Collection Title: Cambrian Daily Leader

Provider: The National Library of Wales

Rights: The copyright status or ownership of this resource is unknown.

View full details

First Previous Image 6 of 6
Full Screen
20 articles on this page
STARVING s T A R it i l P ti I i I

STARVING! s- T A?. R it,, i ?l P ti I i ? I DEARTH OF FOOD IN I GERMANY. I 14 FAM?E ?S?S ITS GA?I I HEAD. I I TERRIBLE ?SIKSS.  TERRIBLIE D.!STRES& I (PRESS ASSOCIATION WAR SPECIAL.) Rorce, Monday.—Terrible stories are published here of the dearth of tood 1a Germany, which is rapidly assuming a position of the extremeet gravity. To all intents and purposes famine pre- j vails ir- Hamburg. and a gentleman re- cently in that city, and now tn Borne, as- serts that the situation there is mertiy j all examplp of the conditions prevailln a.i over (jé{ many. He says that immense store houses in of j food had accumulated, have been taken over by the General Staff, and their con- j tents sent to the front to be distributed among the troops. ■ Traffic in Hamburg has ceased, aDd all! the factories arc closed. There are 1,500 ships lying idle ip the harbour, and the crew? are suffering from hunger. Prices have risen to such in exterf that even in the middle of August eggs cost* 10 marks (roughly 10s.) a dozen. Fresh meat was unprocurable, ail the cattle b;n lug been requisitioned. There was a quantity of milk and butter, and all was reserved for hospitals. There was neither milk nor prepaied food for babies, and a long, sad procession of mothers could be seen outside the Town j Hail imploring the city fathers for as-, distance. The Government action in forbidding anyone to leave the t^n augmented the ranks of tha hungry unemployed. The Municipality vainly protested against thisi order, pointing out th?t it affected Ham- Burg's pobition as a Hanceatic city. ) —«&- THE r PATH. ¡ SG?ES ? ?E FR(tC¡j uB??YS'BE. I liii7 7, Paris. Monday.—A high official iusti from northern region gives the d¡-d¡is..t the advance of the) JeruMCi through ?.oitbprn .France beforei Lhey were repulsed. The en?my passed through Tourcoing, Roubaix, Liiie., D?ua). ArI and Amiens with e.trm: rapidity, and without meeting a great re- j nuance. This-explains 'he lenir-ncy dis-l played towards these towns, the invaders only making comparatively small war hv.-i?; namely. seven million francs at! n £ i-sryvf here the Germans appealed to the civil authorities, promising to respect i the inhabitants provided no act of ho.s- tility vas committer', against the soldiers. Their stay in the above-mentioned towns, ■which were not bombarded. was ex- ¡ trcmely short. They arrived at Lille on September 2nd. and leff on the nth The Department of the Aisne suffered heavily, especially in LIP northern part. | where violent engagements took place at H?rson. ?Vn?Mgny, Bobmn. aDd Vcrvms. < G?!-? '?'as pnti"p!y dpTap?tcd; it w*j sh filed for the firrt time br the Germans, | and was occupied, but it was re-takea by the Allies after another bombardment, j and was finally re-takeu by the Germans. During the three attacks 12,000 shells fell! in Guh-e. St. Quentin was also heavily shelled, and part of the town destroyed. The I Museum WHS Laon resisted vigor-j ously. delavinf the advance of the anemv. The civil authorities managed to Mvo 12 million francs. soissons and Campiegne have not beer, damaged. One suburb of Sen lis was burnt. The Forest of Campiegne has burnt down, as previously stated. Before retreating the Allies set fire to a quantity of tins of potrol. which they we're unable to carry away, in order to falling into the hands of whe "nem, > The heavy clouds of black rr.cke mfh the ?opie b?Iievf the forest was on fire. I EHEJPS. I A P,r,ial supplement of the London I Jazftte" gives revised lists of vessels of ?n.ecay c >un.rrie« detained in British ports or captured at sea by his Majesty's forces. Under this category appear the! names of JíJ. Ucnnan vessels and 17 .Aii-trian 'U-i(iei- fl-ke heading of ships whose cargoes or part of them hare been detained at home ports, figure i6 ships of British nationality, one Dutch, j one Japanese, and another the nation-1 ality of which is doubtful. The French I Naval Authorities ha>. e detained, or J captured, 12 German and four Austrian e"e¡s. No information is at present j available regarding those detained by! .Russia. Havre.—The Dutch vessel yortuna, i cap hired at sea, was brought into port) with cargo destined for Germany, com-i pricing ingots of silver and a Large j quantity of wheat. Rotterdam.—The Roterdamsche Lloyd steamer Tambora arrived here, being detained at Brest from September' 1st to September 10th by order of the' French Admiralty. The ship unloaded all her cargo of cocoa, tea, rice and tapioca meal, and also the Indian mail, j which as landed at Brest, but has not yet &r~ ved h-re. Capetown.— -The German barque Heinz, from Cardiff with coal and han been captured and brought to Simon's-j Bay as a wer prize. The captain was ii n- aware that war had been d--Llared. Renter. A Lloyd's Falmouth message say: the I German ships Caracas and Fritz have been brought into Falmouth as prizes captured I

