Collection Title: Amman Valley Chronicle

Provider: The National Library of Wales

Rights: The copyright status or ownership of this resource is unknown.

View full details

First Previous Image 4 of 4
Full Screen
16 articles on this page
THE OMNIBUS I

THE OMNIBUS. I [Things Seen and Heard by the Conductor.\ Who is the County Eye Specialist? 'I ? Nearly all proverb^ are improved by being turned upside down. A bottle of King Edward's Royal Ale this week fetched 30s. In answer to a correspondent, we have not heard of any shortage of leeks. ? ? The J-a-a-s has not yet made its debut in Amman ford but the 'Flu has. The Amir of Afghanistan adopted the title of Lamp of the Nation and Religion." Cheese is to be reduced from ta. 8d. to 8d. per lb. So the Ministry of Food announces. ? During the past four years there has been a remarkable increase in the consumption of tobacco. The Government is taking steps to deal with house famine and profiteering among landlords. j ? *'•, The Carmarthen road labourers are likely to declare a strike on the 16th March. Quite an epidemic." The Flu has again appeared in the Amman Valley. A boom is expected in the sale of masks. ? It is estimated that there are 300,000 more women of a marriageable age than men in the British Isles; There was quite a rush of motor-cans on the Bettws Road on Thursday evening last. Was it the Jaas? ? The Amman Valley miners are struck on striking, and they agree that it is a striking subject. ? More spirits released from bond prompts one to suggest this as another opportunity for Sir A. Conan Doyle. The visit of a Colonial team to Amman- ford is practically on the sheLf." Nothing further has been decided upon. furt her has been decided upon. The water supply to Ffairfach is going to cost the Llandilo Rural District Council £ 135 per annum. Quite an expensive drink. ? St. David's Day is on Saturday. At Ammanford, Brynamman, and other places, functions will be held to celebrate the event. ? ? A member of the Llandilo Board of Guar- dians complained at the last meeting of the shortage of whisky. Rather a dry sub- ject. The many excuses nowadays for the absence of children from school is the in- ability of the parents to provide suitable foot- wear. It is reported that butter is being sold in West Wales market towns at 3s. and even 3s. 6d. per lb., whereas the maximum is only 2s. 6d. ? The parish of Quarter-bach has now entered a period of prosperity, said the Chair- man of the Llandilo Board of Guardians on Saturday last. ? West Wales farmers complain that labourers who were demobilised are not returning to the land, and have obtained work at the collieries. ? Labour is making a bold fight for recog- nition at Ammanford. A Labour candidate has been chosen to stand for the forthcoming County Council election. Arrangements are in hand, says the Post- master-General, for restoring some of the sus- pended collections and deliveries of letters curtailed during the war. lit serious cases of accidents, the Amman I Valley has to rely upon the Swansea Hos- pital for treatment, and It takes the fastest motor-car aim hour to get there. In its report of a local function, a well- known contemporary states in an apologetical tone, Had we but the- space of the ocean we- Pity tfie poor Editor. -We have no record as to when the last charge of drunkenness was proved at the Ammanford Police Court, nor as to when the Government Ale was introduced. A miner in the Amman Valley has openly boasted that during the taking of the strike ballot he recorded his mark in favouir of the down tools policy on five separate occa- sions. ? The proposal of the British Admiraltyia that the German Fleet now interned at Scapa Flow shall be taken out into deep water in the Atlantic, and there solemnly sunk. A drama of the deep. Do not waste money on dnjgs in the false hope of preventing infection. "-official instructions of the Local Government Board to Local Authorities for the prevention and combatting of influenza. ves not ice that The Home Secretary gives notice that Summeime will be brought into force this year on the morning of Sunday, March 30th, and will continue until the night of Sunday- Monday, September 28th-29th. Even the young men sympathised with the housemaid who was compelled to retuin indoors earlier to make preparations for the satisfying of her employer's inner man on the next day. A fo(u)wl story. ? ? The Sospans created a world's record on Saturday last by defeating the third Colonial team in succession in the space of a month. Ike Fowler, the Ammanford half- back, assisted the Scarlets on all three occa- sions. I'll sink every bottle to the bottom of the sea shrieked the wild-eyed lecturer. Thank Gawd," came fervidly from the gallery. "A convert there!" yelled the temperance advocate. What's your trade, friend A diver!" came back the reply, ind the lecturer fainted. Mr. J. R. Clynes, speaking at the annual dinner of the Manchester Press held recently; said he had good reasons for believing that responsible leaders of the coal-miners, transport workers, and others were doing their best to exert a moderating influence upon their followers, recognising that any upheaval must affect the entire interests of the masses of the nation. ? Some of the knuts do meet with un- fortunate mishaps nowadays. While on a visit to the  visit to the skatmg rink not a hundred miles from Swansea, one was compelled to return to his home attired in his pars overalls. It appears that the wheel of the roller skate came off, with the result that the leg of his trousers became entangled, and there was a rip. What a ripping time!

