Collection Title: Cambrian Daily Leader

Provider: The National Library of Wales

Rights: The copyright status or ownership of this resource is unknown.

View full details

Image 1 of 6 Next Last
Full Screen
40 articles on this page
Advertising

IThe Cambria Daily Leader" gives later news than any paper published in this dis- trict*

Advertising

The London Office of the "Cambria Daily Leader" is at 151, Fleet Street (first floor), where adver- tisements can be received up to 7 o'clock each evening for insertion in the next day Vissue. Tel 2276 Central.

77 AERIAL FIGHTS

77 AERIAL FIGHTS FRENCH BRING DOWN SEVERAL I ENEMY MACHINES RUSSIANS ABANDON SOME HEIGHTS GAINS AND LOSSES BY RUMANIA BACK ATCERNAVODA I TO-DAY'S BRITISH OFFICIAL. During the night there was consid- erable artillery activity on both sides of the Ancre, where the enemy made use of a large number of gas shells. North-east of Festubert hostile trench mortars were silenced by our artillery and trench mortars. -0 TO-DAY'S RUSSIAN OFFICIAL. I Western Front.—In the region of I' Skovov the enemy several time-s attacked our forces, and we were compelled to fall back to our second line of trenches. Flame projectiles were used by the enemy in these attacks. In the region south of Dorna Vatra the enemy counter-attacked, as a result of which we were compelled to abandon some of the heights we had occupied during the attack. The battle still continues. Jransylvania.—West of the Buyou the enemy pushed back the Rumanian troops four versts to the south. In the direction of Predeal the Rumanians assumed the offensive, enveloping the left enemy flank. The battle is still proceeding. Danube Front.—Our cavalry and in- fantry are three versts to the west of Cernavoda, and are fighting for the possession of Cernavoda Bridge.—Wireless Press. -fO-DAY'S FRENCH OFFICIAL, I There was intermittent cannonading and skirmishes at different points of the front. Great reciprocal activity was dis- played between two rival aviation camps yesterday. During the daytime our aviators en- gaged in 77 combats, in the course of which a Fokker bi-plane was brought down in our lines near Auberive, and a number was caused to alight near St. Hilaire le Grand. fhe two aviators were taken pris- oners. Another machine was certainly brought down, and seven de- scended in the German lines on the Somme. Our bombarding squadrons dropped over 700 bombs and shells on the. communication cantonments be- hind the front, notably on the railway station of Lems and Von- ziers, 270 on the Algramge blast furnaces near Thionville, an aero- drome at Dieuze, the railway sta- tion at Courceiles-sur-Miel, and the hangars at Frafrofcaty. ——— .——— JTO-DAY'S SERBIAN OFFICIAL. I Salonika, Th ursday. The 8th of November was spe-nt in I artillery fire on both sides, and local infantry skirmishes of no I great importance.

GUARDIANS CLERICAL STAFFI

GUARDIANS CLERICAL STAFF I Criticised by Rev. E. 0. Evans. I At the meeting of the Swansea Board I &t Guardiams Duties and Salaries Com- tnitfcee, Mr. F. J. Parker presiding, a little scene arose over the fact that the Local Government Boud had sanctioned the granting of a war bonus of 3s., but not an increase in salary. Mr' Morgan Hand moved a resolution that a bonus of 3s. be given the relieving olficers. Mr. Peaoock seconded, and Mr. David Grey supported, and the proposition w as carried. However with regard to the applications I of the office stall', which were based on the fact that the staff had been greatly dG- pleted, and. they had to do other men's work, Ilev. E. 0. Evans severely criticised them. He alleged that the instructions of the Guardians were not carrie d out, whiLst the case paper department was conducted in a manner which was mutilation and toiture." Mr. J. H. Roeser, on the contrary, said he found the case papers most useful. At this stage the Clerk (Mr. LI. Jenkins) remarked, If I don't do my duty, give me the sack, or any other official." Mr. W. A. Thomas: But you are not re- sponsible. The Clerk: Yes, I am, and I am pre- pared to take the resprnsibility. Mr. M. E. David (a little later): We pay the olerk to look after the staff and give ts advice. w| The Clerk: But you don't take my ad- vice always. To this comment Mr. David replied that it was expected of Mr. Jenkins to give advice when requested. Eventually it wa-, decided to pay the three members of the oiiice staff who ap- plied for the increase on the same basis as thoeo members who are now serving with the colours, and whose pla they are tempor&riljr holding. i