LIKE A RAVING MANIAC I

"LIKE A RAVING MANIAC," Etfect of Drink cri a Good Man. I At Swansea Police Court on A-for-day Florence Davies made an application for sureties of the peace against her husband, j Francis Davies, tipper. She said that the respondent caught hold of her on the 5th inst. and told her to look at the children for the !a,>t time. She was afraid of him. BalfdeL, said that the man was 1 an extremely good man when he was: sober. He had a house full of bteautirul children, but when he was il driok he Ifcs like a raring inioiae." On the same night he even wanted to cut his w..vn th roal. The case was adjourned for three f months.

PREFERRED ORINK TO WORK I

PREFERRED ORINK TO WORK. James Harries (38), labourer, was at Swansea on Monday charged with ? leep- ing out at the South Dock on Sunday, having no visible means of subsistence,. The Chairman (Mr. Richard Martin): •.Carnot yon go somewhere? Balsden said that the man could work, but preferred drink to woik. The car-e was adjourned to find out if Th-f ci5,- -as kfee prisoner would fiiid work.

BELGIUM

BELGIUM. DARING AND BLEVER  MOVE. I i i HOW THEY mPEO IN THE QBEAT  S?IHE? BATTL I I i BRILLIANT SUCCESSES I I Antwerp, Sunday.—An official statement issued here-to-day clearly shows how use- ) tvil the Belgian forces are proving in diverting some cf the German forces irom 'Ut main theatre of war. Tift- statement, says:—After four days' ht;rd fighting cur ifeld troops, which left I the fortified position ot Antwerp to attack the German forces in the RrusseL- Louvam-Maiines trhle, have ret?mpd inside the outer ring f the forts. The sorhp, 'he ohj;et of which at first seemed to be merely an operation against the covering troops left by the enemy in fron' of us, developed into an action on .an ex- tensive «-ale. Tb??? enemyJs position was very strong, o?in?' to the D?tur? of the ?rouad, aacl the ".artbworks thrown up during the last < fortnight' The necessity of holding this pùsiriJD at all costs obliged the enemy to call upon all their available forces. Troops Recalled. I Thus the Third German Corps, which had left Minove for >.oderbraeckel, re- turned hastily to m?e' ,uy? troop", and the j intl C'o??, which was already on the j ?udeaardc-K?y?i) ro?. was hken 1"& called. Moreover, the Landwebr and the I.audstnirro detactomenrts "btioned to the south of Brussels, as well as fiiteen thousand German mariaes who arrived in Brussels some days age, took part in fighting. The result attained is. from the point of view of the operations being con- ducted by the Tronch and British staffs, cf capital importance, since in conse- (cfiicnce of our intervention. tiTO German army corps have been unable to go to the assistance of, the German armies, which are retreating in Trance. In vic¥" of this oom^eircfratioB of all the J' German forces available in this.country, our a run found itself at the end of- the fourth day in the presence of superior number-, and returned to Antwerp. Onr field army continues to be a con- stant menace to the enemy, and will oblige the Germans to immobilise im-1 poHani- forces, which are pressiitgly j aeecied in France. The losses dui-inu the fighting have beer, i heavy testifying tf t!? stubbornness of th" : h th" f?ct that th" B?)?fiC?. 1??? en-' oV' (?mmuCLicatinn?- h?t'

PATTIS ACCOMPANIST i

PATTI'S ACCOMPANIST. i DEATH OF MR. VliHffUj GAia AT AN I AOVAHGEO AGE. Mr. Wilhelm Ganz, the distinguished f composer and pianist, died in London on! Saturday, at €he age of 8J. l'or many years he was profeasor of singing at the .-Guildhall School of Musii. Born in Germany in 1833, Mr. (#anz came to Wp-tloii at the age of thirteen. He be- came a member of the orchestra of il Majesty's Theatre under Mr. Ha.1fe, play- lug the violin. As to the famous musicians whom Mr. Ganz met, their name legion. Wagner, | Verdi, Beriloz, and Meyerbeer he knew personally, while he was the chosen accompanist in turn, of such great vocalists as Sims Reeves, Jenny Lind, and Madame Patti. Mr. Ganr "found" Mme. Melba. engag- ing her for one or his concerts, and this eventnaily led to hp- striking success in the operatic world. Local Connections. The deceasoo was a familiar figure in Swansea, and frequently visited Craig-y- dt" (-I charming Welsh re&id- ence of Madame Patii (the Baroness Cederstrom). At the concerts Patti gave in aid of local charities at .Swansea, Neath, and Brecon, Mr. Ganz invariably acted as her accompeudst.

