Collection Title: Cambrian Daily Leader

Provider: The National Library of Wales

Rights: The copyright status or ownership of this resource is unknown.

View full details

Image 1 of 8 Next Last
Full Screen
30 articles on this page
Advertising

I i  )! I; T?ne "Cambria Daily U Ii L  i i I eaaer gIves ater I news than any paper ,I published in this dis- II  trict. 1 trict.li II

Advertising

———————————————————————— The London Office of the ''Cambria Daily Leader" i is at 151, Tleet Street (first floor), where adver- tisements can be received I. up to 7 o'clock each evening for insertion in the next day's issue. Tel. 2276 Central.

USA CONGRESS AGREES 0 I

USA CONGRESS AGREES 0. WILSON WINS PRESIDENTS PATIENCE WITH GERMANY EXHAUSTED Waatrrogton, Thursday. President >* ilson has WOll a temporary victory in the iiglit against tho resolution of Con- gress to warn Americans off belligerent ships. Tie leaders of the House have agreed to defer action; but the action that the Senate "will take is u rtain. Kxchange. Political Crisis in Washington. New York, Thursday .-Prosid<)nt Wilson lias found himself co-itronted with a dis- couraging predicament whichever way he turned. Ait tho moment when he re- quirc-d the loyal support of the party leaders in order to carry the issue with Germany to a successful conclusion he was th njatened by their dtv+ortion, but he, has mu.de a nrm stand. lie has notified the Chairmeii of th-e Omunittoos of foreign Relations that his patience in the submarine negotiations with Germany is exhausted and that he will no longer eiiduro in silence the charges of timidity "which are being made against the Ad- m in J ration.—- Press Association. Foreign Special.

I THE BOMBASTIC BLOCKADE j

THE BOMBASTIC BLOCKADE Death of Former Chief of German ilavy. Amsterdam, Thursday.—According to a telegram from Berlin, Admiral von Pohl, the former Chief of the German Navy, is dead.—liruter. Admiral Hugo von Pohl was appointed to the command of the Kaiser's battle fleet cn the dismissal of Admiral von Ingenohl in August last. lie was an intimate friend of Admiral von Tirpitz, and ha6 been largely responsible for carrying out his policy of sea f rightfulness by sub- marines. Apart from thi-s, he has enjoyed *1 sinecure, tor he has been iu more sue- cessful than his predecessor in getting the German fleet, out of the Kiel Canal. It was von Pohl who signed the hombMstic notification of February 1915 proclaiming that blockade of Groat. Britain which ended so disastrously for the Germans, Admiral von Pohl was in his sixty-second year. Three weeks ago the Kaiser con- ferred or him the Grand Cross of the Red Eaptfe. and he -was then referred to as hitherto in command of the High Sea Fleet.

AUSTRALIAN CASUALTIES

AUSTRALIAN CASUALTIES Total Losses of Colonials: 35,951. The Exchange Telegraph Company is enabled to state that the casualties sus- tained by Australians on ax-.Live service up t,1) the beginning of January were 3íi,!J5{. 1 his number does not include those w hose names have appeared in tlio casual- ties and have since returned to duty. The totals are as follow -.— Dead. Officers 32s Men 5,999 Wounded. > Officers 41 g Men 13,379 Missing. Offi-ce.rs 20 Men 1.6;;0 Sick. Offiœn. 606 Men 14,171 Prisoners of War. Officers 6 Men 5-1 Nature of Casualty Unknown. I Officers .j.!) Men 204 Chaplains. Died 1 Missing 4- Sick 7 Nurses. Died 1 Sick j,

HIS MAJEST 18 GUESTS

HIS MAJEST 1'8 "GUESTS" An encounter between convicts and warders at His Majesty's Prison, Peter- head, is raported by an A berdeen corre- spondent. While at work in the Admiralty yard a prisoner named Mann 1;nocked down a warder. As he was beill taken back to the prison he attacked another "w arder, who had to draw his sword. Later several convicts made an on- slaught on a warder, raid the two ring- leaders were overpowered and handcuffed.

