Collection Title: Cambrian Daily Leader

Provider: The National Library of Wales

Rights: The copyright status or ownership of this resource is unknown.

View full details

Image 1 of 10 Next Last
Full Screen
40 articles on this page
Advertising

i ITKT j SOUTH WALES NEW SEASON MARMMJ?E, I South Wales Jam and Marmalade Co., CARDIFF.

WE MUST HAVEl SHELLS II

WE MUST HAVEl SHELLS. II r IMPERATIVE NEED OF r THE HOUR. r THE HOUIL y il BRITISH UNABLE TO TAKE FULL ADVANTAGE OF SUPERIORITY. y AN ABSOLUTE NECESSITY, I The Military Correspondent of the II Times" sends from" Northern France a remarkable dispatch explain- ing the comparative failure of the British attack in the Fromelles region as compared with that of the French. The dominating and thoroughly pre- pared position of the Germans—whose advance last autmun enabled them to seize all the ridges—the. effects of the poison gas, the effort of re-establishing u 11 r line round Ypreti» but above all the I lack oi sufficient. ammunition, have hampered our men. Yet but for their attack the F Bench farther South would have found a far greater force concen- trated against them. i The result oi our attacks on Sunday lasr in the districts of 11-roinelles and iuchebourg wvre disappointing, he says. I: jound the enemy much more strongly posted tiiau we expected. We had not Mirocient high explosive to level his para- pets to the ground after the French practice, and when our infantry gallantly okormed the trenches, as they uia in both sivtacKs, they found a plITiUll undismayed inanv entanglements still intact, and maxims on all sides ready to pour in I steams of bullets. We could not maintain ourselves in the trenches won, and our reserves were not thrown in because the conditions for success in an assault were not present. ,1 I' U°|!Attacks were well planned and valiantly conducted. The infantry aid | splendidly, but the conditions were tooi hard. Tne want of an unlimited supply | oi higli explosive was a fatal bar to our tuceesfc. Helping the French. We have had many casualties this week, btit- if we have not won all we hoped, we have detained in our front a force equiva- lent to our own, and have greatly lacili- tated the French offensive on our right. This offensive swept on t,owards the Ai-ras- ,ens road like a flood. It gained the 1 hills west of it, flowed round the villages of Ablain, Careney, Souchez, and Neuvilie St. Vaast, and almost isolated them and their German garrisons. By dint of the expenditure of 27ti rounds ft high explosive per gun in one day, all the German defences, except the villages, were levelled with the ground, and, though we must expect that German re- inforcements will be sent from other parts of the long Western line, we have good hope thaa: the Freiburg Army Corps and other German troops will be destroyed, and that the gallant French Generals who are leading this powerful and valiant attack will gain a great I success. Our Urgent Needs. On our side we have easily defeated all attacks on Ypros. The value of Gf"rllian! troops in the attack has greatly deterio- Tated, and we can deal eaHily with them I Jn the open. But until we are thoroughly quipped for thia trench warfare, w( at- tack under grave disadvantages. The men i are in high spirits, taking their cue from I! the ever-confident and resolute attitude of the Commander-in-Chief. If we can break through this hard outer crust of the German defences, we believe that we can scatter the German AMl1ie. whose offensive causes us no con- cern at all. But to break this hard crust t we need more lrigh explosive, more heavy Lowitzers, and more men. This specIal, form of warfare has no precedent in his- tor v. It is certaan that we can smash the German crust if we have the means. So I < the means we must have, and as quickly I possible.

H WELSH WHIP VACANCY I

__H ) WELSH WHIP VACANCY I It is nerally understood that a sue-! cessor is th., lute Mn William .Tones, M.P., as Yelsh Whip, in all probability will not b, appointed for some time.! Welsh Libe-sl M.P.'s hope that whoever is appointed v, act as Whip for vfales and Monmout.shire will be Welsh-speak- i11.