HILL CHURCH FESTIVALI

HILL CHURCH FESTIVAL. I Very successful harvest festival services were held at Hill Church, North Hi11- road, Swansea, on Sunday, .in the mom- j ing the Rev. Cynon Lewis preached, and in the afternoon the Rev. T. Sinclair Evans delivered a very thoughtful ad- dress. Suitable solrx; were wedl sang by Miss Eaton. In the evening the cantata, The Shepherd of Souls," wa6 excelléntly rendered by the cbeir under the efficient; leadership of Mr. F. 'R. Sing, each of the soloists sang in praiseworthy manner. The congregations throughout the day were good and the collections very satisfactory, The ser'riccs will be continued this even-1 ing at the Rev. Benjamin [ Evans, Manselton, 

SA Band at Ffymme

S.A. Band at Ffymme. The Swansea Salv?>tk)"n- A rmy Citadel j Band visited Ffynone, tha Swansea! rp.sidenc,-e of the Bight Hon. Sir Alfred | Mond, M.P.. on Sunday afternoon. UDflw thf leadership of Banflmaster Saru Jonets mho was accompanied by the corps officer. Adjutant Gambleton), the! band played well-kaowit hymn tunes, while at the close the French and' Eng-i lish national anthems were played. The j Belgian refugees ranch appreciated the ¡ programme. I

TO BECOME LAW I i

TO BECOME LAW I GOVERNMEMT AND WELSH AND IRISH- BILLS. UNIONIST MEMBERS' MEETIKC A meeting of the Unionist members of the House of Commons was held at the Carlton Club at half-past twelve to-day. It is imderstood that the party has! been advised of the intention of the Government to place the Home Rule Bill and the Welsh Disestablishment Bill upon the Statute Book, but at thp same time to make proposa-la for cief-erring their operation, and also to introduce forthwith the promised Amending Bill. It was in view of this situation that to-day's meeting was calied. None of the Peers attended, and the Earl of HaJsbury, who was at the club prior to the meeting, left before it com- menced. There was a very large gather- ing of members, and in a few cases it was noticed that some attended in naval or military uniforms. Among those present, were Mr. Bonar lia-w, Mr. Balfour, Mr. Austen Chamber- lain, Mr. F. E. Smith, Lord Robert Cecil, Mr. Walter Lopg;, Sir Edward Carson, Capt. Craig, Lord Edmund Talbot, Mx. Chaplin, Mr. Hayes Fisher, and r. Harry Lawson.

CENTRAL WELSH BOARD I

CENTRAL WELSH BOARD. I SUCCESSFUL STISDEHTS AT SWANSEA I INTEHUlATE SCHOOLS. f' 11' l-- t' The follo-?ing pupils of the S.wansea Intermediate Schools have been successful in t.h Central Welsh Board examinations. Grammar School. Honours Certificate.—Reginald Trevor Davies. distinction; in additional mathe- matics and chemistry; William Lawrence Aiayne, additional mathematics with dis- auction; Oscar John Phillips. Higher Certificate.—Arthur Mansel Daniels. Samuel Finkleblsck, Charles Handyn Haj den, Francis Dennis James. William Ernest Lloyd, Andrew Vivian Llewellyn Smith, distinction in addi- tional mathematics. Sejiior Certificate.—David Black Bar- bour. W. B. Bowen, Clement Hugh Davies (distinction in Arithmetic), Glyn Rees Davies (distincl ion ia Mathematics. Chemistry, Book-keeping), Noel Parry I Davies (distinction in Drawing). J. K. Edmondston, Leslie Purcell Esmond (d1.:tiridir.m in Drawing*, John Francis Evans (distinction in Mathematics, Chemistry), David John Grey (distinction -Ali ics). ,iidney r'l 'disti-actic,ii in Mathematics, Latin, I Greek, French\ Ales. Scott Xing, Thomas J"hn Frederick Oldham (distinction in Mathematics. Drawing), Evan Emrys prioc (distinction in Drawing), E. A. Richards (distinction in Arithmetic, Art!iiir Wa'ter nyd (dis tinct?on in hHory, .T:thmeh.c, Mathe- mahc! Lhn. Grpf'k? L'she Moore Wvrill. -Tunior Corti 6-ate.-T-Tecllev Graham Ai-nohJ (distinction in Mathomatics, Draw- ing, Woodwork), Ronald Dunn Beran (distinction in Arithfnetic, French, Book- keeping. Drawing. Woodwork). Cuthhert Chesrwiddeti (distinction in Mathematics, Chemistry). David George Davies (distinc- b-m' in Boo?-kc?pmg), CoHrt Stuart Drum- mond ?distinction in Mathema.ti. Chemistry). hor G'11 Elias (distinction in f?,t!) inetie. Mstbematics, Latin, French, Chemistry^, Eric Harvey Fitt (distinction in Drawing, Woodwork). John Randolph Glover (distinction in Mathe- matics, Drawing), Harry Gregory. rÜn-, neth Gordon Holmes (distinction in Draw, in'rr). Geoffrey l>avid Jenkins (distinction in Woodwork). Roy Williams Jenkins (dis- tinction in Arithmetic. Mathematics. French" Cheroislry). Alfred Rowland Johnson (distinction in Arithmetic, Mathematics, Chemistry). Richard I-ewis Jones (distinction in Arithmetic., Draw- ing). David John Lake (distinction in I Arithmetic. Mathematics. Physics), Bpn Emrys Le^is (distinction in Arithmetic, Chemislry). David Arthur Lewis (distinc- tion in ArithmeHc, Mathematics, Latin. Drawing. Woodwork). Rupert 1.1"0 Martin (distinction in Mathematics, Cbemi«try. Woodwork), Cyril Herbert B'c.h?ro Morris <'di?tin?cn in" Arithmetic, Mathematics. Lati? French. Physics- Ch?mMtry). Joha Lpon?ro Richards. Warren Thomas Raw- ?'as Richards (distinction in Woodwork), ?amnol ?fs?oDP (r:un{'tioD in Frenph). G. E. Siei11p. (distinction in Arithmetic M^fhemn.t^cs, W r»r>ciwork. Drawing). Lww- Topham. Far- Travis. John Harold, Williams, Wilfred T. Wright (riJtinehon ¡ in Drawing). I High School for Girls. Honours Certificate. Flora Forster ('English Language and Literature with distinction). Mariorie Ganz. J hhr icnte.~Gl«dTS Eva. Bill, Dorothy -T cnes, Gw?nUian Jones ?diqtipc- tv)n -n French) I Senior Cei-?Rc.?<—Marion JoycP Daves 

