Collection Title: Cambrian Daily Leader

Provider: The National Library of Wales

Rights: The copyright status or ownership of this resource is unknown.

View full details

First Previous Image 6 of 6
Full Screen
29 articles on this page
THE POSITION IN FRANCE

THE POSITION IN FRANCE. ■ LATEST WIRES. t ALLIES AGAIN IN CONTACT WITH INVADERS ON THE LEFT WING. SITUATION GOOD. The following messages, to hand this morning, indicate the latest position of affairs in France. The general situation is summed up in a Press Bureau communication pub- lished elsewhere. Paris, Monday, 12.25 a.m.—An official communique reports that the armies on the French left wing have regained con- tact with the enemy's right on the banks of the Grand Morin SITUATION GOOD. An Important Engagement. Paris, Sunday, J.35 p.m.—An official :omruunique say. Yesterday's engagement between the advanced defence force? and the German right wing assumed large proportions. To- day we advanced as far as Ourcq without encountering great resistance. The situa- tion of the Allied armies appears good as =! whole. Maubeuge continues to resist heroically. Our Advantage." I Paris, Sunday. -The following official communique was issued at three o'clock this afternoon:— The troops of the advanced defence based Oil Paris were in touch yesterday with adverse forces, which were ap- parently covering on the Ourcq towards the south-east, the movement of the bulk of the German right wing. The small Pliagemnt which ensued turned to our udvantase." NO PANIC, The Calm of the Parisians. I Renter's raris correspondent tele- graphs: The latest news from the front, indicating that the pressure of the Ger- man arms on Paris is dec reasing, has pro- duced a reassuring effect here, although at no time has there been any suggestion of panic. Another factor inspiring the Parisians with confidence is the presence of the Amfericaa Ambassador, Mr. Her- I -ick, which is regarded as a guarantee against excesses in the event of German occupation. Mr. Herrick is aided in his arduous duties of serving the interests of many different nations by the advice and co-operation of Mr. Bacon, a former Am- bassador. whose French sympathies are well-known. GREAT GERMAN LOSSES. I 42,000 Identification Plates. I Antwerp, Saturday.—A sack containing 42.000 identification plates of Germans w ho have been killed has been conveylid to Brussels from France and Belgium. They are destined for Berlin. Ob- server. [Note: This does not, of coarse, repre- sent anything like the estimated Ger- man losses oil all their fronts.1 MORE RANSOMS. I Cigars Included This Time: I Boulogne, Sunday.—The "Telegramme" J to-day says that the Prefet du Nord has j been imprisoned in the Prefecture at Lille. The Germans demand 4x ransom of 7,000,000f. ( £ 280,000). At Armentierers they were content with 50Q,000f. ( £ 20,000*). At Amiens they have demanded 1,000,000?. ( £ 40,000) and 100,000 cigars. Lens has been ransomed for 700,000f. "Times" Special Correspondent. HOCH! I Kaiser Watches the Firing. I unsterdam, Sept. 6.—The following 'I telegram has been received here from Berlin:—" Attacks are being made on the forts of Nancy in the presence of the I Emperor and the General Staff." u At Metz Now. » ran?, Monday.— 1 ue Excelsior" Bale correspondent telegraphs that the German I Empero: and the headquarters staff are I now reported to he at Metz. LOSSES AT LUNEVILLE. I German Remnant Compelled to Surrender. I The correspondent of the Journal at Cette relates a story told him by the commander of a German battalion, de- scribing the circumstances in which he was taken prisoner. There were some 5,000 men massed in the fort at Luneville, when they were surprised by French artillery, which bombarded them for two hours. When there were only 300 men left, the I commander called together the 21 officers ftnd non-commissioned officers who re- mained, and it was unanimously decided to hoist the white flag, all further resist- ance having become impossibie.-Reuter. AWAITING THE CALL. I Maronites Ready to Fight for France. Paris, Monday.—The New York I Herald publishes the following telegram from Port Said .— Mgr Hoyak, Patriarch of Maronia. has informed the French Government at Beirut that 6,000 Maronites are awaiting he At at call to take their places in the I French ranks I NORTH-WEST I (Nrmans Advance Between Ghent and I Antwerp. OsteiW, Monday—The Germans advanced Yesterday in a north-westerly direction from Brussels, between Ghent and Antwerp. This morning all telegraph and railway pom in anication was interrupted between these two towns. Several hotels have closed here for fear bf an invasion. Yesterday, an engagement took place .t Mordegem, near Massemen. Chasseurs, Icouts, and cyclists, sent a patrol to Mordegem, where Uhlans were report sd. The patrol was joined by other Chasseurs lind Gendarmes, but soon found itself in the presence of 200 Uhlans, who opened kre. Our soldiers replied. At the same Hme a iarge number of cyclists emerged trom a wood, tiring into the Belgian sear. Major Deconinco was killed. Refore the big number of. the enemy, the I Belgians had to retire. ¡ ANOTHER TRAWLER LOST, I A nùu trawle has been sunk by a I 8ine. Two men were drowned. [