Outlines of Local Government

Outlines of Local Government I [By Rev. J. GRIFFITHS, B.A., B.D.] I EDUCATION. I I.-Historical Introduction. I Steps in the Creation of a National System of Education. I The creation of a national system of edu- cation began in (1) 1833, when the first reformed House of Commons voted S.20,000 to be used for the purposes of education." At that time the greater part of the elementary schools of England and Wales, which were of any value, were maintained by two Associations, viz., The National Society, which was devoted to the interests of the Established Church; and The British and Foreign School Society, which was almost entirely Non- conformist. The Treasury recognised- these two bodies and follewed their advice in the distribution of the grant, which was used for the building of schools, on condition that half the cost was met by the voluntary sub- scription. From that slime onward much attention was given to the subject, and in (2) 1839 the first really decisive step was taken by an Order in Council, which estab- lished a Special Committee of the Privy Council, under the Lord President, to ad- minister the grants. All schools in receipt of public money were to be subject to inspection by the new authority. Year by year after that date the grants for elementary education were increased, and were accompanied by grants to institutions founded by private societies (chiefly denominational) for the training of teachers; the pupil teacher, Queen's Scholarships and certification systems were founded; the Science and Art Department developed; and in (3) 1856, the Central Authority was re- organised, and a Vice-President appointed, who 'was intended to be the real Minister of Education. But in spite of all this, progress was very slow, and in (4) 1861, a Royal Commission reported that only about one-seventeenth of the chil- dren of the poor were receiving an education which could be deemed satisfactory even with the low standard of that time. But for nine years nothing was done. Then came in (5) 1870 the great Elementary Education Act, introduced by Mr. Forster, which Ac is the foundation on which the present system is based. It recognised and aided the already existing voluntary schools, but as these w«e insufficient to provide for the needs of all the children, it directed that there shall be provided for every school district a sufficient amount of accommodation in public elemen- tary schools for all the children resident in that district, for whose elementary education efficient and suitable provision is not other- wise made." In other words, the State undertook the duty of seeing that every child could obtain a proper elementary education. For this purpose bodies selected ad hoc were created and were known as School Boards. In the schools so maintained by Local Authorities, no formulary or creed distinctive of any particular denomination was permitted to be taught. At first, attendance at school was compulsory onjy in districts where the School Boards chose to make bye-laws to that effect, but by legislation in (6) 1876, education was made compulsory, and it became the duty of every parent to see that his child received a proper elementary education. What Is now included in this term is now defined in a Code issued by the Board of Education. The funds of the School Boards were sup- plied from four sources: (a) Fees paid by the children; (b) The fee-grant made by Parliament in lieu of fees; (c) Annual grants made by the Board of Education (d) The school rate. (7) In 1891 a further step was taken, and education was made free. Every school dis- trict was required to provide a sufficient num- ber of free places for those requiring them. II.-The Education Act, 1902. The whole of the national system of educa- tion was re-organised by the Education Act of 1902 (with the London Education Act, 1903). That Act (1) To a great extent assimiliated Volun- tary Schools to Board Schools; (2) Re-christened both classes, calling the former Non-Provided Schools, and the latter Provided Schools; (3) Abolished School Boards and handed over their duties to certain of the existing Authorities; (4) Determined the constitution of the body of managers of every elementary school, and provided for the represen- tation of Local Authorities on such bodies; (5) Co-ordinated elementary and secondary education (6) Placed the duty of maintenance of all schools on the Local Education Autho- rities ,but prevented any interference by them in the religious teaching given in Non-Provided Sthools. Under the provisions of this Act the powers connected with the administration of educa- tion are variously distributed amongst the following Authorities:— (ii.) The Board of Education. This Board, which is assisted by a Consultative Com-, mittee of 18 appointed by the President for six years, exercises a general control over the action of the inferior authorities. (ii.) The Local Education Authority. For purposes af Higher Education this is always the County Council; for purposes of Elemen- tary Education it is the County Councils in counties, the Town Council in borough with a population of over 10,000, and the Urban District Council in urban districts with a population of over 20,000. The London I County Council is the Local Education Authority for the capital. The Local Edu- cation Authority is a rating authority, and has throughout its area all the powers and duties of the old School Boards and School Attend- ance Committees. As regards Non-Provided Schools (the old Voluntary Schools), how- ever, its powers are limited to the control of the secular part of the education given, and it cannot interfere with the discretion of the managers as to the religious part. It is (i.e., If a County Council) to supply, or aid the supply of education other than elementary, and to promote the general co-ordination of all forms of education. The expenses in- curred by the Local Education Authority are generally to be paid out of the County Fund, the Borough Fund or rate, or the poor rate, according as the Authority is itself a County Council, Borough Council, or Urban District Council. (iii.) An Education Committee. As a rule, a maiority of the members of this must be appointed by the Local Education Autho- rity from its own members, and as to the rest provision is made in the Act for the repre- sentation of outside interests, for the co-option of persons of experience in education," and for the appointment of women. The Com- miftee is to consider all matters relating to the exercise by the Local Education Authority of its powers; with the exception of powers of rating and borrowing, these may even be entirely delegated to the Committee. (iv.) The Managers. As a general rule each school is to have a separate body of managers,' six in number. These are ap- pointed as follows:— A. In the case of Non-Provided Schools. (a) Wh ere the Local Education Authority is a County Council, four by the Local Edu- cation Authority., and the other two by the minor loca l authority, i. e., the Council of any Borough, Urban District, or Parish which is served by the school. (b) Where the Local Education Authority is itself a Town Council or an Urban Dis- trict Council, all the six by the Authority. B. In the case of Non-Provided Schools. Four managers are to be appointed in accordance with the provisions