AUSTRALIA PUBLIC WORKSI

AUSTRALIA* PUBLIC WORKS I Sydney, Thur3da_? agreement ha! !b

LETTERS OF THIKS

LETTERS OF THIKS, To the F/ditor. Kir.-Jnst a ?? Hoes to  ?.?? ??. Fo?r generosity in publishing n } ?or a mandùlme, which we 1%. e-app- I ??ly. The boys all apprecat ??  wort you and. the Swanse; pople ajre in providing the diflrei, thintrs rhey need, and all join Merl t,anking you. Wishing yourself and aff ile best of tick.-Youm &c., T. filris. 6th Welsh, Expeditionary Fee. To the Editor. Sir.-I thank you very inucbn beialf f the Swansea boys in can for tJ¡(> prompt way in which you arffi our appeal. We all join in sendinyou cut thanks and wish you and youriper all prosperity. There are about or 80 t;A,anp-a lads in our Brigade Yours, etc., hCa" j

A SEVERE DEFEAT j 1 I

A SEVERE DEFEAT j 1 « —-— FRENCH CAPTURE MANY GERMAN BIG GUNS PRINCE RUPPRECHT BEATEN I Paris, Th-Liri;day.-Ptris taken with splendid calm the news of the victory north of Arras. The French troops were called upon ior a great and desperately sustained effort. The magnificent army corps has fought from trench to trench, from hill to hill, and from house to house over an area of fifty square miles. Be-in- ning on Saturday afternoon and not in; day or night, they have taken posi- tions which were really fortresses,' and have captured more than 5,000 prisoners and great quantities of guns and ammuni- tion. Two facts stand out with great promi- nence. First, the French now hold securely the crests of the last range of hills abut- ting on the great plain on which are Lens, j Lille, and Douai; and, secondly, the beaten army was commanded by Prince Rup- precht of Bavaria, one of the worst of the Kaiser's criminal chiefs, who ordered the shooting of British prisoners and wounded. Everyone hopes that the officers captured may include men known to have carried out Prince Rupprecht's orders. The enemy were not able to get sufficient troops and guns to the spot to save their vital positions. On Tuesday night (hey could have evacuated Carency, but at- tempted to bring up reinforcements to save important guns. They only suc- ceeded in sending forward one battalion,; which has now been added to their losses. The garrison was apparently 6,500 men strong, of whom only 1,050 have been taken prisoners. The rest have been killed or wounded. Many Guns Captured. The number of guns captured are given in the following official communique which was issued in Paris at 11 o'clock last night The Belgian army was again attacked last night on the right bank of the Yser. but repulsed the enemy, who in their retreat left several hundred dead 0.1 the ground. To. the north of Arras we obtained new and important results. The material captured at Carency included two 77m.m. guns, a 105m.m. mortar, two 21c.m. mortars, a dozen trench mortars, a large lu mber of machine-guns, 3.000 rifles, and huge stores of sheik and cartridges. In the woods of Hill 125 we found the corpses of three companies of Germans annihilated by our artillery fire. We captured Ahlain St. Nazaire and took several hundred prisoners. The Germans set fire to half of the village.

MODEST AUSTRIAN CLAIMS

MODEST AUSTRIAN CLAIMS On adding the numbers of prisoners and guns alleged to have been captured by the AuBrians in various battles since the outbreak of war, the fantastic total is reached, states the Corriere della Sera," of Milan, of 13,000,000 prisoners and 8,600 gUM.

lvooo WOUNDED INDIAN WARRIORS

lvooo WOUNDED INDIAN WARRIORS' During last, night four train loads of wounded British and Indian soldiers from the neighbourhood of Ypres ar-I rived at Brighton, and were distributed among local hospitals. They numbered over 500, of whom more than 400 were! Indians. This brings the total of In- dian warriors received at Brighton this week to nearly 1,000. The preponderance of serious wounds indicate the desperate character of the fighting during the past few days.

KILLED IN THE DARDANELLES

KILLED IN THE DARDANELLES Mr. Tom Griffiths, of Bron Gwendraeth, Pontyeates, Carmarthenshire, a son of Mrs. Bowen, Farmer's Cottage, Llangen- deirne, who was one of 12 ambulance men from the Pont henry Brigade of the Car- marthenshire Red Cross Society who placed their services at the disposal of their country, has been billed in the Dardanelles. He was 26 years of age, and married.