NO SEPARATE PEACEI

NO SEPARATE PEACE I PREMIER'S DECLARATION AT THE lORD I MAYOR'S BANQUET. I LORD FRENCH ON THE CLIMAX I Mr. Asquith, speaking at the Lord Mayor's banquet at Guildhall on Thurs- day night, reaffirrued the unity of the Allies and the impossibility of a separate peace. The Prime Minister declared that the object of the enemy was to impress neut- rals and to divide the Allies in each a way as to secure the peace she desired. This, he declared, would not happen. The Allies were firmly resolved that the war should not end until a peace should be assured which would guarantee that tneir united efforts ha-d not been in vain. Mr. Balfour referred to the recent Ger- man raid on the Channel. While he could not promise that such an adven- ture would not be tried again, he believed that, if attempted, it would end in dis- aster for the enemy. .Lord French expi'essed the opinion tl-at the conflict on the main fronts would reach a climax in the spring, which, however, should not be taken to mean that that would witness the end of the war.

SCANDINAVIA UNITED I

SCANDINAVIA UNITED I Norway Supported on U-Boat Question. Copenhagen, Thursday Verdens Gang states that Denmark and Sweden have informed Germany that they are in agreement with Norway on the submarine question. Note.—Norway recently warned off belli.-exon.t submarines from her waters and is said to have replied to Germany's protest without making any concession on the subject-

THE COCAINE EVILI 0

THE COCAINE EVIL. I -0- Canadian Corporal Who Alleged Doping. At Marl borough-street Police Court on Friday, Robert Rosborough (24), a Cana- dian corporal, was charged on remand with being an unauthorised person hav- ing a quantity of cocaine in his posses- sion also with being an absentee from his regiment. The police evidence was that the constable saw the accused, in company with a woman in Sotho. When the constable told him he should arrest him as a deserter, accused threw two pill boxes to the ground. The boxes were found to contain cocaine. The accused was not a Canadian, but was born in America..At the station accused said, I know nothing about it. I am doped; I am doped." The sergeant-major gave prisoner a bad j character. Prisoner said he never had any cocaine j in his possession, and that the police evi- dence was not true. The magistrate imposed a, sentence of six months' hard labour and ordered deportation. I

AT THE ASSIZES

AT THE ASSIZES. Neath Man's Claim. I At Glamorgan Assizes, at Swansea, on Friday, before Mr. Justice Bray and a special jury, Martin Harries, colliery pumpsman, of Onllwyn, near Neath, sued the Dulais Anthracite Colliery Co. for damages for personal injuries. The opening of the case is reported on Page Two. Marshall Stewart, mining engineer, Swansea, was called as an expert witness to speak as to a pumpsman's duties and the nature of the machinery in, and the character of, the pumping station, a model of which wa,q exhibited in Court, together with a specimen cog- wheel and a piece of the 4-in. discharge pipe. Replying to Mr. Ellis Griffith, witness admitted the discharge pipe was not in- tended to be walked on. Mr. Ellis Griffith: It requires a bit of a Blondin to waik this pipe ? Witness assented. Plaintiff, in evidence, said after the ac- cident he was attended by Dr. Bromilow, assistant to Dr. Armstrong. Only a little finger was now left on his hand, and he had lost a lot of sleep ever since the! accident. Dr. Lancaster told him the! finger would be of no use to him, and ad- vised him to have the hand off at the wrist. He had been offered the job of picking slag by defendants, but Dr. Lan- caster said he could not do it, but was only fit for clerical work, or as a colliery signalman.

