Collection Title: Cambrian Daily Leader

Provider: The National Library of Wales

Rights: The copyright status or ownership of this resource is unknown.

View full details

First Previous Image 2 of 4 Next Last
Full Screen
5 articles on this page
Advertising

T | ri AMUSEMENTS.  y. I ?30 TO-NIGHT! 8.4S.? jjjpjj Phone Central 92. ? ?: PERFORMANCE OF SI(HJU vl BEAUTY-THE JELCAR HUDSON tL*tLa uHn nuUuU!? ? QUI N T E T T E Presenting Charming Musical Impressions tomprising: Violin, Voice, Piano, 'Cello, Flute-Piccolo. THE TEN TOMMIIES, Woundd, Soldier Entertainers from _gv? pt, and Salonica, France, Gallipoli, Egypt, and Salonica, in a Happy-go-Lucky Novelty, Sing, Boys, Sing." FLORA CROMER, The Popular and Brilliant Entertainer, II' from the Shaftesbury Theatre, London. FORD antTrRULY, Chums in Vaudeville. I Latest News and War Pictures. CLIFTON and DAISY, Danish Wheel Wonders. ISA, WISE, Comedienne. BAISOEN, Sensational Cycling and Pattering Comedian. GRAND THEATRE MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 17, 1917. Six Nights at 7.30. WILL H. GLAZE'S Company in the Great Piay, HIS MOTHER'S ROSARY Next Week- Return Visit of the Delightful Comedy. "PEG 0' MY HEART." T^IGTWEIO^SL liie Horns 01 Good Pictures and Music. ¡ TO-DAY'S PROGRAMME. I A Lasky Masterpioce, OLIVER TW I ST, -Feattifing Marie Dora, from Dicken's Immortal Works. CATHEADS AND FLIVERS, Vitagraph. DIAMONDS ARE TRUMPS, Detective Drama, featuring Trixie Brunette. PINCHED IN THE FINISH, ,f. Triangle-Keystone. Tttur. Next-V lole. Hopson & Stewart Rome. CASTLE CINEMA I J (Adjoining "Leader" OtHce). Tues. and Wed., 2.30 to 10.30. ATTA BOY'S LAST RACE A-Delightful Sporting Drama in Five Parts, featuring Dorothy Gish, BILLY MERSON in x "BILLY STRIKES OIL," Two Part Comedy. PINCHED IN THE FINISH. Two Part Keystone Comedy. The Mystery of the North Case, A Vita graph Detective Drama. Jlf. ———_ CARLTON CINEMA The House with an Orchestra. V; TO-DAY'S PROGRAMME- c— PAULINE FREDERICK in THE SLAVE MARKET, P., By the Famous Players. TAKING FAKERS, Comedy. THE STAR WITNESS, Featuring Lee Hill. I THE NYMPH, Featuring Barbara Gilroy & Thos. Curran Thur. Next—THE PLOUGH GIRL. E L Y S I U ffl I Monday, .Tuesday, and Wednesday. MARY PICKFORD, the World's Sweet- heart, in The Poor Little Rich Girl. PURPLE DOMINO (Epieode 15, the Final of tho Series). SOME PRETTY SPECIMENS OF WARBLERS (Pathe Color Film). RUSHING THE HAM COUNTER (Great Ktilem Comedy). GAUMONT'S GRAPIC. Thur. Next-DAUGHTER OF DESTINY ROYAL THEATRE Wind Street. This Week. Mon., Tues., Wed. THE FATAL PROMISE, Drama in Five Parts. QLADIOLA, Drama in Five Parts. HIS BOMB POLICY, Comedy in Two Parts. 15th Episode PURPLE DOMINO, Drama in Two Parts. -OOntlnuous Performance—2 till 10.3p.- EDUCATIONAL. QTUDEWT8 Successfully PrepAred for Pro C3 aciencrinPITUAN Shorthand. LooM MARINE BOARD, and Civil Servian. LES- SONS ?veu in Arithmetic. English, Book tteep? eM. Satj?MMon guaranteed Mr. Hafrit. 66. OYfoM?treet. Swanteo. Day or Evening Tttition. oro GWAXSEA BUSINESS OOLLEQE. Alex". dra-road.—Enrolments accepted for One Month: then Principal will advise on Stu. dent's suitability for Business. Ernest Victor Buddell. B.A,, Principal. Prospcctus free. Phone: Central 1.259. 1TOOAUST Pupils; Vacancies Ora.. Ora- V torio, R?ue. Eisteddfodau. Eiama.— ?rof. Dyved Uwyo. ? Ma?eet-atr?t. Swa.n. wa 68A1(U» Tf- SAILINGS. CUNARD LINE. "EGULAR PASSENGER AND FREIGHT SERVICES. j LONDON-NEW YORK. LONDON-CAN ADA-NEW ïORK. BEISTOL-CANADA-NEW YORK, LIVERPOOL-NEW YOrlr. .ftr Bates of Paosa-, Freight. Dates of Sailing. and Particulars as to Loading Berths. CUBfARD LING. Liverpool; London Jt. Bisbooag* te. XCI-. 