GVERGROWDiNG I

GVERGROWDiNG SWANSEA M.D. P. AND THE PNS MOST UNKEnLTHr WARDS, i. I HOLISES. I UlJFIT HOUSES. I i Thfcre has just been issued the annaai | report of the Medical Officer of Ec-alth to the Swaiicea Cc-uricil (Dr. Thomas Evans). In a general survey of the year t.1r¿; report states that two of the chief defects t m the town's system of dealing v.i1h, i-af use are the unsatisfactory methods of storage at the houses. aDd the unsatis-1 factory types of receptacles used to deposit it in the street whilst awaiting J collection. The Council's decision to enforce the ovvners to provide regulation dustbins will effect a very necessary! improvement.. Overcrowding and Unfit Houses. The decision of the Council to proceed forthwith with the building of 500 houses for the working cla&s at small rentals on Town Hill will go a long way to solve the problem of oveLrorow(ii-Tig-. The most urgent public heal th need in' Swan- sea." The district in which bad liol-ifing i conditions chiefly prevail are the Alex- andra and Brynmeiyn Wards, the Fox- hope district of the East Ward, and scattered houses in Victoria, Castle, St. Joan's, Landorc. and Morriston Wards. Last year 143 houses were represented as unfit for human habitation, and of these nine were elosed. 1.3 repaired, five still occupied, but partly repaired, and one closed and being repaired. This meant that 115 houses were still occupied where nothing had been done.. The Unhealthy Wards. The predominant death rates now are those caused by tuberculosis and othm ¡ respiratory diseases, which are recognised j 3-- peculiarly associated with bad housing. It is in the Alexandra and Brynmelin Wards that these death rates predominate in Swansea. The unhealthy housing areas I are in Alexandra and Brynmelin. During the year the notifications of pulmonary ) tuberculosis were three times as many in Brynruelin and Alexandra as in thØJ! Ffyaone and St. Helen's Wards, and more than twice as many As the East, Landore, a.nd Victoria Wards. There were 1167 cases of infectious diseases notified during the year, 325 of ) the being scarlet lever, and 530 pul- monary tuberculosis (298, males and 232 females). The death rate per cent, of ca.¡;es notified was 15.1. Low Death Rate. The report proceeds: A notice drawing attention to the Corporation bye-law ÍJl reference to the dangerous and filthy habit of spitting, is posted up in public places of amusement, and also in the tram-cars, but the spitting habit is still prevalent, and it will probably be neces-j sary to put the bye-law into more practi- j col use by issuing proceedings before any real reform can be obtained. I The general death rate for the year was any other pre- vious year, except 1912, the average for the last ten years being 16.1 per 1,000.

FATHER CVYDR LEAVES I

FATHER CVYDR LEAVES. I SECOND SWANSEA CATHOLIC PRIEST TO m THE FLEET. The RRv. Canon Gwydr, rector of St. Davids, Sva.H?ea, who volunteered f?- service as chaplain in the Royal Navy at the outbreak .of the war, has received orders from the Admiralty to report him- self to the Admiral-in-Charge of the naval base at Crdmarty. The reverend gentle- man left Swansea firsi thing on Monday for this destination. Canon Gwydr preached at the evening sendee on Sunday, but made no allusion to bis impending departure. The news II leaked out. however, and the few mem- bers of the congregation who heard it stayed behind to takoan affectionate farewell of their pastor. Canon Gwydr is the second Catholic priest to leave Swansea for the front. Father Chatterton. of St. Joseph's, has already left to go as chaplain in the Army.