AIR BOARD

AIR BOARD. Sir Alfred Mond, Sir Clifford Cory, General Ivor Philipps, and General Sir Ivor Herbert, have given notice to move that the Air Board should immediately be given extended powers for the develop- ment of both air services.

YMCA WEEK OF PRAYER I

Y.M.C.A. WEEK OF PRAYER. In all the 1,560 Y.M.C.A. war centres and in all the 10,000 Y.M.C.A. branches, the week commencing November 12th to the 1 Si h will be observed as a week of prayer." In the Swansea Association building on the six week nights a short address will be given and a prayer meet- ing held at 8.1 5. The various ministers of the town have been asked on either of the two Sunday evenings to preach a special sermon to young men, and practi- cally all have consented to do this either on November 12th or 18th.

SUNDAY SCHOOL UNION I

SUNDAY SCHOOL UNION. Forthcoming Visit of Sir Geo. C. Marks, M.P. The chairman of the Sunday School Union, Sir Geo. Croydon Marks, M.P., whose work in connection with the Ministry of Munitions is so well-known, is arranging to meet the local Sunday School Union in the opening month of the New Year. In all probability, Mon- day, January 22nd, will be the date. It was in April, 1913, chat Sir George ■—then the president of the National Sunday School Union—was last at Swan- sea, the occasion being the annual meet- ing of the Swansea Sunday School Union which was held at Mount Plea- sant, and was described in our columns as being one of the finest religious meetings Swansea has known." Local workors will, doubtless, he look- ing afrward with pleasure to renewing thei.A (iCquaintance with the Member for N.-B. Cornwall.

GAS RELEASED BY BRITISH

GAS RELEASED BY BRITISH. ♦ ARMENTIERES MOVE. I BIG GUNS BUSY ON BOTH SIDES OF SOMME GERMAN UE EXPOSED BRITISH OFFICIAL. General Headquarters, France, 11.20 p.m.-During the day there was con- siderable hostile shelling oh our front south of the Ancre. We bombarded the enemy area east of the Regina Trench. The enemy's claim that on November 5 he repulsed our troops with huge sanguinary losses in a battle of the hist rank delivered with powerful forces is another of the entirely false reports which he has deemed it necessary to issue of late ,at frequent intervals. The facts are as stated in the British communique of that date. Our attacks were local, and made with a few bat- talions, with the object of gaining some advanced trenches at three points so as to improve our front line. Most of these trenches were taken, and our casualties were in proportion to the small force em- ployed and the scope of the ol)erations. General Headquarters, France, Thurs- day, 5.18 p.m.—Early this morning we dis- charged gas east of Armentieres and bombed the enemy trench line. Elsewhere there is nothing to report. FRENCH OFFI CIAL. I Paris, Thursday 11 p.m. On the I Somme front there was no important action. Artillery duels and short infantry en- gagements occurred near Sailly-Saillisel and south of Pressoir, in the course of which we cleared out some positions and took some prisoners. The latter confirm the enemy's severe losses at Saillisel. There was a violent bombardment by the enemy artillery on the Douaumont- Vaux eector. Our artillery replied. On the rest of the front there is nothing to report.

LORD LUCAS MISSINGI

LORD LUCAS MISSING. I Ex-Minister Airman Fails to I Return. N-eows was received on Thursday that Lord Lucas, a former Cabinet Minister, who became an officer in the Royal Fly- ing Corps, is missing. Last Friday he went up in an aeroplane to inspect the German positions and did not return. There was a heavy wind blow- ing from our lines towards the enemy. Lord Lucas became President of the Board of Agriculture in 1914, in the Cabinet rpoorkstruction that followed the outbreak of war. He had previously held mifcor Ministerial appointments. He re- mained a Cabinet Minister until the formation of the Coalition Government in May, 1915, when Lord Selborne suc- ceeded him at the Board of Agriculture. Thereupon, Lord Lucas, in spite of the fact that he had an artificial leg, the re- sult of an injury in the Boer War, entered the Royal Flying Corps, and did useful work for some months. He acted as instructor for a time before proceed- ing to France. He is forty ears of age, and is unmar- ried.