of the Trust Deed of the school, and the other iwo by the Local Education Authority; but where this is a County Council, only one is to be ap- pointed by the Local Education Authority, and the other by the minor local authority. The managers will have the immediate con- trol of the school. Where this is a Provided School, they wilil be entirely subject to the Local Education Authority in the exercise of their discretion. Where, however, the school is a Voluntary School, the managers must obey the directions of the Local Edu- cation Authority as to the secular instruction to be given, but they must maintain reli- gious instruction in accordance with the pro- visions of the Trust Deed. Hence they have the right to appoint and dismiss teachers, sub- ject to the consent of the Local Education Authority, which, however, must not be with- held except on educational (e.g., non- religious) grounds. They must provide the schoolhouse free of charge to the Local Education Authority and keep it in repair (except as to fair wear and tear," which must be made good by the Local Authority). The Principal Sources of Revenue of a Local Education Authority. (1) The fees paid on behalf of the chil- dren or the proceeds of the Fee Grant Act, 1891 (i.e., the grant of 10s. per head in lieu of fees which is made to all elementary schools) (b) Parliamentary Grants; (c) Loans; (d) The Education Rate. For the purpose of higher education, the Local Education Authority obtains funds from two 'sources:— (1) The wiskey money." (2) The proceeds of a rate which must not exceed a penny in the pound in the case of Urban Councils, or two pence in the pound in the case of County Councils. The Local Government Board can give the County Councils power to exceed this limit in any given case. III.-Legislation Since 1902. 1. Education (A dministrative Provisions) Act, 1907, furnishing Local Education Authorities with power to provide scholarships or bursaries, attendance to health, vacation schools, play centres, &c. 2. Education (Adminitirative Provisions) No. 2 Act, 1911. 3. Mental Deficiency Act, 1913. 4. Elementary Education (Defective and Epileptic Children) Act, 1914. 5. Local Education Authority (Medical Treatment) Act, 1909. 6. Education (Provision of Meals) Acts, 1906 and 1914, administered by Local Edu- cation Authority for elementary education 7. Education (Choice of Employment) Act, 1910. Powers of Councils of county, county borough, non-county borough, and urban district for higher education shall in- clude :— (1) Power to make arrangements subject to the approval of the Board or Education; to (2) Give boys and girls under seventeen years of age assistance with respect to the choice of suitable employment by:— (a) Collection and communication of infor- mation (b) Furnishing of advice. 8. The Fisher Education Bill, 1918. Its principal provisions. The following is a sum- mary of the main provisions of the Bill:— School Attendance. All children must attend school till 14 (w h r (which may be extended to 15). All persons under 18, except those who are receiving full-time education or who have been educated full-time to 16, must attend continuation schools for 320 hours in the year. The attendance will be in the daytime, and will not be required on holidays. Employment. No child under 12 may be employed at all. No child above 12 may be employed on school days except after school hours and before 8 p.m. No child may be employed on days other than school days except between 6 a.m. and 8 p.m. No child may be employed in a manner injurious to himself. No person may be employed during the time he is required to attend continuation schools. Where the Authority think necessary an additional two hours' freedom from employ- ment may be secured on the day when the continuation school is held. Fees. No fees may be charged in continuation schools, and such fees as are still charged in Public Elementary Schools are abolished. Improvement of Education. The following forms of provision for edu- cation and physical welfare are either re- quired or encouraged:— i. Nursery schools. ii. Central schools for the older children from elementary schools. iii. Classes for practical instruction. iv. Holiday and school camps. v. Playing fields. vi. Arrangements for social and physical training. vii. Education for children mremote dis- tricts. viii. Medical inspection of places of higher education. Duties of Authorities. Local Education Authorities are required to frame complete schemes for the provision of all kinds of education in their area, and the' Board are required to see that the schemes are adequate and are carried into effect. Miscellaneous. The limit on the spending power of Autho- rities for higher education is abolished. Combination and co-operation. between Authorities is encouraged and facilitatedr A cheaper and more expeditious procedure for the acquisition of land is introduced. Expenditure on educational meetings and conferences is legalised. Local Education Authorities ate charged with the administration of the law relating to the employment of children, and are enabled to enforce the law with regard to cruelty to children. Education Authorities are enabled to en- courage research The law relating to educational charities is simplified. The system of educational grants is revised, and the principle of a minimum grant of half the Authority's expenditure is introduced. Date of Coming into Force. This varies for different parts of the Act, as shewn below: Now. (1) The power to establish holiday camps, baths, playing fields, and other facilities for social and physical training for young persons and adults." (2) The dutto extend medical inspection and the power to extend medical treatment to Continuation and Secondary Schools. (3) Power to establish Nursery Schools. (4) Power to provide maintenance allow- ances. As Soon as Practicable. (1) The framing of schemes by Local Authorities, (2) Power to inspect Private Schoois: (3) Power to raise the commencing age in Elementary Schools to six. (4) The provision for avoiding broken school terms. After the War. (1) Raising of the compulsory Elementary School age to 14. (2) The setting up of compulsory Con- tinuation Schools (including Works Schools) up to the age of 16. (3) The restrictions, on Employment of Children. Seven Years After the War. Raising the Continuation School age from 16 to 18. The Permissive Clauses. The Act conta,ins many permissive Sec- tions; the Local Authority may do such and such things. Thus:— (a) The Elementary age may be raised from 14 to 6 (b) The Continuation School hours may be fixed at 320 rather than at 280 hours per annum; (c) The hours of child employment may be restricted below the hours specified in the Act; or (d) May be stopped altogether if shewn to be injurious; (e) Medical, treatment may be extended to Continuation and Secondary Schools; (f) Nursery Schools may be established. Bibliography. (1) What an Education Committee Can Do Elementary Schools). Fabian Tract. 3d. (2) The State in Relation to Education. Sir H. Craik. (Masmillan). 3/6. (3) The 1918 Education Act- Explained. By Arnold S. Rowntree. (The Athenaeum Lit. Dept.). 2d. (4) A Guide to the Education Act, 1918. K. E. T. Wilkinson. (Athenaeum Lit. Dept.). 1/6. (5) The Choice Before the Nation: Some Amendments to the Education Bill. (W. E. Association) 2d.