RETCH UNITY OF MIND

RETCH UNITY OF MIND, r-a ris, Friday.—The representative of tho rt }rIa lin" ;vesterda v interviewed Lord Rryce, loader of the British section of 

WAR GIfTS

WAR GIfTS  fo thr, n ?T, -mp 1'oUf'wini? pi?.s ? ?he Counts Eoldifr?' and SL'?crs-' Famiiifs' Association (inc.I?:[in? Torr?o'? UEUS) are ackn?w- ledged by Mrs. Beatrice Gwynue Hughes, Llandilo, :tuct president of the association, The articles were received during the last three months of 1P15—■ Camiri: Liii-.n division 13, H. Ferry aids L:, Llandito 57, Laugliarne 12, Whitland 41, Cüllwil Ü. Lianarthaey 11, 118, Blaenau (Ammanford) 103. Mrs. Hannah Jones, Tyrmawr, Breehfa, has also sent a gift of 10 s. and a very useful an4i acceptable parcel of clothes for th Behrian refugees. j

I MINERS WAGES

I MINERS' WAGES 10RD MUIR MACKENZIE PRESIDES OVER CONCILIATION BOARD (By our Mining Correspondent). A meeting of the South Wales Coal Con- ciliation Board held at Cardiff on Friday was of unusual interest for several reasons, Lord Muir Mackenzie, the re- cently-appointed independent chairman, presiding for the first time over the dis- eussiou between the contending parties, The workmen's representatives claimed an advance in wages of 5 per cent, and the coalowners' representatives demanded that there should be a reduction of I-, per cent, And the. difficulties of the situation were complicated by the absence from the new agreement of what has previously been regarded as an important deciding factor —the equivalent," viz., a fixed sum of the selling price of coal to be taken as equivalent to a fixed item of wage payable in respect of it to the workmen. At the time of writing it is not antici- pated that the proceedings will conclude until a late hou.r in the afternoon, as both sides have a mass of facts and figures to lay before the independent chairman, and it is regarded as quite possible that the decision, or casting vote, may not be actually given immediately. In accord- ance with the terms of the agreement, the independent chairman may. if he chooses, take five days to consider the matter, and although an expert statistician, the task he now has to tackle is quite new to him. Mr. F. L. Davis presided over the coal- owners' side, and Mr. James WiDstono over the workmen's side, and there was a full attendance. Among others present wore the "Ri^ht Hon. William Abraham, M.P. (Mabon). Mr. Thomas Richards. M.P. (general secretary, who is still suffering from the. effects of his indisposition). Mr. A. Onions (general treasurer), Mr. John Williams, M.P. (chief a sent for the Wes- tern District), Mr. J. D. Morgan (chief agent for the Anthracite District), and Mr. J. James (agent), Mr. W. Jenkins (agent for the Afon Valley District), Mr. John Davies, Dowlais; Mr. Vernon Hartshorn, Maesteg), Mr. F. Hodges, Ogmore; and or he re. Weicome to New Chairman. I The new independent chairman, lord Muir Mackenzie, was met ;,1: the outset by Messrs. T. Richards, M.P., and Fin- lay Gibson, the general secretaries of the Conciliatintl Board, and warmly wel- comed upon his first appearance in the district in the capacity of independent chairman of the Conciliation Board. Mr. F. L. Davis, the. chairman of the coa-lowner. thfn Drocccdt-ri to nTw-n the case of the employer? for the claim which they had put in tha.t the wages of the miners should now be subject to a reduc- tion of 3f -per cent. This was followed on the name side by fr. Evan Williams, of Gorseinon, who further elaborated the figures and argu- ments adduced on thp owners' side. In the afternoon, rofter a. short adjourn- ment for luncheon, the case for the work- men against the anplicahnn of the coal- owners ?'a? placed Hpforp ?.? independent chairman by Mr. James Winstone, the Chairman on the workmen's side, and Mr. Alfred Onions.