PROFESSORS KNOWLEDGE I

PROFESSOR'S KNOWLEDGE. I The other evening, so Professor Pol- lard related at the University College on Thursday, he asked some professors which was the driest month of the year as tested by the amount of rain, and not one of them got anywhere near the mark.

SEARCH FOR AN AUNTI

SEARCH FOR AN AUNT. I The Chief Constable of Swansea (Capt. Alf. Thomas) has received a letter from Lieut. W. H. Mankey, of the Australian Depot Unit of Supply, B.E.F., France, asking him to assist him in finding an aunt of his, the only relative he has in the United Kingdom. He is an Australian and has been with the Anzacs for two years. He hopes to get leave at the end of this month. His aunt's name is Mrs. Cbegwidden, and previous to her marriage she was a Mies Mankey from Cornwall. Any infor- mation will be welcomed by the Chief Constable.

THE PROSPERING BOYI

THE PROSPERING BOY. I On Thursday morning a boy of about fourteen, small for his age, sat in -an Underground railway carriage on his way to work. The boy wore a high collar, a big-brimmed, hard felt hat, nattily striped cashmere trousers, and brown spats. He was smoking a cigarette, and every now and then he looked over his morning paper at his fellow-passengers with a soured and blaae expression as one who reflected, The Money market is rotten this morning."

IBONUS FOR BOYS I

BONUS FOR BOYS. I Representatives of the South Wales j Iron and Steelworkers' Association (both employers and men) on Thursday had an interview with the Committee on Produc- tion in London with reference to the wages (piogtion. It is understood that the committee, ateo had under considera- tion an application from the employes for a war bonus, to be paid to all work- people—boys and girls—who are at pre- sent earning less than £1 per week. The committee heard both sides, and Sir Geo. Askwith intimated they would forward their decision as soon as possible.

DIED OF SELFSTARVATION I I I

DIED OF SELF-STARVATION. I An extraordinary complaint was made at an inquest at Bethnal Green on Thursday on Annie Elizabeth Moys, aged thirty-two, who died in a private lunatic asylum. The parents, at whose request the in- quiry was held, declared that whenever they visited their daughter there were fresh marks of injuries upon her, which the young woman declared had been in- flicted by someone at the institution. The medical superintendent said that the patient when she came to them only weighed 4«t. 5}lb., and she was con- stantly talking and very restless and al- ways annoying other patients. She also did everything she could to starve her- self. The jury found that death ww brought about by self-starvation due to acute mania, and that the injuries had nothing to do. wii& the wooxija's death.

LOCAL SHIPPING CASEI

LOCAL SHIPPING CASE.I Bristo! Channel Law Suit in I Appeal Cott.. On Friday the Court of Appeal gave judgment allowing an appeal by the de- fendants, the Houlder Line, Ltd., of Liverpool, Newport, Swansea, and else- where, against a judgment of Mr. Justice Rowlatt in favour of the plaintiffs, Messrs. Bruce Marriott and Co. The latter had shipped in London a quantity of mining machinery f or Buenos Ayres, via Newport, on the de- fendants' steamship Denby Grange, a large cylinder, part of this machinery was accidentally injured on the quay at Newport, during the course of re- stowage oper" there. The plaintiffs claimed the aiftfnnit of the damage sus- tained by them, by reason of the defen- dants' failure to deliver the goods at Buenos Ayres. The defendants relied upon the exceptions in the Bill of Lading, as exempting then, from liability. Mr. Justice Rowlatt had held that the defen- dants were not protected by the terms of the Bill of Lading, and against that de- cision they appealed. Lord Justice Swinfen Eady ,in giving judgment said the defendants were not committing any breach of their contract of carriage, and accordingly they were exempted from liability for the damage that occurred. The other members of the Court con- curred, and the appeal was allowed, and judgment entered for defendants with costs.