Llandilo Board of Guardians

Llandilo Board of Guardians. Mr. Gomer Harries presided over the moq^hly meeting of the Llandilo Board of Guardians on Saturday last. The other members present were: Mr. J. Richards, Vice-chairman; Mrs. E. A. Roberts, Mr. Arthur Williams, Mr. J. Stephens, Mr. W. Hopkins, Mr. J. Lewis, Mr. Henry Herbert, Mr. C. L. Price, Mr. W. Roberts (Gar- nant) Mr. L. N. Powell, Mr. D. PritchaTd Davies, Mr. W. Williams, Mr. J. Jones, Mr. W. Roberts (Llanfynydd), Mr. D. Davies, Mr. W. Lewis, Mr. Evan Morris, Mr. D. Glyn Jenkins, Mr. John Bevan, Mr. I Theophilus Harries, and Mr. John Hughes; together with the Clerk (Mr. R. Shipley Lewis), the Deputy Clerk (Mr. D. Jones Morris), and the other officials. MASTER'S REPORT. I The Master reported that the number of inmates was 65, against 75 for the corres- ponding period last year. Twenty-eight vagrants had visited the House, against 31 for the corresponding period last year. The members of the Tabernacle Sunday School had given their annual concert at the-House. Services had been held by the Rev. G. Edmund Williams (B.) and the Rev. W. A. Jones (curate). Mr. L. N. Powell proposed a vote of thanks to the members of the Tabernacle, and which was unanimously agreed upon. I LIGHT RAILWAY. I A Committee, consisting of the Chairman, Vice-chairman, and Mr. J. Griffiths, surveyor, Talley, was appointed to attend a conference to be held at Pumpsaint to consider road transport facilities. LIQUOR RESTRICTIONS. I With reference to a circular read on the subject of continuing the liquor restrictions, a member said that it was very clifficult to obtain whisky ror paticntts sutferill from influenza. INDISPOSITION OF MEMBERS. I Mr. Gomer Harries said that they all regretted the absence from their recent meet- ings of three of their members through indis- position, viz., Mr. D. W. Lewis, Bryn- amman; Mr. Evan Davies, Pistillgwyn; and Mr. John Davies, Waunherod, He was glad to tell them that Mr. Lewis was a little better, and took a keen. interest in the pro- ceedings at the Board. He moved a vote of sympathy with them all in their illness, which they all deplored, and -expressed a hope for theiir speedy recovery. Agreed.

IAT EIN GOHEBWYR AC r ERAILL

I AT EIN GOHEBWYR AC r ERAILL. Ysgrifau, Barddoniaeth, Nodion, Hanesion, a Gonebiaelhau i'w hanfon cyn GYN1 ED YN YR WYTHNOS ag y byddo modd i'r GOLYGYDD, CRONICL Dyffryn AMAN," I AMANFORD.

No title

[Er ein bod yn rhoddi pob cyfleustra i ohcbwyr ddatgan eu barn ar gwestiynnau lIeol, nid ydyw hynny i olygu em bod yn cydsynio a'u datiauau.-GOL.)