LLANSAWEL VICTIM OF LUSITANIAI

LLANSAWEL VICTIM OF LUSITANIA I One of the passengers who perished in I the disaster to thp Lusitania was Mr, Evan Jonc?. of Ott?mw?, Jowa, U.S.A., who was cn his way home to Llanawd, Carmarthenshire. He was 60 years of age, and the son of Mr. John Jones, Cwmhowel, and left his native viHage for America ,ii)d le?t liii nitivevillage for Aii-terica ]]ahn villag-e to spnd the remainder of his lifp in retirement, and prior to his departure he disposed of his pi-operties in Ottumwa. I

I WELSH GUARDS CONCERT I

I WELSH GUARDS' CONCERT] I The Welsh Guards have held their first <-oncert. One of the Boys tells us all ai)oiit it:- We had erected a temporary platform, covered at the rear with a huge Union Jack. The good village folk turned up in large numbers, and soon made them- selves quite at home. The Welsh Guards Glee Party laid the foundation of a successful evening with Men of Harlech." This party, which was conducted by Pte. J. Wiliiams, has been raised through the instrumentality of Gannon." the Merthyr bard. One would have thought that the party had been together for years, so wonderful an account of themselves did they give. Their renderings of Aberystwyth and Ton- y-Botel raised the audience to a high stage of emotionalism, and the Englisil folk present must have thought that we truly were a strange people. That fine old song, Asleep in the j Deep," revived bitter memories of the pest few days. The comedians were great, and Private Dupree should in future be known as the old man from Abertawe." Corpl. Richards excelled himself in Kissing Cup's Race." Mouth-organ solos and a fine sword-swinging exhibition also added interest to the proceedings. The Hymn of Hate" was recited by a local sooutmaster. The renderings of Land of My ,Pathers" and the National Anthem brought an enjoyable evening to ? clo?. The (n('ert w" in charge of ? HattaIion-Sprgt.-Major Stevenson, and we Were favoured with the presence of several ?'SmM'? including the commanding officer (Li« £ ) £ ,-Cak>Qel Murray Tfyreip^adL

CABINET RESIGNS nibMo

CABINET RESIGNS.! nibMo. POLITICAL CRISIS IN I ITALY. I I NEUTRALIST PARTY INTRIGUING FOR FURTHER DELAY. THE DAY OF DECISION r_ Rome, Thursday.—The following Note was issued here this eve,ning:-I'hei Council of Ministers, considering that it does not possess that unanimous assent of the Constitutional parties rf'garding I its international policy which the gravity of the situation demands, has decided to I hand its resignation to the King. His Majesty has reserved his decision.— Reuter. This is the second Cabinet to fall I owing to the war, the first being that of M. Venezelos. I The Day of Decision. While the Italian Government had preserved the greatest secrecy in regard I' to the negotiations with Germany and Austria, it had become almost certain that the decision to join the Entente Powers had been arrived at, and that May 20-the day of the re-assembly of Parliament—would be the turning point in Italy's history. The teeling of the nation in favour of this attitude has shown itself unmistak- ably, but in Parliament there is a very strong Neutralist party, and Signor Gio- litti, the ex-Premier and the most power- ful politician in Italy, has come in for unpopularity on account of his suspected intrigues. « How far the suspicions are correct re- i mains to be seen, but he has protested that he has not sought W force his views t on the King and the Premier, but that he was consulted by then*. Two Parties in Conflict. The two sections in Italy at present— the Interventionists and the cutralists I —so far, had allowed the Cabinet to con- tinue their work with the hope that whatever decision was taken, would meet with the unanimous support of the nation, but they came into open conflict when Signor Giolitti openly said that he was convinced that war could be avoided and Italy still obtain adequate conces- sions from Austria. ITALIAN TROOPS FOR ALBANIA. I I I Crowd Threatens to Lynch a Statesman. I P&ris, Friday.—The "Echo de Paris" Corfu correspondent telegraphs:— I Five transports with Italian troops left Brindisi for Albania. It is stated this reinforcement has been considered ex- pedient in consequence of the growing activity of the bands of insurgents in the pay. of Austria and Turkey, who might attack Valona. The "Petit Parisien" Turin advices say that thousands of demonstrators in favour of intervention, marching to the I seat of the Austrian Ambasador, sur- rounded a tramcar containing Signor Bertolini, ex-Minister of Colonies, and threatened to lynch him. The Carabineers intervening, Signor Bertolini escaped. Ylie carria-ge o( The carriage of Signor Facta, ex- Finance Minister, friend of Signor Giolitti, was also attacked. The troops concentrated in the principal streets II which were in total darkness, were power? less to prevent the demonstrators attack- ling' the shops of Germans. The German College has bad all the windows smashed. Revolver shots were fired. and it is feared some people have been wounded. Grave Steps Anticipated. ,I Rome, Thursday.—After the Cabinet Council Signor Salandra had an interview with the King. Grave steps are antici- pated at a very early moment.