ENEMY LOSSES I

ENEMY LOSSES. German Casualties Estimated! at 3,755,693. I The following has been received from a well-informed scurce:- The German casualties reported in German official casualty lists (exclusive of correction) during the month of October, 1916, total 199,675. These figures bring the total since the beginning of the war. to 3,755,693. The above figures include all German nationalities: Prussians, Bavarians, Saxons and Wittenburghers. It is to be noticed that these figures do not, consti- tute the estimate by the British authori- ties, but merely represent the casualties announced in the German official lists. It should also be noticed that the casu- alties are those reported during the month of October, but this does not represent II them as having occurred in October.

AUSTRALIAN COAL STRIKE I

AUSTRALIAN COAL STRIKE. I Melbourne, Thursday.—The situation in all the States, as a result of the coal strike, is becoming more serious daily. Addi-tional steamers being held up, rail- way services being curtailed. I

EXPORTS FROM SWEDENI

EXPORTS FROM SWEDEN. I The Swedish Chamber of Commerce for the United Kingdom. Loudon, is in re- eeipt of a cable from the Swedish Boa rti r of Trade, Stockholm, dated the 9tli inst., to the effect that all conserves and live animals have been added to the list of II goods which are now prohibited for ex- portation from Sweden.

CALLOUS DRIVER1

CALLOUS DRIVER. 1 On Tuesday evening a middle-aged woman was knocked down in H igh-street, Clapliam, by a motor-car, the driver of which failed to stop. The car is said to have been a dark. low, uncovered one, winch passed a tram-way car at 12 to 15 miles an hour, and, after the accident, slowed down. but then went off towards Clapham Common.

VTC AND INCOME TAXI

V.T.C. AND INCOME TAX. I An exempted man, who had .to fulfil the condition of joining a Volunteer Training Corps, and spent a considerable sum in uniform, equipment, purchase ot I shot, etc., has in reply to an inquiry, re- ceived from the Inland Revenue a letter stating that, as the expenses in question were not incurred wholly and ex- clusively in connection with your busi- ness or vocation, they are not admissible as a deduction for income tax purposes." — rrr^

ITALIAN FRONT DELUGED II

ITALIAN FRONT DELUGED. II Udine, 'Hiureday.—An absolute deluge is descending at the front, accompanied by sleet and hail, which seems to obliter- ate everything. The road is almost un- traceable. wliiie tie Vallone has been transformed in some places into a torrent, and in others into rapids and lakes. The Vippacco river is overflowing, and carries on its rapid current Austrian war material and also carcases of horses be- longing to Austrian batteries abandoned in the retreat. Despite such terrible conditions, the Italians continue to molest the enemy, and are stronjpy reinforcing the positions lately conquered. -—■—- —!

CHANCE FOR THE TENANTS I

CHANCE FOR THE TENANTS. I Manchester Co-operative Wholesale Society have completed negotiations fc the purchase of a further considerable portion of the estate of Sir Delves Brough- ton. of Doddington, Nantwicli. Some time agy the Society acquired Weston Hall. on* of the largest farms on the estate, and the present negotiations involve the purua,& of some 2,000 acres of land, which en brace eight large farms and small holdiigs. Mr. John Lomg, Sir Delves B rough- ton's agent, announced the prospective sale on Thursday to the tenants. It is stated that the tenants will not be dis- turbed, but the Jo-operative Society will have first call on their produce.