GLANAMAN

GLANAMAN. Wele ddarlun y cyfaill ieuanc, Tom Davies, mab mabwysiedig Mr. a Mrs. Joseph Jones, Macsyderi, Heol Grenig, Glanaman. Cwympodd. yn y rhyfel mawr yn Ffrainc, ac efe yn 26 mlwydd oed, Tachwedd 4, 1918, wythnos cyn cylioeddiad y cadoediad. Yr ocdd yn ddyn ieuanc towel, distaw, hardd ei ymddangosiad a'i foes, a chwilth fu ei golli mor gynrar. Yr oedd yn aelod ffyadlon a dichlyuaidd yn Eglwys Bryn Seion, Glanaman, lie y cadwyd gwasanaeth coffa Iddo. Y Diweddar Priv. TOM DAVIES, Glanaman. I Griddfanodd fy nghalon ar ei rhawd, Pan glywai 's dy farw, annwyl frawd; Hedodd dy ysbryd i'r wlad sydd well 0 ru magnelau yr Ail fro bell. A bedd dier.w raewa estron wlad Gest rywle yn r fra/nc ar faes y gad. Brined yw'th hanes wrth newid byd- Bu farw wrth ymladd dyna gyd. Er marw yn un o fiMwn a mwy, Mae'm calon yn gwaedu o dan ei chlwy'. Fe fVTI yr unis;cl oi. k o hyd, Ymhlith y m lo dd ym mhrofiad byd. Os nad oes cofadail gan fyd dihedd, Na charreg airw uwch man dy fedd, Fe fyn dy ardal flodeuglwm cu 0 ddyfnaf ei serch uwch dy fangre ddu. Daw dagrau y teulu tan bwys y siom, Dagrau agosaf y galon drom, Dros ewyn y don He y cwympodd Tom. Mae Maesyderi o blygain i osper A'th enw'n fyw ar y wefus bob amser. Os huno yn Ffrainc, ni chei fa,rw yno Tra adgof am danat yn mynnu blodeuo; A charreg ateb i'th fywyd diddan Ym mynwes dy gyfoed yng Nglanaman. Mae'r marw yn medru byw mewn calon, Heb wybod ohoni lie cwsg dy weddill.ion. Huna, fy nghyfaiil, tan gwrlid oer, Gwylier dy feddrod gan Haul a Lloer; Cawn gwrddyd eto, er trymed y groes, Rhwng y pyrth o bed yn y wlad ddiloes. CYFAILL.

CAERBRYN

CAERBRYN. Nos Saboth wythnos ïr diweddaf, yn Peniel (A.), cafwyd pregeth nerthol a grymus ar yr Eglwys Ddelfrydol gan Mr. S. Gwyneu,fryn Davies, Cwmeoch. Yr oedd y He yn orlav.n, ac ni siomwyd neb; ond fe deimlwyd gallu Duw er iachawdwriaeth fel gwefr sanctaidd o alon i galon. Mae'r ochr yma i'w fywyd wedi bod yn dawel am lawer blwyddyn. Dymuniad ni oil ydyw y caiff merth corrf ac ysbryd i ddal hyd ddiwedd ei yrfa, gan fod adnoddau cyfrin y byd ysbrydol yn haenau i' w holl- natur, ac anianawd y Gwr o Nazareth yn ei bersonol- iaeth. Nos Iau a nos Sadwrn diweddaf, petfform- iwyd gan Gwmni Dramayddol y lie y ddrama, Y Prentis Plwyf," dan arweiniad Mr. Henry Morgan, M.E., Blaenau. Cadeiriwyd nos lau gan Mr. David Davies, C.S., Cil- rhedyn; a no; Sadwm gan Mr. Thos. Morgan, M.E., Penygroes. Gwnaeth y ddau foneddwr eu gwaith gydag arddeliad ymhob ystyr. Diolch am ddynion sydd yn gallu trugarhau mewn awr gyfyng bywyd i'w cydfforddolion ym myd amser. Yr oedd yr elw o'r oil i ddau frawd teilwng o'r ardal hon, sef Mr. David Evans, Wernoleu, a Mr. William J. Thomas. Mae y ddau frawd wedi cael eu goddiweddi gan gystudd hir. Ein dymuniad yw am yr ychydig yma i fod o rhyw les a chysur iddynt oddiwrth deimlad caredig eu cyd-frodorion. Yn Peniel, nos Lun diweddaf, cafwyd cyngerdd o'r fath oreu dan nawdd Pwyllgor Croesawi y Milwyr a'r Morwyr y lie. Arwyr y cyfarfod oeddent Priv. Esaiah Evans, Priv. Herbert Rees, a Priv. Tom Jones. Yr oedd y He wedi ei orlenwi ymhell cyn dechreu, er dangos parch a chydymdeimiad a r brodyr. Dyma'r cyfle cyntaf ¡'r brodyr yma i gael cyngerdd yng Ngliymtu oddiar Medi, 1914. Yr oedd Esaiah Evans wedi bod trwy frwydr y Dardanels o'r dechreu i'r diwedd, ac oddi- yno i Mesopotamia. Yr oedd Herbert Rees wedi bod am yn agos i dair blynedd yn Salonica; a Tom Jones wedi bod yn Ffrainc am amser hir. Calondid mawr oedd gweld y tri wedi dod yn ol yn ddianaf. Cadeiriwyd yn ddeheui? fel arfer gan Mr. Morgan, Blaenau. Cymerwyd rhan fel a gan,lyn:- Unawd ar y berdoneg, Miss Alice Davies; pen.i 1 lion, Rhydfab a Tegwen ad- roddiadau, Mrs. Jones, Penygroes, Willie Jenkins, Willie Morgan, T. P. Jones, Ray Roberts, Nellie May Evans, a Wm. Lewis, Penyrheol; unawdau, K. J. Evans, Megan Evans, Mrs. Nicholas, Penygroes, Mr. Wm. Beynon, Llandebie; pedwarawd, Luther a.'i gyfeillion; string quartette, Tommy a'i gyfeillicm; dadl, Dilys a Hettie Evans. Cafwyd i ddiweddu Hen Wlad fy Nhadau gan Mr. Henry W. John. OMEGA. I