I SRYNSiENCYK

I "SRYNSiENCYK." FAMOUS WElSH PREACHES AT SWANSEA l SERVICES. The Rev. John Williams, known to all Welshmen in Wales and irithout as I Brynsiencyn," preached at the anniver- sary services ac ^rug Glas Chapel. Swan- sea. on Sunday. The chapei at Greenhill, over w hose ministry Rev. T. E. Da vies presides with much acceptance and success, held large congregations at the, three 'services. In the evening, the accommodation was very fully taxed. Mr. David Evans introduced the services. Mr. Williams preached a powerful and moving evening sermon. As oratory, it was great; but the Bishop of Welsh j Methodism is more than n n orator: he is also a wonderful expositor and exhorter. On Sunday, for over an hour, lie held the congregation—cm representative &1 many Swansea interests—in his grip. Mr. Williams has a genius for finding simple illustrations to his theme. Last night he drew one of his raain iH?strati?Ds from | the daisy, and it flooded the conclusion to ?hiRh he was vor?Ai-s with stTong light. Another eSe?idve point wqs made of the marks left upon the ages-old rocks by the feet of birds who rested upon them in the days when the world was young. Mr. Williams is to preach again this i evening, the service starting at seven I o'clock.

ADVtCE TO THE RUPTURED

ADVtCE TO THE RUPTURED. Nature ha.s provided for the healing ot I every conceivable injury to the human body. Rupture c?n not only be kept f rom WILting wor-i.t- can frequently be cured. Lt? ?L advi?' you. I fit "conceit' ap- plia.IlS from 26. 6d. RemembEr, a wrongly devised truss is the cause of the gradual increase in the sise of the rup- t-nre. Are you getting worse? Call in any day except Thursday or Sunday be- tvM9i the hours of l'O and 2.0 or 4.0 to 8.0. I will ?p you in my prnate fitting room- .h ior Mr. Rich, at Rich, The Chemist, 30, High-street, Swansea.

No title

The officials of the Alberta Government, including the staff of the London office, have agreed 

TRENCH GMD IN

TRENCH GMD IN TWO B HALF BURIED AT SWANSEA'S NEW BHiDiE. RAIN AND THE HUNNINS SAltD. A serious accident happened at the site of the ne'N Sup bridge on Monday morning. In the course of the work extensive evations have been made. This morn- illS; a trench caved ir, and nearly buried tvs o men oompletely. Loth were injured. | con t 0 the Hospital and the other to his home. The man admitted to the Hospital was suffering from a slight injury to his jaw. He was attended to, but not detained. Up to His Waist in Debris, The inj tIred men are Arthur Jones and Edward T .-aett, navvies. Jones v..r bnried Tip to his waist in debris, and had his knee slightly in- jured, while a big scone fell on Bennett's head, causing the injury to his jaw. A large quantity of earth also feU on him. the hole bad been dug for the main abuttment foundation, being 10 to 12 feet deep and about tt feet square. All the sides bad been well timbered with strong mate-iB,I. Rain and the Running Sand. The subsidence occurred on tvo sides i of the trench, but more s.prio?lT where! the two men were working. It is attri-1 buted to the heavy rains of the week- end, which had perrojat?d through to the running sand, causing the mischief. The accident illustrates one of the many difficulties with-which contractors for this kind 01 work have to contend. Very little delay will be caused to the project, which is making good progress.