NIGH PRICE OF WHEATI

NIGH PRICE OF WHEAT I Big prices were again obtained for wheat in, Plymouth Corn Exchange yesterday. Foreign wheat changed hands freely at 73s. 6d. a qnarter, and the Eng- t lish variety realised from 63s. to 64s. a quarter.

IRISH DIVISION AT THE fRONTI

IRISH DIVISION AT THE fRONT I Mr, John Redmond, in a letter to the Freeman's Journal," says: "The Tenth Irish Division has been completed, and is the first Irish Division of the Now Army which has left our shores for the front. It is well that tins fact should lie known. I am certain it will worthily uphold the honour of Ireland, and it has the fervent good wishes and prayers of the Irish people for its success."

WHY MAURETANIA WILL NOT SAILI

WHY MAURETANIA WILL NOT SAIL I The Cunard Company last night issued the following announcement: The state- ments that have recently appeared in the Press, emanating probably from German sources, to the effect that the Cunard Company have cancelled their sailings to America, are quite incorrect. As the Lusitania cannot, unhappily, sail on Saturday next, the only sailing that has been cancelled is that of the Mauretania on the 29th inst., the reason in this case being that there was not sufficient demand for passenger accommodation to warrant running that steamer.

IN THE SEA OF MARMORAI

IN THE SEA OF MARMORA. Mudros, Sunday.—The two British sub- marines which succeeded in getting through the Dardanelles minefield and in entering the Sea of Marmora a fortnight ago were admitted by the Germans a few days later to have sunk two Turkish transports. The German report went on to an- nounce their capture by the Turks. It is now, however, known here that until a few days ago they were having it all their own way from Gallipoli to Constantinople having sunk more vessels than the 'Ger- mans liked to confess, providing them- selves with fuel and provisions at the expense of the Turks, and spreading con- fusion and panic among Turkish ship- ping.—" Times telegram# A

TRENCHES CARRIED

TRENCHES CARRIED THE FRENCH ADD TO YESTERDAY'S GAINS FOUR BLOCKHOUSES DESTROYED PARIS, Friday. The following French official com- munique was issued this afternoon:— Rain has fallen without ceasing since the morning of the 13th. In the night of the 13th and 14th the French carried several trenches to the south-west of Souchez, in spite of the difficult and slippery nature of the ground. They have maintained all their yes- terday's gains on the rest of the Loos- Arras front. In the valley of the Aisne the French have destroyed four German blockhouses and several trenches.

PROMOTIONS

PROMOTIONS Swansea Officers in France Given Their Step. Some interesting Swansea promotions are announced in the Gazette." The following members of the t'th (Glamor- gan) Battalion of the Welsh Regiment will receive the congratulations of many friciads Lieutenants to be Captains. Julian M. Goldberg, Frank A. S. Hinton, Thomas S. Bevan. Second-Lieutenants to be Lieutenants. Carl Langer, Howard Fletcher, John Hubert Roberts. Yeomanry-Glamorgan.-Capt, Sir F. C. R. Price, to be temporary Major (Oct. 30). Lieutenants to be Captains: 0. Fisher (Oct. 30); C. L. Aylett-Branfill (temporary, April 2); E. J. C. David (temporary, Al}ri13). Second-Lieutenants to be Lieutenant:" I?'Eistier. G. R. P. i C- P, P. Llewellyn to remain seconded; R. C. Wilson (Aug 5); L. W. David (temporary. Oct. 30); J. G. Bruce (temporary, April 2); G. D. Aylett-Branfill (temporary, April 5); G. R. S. Byass (temporary, April 13); H. W. Nell to be Second- Lieutenant (April 8). Regular Battalion.-16th Welsh R.— J. W. H. Rice to be temporary Lieutenant (March 22). 18th Welsh R.—T. M. Johns to be temporary Second Lieutenant (April 8).

KING OF GREECE ILL

KING OF GREECE ILL Athens. Thursday.—The cold from which the King of Greece has been suf- fering has developed into pleurisy. His condition, it is said, is believed to be hopeless.