IGORSLAS

GORSLAS. Diau gennym fod ardal Gorslas yn wylo ei cholled ar ol y ddynes dawel, Mrs. Rees, Plym Villa, yr hon a fu farw yn sydyn o dan driniaethau meddygol yn Ysbyty Aber- rawe, Chwefror 18. Gwan fu ei hiechyd ers rhai blwyddi, ond yr oedd sydyr. rwydd ei marwolaeth yn gyfryw nad oedd neb yn dychyrnyg am dano. Cludwyd ei gweddillion marwol, y dydd Sadwrn canlynol, i'w daea.ru ym Mrechfa, hen ardal ei genedig- aeth. Yr oedd yno dorf wedi dyfod ynghyd gyda mynwes agored i dderbyn yr angladd, pa un oedd yn cynnwys tua deg o feduron ac er garwed y daith, cafwyd hwylusdod neilltuol i gyrraedd ei phen draw. Gwein- yddwyd yn daer ac apeliadol gan y Parch. J. Thomas, Penygroes (gweinidog y teulu), a'r Parch. Isaac Davies, Nantgaredig. Eiddunwn nodded ac amddiffyn. y Nef dros y perthynasau oil a'r fam oedrannus, a thros y priod a'r un bychan sydd mewn mawr alar ar ei hoi. Dymuna y perthynasau gyflwyno eu diolchgarwch am bob sirioldeb a chymorth a weinyddwyd iddynt yn yr ystorm. J. R.

PENYGROES

PENYGROES. Croesawi Gwýr Cad.-Nos Wener di- weddaf, cynhaliwyd cwrdd croeso i nifer o fechgyn y cyich ar eu dychweliad adref o faes yr heldrin mawr. Cadeiriwyd gan Mr. D. Mainwaring, Caledfryn, Penygroes, yn ei ffordd ddeheuig arferol. CyflwyHwyd y swm arferol "r bechgyn, pa rai a ddiolchasant yn garedig ,j'r pwyllgor am eu sel a' u parch tuag atynt. Angeu'n Medi.-Yr wythnos dd,iweddaf, bu pedair angladd yn y lie uchod, a heSryng- wyd cyfeillidn cu i gyrrau'r wlad lie mae'r wybren fyth yn glir. Ni wnawn roddi manylion ynglyn â hwynt, ond dymunwn i'r galarwyr wenau'r Nef yn eu hadfyd. Os ydym yn colli cyfeillion ar y ddaear, melys meddwl fod yna Un yn aros yn Dad, yn Frawd, yn Ffrind ac yn Gariad ar gyfyng ddydd marwolaeth. Efengyl y Groes.-Saboth diweddaf, darfu j'r bardd a'r lienor hyglod, Mr. S. Gwyneu- fryn Davies, Cwmcoch, Penygroes, lanw pulpud yr enwad yn y lie uchod. Cafwyd odfeuon gwlithog, ac eneiniad y Nef yn amlwg ar y pregethau. Mae Gwyneufryn wedi ei basio i bregethu gan yr Enwad yng Nghwrdd Chwarterol Llanelli, ychydig amser yn ol. Nid oes eisiau i mi ganu clodydd y gwr da uchod; gwyr pawb am ei gymhwys- derau aÏ set dros achos y Meistr Mawr. Deallwn ei fod i bregethu yng Nghwmgwili y Sul nesaf. Llwyddiant, frawd. Gwyl Ddewi.-Sadwm- nesaf, yn Festri y lie uchod, cynhelir eisteddfod i ddathlu Gwyl Ddewi. Cawsom ar dc; :all fod nifer fawr o gorau o bob rhan o'r wlad wedi pender- fynnu cystadlu ar y prif ddarn. Mae' r ornest i fod yn un galed, fechgyn. Deallwn hefyd fod yna argoelion da am gystadleuaeth yn yr adran-nau eraill. Ni chlywsom faint sydd i fewn ar y bryddest; pur debyg fod y beirdd wedi torchi ati. Cymerir y gadair yn brydton am 5 o'r gloch gan Mr'Rhydfab Rees. Mae swn traed tyrfaoedd yn tyrru tua'r lie ers ciyddiau. Os am wledd na cheir ei chyffelyb eto yng Nghymru, ewch yno y Sadwrn nesaf. Drama.—Nos Sadwm diweddaf, cafwyd perfformiad o' r ddrama, "Y Prentis Plwyf," gan Gwmni Dramayddol Caerbryn a' r Blaenau yn Ysgoldy'r Cyngor, Blaenau, pryd y cadeiriwyd gan Mr. T. Morgans, M.E., Penygroes. Cafwyd arai,th hyawdl gan Mr. Morgans o'r gadSir, yn yr hon y dywedodd y dylasai r bechgyn ieuainc ddat mantais ar eu cyfieusterau i hyrwyddo achosion da; fod gwell mantais ganddynt nag oedd gan ein tadau pan oeddent yn gweithio naw a deg awr. E-ithaf gwir, nid ydym well o gael oriau byr os na wnawn well defnydd ohonynt. Yr oedd y Ile yn orlawn, a'r elw yn mynd i ddau frawd sydd wedi colli eu hiechyd ers amser maith. HEDYDD Y BORE.