1 UNDER FIRE

1 UNDER FIRE HOW THE BRITiSH I SOLDIER FIGHTS. :COOl AND CALM, AND BRAVE BEYOND ALL PRAISE. I I I THE LOST PIPE. The Tii-iies to-day publishes a wonderful story told by a Belgian corre- spondent in the ,beld of the British troops in action. By the most wonderful chance (writ?s the correspondent) 1 happened to be in the Briti.su imps in Belgium just when the great battle of Charleroi began, a tight that will remain inscribed in lettrs ci blood on the scroll ot History. 1 was the only \Var Correspondent present at the acLuat theatre of w?r at the time, and I shall always bless my good fortune m ('mg a wnnesb 01 this gigantic combat i? only because it e?tabusucd for ever the reno? n of the British Army alld ¡ afforded me the opportunity of seeing with wondering admiration the BritlslJ soldier under tire. ¡ It was at Mons, on Saturday, August 22. The first outpost engagements were ginning, and the British troops, who had only arrived on the scene the came morn-! ing. immediately entered the battle with-; out even a moment's rest. In a few hours j Mons was put in a state of defence, and you should have seen those s work- ing. Trenches were dug and the brklgèb I barricaded by eager hands, in sight of: such willingness and such irresistible gaiety, you would never have thought j that these men were ou the eve of a ter-; rible battle. Personally 1 could not heip j feeling that I was only watching a niali- i ceuvre scene, for the phlegm and the iio;i- chalence of these soldiers would never j have permitted one to suppose that the; enemy were only a few miles away. Gallant soldiers' What immense fideuce they inspired: At the sight ot I them, so calm and so resolute, the people i of Motto, panic-stricken only a lew hours before, suddenly seemed to gain a irc-.i;h!2 store of courage and almost a sence of 1 security. Prodigies of Heroism. The battle went on for lour day*, and throughout this period tne British Army, as i am prouu to declare, performed i prodigies ot heroism to check the German advance. On the Sunday, August -aid, the Germans, who were infinitely superior in numbers, made vigorous efforts to pre-I vent the British from retiring in good order, and tried to drive thevi back on Maubeuge. The hrirauvs and skill with which the British retreat was conducted foiled this attempt, and considerable losses,far higher, tnan ours, were in. flicted on the enemy, whose compact and cuormuus masses, ?ltrlc?ci at the British troops, were repeatedly driven back. The fighting on the 6th, near tam- brai, was dour and desperate. There. I again, the British troops made the most splendid resistance in a position in which j they had to make up for their inferiority in numbers b.) the rapidity of thfeir inovements. Several regiments charged six times, running. Nevertheless, they extricated themselves from their danger- ous situation, and eventually fell back in good order, though with heavy losses from the most terrible artillery fire I have ever seen. During this memorable day, on which I! 