WELSH COALOWKERS FORTUNE

WELSH COALOWKERS FORTUNE Mr. Wm. EYns, of Brouteg, Merthyr Tydvil, and of the Cyfarthfa Iron Works, Merthyr Tydvil, general manager 01 Messrs. Guest, Keen, and Nettlefolds' Works, at Dowlais, Cyfarthfa, and Car- djif, former chairman of the Monmouth- shire and South Wales Coal-owners' Asso- ciation, who died on February 12th last, aged 71, left estate of the gross value oi £ 12,899, with net

THE SOUND OF DRAKES DRUM

THE SOUND OF DRAKE'S DRUM. Lecturing at Leeds on The Hidden Side of the War," Miss Edwards, of the Theosophical Society, declared that the spirit of Drake was reincarnated first in Nelson and now in Jellicoe. and added that the legendary Drake's drum at Plymouth Sound has been recently heard again, as it was in Nelson's day- Another cose of reincarnation she found in King Albert, whose spirit is that of William the Silent.

a LICENSED VICTUALLERS DEMANDS

a__ LICENSED VICTUALLERS' DEMANDS The Licensed Victuallers' Defence League Conference at Harrowgate to-day called for a revision of the billeting allow- ances. The complaint was made that nearly the whole of the additional taxes fail upon the retailers ,and it was urged that brewers should declare the gravities of beers on delivery, and that allowance should be made by the Excise to retailers for restricted hours. A motion favouring the abolition of grocers' licenses as creating unfair com- petition was defeated as being inoppor- tune. The conference called for the suppres- sion of beer hawking and spirit peddling.

FORMER SWANSEA COUNCILLORS Will

FORMER SWANSEA COUNCILLOR'S Will. Mr. Griffith Davies, J.P., of 1, Panty- gwydr-road, Swansea, formerly of 34, Henrietta-street, Swansea, stonemason and contractor, for some years a member of the Swansea Town Council, and a trustee of the Brunswick Chapel, w!io died January 18th last, aged 67 years, left estate of the gross value of £ 10,177, of which the net personalty has been sworn at 9d. Probate of his will, dated 28th August, 1883, with a codicil of December 10th, 1914, has been granted to Mr. Fred. Jas. Parker, hay and corn merchant, of Ply- niouth-ftreet, Swansea, and Mr. Thomas Henry Taylor, of tjie Baths Company, Swansea. The testator left all of his pro- hperty to his wife, Mrs. Maria Davies. I absolutely.

PROHIBITION OF SPIRITS

PROHIBITION OF SPIRITS. The Press Association's Lobby corres- pondent says:— A new turn will be given to the discus- sions in the House of Commons on Mon- day on the Government hill restricting the sale of immature spirits by an amend- ment of which Sir E. Carson gave notice yesterday. The effect of his proposal would be the absolute prohibition of the sale of spirits, and he explained that his object was to place all distillers, whether their output was of the raw or the matured article, on the same level, and enable them to start again on equal terms after the war. It is .assumed that if this was carried the Government, in accordance with Mr. Lloyd George's pledge when endeavouring to secure acceptance of his original scheme, would propose fuU 'compensation ? ??ivcn for Qusiness lo? attained. ? ?. ?Jt

OUR NEW COLONY I

OUR NEW COLONY., w I CERMAN RULE IN AFRICA i ENDED. I GENERAL BOTHA ACCOMPLISHES HIS PURPOSE. I A GREAT ACHIEVEMENT I I As already reported ill the Cambriai Daily Leader," Genera l Botha and the: British South African forces occupied Windhuk, the capital of German South- West Africa, without resistance on Wed-i lie.sday. The Union Jack Vi&¡ hoisted I over the Town Hall at noon. -Alartial law has been proclaimed in the district, and General Botha has reminded his' men of their duty towards the 3,000 i European and 12 000 native prisoners whom the fortune of war has delivered into their hands. The capture of Windliuk means the, practical end of German rule in South- West Africa. To-day the blunder by which, 30 years ago, this territory was' allowed to pass under the German flag) has been redeemed. Course of the Campaign. 1 It was along the Swakopmund and luderitz Bay lines that the British South African forces, .supported also from the south-east, have converged towards their objective. Although Luderitz Bay was peacefully entered hy the Union De- fence Force on September 18th, the opera- tiOllB were interrupted bv the Boer rising later in the year, and it was not until, this year that the campaign was efi'tc-! tively resumed. The principal stages ofi the advance were:— Jan. 14.—Swakopmund occupied. Feb. 22.—Garub occupied. Mar. 20.—Battle of Ptorteberg. Apl. I.-Aiis oeeiipie.

