with the projected scheme for the con- struction of new docks at Neath and Briton Ferry. A few weeks ago Mr. Godfrey Wil- liams, J.P., the owner of the Aberper- gwm Collieries, promised support at a gathering of engineers, and the pur- chase of the Miers Estate by a local gentleman in Mr. E. Evans Bevan, the largest individual coalowner in the kingdom, is a recent event which can- not fail to give impetus to the move- ment. Frurther, we can state that the local captains of industry view the project with whole-hearted approval, and that when the time comes for co-operation —and it will be soon—the promoters of the docks scheme will have generous and general support. On Tuesday, for the second time in a few weeks, Messrs. Crutwell and Lister, of the firm of Sir John Wolfe Barry, Lister, and Partners, Westminster, who are the consulting engineers to the Neath Harbour Comnlissione-, were engaged at Briton Ferry in taking site sections and will be so engaged for some time. During the past twelve months, much has been accomplished in testing and surveying, but preliminaries in connection with such a gigantic under- taking, which, when completed, will, it is claimed, be bigger than Cardiff Docks," must necessarily occupy much time, and there has been no delay. Meanwhile those who had any doubts as to the scheme first outlined in our columns may rest assured that the matter is going forward, and that both Neath and Briton Ferry will, in the course of a few years, occupy a very prominent position in the shipping life of the country.

GOVERNMENT AND OIL SUPPLY

GOVERNMENT AND OIL SUPPLY. LOGIC OF PERSIAN DEAL. MR. BRACE ON NATIONALISATION I In the course of an article on the Persian Oil Deal, Mr. William Brace, M.P., says:— Despite the fact that the First Lord of the Admiralty was able to carry by an enormous majority his resolution in favour of a C2,000,600 investment in ordinary shares and £ 200,000 in de- bentures of the Persian oil undertaking so that the British Navy may have its own oil supply, it will be a mistake to calculate that from this point on- ward the proposal will he given an easy passage. The debate upon the resolu- tion and the division had best be classi- fied as a preliminary skirmish. This resolution must again be reported to the House of Commons, and be treated as a Bill would be upon its report stage. Should it again receive the ap- proval of a majority of the House of Commons, then a Bill must be brought in which will embody in detail what this proposed investment involves, so far as the money is concerned. INTERNATIONAL ASPECT. I But surrounding this ouestion there is the outstanding one of international relationships. It is thought by many who have given special study to the Persian problem that this is the first step towards the annexation of Persia by Russia and Britain. I am not for the moment interested in discussing that, and simply mention it as a factor which will form part of the delibera- tions of Parliament before final sanc- tion is given the Government to invest in the Persian oilfields. There can be no doubt but that the rally to support the project in the Commons last week was consequential to the superlatively clever speech of Mr. Winston Churchill. In attacking the existing gront oil com- panies upon their prices and monojxily power, he raised an issue which caused a number of usually contending par- ties to unite in support of the proposal in the Lobby. Wliether these sections will continue to unite upon the report stage of the resolution, and later upon the details of the Bill, is too difficult to forecast. In connection with this business the Labour Party and the miners of Wales and Monmouthshire have their own special point of view. As a principle, the Labour Party can- not but cordially welcome the innova- tion under which the State will become its own producer and distributor. ) MINE NATIONALISATION. I Standing in front of the oolitical programme of the Labour Party are proposals for nationalising the mines and railways of the kingdom. It will assist propaganda to this end immensely if a precedent is created by the pur- chase of these oil shares. If it is good business for the nation to own its own oil wells, why not its own mllieri--s ? And if it is advantageous for the Ad- miralty to adopt this policy, how can it he disadvantageous for the whole nation to do so? Coal is as much the driving power for the industries of the nation as it is of the Navy. For motive power oil is of less importance than coal, even in the Navy. If. therefore, the Admiralty Board demand the purchase of oil wells in Persia as a, pressing necessity for Britain's naval supremacy, how can they resist apply- ing the same rule as regards collieries, and when this stage is reached how can the nationalisation of mines be con- demned as bad policy? The same argument applies no less effectively in connection with the pro- posal to nationalise the railways. As a believer in the nationalisation of both mines anzi railways, I am bound to say that I welcome the purchase of these oil wells in Persia by the Government. It will make a splendid sounding-board for nationalisation advocates both in Parliament and the country. OIL VERSUS COAL. I As to the extent which oil is likely to supersede coal for the Navy and in other directions, I do not think owners of mineral property need worry under this head, whether they .are the pos- sessors of land in which coal is deposited or shareholders in collieries. The last Royal Commission to investigate this subject, after having the highest oil experts in the world before them as witnesses, had to report against the idea of oil taking the place of coal to any considerable extent, not because of its unsuitabilitv as a power agent, but because of the impossibility of pro- viding a sufficient supply of oil. Since that conclusion was reported millions more motor cars have been "built and have become oil users, to say nothing of developments in other directions. It is not for me to say oil companies have not used their monopoly power to force up prices for oil. I think they have. But they have been assisted and encouraged in this policy by the fact that the supply of oil is of a lim- ited character, and is under the con- trol of comparatively few people. As a man whose interests are wholly con- nected with coal production and dis- tribution, I do not fear oil as a com- peting product, and in so far as the investing of the nation's money in oil- fields prepares the' way for an invest- ment of the nation's money in coal- fields, I look upon this Persian oil deal as good business from the workers' j standpoint.