'learnt to appreciate at their full worth! the admirable qualities of the British sol- dier, one incident which may be cited among hundreds of others is the charge of the German Cavalry Division of the Guards against the ]^th British Infantry Brigade. It was a terrible charge. After a desperate bout of hand-to-hand fighting, j men and horses mixed up together in a seething, compact mass, the German cavalry was repulsed and fled in utter disorder, the lads of the 12th Brigade giv- ing them the bayonet in the back. Then there was that brilliant fight put up by the 5th British Cavalry Brigade, commanded .by General Chetwode, against the German cavalry. The 12th Lancers and the Royal Scots Greys particular! distinguished themselves, routing the Germans, thanks to prodgies of valour worthy of ancient history, and making a large number of prisoners after a bril- lhn t pursuit. These are but a few notable instances of what was done almost all along the battle front during these engagements. Dearly the Germans paid for their ad- vance. The Sotdier and his Lost Pipe. I What impressed above all were the coolness and dash of the British soldier. His utter indifference to danger, and his general air of Don't care," simply carried me away. At moments of critieal danger I have seen him worrying as to when he was to get his cup of tea horn his little travelling: kitchen- 1 shall never forget the admirable re- ply given by an English soldier, wounded] in the hand. whom I found sitting by the j roadside outside Mons wearing an air ofl consternation. I began to talk to him and asked him if bis wound was hurting him. It's not that, he said, with a doleful shake of his head, but I'm blessed if I haven't beeD a Ilrl lost my pipe in that last charge." I gave him mine, and he was instantly comforted. 1 asked another what he thought of the Germans and he said: "They are like flies; the more you kill, the more there seem to be." That was the extent of the impressions he had received during that awful fight, and he gave me his answer j with a merry laugh showing a glint of very white teeth. I saw others going under fire v. ith a football attached to their knapsacks. The Soldier's Humanity. There is another thing which struck me j enormously, and that is the ligimanitv of! the British soldier when. the fighting is done. In battle lie is superb. He puts, into the fight all his energy, ill his in- doroitable pluck, and he deals terrible blows at the enemy. But when the battle, is over, his first thought is of humanity, The British do not exult over the enemy's losses. They try to snatch from death as many of their enemies as possible. After the battle, the men with whom they have just crossed blades are no longer enemies. They are, in their eyes, just poor wounded fellows. This solicitude, great-hearted as i it is, after hard fighting, will always re- j dound to the honour of the British Army,