I WILL AVENGE HIS WIFES DEATH I

I WILL AVENGE HIS WIFE'S DEATH Toronto. Thursday.—At Hamilton, 1 ,Onl3ri,i, a l)oli(-Co6table ?h?ap wife went down with tb? JJuitanja resigned to-day. He is now a member of the 3()th i Overseas BattalioD.

INEATH SOLDIERS KILLEDI

NEATH SOLDIERS KILLED I News reached Neath this afternoon that Lance-Corporal W. Tustin, of the, 2nd Welsh, who resided at King-street, | Neath; and Private Nicholas, of Bowen- street, Neath, have both been killed in action.

ARCHANGEL PORT CLOSEDI

ARCHANGEL PORT CLOSED I Petrograd, Thursday.—The Council of Ministers has instructed the Minister of Commerce to inform Russian trade! circles that the Port of Archangel is being used for Government transport and will be impracticable for private cargoes until further orders.-Reuter.

DISMISSED THE ARMY I

DISMISSED THE ARMY. From last night's "London Gazette": Major Gile.; E. Carvetli. 6th (Glamor- gan) Battalion Welsh Regiment, is dis- missed from his Majesty's service by .sentence of a g jneral court-martial. Lieutenant Wilkinson Overend, R.A.M.C., is dismissed from his Majesty's service by sentence of a general court- martial.

THE YORKSHIREMANS WARNINGI

THE YORKSHIREMAN'S WARNING I An officer in the Yorkshire Territorials I says that. during the recent fighting near Ypres, three shells landed over the breast- works near a Very broad )'ot' -K4hi=: which so annoyed him, as he was trying to sleep, that he got up and shouted to the Germans, You'll be laming sum on us if yer aren't careful. So I've telled yer!"

THE PRICE WE MUST PAYI

THE PRICE WE MUST PAY The names of 53 o fficers and 268 men ] were included in the casualty lists issued on Thursday night. They are all reported! from the headquarters of the Expedition-! ary Force, and are classified as ffillows:-i Oiffcers. Men. Killed 9 41 Died of wounds 3 15 Died 3 Wounded. 38 198 Mining. 3 11

SWANSEA BAPTISTS RESOLUTIONSI

SWANSEA BAPTIST'S RESOLUTIONS. I At the quarterly meeting of the Swansea and District Baptist Association at Adulam, Bonymaen on Thursday, Mr. H. C. Jeffreys, Cwmbwrla. presiding, a reso- lution was passed supporting the Govern- ment drink proposals, whilst a vote of sympathy with those who had sustained loss by the disaster to the Lusitania, and an expression of horror and disgust at the perpetration of the deed which had caused the calamity was passed.

BELGIANS BREAK CERMAN ATTACK I

BELGIANS BREAK CERMAN ATTACK I Havre, Thursday. — A communique issued to-day by the Belgian Government says there was violent fighting all yester- day. On the night of May llth-12th, after an extremely violent bombardment of our front, the enemy made an assault I in compact masses on one point which we had established on the Yser front, but was met with rifle and machine gun fire i which broke his attack, and he was re-I pulsed, our troops taking some prisoners. The enemy left more than 200 dead on the field. v u

BLOWN IN ALL DIRECTIONS

BLOWN IN ALL DIRECTIONS SEVEN MEN INJURED BY CAS EXPLOSION, AT LLANELLY STEELWORKS MISHAP Seven men, while following their em- ployment at the South Wales Steelworks, Llanelly, early this morning sustained extensive burns as the result of an ex- plosion of gas. Their names were:—James Harris, New Buildings, Long Row; James Evans, Al- ban-road; John Isaacs, Glenalla-road; James Williams, Richard Rogers, David Brennan and another. Experiments were being made with a patent that was being introduced into the works for the first time, and some diffi- culty was experienced with a gas valve. The men descended to the pit under the furnace with a view of remedying matters, and when three of their number removed the door of the valve, an ex- plosion occurred, a flame like a tongue of fire causing the injuries to the men, who were blown in all directions. Medical aid was summoned, and Dr. Edgar Jones having attended to the men, they were removed to their respective homes.