I GENERAL SAPRAILS KINDNESS F

I GENERAL SAPRAIL'S KINDNESS F I Generous Gifts to Poor at Salonika. Paris, Fi-i(!:i Petii- Parisien's special correspondent at Salonika, tele- graphing under yesterday's date, says: J General Moschopoutos and General Zim- brakalcis, accompanied by their rospectivo chiefs of staff and the heads of the I various branches concerned, were to-day taken by General Sarrail over the artil- lery. engineering, and aviation parks, the commissariat department, and special cartography, cinematography, and photo- graphy branches of our army. They t lunched at tho camp at Zeitenleck. Pity for the Hungry. I The "Petit Parisien's" special corre- spondent at Salonika telegraphs under ye.storda y s date: General Sarrail, taking pity on the. terrible distress of Greek refugees from Asia Minor and Mace- donia, has given orders for 17,000 sacks of four. 2,000 sacks of rice, and 400 kilos cf compressed rjuinine to be put at the dis- posal of the Prefecture of Salonika, to be distributed free among these unfortunate people. For some weeks past General Sarrail had ordered soup to be given to all refugees who came and asked for it, 1){'- sides making an allowance of 1,000 kilos of vegetables daily for distribution among the poor. These generous donations t i -,c, poor. Tb clee, r- ) which. have been greatly appreciated by the poor inhabitants, have t reated a most excellent impression, and v ill bo continued—Press Association War Special. tmmn Ml am m mmm a n ■ mi—|

I NORTH LOUTH RESULT

I NORTH LOUTH RESULT. I Mr. Whitty (Nat.) 2299 Mr. Hamil (Ind.) 1810

I DESTRUCTION OF AVIATION SHEDS

I DESTRUCTION OF AVIATION SHEDS I Geneva, Tllureday. q'lie Allies' I aviators recently destroyed six new avia- tion sheds collt-aining aeroplanes at- Ilabs- "heim. II [Ha.bshim is in Alsace, about foar mi?? east of Mu?cus?.]

I j TliRO PLAKE fFiGA MAURITIUS

j Tli,'RO 'PL'AKE fFiG,A MAURITIUS. Press Bureau, Friday.—The Seeretarv of Slatu foi- lowingAs the. result of public suW.rip- tiou in Mauritius. the War Office has received a further sum of to meet the cost of an aeroplane. This is the third aeroplane which has been presented i'rom this source within six weeks.—-Press I -s i x Association. -m_-

ISEVEM SISTERS COLLIERS THREAT

I SEVEM SISTERS COLLIER'S THREAT. William Evans, collier. Dylais Gardei^ [ Seven Sisters, pleaded guilty, at Neath, on Friday, when charged with using abusive and threatening language Û n carriage oil the Neath and Brecon Kaiiwa,y. Mr. James Rcvell prosecuted. The guard stated that defendant threatened to smash the window, an:i also smash Tiis head, when lie got to Seven Sisters. A Sue of was imposed, the Chairman (M?. Abraham George) adding that tbeso | were on the increase, and the Bendl j inteJS3ed increasing the fLua*