MOHAMMEDANS MARRIAGE

MOHAMMEDAN'S MARRIAGE.! The Divisional Court on Friday gave judgment in thecase in which Dr. Mir- anwarnuddin, a member of the English Bar. and a Mohanmedan, raised the point as to whether h. was entitled to marry a second English Ldy, after having divorced ,his first wife in accordance with Moham- medan law. The Supt. R^strar of Marriages at Hammersmith lad declined to issue a cer- tificate and liense to nable the doctor to marry Violt Ling, holding that his former lllaITia with Ruby Hcod was a lawful impediment.. The Lord Ohirf Jiustice said there was no authority to esablish a proposition that a marriage contacted in England was dis- solved by the iws of religion of the hus- band..Religici was applicant's personal I law. t The rule wa-discharged. J

MR WILSON

MR. WILSON DEFINITE NEWS AT LAST REPUBLICANS WANT RE-COUNT New York, Friday.—Mr. Wilson has I been re-elected for the Presidency.— Keuter. THE FORMAL NOTICE. New York, Friday.—Mr. Tumulty, from Shadow Lawn, has wired to President Wilson, who da en route for Massachusetts, the formal notice of his re-election. [Mr. Tumulty is President Wilson's secretary. ] Mr. Moorhead, the American Consul at Swansea, told a leader ? representa- 'bivc t it is unique for a caZndLi;d-Z,iz ldL" sI be acclaimed Pr&,ident and afterwards find that he has been defeated. It al- most invariably happens that the candi- date who carries New York and the East has a majority, explained Mr. Moorhead, end it was on this hypothecs .kat tlie Press of the United States included that Mr. Hughes was in. On this occasion. however, the East has upset calculations. The Eastern States are of course largely agricultural, and the process of counting the votes is a much longer one than in I the urban areas. MR. WILSON'S MAJORITY. New York, Friday.—The newspapers this morning state that President Wilson has been re-elected. California should be I added to the United Press estimate of States voting for Mr. Wilson, which makes a total electoral vote this morning of:- Wilson 272 Hughes 243 —Exchange Special. [Note.—If Mr. Wilson has received 272 votes, the position cannot be altered even though all the results as yet undecided favoured Mr. Hughes, since 266 is a majority.] LEGAL PREPARATIONS FOR RECOUNT. New York, Friday.—With California giving Mr. Wilson a plurality of over j 3,000, he now has 272 electoral votes, a figure which re-elects him to the Presi- dency, The Republican National Headquarters admit preparations for legal proceedings for recounts of the ballots in States where the results are close. The Democrats are preparing to defend their position CONSTITUTION OF THE SENATE. New York, Friday. The latest indica- tions are that the Senate will consist of 54 Democrats and 42 Republicans, a majority of 12 as against the present majority of 16. Miss Rankin (Republican, j Montana) is the first woman elected to Congress.—Renter.

FUTURE OF BELGIUM I

FUTURE OF BELGIUM. Amsterdam, Friday.—After the Im- perial Chancellor's speech in the Reich- j fcitag, the spokesman of the Centre Party said that Belgium must remain in Ger- man hands politically, militarily and economically.

SOME EPIGRAMS I

SOME EPIGRAMS. Mr. Justice Darling delivered himself of the following epigrams in court on Thursday: A man might be tricky and un- scrupulous, and yt be a good servant to his country. For instance, there was Machiavelli. My slight studies in Parliamentary procedure lead me to think -that if you can convince one man certain others will follow. I believe shepherds have noticed something similar.

THE CAPITAL OF WALES I 1

"THE CAPITAL OF WALES." I King Manoel of Portugal was the prin- cipal guest at the Lord Mayor's banquet at the City Hall on Thursday. The loyal toasts having been honoured, Mr. J. A. Jones proposed the toast of "The Houses of Parliament," to which Lord Pontypridd and Mr. J. Herbert Cory, M.P., responded. Mr. Cory said he hoped, with the assist- ance of Mr. Lloyd George, to have an Order in Council made recognising Cardiff is the Metropolis of Wales. (Cheers.)