CONSCRIPTION

CONSCRIPTION Lord Haldane's Statement to the Peers. In the course of the discussion on the Army Act Amendment Bill, in the House of Lords yesterday, Viscount Haldane, the Lord Chancellor and former Secre- tary for War, made an announcement on the future of recruiting which is bound to attract widespread attention. The Bill provi des for the compulsory trans- fer of soldiers from one, unit to another, and Viscount Midleton, also a former War Secretary, on this point said that the Government should not shut their eyes to the possibility ot a departure from the voluntary principle in the matter of re- -cruitin- Lord Haldane replied as follows: We are fighting for our lives in per- haps the most tremendous war in his- tory. We are fighting for our lives, and even though we may think under ordin- ary condition; in time of peace that the voluntary system is the system from "which it would be most difficult for us to depart, yet we may find that we may have to reconsider the situation in the light of the tremendous interests of the t nation. We are fighting for a cause which becomes more and more a cause for which we ought to be prepared to lay down everything we possess in the world. That being so, there can be no question of principle against the larger consideration. But we are not faced with the problem at present. I think it may come. but at present the War Office have their hands full with the men they possess. It is well to remember that our voluntary system has given us an army which for quality compares with anything that can lie put in the field. One hesitates before one considers in a practical way whether it has failed on the qution of quantity. Lord Lansdowne observed He had heard with great satisfaction the momentous announcement that the Cabinet were prepared to reconsider the whole situation in regard to recruiting in view of the tremendous interests at stake. It may he recalled that on April 20 last Mr. Lloyd George, replying to questions in the Commons on behalf of the Prime Minister, said: The Government are not of opinion that there is any ground for thinking that the war would be more successfully prosecuted by means of con- scription," adding that Lord Kitchener was very gratified with the response made to the appeal to the country volun- tarily."

FIGHT OR PAY TAXI

FIGHT OR PAY TAX. I Petrograd, Thursday.—The Tsar has ) approved a decree imposing a temporary war tax on all excused from military I service.

NATURALISED ALIENS PETITIONI

NATURALISED ALIENS PETITION. I The German and Austrian.members of the London Stock Exchange, who are naturalised British, oiibjects to-day pre- sented their memorial to the Lord Mayor of London, reiterating their allegiance and loyalty to the British JThrone, and condemning the barbaric f&etliods of warfare pursued by Germany. The signatures were 131 in number, and the memorial was handod to the Lord Mayor by three of the oldest members of the community, one of whom had lost his only son at the front fighting for Great Britain.

WELL DONE HTHEFUSIUERS I

WELL DONE, HTHE-FUSIUERS I A Swansea boy in the 12th Battalion of the Lancashire Fusiliers writes with pride to tell us of the splendid route march of 60 miles they made the other day. We are not in the habit of giving away home information regarding the new armies, but we wish the Germans could hear of the work of our British lads who are shortlv to proceed to the war. We marched, says our correspondent, wich full equipment. It was a grand feat of physical endurance. The march was commenced at 7.20 a.m. on a Thursday morning; 24 miles were made at first day to billets for the night. On Friday the march was resumed at 8.45 a.m, although reveille was sounded at 5 a.m., and 20 miles were covered by 5 p.m., where we halted for the night. At 4.30 Saturday morning the bugles were again heard sounding the "rouse." We left our rest- ing place at 7.20 a.m., and covered the remaining 16 miles before noon. OIl arriving at our destination, the men- had to do fatigue work. During the two and a half days'ja^ch- ing we were on; active service footing, sleeping in a workhouse the first night, and in a barn the second, and we received active service rations.

No title

n The price of bread in France will remain I normal during the who le course of the war, thanks to the measures adopted by the Government in seizing the entire stock of available wheat in ibe country- t

Advertising

4.0 itinera at C-nt 'vicx': GeizerLl .'Wacto,, Ir.iT>. Cattle, Eoi Donovan, Joy-WheeI. t 'tl .y:" 1 1-¡. iVr>>_ ix., Unfortunate, Allegro, Sandrian Beauvril. Landslide-. ? ? T» It?.? u to 2 Alma i :L! G to 1 -■la^rgrseu, 7 to 1 Oybale, 1iQ V- 7 Martinmas.. t LUX i, CEEVASSS 2, ÄJ AL{) ,).) ran- IWBElT LEE 1. LADIGNAC I 'V,E%T- BEM 5.—Alto ran; Eant. I I j i I Pirate Submarine Sunk? The master of the stisamer Col- reports having struck an ob- jeot while at eea, and immediately j afterwards a quantity of oil rose to th& surface. He believes a German.Sub- marine W68 sunk. t I 1 1 I I i i  i i i" i  ¡ i i i w- U i • i • i- t •  i •' 1 | i f I   -( J i j-i < £ N ^« 4) h *$ i- < t