14AFOD BROTHERHOOD SOLDIERS

14AFOD BROTHERHOOD SOLDIERS. The Rev. O. J. Owen i. Caersalem, Tre- i boeth), gave a stirring address at the Hafod Brotherhood on Sunday, and solos were rendered by Miss May Barnacottj aud Mr. A. Williams. Miss Daisy Jones accompanied during the afternoon. Mr. T. Isaac occupied the chair. During the afternoon presentations were made to Bros. A. Williams and A. Nash, who are leaving the town. Twelve members of this Brotherhood have joined Kitchener's Army. Each one joining will receive a Bible from the Brotherhood at Hafod. The members who have joined and who happened to be in the meeting were heartily cheered- f 1

RUSSITAI i

RUSSITA. i — ANOTHER STEP FORWARD AUSTRIAN TROOPS ASK TO BE TAKEN paisonifis I.. "LIFE IMPOSSIBLE." Still further reports, are to hand of the Russian advance, trom which it will be seen that their menace to Germany is becoming daily more serious. Petrograd.The following official state- ment is issued here:— Sanguinary fighting continues along the front from Lublin to Kholm. where the 10th Austrian Army Corps made an at- tempt to break through ti'.e Russian line. The Austrians were heavily repaised, and 5,01) were taken prisoners.. The Russians secured various documents, in which Austrian Generals made urgent appeals for help from Germany in Galicia. Thirty locomotives and an immense amount of rolling stock were cap- tured. When the Russians entered the railway station at Lemburg they found it crowded with trains loaded with muni- tions of war, dyamite, benzine, and medi- cal stores cal stores, captured the station so suddenly ..hat three motor cars which were on the point of leaving fell into their hands. !n the neighbourhood of Zooleu a German aeroytane was brought down and the aviator captured. At Vlotslavsk a German armoured train coming from Alexandrova attempted to shell the town, I but was beaten off. General Samsonoff's Death. I Petrograd.—General Samsonoft, who was killed in liast Prussia after five davs" fighting, met with a heroie end. Being warned that he was in a too-exposed position, the general replied, "My place is with my men." Shortly afterwards a shell exploded, killing him and most of his staff.—Press Association War Special. I OFFICIAL SUMMARY. Surrender of a Whole Austs-ian Regiment. Petragrod, Sunday.—The following com- munique has been issued by the staff of the Generalissimo: On September 4 the Russian troops continued their energetic offensive along the whole Austrian line. The enemy's I centre suffered most from the Russian at- tacks. In the district west of Krasnos- tawce the 15tb Regiment of Infantry was surrounded and surrendered to a man, with its commander. 11 othcers, and 1,600 soldiers. A German division, which was marching to the help of the Austrians, was attacked on the left bank of the Vistula. The Russian troops have occupied the region of Strje, and the Russian cavalry is al- ready amongst the passes of the Carpa- thians. On the East Prussian front there have been ouly insignificant skirmishes The Russians fired on and captured near Seradz a Zeppelin airship and 30 occupants, including two stair officers and two gunners, together with explosives, plans, and photographs. They alst) brought down an aeroplane in which was an Austrian colonel, During the last iwo days 130 Austrian officers and 7,000 men, prisoners of war, have passed through Minsk, en route for Smolesnsk.—Reuter Special. ADVANCINQ WEST. I The March on Przemyst. I Rome, Monday.—A Russian, official report dated Saturday states that the Russian troops are gradually surrounding the important fortified town of Przemysl, some 55 miles west of Lemherg. [Premysd, which has important indus- tries, was strongly fortified" in 1874. It has a population of 46,300, about one-I third being Jews.] LIFE IMPOSSIBLE." I Austrians Ask to be Captured. I Rome, Monday .—According to advices! which have reached here. the Austrians I still continue their flight south-west of J"ernl)ei-g. Li-e;-vwilf-re the Russians are collecting cannon and quantities of arms j abandoned hy the enemy, while a whole detachment asked of its own free will tot be made prisoners, saying the rigour of I the officers, together with the privations -;uft* re(I owing to the lack of everything, I made life impossible.

BRITONFEHRY RECRUITING I MEETING

BRITONFEHRY RECRUITING MEETING. On the initiative of Mr. W. Te Davne.«, commercial manager of the Britouferrv Steel Co., Ltd., a meeting of representa- tives of all public bodies has been called) for this evening, in ordet. to discuss ques- j tions of national defence and make "rangemen ts for a mass meeting to be held next Saturday. n

NEATH AND DISTRICT ATHLETIC I CORPS i

NEATH AND DISTRICT ATHLETIC CORPS. Mr. Arthur L. David, of Caergrocs, j Cadoxton, Neath, has circularised all the cricket and football secretaries with the idea of forming an athletic corps for N!'ath and district. The circular states, that the corps will meet for drilling only, which will take place on the Neath foot;- | hall ground. A preliminary meeting is to be held this (Monday) evening to dis- cuss the appointment of a duly qualified drill instructor.