PIT HEAD BATHS

PIT HEAD BATHS GREAT SOUTH WALES CAMPAIGN I LAUNCHED. t WOMEN'S PARTIN THE QUESTION. A well-attended conference of women from all parts of the South Wales coalfield and representatives of the Miners' Federation lodges, the churches, and the headmistresses of the isch-ools was held on Saturday at the Cory Hall, Cardiff, to discuss and inaugurate the campaign for the gen- eral establishment of pithead baths. The Lady Mayoress of Cardiff (Mrs. James Robinson) presided, and she was supported by Mrs. Pritchard Hughes, Llandaff, Mrs. Thomas Evans. Dr. R. Owen Morris, the chief education offi- cial of the King Edward VII. National Memorial, Mr. and Mrs. D. Watts Morgan, Mr. and Mrs. Alfred Onions, Mr. and Mrs. Vernon Hartshorn, Mrs. T. Richards, Mr. Henry Davies, min- ing director, and others. There were about 300 delegates present, including nearly all the wives of the miners leaders. The Lady Mayoress said she hoped they would all The very keenly inter- ested in this subject after the explana- tory addresses from Mr. Henry Davies. and Dr. Morris, and help forward the movement. (Hear, hear). She resided in a colliery district for some years, and had every sympathy with the col- lier and the colliers' wives, and knew that the present method of bathing was neither decent nor comfortable. Let them look at the subject from a woman's point of view, for she felt it would be an enormous saving of labour for the wife, who would have more time to attend to the men's food and their comfort. Mr. Henry Davies explained the good work already done in this direction by Mr. David Davies, M.P., who had pro- mised to pay one half of the expenses of the campaign, and he proposed that this conference of miners' wives and others interested in the welfare of the miner places on record its sin- cere appreciation of the generous con- tribution of Mr. David Davies, M.P., towards defraying the costs of the pre- sent campaign; also recognises with much pleasure his unceasing activities in all matters to safeguard the health and uplift the miner." OBSTACLE TO BE OVERCOME. I Mrs. Watts Morgan, seconding, said that, speaking from experience, having lived among colliers for some years, she knew of some of the objections raised to the movement. They would have to surmount those difficulties and fight their way to victory. Mrs. Tom Richards supported, and the resolution twas carried unanim- ously. Mr. Hy. Davies, the director of min- ing education in Glamorgan, then ex- plained the proposed system and what pit-head baths really are, where they are adopted, why they are needed, and their advantages, what they cost, and how to ake their advantages more widely known. He strongly urged the women in their own interests to prevail upon the men to vote in favour, and said the men would not have to wait for their baths, nor would they be exposed to any extremes of heat and cold. Mr. Davies replied to a number of questions put to him by the ladies. VANISHING OBJECTIONS. I Mrs. Vernon Hartshorn said that the objections to the baths were getting gradually less, and people were getting to understand better what they pleant and the more they understood the greater interest would he ta^eu in the movement. She moved: "That this conference r^neT) d to the miners of the South Wnles and Monmouthshire coalfield the desirability of adopting the pit head bath system of washing and drying the miners' clothes. Mrs. Onions seconded, and the reso- lution was carried unanimously. On the mot'on of Mrs. Tom Smith, seconded bv Mrs. William John, it was resolved that a campaign be orr"*n;?ed by the women of the coalfield with t',e object of making better known the ad- vantages of the pit head both sv-te n. and advising a house to lioil,- rapv.is and the promotion of arrangements for a ballot of those concerned according to the Coal Mines Regulation Act. U Mrs. Tom Smith then proposal Mrs. Lucas seconded a re^olnt;o^ t'"4 an executive committee of the minc: agents' wives and three mem bers of the South Wales Women's Labour League and the Co-operative "^VrrrV- Guild be formed with the obiect of arranging the propaganda campaign, also that Mrs. D. Watts Morean be asko-1 to nct ft convener and secretary of ccecutive. T1,is -solution having been carried, it rjis farther resolved, on the motion nf Mies .Tane Robert, Cardiff, that the headmistresses of the girls' and infant schools in each mining village be spe- cially invited to act as secretaries of local sub-committees, also that an ap- peal be made to all the religious bodies for their active support in the move- ment. Mrs. Pritchard Hughes proposed a resolution inviting the Miners' Federa- tion to co-operate in the campaien and contribute towards defraying the ex- penses. SUOCCESS IN GERMANY. I Mr. Alfred Onions, in seconding, I spok e of the success of the movement in Germany. If pit-head baths were I I (CwtAns" bt bottom el sftt eel.} I