WATERLOGGED COLLIERY i

WATER-LOGGED COLLIERY. i I Claim for Damages in Chancery Court. A claim by Wm. Burchell Rees, of I London, landlord of property z tnnyl"- I dawela Farm, Llandilofawr. Carmarthen, I against the Ynysammon Colliery Co., Ltd., of 3, James-street, Pontardawe, in voluntary liquidation, and Geo. Bromley Bowen, of Salubrious-chambers, Swansea, the liquidator, came before Mr. Justice Saxgant in the Chancery, Division on Fri- day. Plaintiff sued defendants, as assignees, of a 48 years' lease of the coal under his land, for S104 for rent, royalties and way- leaves, which he alleged to be in arrears; I 0.100 for damages for alleged breaches of covenant to repair and return of plant and machinery, said to have been re- moved. Mr. Grist Hawten, for plaintiff, said the questions to be tried were: First, as to the rent due up to October last; ihwi question of damage to the mine, which was a very valuable one. Under his! agreement Mr. Rees was to be paid cer- tain royalties, but the defendants had not worked the mine for some time, and » plaintiff was losing his royalties. The i chief question, however, was the expense of putting the. mine into repair, and It; was estimated that it would cost about £ 8,000 to put it into a proper state, and take 18 months to do it, because of the water-logged condition of the mine. The machinery, which was kept at |he mine j for the purpose of keeping it In repair had been removed, and his contention was that the defendants had no right to do this until the expiration or determination of the term and payment of the rent due. It would cost t720 to replace the machinery removed. Mr. G. W. Lyddon, mining engineer. Maesyrafon, Yetradgynlais. gave evidence that, owing to the lack of pumping, the mine w under water. To put it m re- pair would cost 97,310. He could not say rrhen the machinery had been ren-love,4, because the mine was under water. Mr. J. G. Pease, for the defendants. c.aii-cl it was taken away, no doubt. They did not leave it to drown. It was ultimately arranged that the engineers should make an inspection on Monday next, and the motions should be in the papar to be disposed of ou T

TODAYS WIR RESUMEI

TO-DAYS WIR RESUME Leader Office, 4.50 p.m. According to to-day's British official there was considerable artillery activity on both sides of the Ancre during the night, a large number of gas shells being used. To the north-east of Festubert hostile trench' mortars have been silenced by our artillery and trench mortars. The Russian communique states that oiL the western front, in the region of Skavov, the enemy several timet launched attacks, as the result of which the Prussians were compelled to fall back to their second line of trenches. In the region south of Dorna Vatra the enemy compelled the Russians to aban- don eome heights. The battle is still proceeding. In Transylvania, west of the Buyou, the enemy resumed the offensive, and pushed back the Rumanian troops four versts to the south. The Rumanians have assumed the offen- sive in the direction of P. 'ml.. On the Danube front the Rumanians are II lighting for the possession of Cernivoda Bridge.

TODAYS NEWS IN BRIEF I

TO-DAY'S NEWS IN BRIEF I The municipality of Ancona. Italy, has named a new quay after Captain Fryatt. The Prime Minister presided a.t a met- ing of the War Council at 10, Downing- street, on Friday, .1 The Bishop of Gloucester (Dr. Gibson) ) has offered his palace as a hospital to the Red Cross Society. The Red Croes Society has received 910,000 from Nova Scotia and £5,000 from Ilongkong, collections on Our Day." Bread and cheese and coffee have been substituted at Lambeth Workhouse for the Saturday dinner of cold meat and potatoes.. A memorial service for Lord Llangat- tock, who died from wounds, will be held at St. James's Church, Piccadilly, on Tuesday next at noon. All future recruits to the Irish police are to take art oath not to join any secret' society. Hitherto an exception has been made in the case of the' Free- masons. In was officially stated on Thursday that Captain Bowen Colthurst, who was tried by court-martial in Dublin. and was found insane, has been removed from the Army, Mrs. Hughes, Roscommon, has lost her sixth son in action; two came from America to enlist, two came with the Australia!! Forces, and two enlisted at home in the west of Ireland. A naturalised Austrian, Nathan Shein- wold, in whose workshop there were said to be 16 unscreened lights showing a bright beam from a skylight, was on Thursday. fined tlO at Old-street Court. Mr. Herbert Samuel said on Thursday I in the House of Commons that provision had been made to meet the distress which the war had brought upon persons in the Isle of Man dependent on the boarding- t house industries. For breaking windows at the Home Office and the Colonial Office Elizabeth Hope and Mephy Scrabo at Bow-street on Thursday were each nnpd M j*nd S2, the amount of the damage done. or one month's imprisonment in the second division. Lord R. Cecil said in Parliament on Thursday that Dr. Mrs. Scarlett Syuge (who had recently circulated a report de- scribing the comfort at Wittenberg avd Mother prison camps) fraternifsed with the invaders of Serbia and ap- parently obtained permission to visit German cam its.