I BEQUESTS TO SERVANTS BEQUESTS TO SERVANTS I

BEQUESTS TO SERVAN?TS. | BEQUESTS TO SERVANTS, I Mrs. Meaner Mary Methuen, of Liwstwyddyn. Pumpsaint, Llanwrda, Car- marthen, who died on May 27th last, the widow of Lieutenant Colonel Charles Lucas Methuen, left estate of the gross value of Jj7,906, of which t7,628 is net personalt,y, and probate has been granted to her son, Captain Cameron Obey en Harford Methuen, Capt. Henry Roope Pomeroy Salmon, and Mr. Hugh Wynd- ham Lattrell Harford. The testatrix left. .tiN to her faithful and devoted servant, Mrs. Cobbold, and .£80 to- her coachman, Levi Rigg

No title

Mr. W. E. Home, M.P. for the Guild- ford Division, who-se son, Lieutenant Uuy Home, of the 19th Hussars, is reported to be a prisoner in the hands of the Germans, is inifiating a roll of honour of all officers and men in the Guildford Division now serving in his Majesty's Forces. The liit already comprises be- tween 2,000 and 3,000 names. t

HIDDEN SOLDIERS ATTACK

HIDDEN SOLDIERS' ATTACK. I BELGIAN PSiSOt REPORTED SERIOUSLY WOUNDED. Amsterdam, Monday.-The "Xieuwe Rofterdamsche Courant learns from Breda that on Saturday, afternoon, be- tween Herc-atbiii-, enct Zamel, not far from Antwerp, two motor cars conveying j x Belgian officers were attacked by German soldiers hidden in a mill, who killed two of the officers. Prince Baudouin de Ligne, who is re- lated to the Belgian Royal Family, was severely woundeu. One of the motor cars escaped. A few hoars previously around the same spot an engagement took place be- tween Belgian and German soldiers. The latter retreated leaving twenty-four horses. The Belgian Legation at Hague con- urms the fact of Prince Baudouin de Ligne's injury.

IAIDS FOIi CERfAN SAILORS

"AIDS" FOIi CERfAN SAILORS iTRcSTIKG DISCOVERY ON BOARD WEECKEB CRUISER, Considerable sensation has been created in Petrograd, says the Morning Post correspondent, by discoveries made on board the German cruiser Magdeburg, that was blown up after going a-shore at the entrance of the Finnish Gulf. Among the articles lying about the decks on the after-part, where boats were lowered for the majority of the crew to escape on the accompanying destroyers, were several specimens of the old cat o* nine tails." When the Russian authorities went through the ship they found one of these instruments in every officer's cabin, and all bore signs of long and, in some cases, of hard usage. These curious attributes of naval rank are all a"1ïke in having a handle eight inches long, with a loop for the wrist. From the other end depend nine leather thongs of formidable appearance, nearly as thick as the little finger, and twelve inches long. In each case-the officer's name was inscribed on the handle. The publii are to have an opportunity of inspecting these latest-discovered in- struments of Prussian culture.

BARRY Still CHAMPION

BARRY Still CHAMPION. AUSTRALIAN ClANT SCULLER DEFEATED AT PUTNEY TO-DAY. On the Thames at Putney to-day, Ernest Harry, England. the world's champion, beat the Australian, .1im Paddon, of Evan's Head, New South Wales, by two lengths, in a race for the world's championship and the Sports- man cup. This was Barry's seventh important race over the Thames Championship Course, having in successive contests de- feated Towns, Albany, Fogwell, Arnst, Durnan, and Pearce. His opponent is a veritable giant, standing 6ft. 3in. and weighing 13st. 131b —the biggest mull that ever competed for the World's Championship. The chal- lenger had not had as much sculling or facing experience as Barry, who has now I been performing in big events of the kind for six years, but in other respects was at an advantage. Both men had defeated Dick Arnst, a man once regarded by Colonials as in- vincible, and it was on Paddon's showing in November last against the great New Zealand sculler that he was matched against Barry. A later official message states that Barry won by 25 lengths, easing up, his time being minutes. 2S seconds. The course was 12 miles furlongs.

ROYAL VISIT TO HOSPITAL j

ROYAL VISIT TO HOSPITAL The King and the Queen visited the wounded soldiers at St. Thomas's Hos- pital this afternoon, spending about oue and a half hours in the wards, and making many sympathetic inquiries as to progress of the patients.