29-31 Cockepur-street. 66, Baldwin-atreet, Bristol: 1 and 2. Milbay-road. Plymouth; ISa. High-street. Cardiff: 117. New-street. Birmingham; or to 1 lAiml AgtaU. SALES BY AUCTIOM. COUNTIES OF BRECON AND GLAlIOHGAS, IN THE VALE OF NEATH. MESSRS. Joftn M, LesceV and.Son WILL SELL by AUCTION. V tbe CASTLE HOTEL, ;EATH., m WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMEEIl l!>th.\jjl7, I at 2.30 p.m., the following VALUABLE j Freehold Rsssdencssj FARMS, DWELLING-HOUSES, AND GROUND RENTS, Forming part of the DYLAIS FACn" ESTATE. The Residence known as DYLAIS FACII," near Nèath, with the Gardens. Grounds, Outhouses, Two Gardeners' Cot. tages, and Lands; also the Farms and Woodlands known as WenalH", Lletty- mawr, Brynwith. Castelforchnant, and other Lands adjoining, comprising about 400 ACRES, and forming a COMPACT SPORTING ESTATE. Freehold Dwelling-Houses and Ground Rents at Tonna, near Naath. The Residence known as "LLETTYDAFYDD," situate at Melincourt, Resolver. The Farms known as EKONWYDD, PENTRETRUSCOED; PEN VOLE, and GWAUN MAERDY, in the Parish of Ystradfellte, Brecon. shire. Dotaile.d particulars of Sale may be ob- tained of Messrs. Jeffreys and Powell, Solicitors, Brecon; the DyLais Estate Office, Neath; or of the Auctioneers, at their Offices, J6, Waterloo-street, Swansea. 11, MONTPELIER TERRACE, SWANSEA. Important Clear-out Sale of Valuable Household Furniture and Effects. Messrs. James and James F.A. I., A RE favoured with instructions from .1.. Mrs. Mat Edwards, who is leaving the town. to SELL by PUBLIC AUC- TION, on the premises as above, on THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 20th, 1917, the whole of her Well-Preserved and Valuable Household Furniture AND EFFECTS, including a Splendid Walnut Cased Full-Compassed PIANOFORTE. &c., the principal items being: Carved Wal- nut Dining Room Suite in Saddlebags, Massive Carved Walnut Sideboard, Uval Table, Ail Brass Fender Sujte, Asmin- ster Carpet, Massive Marble Mantel Clock and Bronze Equestrian Fi,ures, Electro-plated Goods, Carved Walnut Drawing Room Cabinet with Mirror back and Medallion Centre Brass Kerb, Axminster Square, Large Oilpainting in Gilt Frame St. Catherine's Rock," by Goddard, Largo Gilt Framed Pier Glass, Handsome Gilt Clock under Glass Shade, Ea&y Chairs, Polished Oak Hall Stand, Carved Oak Hall Chairs, Shelf and Dresser and Ware, 2 Kitchen Tables and Chairs, Cooking and Kitchen Utensils, Asmiuster .Stair Carpet, Brass Stair Rods and Eyes, Massive Mahogany Tip- up Square Table, Mahogany Couch and Chairs, Brass and Black Bedsteads, Box, Spring and Wool Mattresses, Solid Mahogany Wardrobe, Shaped Fr^nt Mahogany Marble Top Washstand and Dressing Table to match. Cane Seated Chairs, Birch Swing Glass, Fine round Shaving Glass on Tall Mahogany Ped- estal, Cane Seated Rocker, Mahogany Chest of Drawers, Mahogany Pembroke Table, Sets of Chamber Ware, Orna- ments, etc. Goods on view Morning of Sale from 9.0 a.m. Sale to commence at 11.30 a.m. promptly. Terms: Cash. Auctioneers' Officer, 7, Goat-street, Swansea. Telephone, Docks 172. LLANGENNECII HOME FARM, Within easy distance from Llangennech Railway Station. MESSRS. Wm, and Walter James, F.A.I., A RE favoured with instructions from Mr. John Evans (who is giving up the Farm), to SELL by AUCTION, on the premises as above, on FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 21st, 1917, the whole of his Valuable Live Stock, CROP, IMPLEMENTS, DAIRY UTEN- SILS, HARNESS, etc., viz.:— 25 MILCH COWS.—o Shorthorn Cows with Calves at their heels, 2 do. to calve in October, 14 Young Shorthorn Cows in full profit and in calf, 6 First Cross Black and Shorthorn Cows in full profit and in calf. 14 IN-CALF HEIFERS. 