ODL CROESAWI I

ODL CROESAWI Priv. Gwilym Davies, Waungron, Blaenau, Llandeie, ar ol brwydro am fisoedd yn ffosydd y rhyfel dros hawliau a rhyddid ei w,lad, a ddarllenwyd yn Peniel, Caerbryn, Ionawr 27, 1919. Croeso, fy nghyfaill, o erwau'r drin I dangnef dy henfro fad; Gwn fod ei swynion i ti yn win, iipl, diodde dros hawliau'th wlad. I Mae'th ardal yn gyfan yn gwenu Wrth ganifod Gwilym yn nhre; Gwn fod curiadau dy galon di Yn sisial Amen trwy'r lie. Hwyliaist yn wrol dros donnau'T Hi I swn y megnyl a'u rhoch; Ac engyl yn gwylio'th gamrau di, Ar adain gweddi Cwmcoch. -Pwy fesur deimladau'r hen Jonah, A gloew ddeigryn dy fam, Wrth dderbyn eu Gwilym i'r aelwyd Adre o'r Eidal bob cam? RHYDFAB HENDRE. I

DYCHWELIAD Y MILWR I

DYCHWELIAD Y MILWR. I Dychwelyd mae ein milwyr Bob dydd o faes y gwaed, A balch yw Uu eu gweled Ar Gymru' n rhoi eu traed "Rol bod mewn erchylil frwydrau Yn Ffrainc a Fflanders draw, Rhagluniaeth fawr ei hunan A roddes iddynt law. Dychwelyd wnaeth y mi'lwr, Rol goddef tywydd blin; Cynhesrwydd ar adegau, Bryd arall oeraidd hin. Cadd newyn mawr a syched, Nes ofni bron cael byw Dychwelyd wnaeth y milwr, Am dano cofiodd Quw. Dychwelyd wnaeth y milwr, 'Rol bod yn.g ngwlad y tan, Y n Salonica gynnes, Yr Aifft a Salem lan. Pan ganfu cysgod gartref, Dechreuodd daro tant; Ac unwyd yn y miwsig Gan siriol wraig a phlant. Dychwelyd wnaeth y milwr, 'Rol rhoi i'r gelyn giwy", A thaflu arfau rhyfel- I'r wadd a'r ystlum mwy. A chwifio baner Heddwch Trwy Brydatn Fawr bog dam; Ond Ha! mae ilawer milwr Ni ddychweI-aeth ,i't fam. JOHN F. JAMES. Lttvypt-uya I. ;:ih

I Y SOSIALYDD GLOFAOL i

I Y SOSIALYDD GLOFAOL, i t Dyma ftoeddiwr am gyfiawnder Ac am ryddid i bob dyn Aiff i boced pob un arall Ond i'w boced ef ei hun. Meddwi wna ar eiddo arall; Cyll bob tegwch yn ei wane > Am gael arian ei gyd-ddynion < Ar ei enw yn y bane. Rhaid l r gweithiwr dalu ato, id I gwel .4 Nid trwy degwch ond trwy drais. Ei ofyrion oil bob ceimog, A rhaid peidio codi Hais; Neu j'r offis a yn union, A rhydd ordor yn dd-" (' 'd Fod rhaid stopo John neu Dafydd, Neu fod streic yn siwr o fod. Rhaid ï r swyddog roddi notis I r hen weitbiwr ar ei gais, i-od rhaid iddo i ymadael Drwy y Caisar hwn a'i drais. Uyma gauad drws ei bantry, Ni fydd ganddo fwyd ï w blant; v charff waith yn unman aran, Heb y transfer rhid mynd bant. Pwy a dyr y gadwyn haiarn Sydd am wddf y glowr tlawd? Gwaih rhyw Sec." o'r Federation, Diegwyddor at ei frawd. Dyma'r tyrant mv.-yar welodd GIowyr tawd C ym ru ion Dyn sy'n v-imiso'i gyd-Lldyii Ac i w dafiu tan y don. I EHEDYDD CAERBRYN.