SIR WILLIAM LEVERS DECLARATION

SIR WILLIAM LEVER'S DECLARATION. Addressing his Port Sunlight recruits to-day. Sir William Trevor said they were taking part in a war for humanity the whole world over. We were fighting the cause o [civilisation, progress and the democracy of the world.

ITRADE RETURNS I

TRADE RETURNS. The Board of Trade returns issued to day show that the imports for August amounted to £ 42,362,931, as against in the corresponding month of last year, a decrease of £ 13,013.670. The exports for August were £ 2l,21J,271, as against ..H, 1W, 7¡, a (lecreace I ofi Only five items among the imports show an increase, these being grain and flour, £ 77S,0C4; metallic ores other than iron ore, scrap iron, and steel, £ 318,700; raw cotton, £ 471,630; oilseeds, nuts, oils, fats, and gums, £.23,090; and new The chief decreases among the imports were meat, including animals for food, £ 29,773; other non-dutiable food and (I ri tik, 1; dutiable food and tobacco, £ 94,703; un. manufactured wood and timber £ 3,202,901 manufactured iron and steel; £ 733,801; other metals and manufactures thereof, £ 793,205; manufactured manufactured and manu- factured silk, £ 997.362. The only item in exports for August to show an increase was metallic ores, other than irotilrre, scrap iron and steel, the figure being £1,:?97. The exports of food, drink, and tobacco decreased by £ 1,302,621.

LIVERPOOL MEN SUBSCRIBING I

LIVERPOOL MEN SUBSCRIBING. The employes of a number of Liverpool I firms have agreed to weukiy deductions from their wages to the local branch of a relief fund, which now excee d s < £ 23,000. — —

MOSELEYS PATRIOTISMI

MOSEL'EY'S PATRIOTISM. I The Moseley Rugby Football Club has decided not to play any matches this season. They will offer then' ground to the miiiiary authorities. All fixtures have been cancelled, and many of the players have gone on active service, whilst others are volunteering. Altogether the club wll provide aJxwrt 20 fighting men. J

tPTD1ATEREI I I H r LH i 3 U I i

t"

THE TECHNICAL COLLEGEI

THE TECHNICAL COLLEGE. "roiLIST OF SUCCESSES AND CASE OF A BELQiAH REFUGEE. A meeting of the Swansea Education Committee was held on Monday, Mr. D. Matthews presiding. Dr. Manseigh Yarley, Principal of the Technical College, presented a report on education successes, which, he said, were more important than usual. They were as follows;— rust examination for medical degrees (London University): A. I o tier. First professional examination (medical) of the Royal College of Surgeons. Dublin: \V. A. Jones. Tntet- B.Sc. (London): W; D. Williams Inter B.Sc, Engineering (London): A. H. Bates.{. D. McDonald, B. S Marshall. S. R. B. Pennington. Final BoSe. (Lond): J. L. C. Davies, M.S.S.; C. L. G. Hyde, G.S.; B. L McMillan, G.S.; E. L. Protlieroc, G.S. 't< vi'C Studentship to Imperial College: D. G. Hopkins. Terrace-road, M.S.S. RAport commission in Kitchener's Ar)nv Slaff: H. E. Quick, M.13., F.R.C.S.. B'(''II lieutenant in R.A.M.C.: H. Cranage, lieu- tenant in R.E. signalling dept. Student:? T. M. Jenkins,, second lieutenant in Bed- fordshire L.I.; E. L. t'rotlieroe. lieutenant in Mr. W. II. Miles asked what arrange- ments were proposed to fill the vacancies I)v. Varlcy said he had not yet had time to consider the matter, but they ought to be prepared to do so in a short time. The chairman and himself might arrange temporary appointments. The matter was referred to a commit- tee which had already in hand the ques- tion of vacancies. A Belgian Refugee's Education, Mr. Melbourne Williams remarked that 1 among the Belgian refugees at Ffynone was a boy of about 111, who did not speak English, but who, he believed, understood a little of the language, and was anxious to learn it. Iie suggested that he be in- vited to attend the intermediate school, and be in such classes as the master thought fit, all tho fees to be remitted His knowledge of French would be valu- able to the other scholars. Mr. Colwill asked, if otherF came over. would the precedent bo followed. The Chairman said cases could be dealt with as they arose, and Mr. Williams' motion was agreed to. Labour Examination. Mr. J. Lewis, alluding to the fact that only 17 out of 75 candidates had passed the labour examination, said he iinder- stood that a few months ago, arising out of the tact that very poor scholare were being produced by the elementary schools- a committee was instructed to meet several business men. There was tho same report every year. Mr. T. J. Rees, Director of Education, replied that the committee was not pro- posed in con nech on with the Labour ex- amination. On the whole, the results were not discreditable in view of the time in which the scholars had been in the standard on whose work they were ex- amined.