BATTLE OF VERDUN BATTLE OF VERDUN I i

BATTLE OF VERDUN. | BATTLE OF VERDUN. I i Four Days' Furious Fighting. GERMANS' GREATEST OFFENSIVE. i ————— I i I Costly Efforts With Small Gains j The great battle for Verdun is still in progress, and de- spite German claims of victory, the French are holding j their own, and have straightened out their lines. The communique issued last night shows that after four days' furious fighting, the enemy has failed to secure any material gain, and that the French are equal to the greatest strain likely to be placed on their resources. It is generally felt that Verdun is safe, and that the German offensive will fail. The artillery is playing a big part in the present engage- ment, and it is apparent that along the entire front the Allies have an abundance of munitions, thus enabling them to dominate the fire of the enemy, _————.——— The French are quite conndent of hold- ■ ing their own in the battle of Verdun. They believe that their twtdc?s of letting the enemy assault in masses involves enor- mous sacrifices to the Germans, and there- fore pays. They have maintained their front unbroken, though they have carried out. strategic withdrawals from two, or possibly three, villages and a wood. Measuring on a map the Germans have made no perceptible approach to Verdun. Their claims in their official report are quite modest, and they do not slate that they have captured any more prisoners. The impression produced is that their pro- gress has been stopped and that the French have the battle quite in hand. The Germans inention three villages as having been wrested from the French, in- i eluding Samogneux, six and a half miles north of Verdun, the loss of which the French do not acknowledge. The explana- tion of this discrepancy is probably that the Germans only hold part of the village while the French retain their foothold in the other part, as was the case with the famous itigir refinery at Sonchez, which for weeks was daimtd-and held—by both si des. Purpose of Onslaught, ) This German onslaught by the Crown Prince's army has now lasted three day? without producing any appreciable effect upon the French pOttitions. No more hope- ful observation could be made than this. The violence of tbo German attack has been indescribable, and it still proceeds to- day in all the .sectors north and east of Verdun. General who commands, is as coiifidetit asever. The Crown Prince, with the. host German troops, is once more battering his bead against, the wall. The most probable reason for the German at- tack on Verdun is to provide the GeWnan people with some new consolation. If, of course, the historic fortrew,, of Verdun were taken, or even approached, the event would be trumpeted through the empire. There is not the remotest, chance of Ver- dun being taken or even approached, but I even an advance of half a mile towards Verdun is something to lie advertised among the German people. Hitherto, how- ever, the German communiques have been curiously modest about the attack on Ver- dun, and actually speak of it as a. defen- sive operation. I French Losses Small. I The wounded say that never have they seen such furious fighting. The whole universe geeius to be tumbling into ruins from the fury of the artillery, but, be- yond totally destroying some trenches, nothing has been done. It is no secret that the Freneh losses are surprisingly small, despite the gas shells which were used in gmat quantities. Fiv.nch generals do not expose thoir men to unnecessary risks, and thus, when they find that, they must eventually evacuate certain salients or lose hwily. they choose to retire raJher than suffer losses for nothing. What the Germans have already gained in this sector has been bought very deariy, because if is impossible to throw army corps against the French artillery without men being mown down. rrhi is what is happening here, and England need have no fear for the result. I OFFICIAL NEWS. Paris, Thursday, 11 p.m.—To-uight's official communique eays:— Wie carried out a concentration of fire on the enemy organisations to the west of Maisons de Champagne and to the south of Ste. Marie-Py. In the Argonno w-e executed a destruc- tive fire on the German works at La Fille Monte. In the region to the north of Verdun the enemy has continued to bombard our front with the same intensity from the Meu6e to the south of Fromezey. The activity of the artillery abated somewhat, between Malincourt and the It -ft bank of the Mouse. There has not yot been any infantry action in this region. Between the right bank of the Meuse and Orncs the enemy has given evidence | of the same fierceness as on the preceding days, and has redoubled his fierce attacks, leaving on the ground heaps of corpses without succeeding in breaking our front. On the two lines we carried back our lines on the one side to the area of Samog- neux, and on the ether side to tho south of Ornes. Our artillery has replied without inter- mission to the enemy's artillery. In Lorraine we repulscrl and pursued an enemy reconnoitring party that tried to approach one of our positions north of St. Martin. I BFimSH BOMBARDMENT. Mining Success Near Hulluch. Press Bureau. Thursday, 10.27 p.m.— The following telegraphic dispatch hM '—— tceeived :— j General Headquarters, Feh. 21. 9.15 P,M.-We sprang a mine opposite Hulluch last, night a!)d occupied the crater. To-day an artillery duel about Bac St. Maur ended in our favour. (htr artillery hombcrded hostile works near Frelinghiem, on the YMr-Coniines Canal, and east of Boesinghe, with euc- Ce6S. FRENCH OPINIONS. ( Enemy Beginning to Waver. Paris, Tli ii Coin m.k,.n!i ng on the opprations nori-h. of Verdun the Liberte" says:-If, would be puerile to deny that the enemy is attempting a great effort, the I greatest attempioo the lser affair, but we shall break down the offensive at 'Y-r -T gc Verdun as we did the Veer attempt. The I battle of Verdun has now beeu raging for four dav, Illd we have nowhere been beaten, iD spite of enormous sacrifices made by the enemy. We have only to hold on a little longer and we shall see him waver and then finally, break beneath our blows, which are fining more and i more violent. The TMnp? rptBt???-I" ?p?cof the violence of fbR attach, ?od t}otw-ithRtand-¡ ing the ?rpnyth of the forces emplooo. th" Gfrm?ns have m.? ?arco!y any 1'_1'0-1 ?r??. They :ue, moreover, un afzairs? an army which h6 b?-n powerfully or?ni' llerbelois, rre in our hands. South of Mctz an advanced French post was surprised, and the entire garrison of over ,54) men were taken prisoners.