PIT HEAD BATHS

(Continued from prooeding wluma). established the men would be more healthy and more energetic. The coal- field was rich enough and could afford to finance the movement which would make the houses of the working men far more comfortable. Let 4b"rn Y"ö- move the suspicions with which tbe, movement was regarded and the result would more than recompense them. The resolution was r;vrr'ed. Dr. R Owen Morris flf'ïvo.red an ad- and said these hv^'enic reforms woro calculated to grPat]T* hc-nerlt, the working communities in South Wale*. Fnr tbo prevention or tiih^ron'^i. and her diseases a higher trll\nd"d of < leanliness was absolutelv ne--P,arv. No rlass of working people had r~ponded "n nohl, to the great hygien e move- in this oountrv as the colliers and their families. If this movement suc- ceeded men would be healthier and more rigorous and it would raise the standard of self-respect and eelI- esteem among the men. Morally and socially it would improve the genera- tion. and, from an economic point of view it would lw. of immense He strongly appealed to the WOTPen to unite in this campaign. Why should thev "'I'rk 16 hours fl ,h" the r husbands only worico(I (T. aij!Zliter and a-pp'^us^). Mr. Watte Morgan proposed, apd M r. Vernon Hartshorn ^eco"ded. a vote of thanks to the Lady Mayor^s for oresidi-«r. and Mr*. C. B. Stanton and Mrs. Herbert Jenkins supported, the vote being carried with acclamation.

ITHROUGH SIX REIGNS

I THROUGH SIX REIGNS. DEATH OF GWERNOGLE OCTOGENARIAN. By the death on Saturday of Mr. James Evans, Cwmwrdv, Gwernogle, Gwerno g le, Carmarthenshire, one of the oldest re- sidents in West Wales is removed. De- ceased who was 95, was therefore born when George III.was King, so he had lived during six reigns. He was one of the most prosperous farmers in the county and farmed at Blaenhenfa. Llanybyther, where he brought up a family of 12 children. His youngest son is Mr. Evan Evans, Beresford House. Unwinds. Swansea. His daughters are Mrs. Arthur Adams, Landore, Mi\ Thomas Davies, Gower- ton, Mrs. Danie! Morgans, Llangen- nech, and Mrs. Gilleland, Merthyr. He retired from active farming some 30 years ago, and moved to Cwmwrdv, near Gwernogle, where he acquired some freeholds. When appealing be- fore the income tax commissioners he used to cause much good humour by saying he was wort h more than Li2,000, because each of his children cost him £1,000 to bring them up. He acted as overseer and guardian for the parish of Llanbvther 60 years ago in the days when a 3d. rate cov- ered the whole expense of the parish. He sat as Guardian for many years un- der the chairmanship of Jones, Glan- denmis, the well-known Lampeter banker.

MINER CRUSHED TO DEATH

MINER CRUSHED TO DEATH COMPANION RESCUED AFTER 2! HOURS' WORK. W hile engaged in timbering a pit owned by the Conygre Coal and Fire- clay Company, at Tipton, Stafford- shire, on Monday, two miners were buried under a fall of roof. One. of them, John Henry Morris, aged 48. of Grove Street, Kates Hill, Dudley, was killed, and his mate, William Smith, Queen's Road, Tipton, injured his ankle badly. The roof callapsed at seven o'clock, and the deputy immediately organised a rescue party. So great had been the fall, however, that it was not until half-oast nine that Smith was recovered in an ex- tremely exhausted condition. He was attended by Dr. Brown and removed to the Guest Hospital at Dudley, where he is progressing sat isfad,ori ly. When Smith was rescued alive the rescue party continued their operations, and after half an hour's strenuous work found the dead body of Morris. 1 I

CITIZEN SUNDAY FOR LONDON

CITIZEN SUNDAY FOR LONDON. Announcement is already made that Sunday, October 2.5th, has been selected as Citizen Sunday for London. In a notice signed by leading clergymen and ministers of many denominations it is stated: The conditions of the modern world have so completely changed that mere almsgiving no longer corresponds with the nature of Christian obliga- tion. It is merely to mock the wants of men and women when we offer them an alms to supplement that which they have received as insufficient wages for their work. True charity must begin by seeking to secure tha.t hard-working and honest men and women have enough wages (with reasonable homes and decent conditions) to maintain them in health and strength and to enable them to provide for themselves. At present in a great number of cases tihe wages of honest labouring people are not enough. Adequate wages are the necessary basis of industrial effi- ciency, and in lending our influence to secure such wages we are following the commands of prudence and of human- ity, as well as of religion."