A CREAT SEKDGFF I

A CREAT SEKD-GFF. The 3.3.5 train to London on Monday I afternoon carried a large batch of recruits to Cardiff and London. There were illfJVing scenes at the High-street Station. Among the recruits were Dai Dupree, a popular young footballer who had friends in count- less camps at Swansea, and Will Harris (Trafalgar-terrace), another young foot- baller with hosts of friends. They had a great send-off. C Jim Davies, the ex-Swansea footballer, how of 1(-)-'t witli the 8.30 train this morning for Winchester.

ITHE ST LEGERI

THE ST. LEGER. Market Formed on Wednesday's Event. -LOiNDOin, Monday, 3.0. I 4 to 1 Peter the Hermit t and o, 4 to 1 Hapsburg o. 9 to 2 Kennymore t and o. 10 to 1 bar three o. I

Advertising

< <=..<-<- .-=:=- I o. R. I,   -F KEjn,, ''r' .'4f i, !:fff'" rJ 0,. fJII; I", [J y C!A.I i .& II' ed V ,0-" u m  ?ll Ph  AnÜ I 6[0 I bJjúUù mUt An tu 1 Lord Kitchener is much gratified with the response already made to the Appeal for additional men for His Majesty's Regular Army. In the grave National Emergency that now confronts the Empire he asks with renewed confidence that another 100,000 men will now come forward. ?vy* yR? ? ? f? ?*? B *? f? T!*? y? '? yw?? ?r? TERMS OF SERVICE. j J (Extension of Age Limit). | Age on enlistment 19 to 35, Ex-Soldiers up to 45, and certain selected Ex-Non-Com- t missioned Officers up to 50. Height, 5 ft. 3 in. and upwards. Chest, 34 inches at i least. Must be medically fit 1 General service for the War. ?' Men enlisting for the duration of the war will be able to claim their discharge with all convenient speed on conclusion of t the War. < PAY AT ARMY RATES. And Married Men or Widowers with Children will be accepted, and will draw Separation Allowance under Army con- j ditions.. [. — | flOW TO JOIN.-Men wishing to join i should apply in person at any Military I Barrack or at any Recruiting O,ff'k,ce the t address of the latter can be obtained from II Post Offices or Labour Exchanges. Go Save the King. I [ [i

THE NATIONAL FUN 11 I

THE NATIONAL FUN. 11 I The Prince of Wales's National Relief Fund to-day amounted to ,£2,29.5,000. O I I enclose f e d. toward the Prince of Wales' NATIONAL RELIEF FUND. Name. Address. This coupon should he filled in, and -he en/elope addressed to the .1ay.r of Swan- I t5, Guiluhall.