I CYFLWYNEDIG

I CYFLWYNEDIG Mr. Willie Rees, Brynpedol Farm, Bryn, aman, a Miss Nellie Michael, Emporium. Garnant, ar eu huniad mewn glan briodas- Mae Willie Rees, Brynpedol, Hawddga.r lane, hawddgar lane, Mewn rhwymyn priodasol Fel y bane. Fe fu y bachgen tawe I Ar faes yr erchyil ryfel, Yng ncrhwmrl'r cledd a magnel; Ond heddyw daeth i gornel, Fe idaliwyd gan Miss Michael, Do, hyd dranc, Mae 'nawr yn eithaf diogel Fel y bane. Gwnest wyrth o'r diwedd, Nellie, Do, yn wir; do, yn wir, Trwy ddal y gwron Willie, Do, yn wir. Yr hen Germaniaid pygddu, Er iddynt ei garcharu, A hanner ei newynu, Methasant—do, er hynny, Orchfygu'th annwyl Willie, Ond concraist dïr .hall allu, Do, yn. wir; Hwre! Hwre! i Nellie, le'n wir. Hawddamor ï r briodas, le'n wir, ie'n wir, Y naill i'r llall fo' n urddas, Ie'n wir. Tra'r Aman yn telori, A'r Garnant is y twyni, O! bydded ces o ganu A seiniau lwli babi, Ac aelwyd fel y liii I Willie hoff a Nellie Yn ein Sir, Yw gweddi Dan a'i gwmni, le'n wir. HEN LAW.

MILWYR ABERGWILI

MILWYR ABERGWILI. Ar Iwyfan cyngerdd a gynhaliwyd yn y lie uchod, lonawr 26, ,1919, anrhegwyd deu- ddeg o'r milwyr oedd wedi eu dl,arfogi o*r Fyddin, gan Mrs. a Miss Owen, Bishop's Palace. Fel fforest frith ar fore teg Addument hwy cin llwyfan gu, Isgadben irf ac un at ddeg Ddeiweddent gewri Cymru Fu CyflwyftVvyd iddynt roddion hud Am euraidd ffrwyth eu llafur drud. Eiriannai'r dorf eu clodydd gwych F el eira gwyn yn toi y tir, 'Roedd ambell ddewr yn wydr-ddrych 0 gynÏ r gwae a "r brwydro hir; Plant fferm, y bwth, a'r plas oent hwy, Diarfog wyr, ceriwbiaid mwy. Pan dorrodd Cad yr Almaen draw Dilerau hedd arwyddwyd gynt, Gollyngwyd atom saethau braw A gwaeau fil orlwythau'r gwynt: Aeth plant ein pentre fel i wledd, Pob un âÏ glun dan loew gledd. Dros Belgium friw a'r Eidal dlos, Trwy ddwr a than dan felldith Iryrll-- Mewn peiriau lu mewn ffau a ffos, Nes cyrraedd bro Calfaria Fryn Daliasant yno wawrddydd hedd, I'r caddug brwd cloddiasant fedd. Rhydd Salonica yma swyn, Y Dardanels, aur rynnau Ffrainc, Lie huna ein gwror.iaid mwyn, Lie cwyrnpodd brad o" orseddfainc. Mae'r beddau fyrdd yn mron y fam, A mynych draw ei chalon lam. Eu gwedd i ni sy'n for o hedd, Mae r lleia'n fwy na'r Wyddfa fawr; I'w rhamant chwai pwy wthia gledd? Pwy dyn eu heirdd goronau i lawr? Eu dewredd yn y ddrycin dan Glodwynna Walia, gwlad y gan. Hawddamor! Gymry, gwyn eich byd, Colofnau bri a fyddwch mwy; Eich henwau gerfir eto'n glyd Ar bared calon lan ein pl wy' Fel pesga'r GwiLi rwysg y m6r, Gwnewch chwithau anrhydeddu' ch lor. DYFFRYNOG.

SUDDEN DEATH AT BRYNAMMAN

SUDDEN DEATH AT BRYNAMMAN. The death kas occurred suddenly of Mrs. Jones, the respected landlady of the Crown Hotel, Lower Brynamman. It appears that on Monday morning the deceased lady was in the act of ascending the stairs, when she faltered and was taken seriously ill. Dr. Corkey was called in, but she expired shortly afterwards. Deceased was about 66 years of age, and leaves to mourn their loss three- daughters-Mrs. Hopkins, Ystalyfera; Misses Hilda and Leonora Jones, C.R.A.M. Bryn- amman; and two sons-Messrs. Trevor and Griffith John Jones.

NSPCC AND CHILD NEGLECT

N.S.P.C.C. AND CHILD NEGLECT. The National Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Children investigated 3,058 com- plaints of neglect and cruelty in England, Wales and Ireland during the month of January. Of the 2,993 completed cases, 2,930 were found true, affecting the welfare of 8,378 children and involving 3,736 offenders. Warnings were issued in 2,612 cases, 131 were prosecuted (resulting in 127 convictions), and 187 were dealt with by transfer or in any other ways. From its foun- dation in 1884 the Society has dealt with 1,015,887 complaints, involving 2,860.; children. In the Carmarthen and Pembroke Counties Branch during the same month 21 cases were dealt with, affecting 47 children. The local office of the Society is situated at Peuhyn, "_Waterloo Terrace, Carmar- t h en. N PTiated and Published by the Amman Valley ChroakJe, Limited, at their Offices, Quay StMet, Ammanford, in the County of Cag- marthen, February 27th, 1919.