IABSINTHE BANNED

ABSINTHE BANNED Greeks Carry Out General SarraiTs Request. Par- ?z, Fr  I Pari;?, Friday.—The Salonika corr(>- pondent of the .tvho de Paris" tele- graphs As a rcsull of the diiffculties of coni- misariat encounter vl by he Greek armv in Macedonia, tho ^Minister of War has decided on moving certain army corps. In the meanwhile orders have been issued for fho let of Artillery and the field artillery of the 1st Army Corps to go into camp near Athens. Cer- tain other unit? in Eastern Macedonia will receive orders immediately to move near the large towns in Cue district. deneral Sarrail has asked the Greek authorities to forbid the tale of absinthe in Salonika and the zone occupied hy the Allied armies. In conformity with this request, the Greek Government has a lutely prohibited the import- of absinthe into Macedonia. Orders at the same time have been issued that no absinthe at presort in "bond ia the Customs House I shall be allowed to pass out. Rigorous measures will be taken against trader-, and refaiTerf delivering abtinthe to fcoldierj in the Allied armies.

MARRIED MENS GALL ii

MARRIED MEN'S GALL; i i WAR OFFICE WARNING TO BlC I EMPLOYERS I It has been freely rumoured in the last I few days that the Government intended shortly to summon the married Derby groups to the colours. A very definite iorm was given to tJiese rumours on Thursday night by the publication of a list of dates on which the various married groups might expect to he called out. There is the, best authority for paying j that no dates havf yet been fixed by the War Office. It is understood, however, that banks and other large V.v,. lre~i j officially wariH>d that the WL.(- oi w.c- married gi-oups will be calkd up before the end of July. They will not all be called up at the same time, hut the sum- mons to the younger married groups will come as soon as the men taken under the Service Act have been brought info line. Meanwhile, the lYa- I Office,' in the face of national necessity, aro pressing strongly for a revision of the reserved occupations and starred trades. At the moment the Government are short oi' men in training. There is ample accommodation, but the 6trealni of re- volume. The Derby figures revealed the cruits is not flowing in in sufficient volume. The Derby figures revealed the existence of ample reserves, but the yieid of the scheme so far has not kept pace with the national requirements.

EXEMPTION OF TINPLATERS I f

EXEMPTION OF TINPLATERS I f Swansea Advisory Committee I Receives a Deputation. At a meeting of the Swansea Borough Ad- j visory Committee at the Guildhall or. i Tb.vrsday afternoon the important questi in of the position of tinplate worker6 in rc- pnrl to exemption from military scrvice was considered. A der-ntation of tinplate manufacturers attended to give the committee the benefit of thei: views, and the subject was thor- oughly discussed in all its bearing*. Xo definite course of action, however, was de- cided Oli, and the meeting was adjourned.

THE MOEWES VICTIMS I

THE MOEWE'S VICTIMS Where and When the Ships Were Sunk. A Lloyd's Tenerifte message, dated i Tuesday, say:, the British steamer Wcs-t- burn arrived at TVnerifl'e under the Ger- man naval flag with i men, the crews of the following British ftcamcm: Flamenco, Horace, Carbridge, Clan MeTavish, Wt-itii)rn, tho British harque Edinburgh, and the Belgian steamer Luxembourg, also n4) prisoners of war ex the Appam. A later telegram Mates that the cap- tains of the steamers rewort being cap- tured by a German raider before their vessels were siwik between thn South I American coast and Fernando Maronha, between 16th January and 9th February.