THIS DAYS RACING o

THIS DAY'S RACING. | o BIRMINGHAM. *> A—A EDEN ALL-AGED SELLING PI?.TE of 103 aovs. Sh fu:rloug. Mr E<S' EOSAVlL. 6 9-10.WM GftTGGS 1 Itlr Brushwood's CANONITE. a 9-13) Wheatley E Mr Tabor's MALMSEY, 5 9.10. Clark 3 Also ran: Ballast Mor (Hewitt), Black Pirate (Spear), Little by Little (Wing), Chaka (oFx), Gluck (J. Smith). Papola. f (MOyl¡wdL Oi 2.8. T-rained by O. Leader. Bet,tir-F, U to 10 on Ganonite, 4 to 1 Malro- I f e. 9 to 1 BO&AVILLE, 10 to 1 Papola, 100 to o others. Won by a lensrtfc; three lengths between second, and third. 9 OA — WEI?ESBOURNB NURSEBT -? "U U p??.DiCAF PLATE of 200 eovs; for two year olds. Five furlongs. Mr Lambton's AURIGA. 8-6 WAL GRIGGS 1 "'f. -o) 'r T p Mr L. 5. Potter's LLANTIJpXT, 8-9 Gardner 2 Mr Crcker's 9-0 Mahoney 3 AJso ran: Joyful Jean (Robertson). Mou- tagme (Dick), Petticoat t (Martin), Archway (Piper).. OS' 2.3L Trained by r, Lambton. Betting": Evens Montague, 6 to 1 AURIGA, 8 to 1 others. Won by a short head three-parts of a length between second and third. 3 Ü-TOWN SET.LING WELTEB. HÁTII. CAP of 150 &ovs. Two miles. Mr G. Edwardee' PAT MALO>i E, 3 1)..0 MO Y7 lA ND 1 Mr Tabor's RAZEII. a Spai-kes 2 Mrs Swan's HOCH. 5 9-7 Walkington 3 Also ran: Dennery (Trigg), Friendship (H. „W^tt.3), Bezek (Foy,, Bicoehet Off 3.0. Trained by P. Hartigan. Retting: Evens PAT MA LONE, 7 to 2 Friendship, 100 to 15 Basse I, 3 to 1 Bezek, 100 to 8 others. Won by a short head; head between second and third. ?  O OA—COVENTRY PLATE of 200 sov? for U t.hre?-?ea.r-old?.. One mue and a. quarter. RACE DECLARED VOID, Official Scratchirigs, Coventry Plate, 'Warwick-—Kyoto. All engagem'nts--La»?o, Orbost, High- born. Archimima, Ma-eie Flute, Judex. Warwick engagements-—Gre»y Antler. Biimiingham Selling Handicap. September I 22nd — Xeyhavem. I WARWICK WELTER HANDICAP PIRATE of 200 sovs. One mile and a half. I ( Rm To-morrow (Tueeday). Mr Huhor. s .^3.nt. 5 9-12. Wootton Mr lil me-S, Vinilla, 4 9-12 .Nugent j Duke, of Portland's Tuxedo, 5 9-5,Wáugh Sir J. Tjchborne s Earldom, 4 9-2 D3 -son Mr Kenney's Early Hope, 5 9-1 Lund Mr Cerval, 3 8-12 Jenkins Mr Wadia's Wavestar, 4 840 Morris Mr Barling's Yoringp.1. 6 8-9 Barling Mr Astor's Hamoaze, 3 8-4 Taylor Mr Miohalinos* Londcrry, 6 H.F. Huut Mr Benson's Knight of Peace, 3 8-1 H. Powney Mr Tatezn'e Man of War, 5 7-15 Baker MrBuebamms Ba;!Iycra?gy, 3 7-12  F. Darling Col Story's Curr&?ha?ur. 3 7-12?.-J. Dawson M r MontagTIB Le Farfadet, 3 7-11 & Da. WROU Mr Wootton's Nasda.r, 4 7-31 Wwtt-on Mr Ra:I\6det"s Courtlands, 4 7-8 Fit ton Mr. tii-atton's loos. 3 7-6 More-ton Mr Hammond's Kirkella. 4 7-3- .Parker Mr B. Soott's Oeyx, 3 7-0 Lewis

BREVITfES BREVITrES t I

BREVITfES.  BREVITrES. t 15G German Amwunition Barges Sunk. I Paris, Saturday.—It is reported on good i authority that French troops have ,Run kii in the Ri ver Oise 1.0 barges of German! ammunition.—Renter. Uhlans in Despair. Troves, Saturday.—Fifty Uhlans abfco- f lutelv demoralised arrived to-day at the railway station of Monrean, led by a non- i c'su?missioned officer. They were ex- l hausted n-ith fatigue a.d hunger, and laid ] down their arms. saying, Do as you like i with us. "F,.eiifer. i German Aviators Captured. Paris, Saturday.—A German aeroplane, says the" Petit Journal," which was re- connoitring yesterday over Brie, was brought doWD by a shot from a rifie, and the two & viators, who were noth injured, were capiui/ed,—Press Association VI ar Special.