DCM AT SEVENTEEN I

D.C.M. AT SEVENTEEN. I Pte. Joseph Heeson, Royal Welsh Fusi- liers, is one of the youngest heroes of the war. He has won the D.C.M. while under 18 years of age for successfully leading a bombing party to ,the German trenches, after which he as successfully led them I back to our lines in safety.

FOOTBALL IN FRANCEI

FOOTBALL IN FRANCE. I Sergt. J. S. Stuart, of the A.S.C., writes I us acknowledging the receipt of a foot- ball sent to France at the request of the unit. the gift of Sir Alfred Mond, M.P. The Swansea boys," he says, "all ap- preciate your kindness, and wish your paper and yourself bast wishes."

ELVET AT SWANSEA I

ELVET AT SWANSEA. I The Rev. Elvet Lewis, M.A., will preach at Zoar Congregational Chapel, Swansea, on Saturday, Sunday and Mon- day next on the occasion of the anni- versary services. An English sermon, will be delivered by Elvet on Sunday afternoon. Large congregations are ex- pected. The congregational singing at Zoar under the conductorship of Mr. Dd. Evans (organist, Mrs. Screech), is also worthy of special mention.

GUARDIANS AND HOSPITAL

GUARDIANS AND HOSPITAL. Proposed Withholding of Grant I Negatived. At a meeting, on Thursday, of the Finance Committee of the Swansea Board of Guardians, Mr. John Rundle presiding, reference was made by Mr. W. Owen to the subscription of 2S5 10s. to the Swansesi Hospital. He moved that it be withheld until an arrangement had been come to for the allocation of the shipping interests to the Hospital. He contended that out of the amount the Hospital should contri- bute to the main??mance of seafaring men treated at Tawe r,04ge. Mr. W. A. Thomas said the Ho?pit?I con- tinually treated seamen, and he trusted Ow Guardians would continue to 8ubrih to the Hospital. Rome discussion ensued, and it was urgM that the Hospital was doing all it could for the welfare of the public. Mr. Owen complained that the Hospital did not treat the Guardians properly and that correspondence was not replied to. A vote was h ken. and rCIlte in favour of the proposal to pay the subscription as usual. Mr. Owen asked that another vote be taken, but the Chairman declined, declar- ing the amendment lost by a two to one I majority.

MISSING RND MAN I

MISSING R.N.D. MAN. I Mrs. Bevan, ot .k I'.langyfelach-strert, S?:msea, has r"ein-ed n?ws tha hrr son, .T. W. Bevan. 07 th? Royal Naval Division, has been missing since October 20th.

Advertising

THE ARABIA DISASTER. Cairo, Thursday (received Friday).- When the Arabia war. torpedoed she was struck aft on the starboard side. There was no panic. The vessel sank etern first, an hour and a half later. Tho City of Marseilles, another steamer and three trawlers picked up the sur- vivors after they had been in boats about an hour. Two submarines were eeen. The Arabia fired at one after she was etrnck.