PARENTS AND MEASLES I

PARENTS AND MEASLES Many Cases Due to Ignorance. The Ystradgynlafs District Council met on Thursday, Mr. Tom William,, J.P., presiding. Dr. Walsh reported that during the past month several iiiore cases of measles had occurred in Abercrave and district. Th dif{)cnlt:v., in regard to these cases was that people did not realise the neces- sity of keeping their children isolated. In Ms opinion parents were inclined to triiie with it. and although they seemed to listen to the advice given them, te was afraid it went in through one ear and out through the other. They seemed to have the idea that when a child was suffering li;om measles that the others were bound to have it, and accordingly they put the children together so as to go through the trouble at the same time. (Laughter).

HEATH BOYS ADMISSION I m

HEATH BOYS ADMISSION m. I Altered Certificate to Leave School. A boy's frank admission ended abruptly a rather serious charge at Neath County Sessions on Friday, when Martha Owen, of Bryncoch, was summoned for altering the date of a birth certificate with the object of sending her -on to the brick- fields to work before he had reached the school age. Mr. Edward Powell prosecuted on be- half of the Glamorgan Education COlll- mittee, and Mr. A. Je.stjn Jeffreys de- fended. Mr. Powell said the mother wanted the boy to leave school, but when the birth certificate was brought to the school it was found that the date had beeu fcrged, making the lad a year older. Mr. Jeffreys: 1 admit, that the original certificate had been altered. Mr. Powell: It has been done so clumsily that you are bound to. On. The Boy's Confession, Ihomas Jauifa Owen, lbs boy in ques- tion, tol(1 the Bench that when his mother was out lie got a peu and ink and altered t.hp certificate because be wanted to go to work. I Mr. Powell: After that admis-ion I apply for an adjournment to piaer the matter be.forc the coi-tilliifiep. It is a serious ldmision; it is foT?nry ci oprtiiirate. and if he is prosecuted you h. ? n'? alter- nahT'ehnt pnd him for 1 rial. The Magistrates' Clerk (1Jr. L. Kemp- thornei: The 00." appears to be very wicked to do such a. f bin-. Tf ho had only waited 21 dav- it would have saved this bother. The Bench took a sympathetic view of the case, and tined the mother 10s., the magistrates' elPrk remarking t.) the lad: Go away, you wicked boy; but for your 1 age you might have been sent to prison."

IA NEW WAR MEDAL

I A NEW WAR MEDAL. Bv order of fhe King the institution of a new medal is nô}.rurdf>r consideration with a view to meeting the exceptionally large numV-r of claims in tho field, said ILr- Asauith on Thursdjy.

THEWARi t

THEWARi t ——— Resume of To-day s Messages. "Leader" Office 4.50 p.m. It. is expected that all the married groups under the Derby scheme will be called up before the end of July. I President Wilson lias, prevailed upon Congress not to issue a warniug to Amerie»o>- against travelling on be) hgercnt siups. ) The great battle for Verdun is still I ragihg, but the French are holding I their own admirably against the furious attacks of the enemy. Another important Russian victory hts ¡ been gained in Persia, where the almost impregnable natural position of Sakhne pass has been occupied, following the capture of Bidesur pass in the region of Hemiur. nshah. The Austrians are vainly endeavouring to retake positions lost to the Italians. Artillery fighting is recorded from the I Popena Valley.

RUSSIAN VICTORY IN PERSIA

RUSSIAN VICTORY IN PERSIA ALMOST IMPREGKABLE PASSES I CAPTURED e Petrogtad, Friday.—Die following official despatch l1a:o been received from Teheran:— After a series of battles in Persia, the remains of the troops organised by our enemies had concent!ated in the region of Kermanshah, having occupied and for- tified two mountain passes with the help 01 German and Jlurkis'i sappers, namely Bidesurkh Pass and the almost impreg- nable natural iwsition of Sakhne l'ass. News arrived to-day that our troops have di.-h)d?cd the eu?my from Bidesurkh Pass and occupied Sakh'? Pa*s, and th:it? ""Y H:" pursuing tho Turks, who are in !11l ifr?at towards K'rmanh:1h. Our troop-s captured three field gur. ) one mountain gun. a number of shells, eight ammunition waggons and a num- ber of field machine-guns.