RUSSIPis 1 r U i itI

RUSSIPis 1 r! U ?% i it. I Al'STRIANS FORGED TO AUSTRIANS rM?h? TO! FLY. I  i I OFFICIAL DETAILS OF THE CHEAT B A I I BAlm. I We have already published a. Press Bureau message issued yesterday with re- gard to the progress of the Russian cam- paign. The following are additional details:— Petrograd, Saturday,—The following ¡ official communique was issued here:— Our troops have gained a complete vic- tory over the AustroTGemajj armies from KJSlÜk ?nd Tomaszow. They have been driven over the River San. We have also achieved a great success | ar ainst the Austrians to, the west and north-west, of Lemberg. We captured more than 200 officers, about 30,000 men, many canxon, machine guns, and great quanti- ties of munitions. Details are being veri-fied. NARRATIVE OF THE OPERATIONS. Sunday. The following communication has bean issued by the Headquarters Staff dealing with the decisive victories gained by the Russian troops over the enemy's armies at Krasnik and Tomaszow (South Poland), The total AuBU-ian and German forces exce?de?I L??,OC'), with 2.500 guns, that is, over -M divisions of infantrv and eleven (lf,i cavalry, reinforced by several German divisions. The mainhody cf the enemy, numbering 600.000 men. tnoved cowards Zavichvart and Toiuaszow, advancing on Lubin. Its ring wing was covered by the Lemberg army. numbering 200 battalions, and its left ving by several Austro-German divi- sions around; Radom- Austrian Advance. On A a gust 25th the Austrian armies began a determined advance to counteract the blow which was threatening Eastern Prussia. The deployment of Russian troops over a front of several hundred versts had not yet been completed, and we could therefore only face the Austrians in the north with a greatly inferior force. The first attacks of the enemy were directed against Krasnik, but the centre of the Austrian efforts was very shortly j removed to the Tolnaszow district, where i their reinforcements began to pour in. On September 3rd, when the fall of Lemburg was imminent, the Austrian advance! reached its culminating point. On its frontal line the enemy extended from Opble to Bychave, approaching within gunshot of the station at Travniki, and enveloping Erasnostav, Zamestie, &nd Grabessof, near Yosefof. The Russian Plan. Two bridges were thrcwn across t.ha Vistula, by which troops from Radoni i crossed on their way to the battlefield while awaiting the result of General Ruszky's operations. Our plan was based on the rapid reinforcement of our right wing. The Russian cavalry carried out this task very successfully. Our troops in the Chelm (Kholm) district. which were in sufficient and too spread out, and against which the principal at- tack of the Austrians was directed, did not receive reinforcements, for the ad- \ance of the ^ustrians, even to Chlem it-j se lf, could evenirrally only increase the consequences of their defeat in the event, of the ultimate success of our wings. lu spite of their numerical inadequacy, our troops in the fpnt?e did noL < o?ne them- 6elves to defence. They delivered a cfunter-att?ck. obtaining considerable success near Laheve, where for six days they did nothing but repel continual t.1 tacks of the enemy. Only on September ithe were they moved to the rear in ac- cordance with orders received. This manoeuvre secured a more enveloping disposition of our force. Flight of the Austrians. I The successk-s of General? Suszky and Brussiloft' enabled us to make a general offensive movement., and the enemy's centre was beaten at Sukhodovle. As a result of the rapid movement among the troops the Austrians at Krasnik were at- tacked by General Ru.szky from thr, F(,Ufb- west on September 6 and were forced to accept; battle on thrpe fronts. We re- pelled counter-attacks of troops at Krae- nik, and we carried by impetuous assault the enemy's positions on the front Opole -Turobin, extending over a distance of sixty versts. On September !) the Aus- timns fled, abandoning their arms. They continued vigorously to attack our left ti I-o fhp diree- wing in order to wip success in the direc- tion of Ijemberg. However, about Sep^ tember 12, we also as.sumed the offensive or. thi; side, atttl- now the battle of Galicia.. which has lasted seventeen days. is drawing fo :ir end. The pursuit of the continues. 120.8W5 PRISONERS. Rassian Triumph Said to be Decisive. Paris, Snuday.—The Maiin learns from Petrograd that the ?st Austrian Army, m,der the cnmmand of General Auffenberg, has lost 300 officers, 28,000 soldiers, and tOO guns. The Second Army has lost as prisoners 500 officers and 7().fI(H) soldiers. The Russian victory over the Austriafis is considered to be absolutely decisive. According to a Petrograd message in the -four.-ial," the Russians are said to have taken 120,000 Austrian prisoners, and other cap cn res are imminent.— Press Association War Special. Nine Regiments Almost Wiped Out. I (Press Association War Special.) Petrograd. Sa,tii-day.It is reported that in the last battle at Gorodok, in the 1) l?' ?O?1- 1 .i, province of Podolia, three Cpssaok regi- ments completely^ routed niIp Hungarian cavalry regiments, two of which were so cut up that only 30 men of them were left. Among tbe killed was a major, npon whom, was found a detailed plan of an Austro-German march to Perm. Demoralised and Broken. j (Renter War Telegram.) Rome, Saturday.—News received here from the Austrian frontier states that the Austrian Army in Galicia is absolutely demoralised and br-oken np. It is added that ali the efforts of the officers have I been unable" to restore confidence in the soldiers, who are panic-stricken, and are fleeing for safety, abandoning everything I they possess. ANOTHER ESTIMATE, I Austrian Prisoners Said to Number 200,000.1 Another message from Petrograd states I that the Russians have capture no lees than 300,000 prisoners. EAST PRUSSIA. 1 Russian March Suspended. I Messages to hand to-day confirm what we have already foreshadowed., A Petro- grad telegram says it is officially stated that the Russian army has suspended its march in East Prussia owing to being in insufficient force. Tfie overwhelming German movement forced a retreat on Sept. lftth. Active operations to hinder the German offensive began on the fol- lowing day. The fighting, Adds the message, con- tinites,