YOUNC TEACHERS AND THE CALL I

YOUNC TEACHERS AND THE CALL. I To the Editor. I Sir,— In ere arc rnanv young teachers in Swansea who think that their place at the present time is with one or other of his Majesty's forces. They argue, and I think rightly, that the older 'members could easily do their work. There is one thing, however, which is holding many back. viz.: the reticence of the committee in issuing any plan as to granting salary while Oil service. The teaching profession is an expensive one. C-ollege training costs money, and most young tpachen when starting their school careers, do so under a sense of obligation to their parents who may be dependent upon them. Jn conclusion 1 may add that London, Notts., Gloucester, and many other, authorities have encouraged their young teachers by granting tJICpl full salary, less a.rmy pay.- Y OUTS, etc., Y. T. NEATH PAL'S BRIGADE." A meeting for the purpose of forming a Neath Pal's Brigade will be held thia evening at the Gwyn Hall, and Sir David Bryiunor Jones is expected to I speak.

THE RESPONSE AT NEATH

THE RESPONSE AT NEATH. I here has been no lull in the recruiting at Neath to-day, and the Drill-hall has been a hive of activity. Up to noon tiic total who had enlisted was nearly 900, and the thousand should he i-eached on Tuesday. Included in to-day's batch of patriots were several well-known foot-1 bailers and firemen employed on the G. W .R.

No title

One of the German sailors in the Deten- tion Camp at Frith Hill, Camberiey, has died from pneumonia and was buried on I Saturday. The coihii, covered with the Union jack, was followed by a party of German sailors under an armed escort. Nearly £ 600 has been contributed to the fund which is being raised by the Im- perial Merchant Service Guild for the assistance of the dependents of members who are commanding or ofheerin gBritish merchant ships and suffer loss through injuries, wounds, or capture by the enemy. The Port of Londop Authority has in- timated to the Government its intention of milking no charge for its services in ¡ connection with the storage of such portions of the gifts of flour, cheese, and coal from Canada, Quebec, and Nova Scotia as may be sent to the Port of London.

THE CABLET III

THE CABLET. III Mr. Asquith returned to London in t-ho ? c?rty hours oith??Morning, and Mr. f| Uoyd George got back to his official resi- 1 j dence at 11.30 a.m. Tlj A Cabinet meeting was held at noon, k Ij there being a full attendance of A.Un'- ters, inohxiin? I?ord Kitcbpnpr. f Li

GERMAN METHODS 1

GERMAN METHODS. 1 — The following letter from a private m f the 1st Hants Kegt., Private Frank Alleii. has been received by P.C. Brooks, of the J Neath County Police. Private Allen was t'i wounded at Mons, and is at present at Ketley Hospital. ► After saymg that they had a lively time of it, he continues: I hope, however, to be out with the Germans again; but it is not all honey there. The first day we had it, their shrapnel doing a deal of damage, but, as to their rifle shooting, why they couldn't hit the town they were born in. The first day we lost about. 60 men, and two officers were killed, the commanding om::cr sharing a similar t,.oniiuan(i,,Lj6, ottit. -ci- h ariiig a ,iiiiiiar The Germans are cowards when you get near them, and when they see a bit of steel they run for their lives. The Ger- mans are killing all the wounded as thcy come across them, and they are killing L the women and children and burning vil- lages. It is an awful sight at times. I don't think there will be another fighi like those four days. The-German ofifcers drive their men along with the sword if they hang back. and. if they refuse to go forward, they kill them."

NEATH CHAPELS HELP U

NEATH CHAPEL'S HELP. U .At Hi? En?t'sh Baptist Church, Neath, | a ('oHc'djrm for the Pr;nce of Wah" l,'und1-1 yesterday realised £ 30. I-

Advertising

"Y^T'A-^TED, strong- Genwa-1; no washing; A',CTET), t;tr4)tjg Geney-a-1; iio wa:;bing;I I Walter-road. 170A9-?2 f 1\ift: .}:: i: :{r Printed and Publisherl. for the Swansea Presi, Ltd.. by ARTHUR PARNELL HIGIIA-M, at Leader Buildings, swanmea.