o HEATH BURililNG FATALITY I

o HEATH BURililNG FATALITY I Little Girl's Rush to Death. A little girl named Mary Ann Bowen, aged eight years, daughter of Magdal-n Bowen. NanVlanc, i'enydre, Neath, died on Friday morning from burns. It trans- pires that the. little girl was playing 'ti the kitchen -with her .-ousia when her pinafore caught lire, li'.ushing into the street, the wind fanned the f'ames, and before seme n?'ighhours (ould rend er any assistance she was ablaze. The burns were extenín). amI t-?f died !rum si, u.1

j MOULDERS IN MUNITION WORKSI

j MOULDERS IN MUNITION WORKS Mr. Llewelyn WiMiams' Questions in Commons. Mr. Llewolyn Williams R.. Carmar- then District) asked the Minister of Muni* ions in the House of Commons on Thursday whether he was aware that the .Friendly Society of Iron Founders had 220 of its members unemployed at the beginning of February, and whether he would take steps to send back the sol- dier moulders at Llanellv and elsewhere to their military duties, and replace i them by the moulders who are now un- employed. Dr. Add-on replied: I must refer my hon. friend to the answer given to him on December m last, in which I pointed out that the work of moulders is spe- cialised to a very high degree. In spile of the facts quoted by my hon. friend, there is at the present time an unsati=>- tied demand for upwards of 100 moulders of different grades, although the vacan- cies have been circulated to every Labour Exchange in the country. Any of the unemployed men referred to in the question who arc. in fact. capable or filling these vacancies and witling to do so can at once he placed in employment in them. In the circumstances it would c learlv be undesirable to take the action suggested in the question.

I DISTRICT JUDGE ASSASSINATED

I DISTRICT JUDGE ASSASSINATED Madras. Wednesday—Mr. Herbert Harding, the District Judge of Triehino- j poly, was ftablied .hilt' going to court, I and sulisequcntly succumbed to the in- juries he received. The assassin is in custody.—Renter.

IRAW RUBBER IM LETTER MAILS

I RAW RUBBER IM LETTER MAILS. parcels of raw rubber were taken from the letter mails on ihe steamship Ilollandia and 1 ,31() parcels from the steamship Gelria on their receiit, inward voyages l t.

I AUSTRIAS TASK IN MTENECRO

AUSTRIA'S TASK IN MTENECRO. Zurich. Thursday (received Fridayi.— The Austrian advance in Albania is being greatly impeded by the determined resist- ance of the inhabitants, aided by the natural conditions of the country. The. absence of roads renders the trans- port oi artillery impossible, and the re- building bridges which have been de. j ?troved is exceedingly difficult owiDr- to ,lie Tivpr. Albanian kind? are constnntlv attack- ins: lv»dies r.f Austrian troops. The population of Belgrade, according tel Austrian official esiiniatoc, i I -yJtOi'O, oi'uinst be tore liig Wl T-.

Advertising

VERDUN BATTLE ENDING. The following passage oc- curs in this afternoon's French communique: On the left. bank of the Mense cannonading has con- tinued with loss violence In the region to the north of Verdcn. The enemy has oc- JÜ eted any attack upon our positions in the course of the night We are estab- lished on "a line of resistance organised behind Beaumont heights, extending to the east of Chan XcuvilJy to the south oi Orraes. MORE GERMAN SHIPS SEIZED. A telegram from St. "mcent < 'ant' De Vered~, says uti the 25th. itist.. the Portuguese Government took harge yesterday oi eight O Tiiiaii steam.-i- lying oero.—Exchange. Hoiirtny for School-Children. .t a-i"Starfing comraiitee ) vhi-> afternoon, if, was de- cided to ci so t7 on March ITth. I'l-rick Durl in order that she children might participate in tho 1'lag Day which is being organised in •aid oi the Wci-h Troops Coiuk-rts Fund, 6th WELSHMAN WOUNDED, Private L. -T. Hughes, oi the B. Com. pany, Welsh Regiment, has written fruin France to his parents, who live at Scvboitech-street, Swausoa, inform* ing •; lieUI he IKIN been sliahtlv » .undo:«r.d' it ac-vri ]1, <