IE BRITISH PLANI

IE BRITISH PLAN I "OUR SGHEiE WORKED I WELL" SWANSEA SOLDIER'S STORY OF THE BATTLE I GF MSItS. 8 WONDERFUL MARCHIN(L I CorpI, H, Ezoell, 2nd Welsh Regiment, who was vrith the British at Mons, writing from Xetley Hospital to his sister, Mrs. Roger H- Thomas, 14, Manselc street, Swansea, says :— I was ordered to go sick owing to my feet, which were cut all over owing to the continuous and rapid marching over bad roads, etc. I hope to he out next Tues- day. I shall probably be sent to the depot (Cardiff) from here, and it is quitn possible that I may have a fortnight's furlough: the majority are given it. I have only what I stood in; the Germans captured the remainder. The Jcurrtey to France, I No doubt you are anxious to know ?-hat we have been doing. 'When we left oamp we had no idea where we were going ?LEtil we reached Se-tithampton. e?aberkedI in the Bremen Castle, and sailed in less than 3 hours. After getting out of the train we eventually arrived at Havre, m France, w here we received a most cordial welcome. The people loaded us with everything, including a small French B flag to wear in our hats- We marched to a camp about seven ■ miles away, and remained there a day Ba and a half. Ttipn we entrained, and pro- 3 ceeded to a place called Lechelles, If I .houxs train ride. Meeting the Germans. I From there we had days of marching until we came across the Germans at S Mens. My brigade, which included the | South Wales Borderers, took up a posi- tion in trenches, outside the village of I Peiseant, near Mons. We remained in i the trenches, under fire (shrapnel) aU I day, and commenced the retirement at i night. We kept retiring for about eight 3 days, travelling abcut 25 miles per da7. The most we did was 34 nUle. followed the next day with 30 miles. This was no joke, with the load we carried, which in- eluded 220 rounds of ammunition, -and under a heavy shrapnel fire all day, and practically a.U night. Part of the Plan. II The majority think that we were forced i to retire, but the scheme was told us bé- fore the retirement, commenced. It was part. of the plan. not doubt to cut off their line of communication. We were in formed at the finish that it was working > successfully. The luck of my regiment was great- T%Ice we were in danger of being sur- rounded by thousands of Germans, but ) we got away by forced marching. We were told that afterwards. With the j snrapnel fire, they were dropping every- where except where we stood, or were en- trenched. Regiments on either side of us suffered, but we were untouched. U to the time I left our casualties were about 100, missing. No doubt the majority of these are prisoners, because of falling out during the heavy marching. It was quite impossible for us to attend to them because the enemy was too close. Everyone was v in the best of spirits We bowled over an officer and a part. of Lilian; the regiment has got their equipment, lances, swords, etc., aa trophies. They are very good here (Netlev Hos- pital); plenty to eat and read. The chie difficulty here is getting cigarettes." THE NATIONAL FUND. I The National Relief Fund toda# reached 2?',575,OM. I THE GREAT DECISION. I Everything Depends on the Resuft ol TD-morrow," !t An official communique issued in Parii says:— On the entry of our victorious troop into \irtv-le-Trancois there was found it a house that bad been occupied by fb staff of the Eighth German Army Corp the following order, signed Lieutenant General Tulff von Iecheppe Und Werden bach:— Vitry-le-Francois, Sept. 7. 10.30 p. The object of our long: and arduou marches has b^en acbi*-ved. The prin cipal Freurb troops have been forced t accept battle after having }>f'en con timially forced back. The grpat. decisioi is. undoubtedly, at hand. To-morrow therefore, the whole strength of the Ge many armv, as well as of all that of ou armv corps, are bound to be eTIgaged- II alone; the line frow Paris to Verdun. T save the welfare and honour of German I expect every ofifcer and man, notwifjb standing the hard and heroic fights of th {;"t fpw davs. to do his duty unswervingl and to the las: brwfb. Fvk-T-rfhing df pend-, on the r°^ulI of to-morrow." This shows that the Germans. tached DO less importance to the issue o the battle of the Marne than our con mander-in-chief. BAD BLOOD I Quarrels Between Prussians and I Bavarians, I Ostend, Saturday —An informant be I have hitherto always found reHabl arrived here from Brussels morniug with uews that quarrelling iuV broken out thnrf,, bptwe" Prussian ar B Bavarian soldiers. In a serious coIHaM near the barracks at Etterbelk ten IIzv are, stated to have been lost. Times B telegram (per Pr"s Assodation).-Cóp 4ip ■

Advertising

SWANSEA AUCTION Rooms, 46, WATBBJjOO-STREE' Izrportint Sale of 2 PIANOFORTES, ftim China, Cabinet. Marble Cloaks, Ialal Mahogany and Rosewood Drawing Roo Suites, Diniag Tablee, Oak Dining Roo Chairs, Settees. Carpets, Stained Bed Suite, Wardrobes, Bedateada and Beddtni Commodee, Bedroom Ware, Chests Drawers, Pictured, Lino., Cameras Mar core Set in Case, Plate. Glasa. Anthnwn Stove, Operating Table. Bed Table, at1 other Surgical Appliances, Loo, Side M v Occasional Tables. Hal] Stands, Plat Glass, and a quantity of other ueef Kitchen Appointments, which hare befi removed for convenience of Sale. Messrs. J. M. Leeder & So TTriLIi SBLIi by AITCtPION at their Boon! v v on WEDNESDAY. SEPTEMBER Mt 1914, at 11.30 a.m. preciseiy, & large quanta of wl.k. e: r Household Furniture r rcnierhiy particularised sue, above. On View Morning of Sale. Printed and Publifehed for the SwaiZL2sL Press, Ltd.. by ARTHUR PABNEI. HIGH AM. at Leader Buildiat Swansea. p