17 FAT TWO-YEAR-OLD STEERS, ready for the butcher. 1 BULL.—Fat Three-year-old Shorthorn Bull. 7 CALVES. 7 nORSES. 214 SHEEP.—134 Young Cross-bred Suf- folk and Shropshire Breeding Ewes, 50 do. Ewe Lambs, 30 Fat Ram Lambs. 3 PIGS. POULT RY.-20. IMPLEMENTS, HARNESS & DAIRY UTENSILS. CROPS.—The Crop from 13 Acres of White Oats and 4J acres of Green Crops. Liyicheon on the Tables at 11 o'clock; (by Ticket only). Sale to commence at One o'clock promptly. Credit on Conditions on sums above £5. Auctioneers' Offices: Frondeg, Llanga- dock; Llandovery, Llandilo, and 7, Goat- street, Swansea. SHAFTESBURY HALL, ST. HELEN'S- ROAD, SWANSEA. WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 19th. 1917. Mr. Joseph Harris WILL SELL by PUBLIC AUCTION, "at the above Hall (where the goods will have been removed for convenience of Sale), a Largs Quantity of Superior Household Furniture AND OTHER EFFECTS, the chief item3 comprising:—ALL-BRASS SQUARE PILLAR BEDSTEAD, Inlaid Sheraton Bedroom Suite, Dark and Light I Walnut ditto, HANDSOME AMERICAN WALNUT BEDROOM SUITE with 7ft. WARDROBE, Single Mahogany Ward- robe, Splendid Chest of Drawers, Wire- wove Mattresses, Overlays, Feather Beds, Bolsters and Pillows, MAGNIFICENT CHESTERFIELD SUITE, Inlaid Mahog- any Settee, 4ft. Mahogany China Cabinet, I lhIaid ditto, HANDSOME INLAID COR- NER CUPBOARD, Two Large Gilt Pier Glasses, Walnut Overmantels, Oak-framed Dining-room Suite in Green Leather, Silk Tapestry Dining-Toona Suite, Walnut Telescope Dining Table, MAHOGANY BOOKCASE AND BUREAU, Walnut Sideboard, Small Mahogany ditto, Car- pets, Linoleums, Hearthrugs, Brass Fen- ders, Fire Brasses, E.P. lea and Coffee Service, etc., as well as a Full-Compassed Iron-Framed PIANOFORTE, BEAUTIFUL AMERICAN ORGAN with 11 Stops, SPLENDID ROLL-TOP DESK, Handsome Black Skin Motor Rug, and other articles too numerous to per- ticularise. Goods on View day previous trom 4 to 5.30 p.m. and Morning of Sale. Sale to commence promptly at 11 o'clock a.m. Terms-Ca.sh. Auctioneer's Offices, 1, Georgo-street, Swansea. Tel. No., 4G8 Dock*. PUBLIC NOTICES. l GLYNN VIVIAN ART GALLERY SWANSEA. MINIATURE PAINTING CLASS. 'UDEa the Will of the Late Mr. R'I Glynn Vivian, a number of FREE STUDENTSHIPS will be Awarded Annu- ally to Ladies resident in Swansea, and over 16 years of age. Tho Class meets on MONDAY, WED- NESDAY, and FRIDAY MORNINGS, f"cm 10 a.m to 1 p.m. Tuition is given in Miniature Feinting. Painting i,?roiu Life and Antique, and Anatomy. Applications for Free Studentships to be made to the Director of Education, Education Offices, Swansea, before Mon- day, 21th September, 1S17. NAVAL AND MILITARY WAR PENSIONS & WELFARE LEAGUE (" BIT BADGE LEAGUE). A SPECIAL MEETING Will be held at the ELYSIUM, HIGH STREET, On WEDNESDAY, SEPT. 19th, At 7.30 p.m. Sharp. All Members are Urgently Requested to Attend. ew Membus may be Enrolled at 2.15 1 p.m. till meeting opens. ROLL UP IN YOUR HUNDREDS. H. SCOTT, Secretary (pro tem.) GLAMORGAN EDUCATION COMMITTEE. WANTED, TWO SCHOOL ATTEND- ANCE OFFICERS for tho Gowerton and Port Talbot Groups of Schools re- spectively. Salary, £ 85 per annum, rising by annual increments of S5 to EI20 per annum with Uniform and War Bonus of £ 10 per annum. Only applications from Candidates ineligible for ecrvice with H.M. Foreos will be considered. Appli- catlorif (which must be made on forms to be obtained from the Chief Education Official, County Hall, Cardiff) must be returned not later than September 25th, 1917. September 1,1th, 1917. MOUNT ZION Baptist Church, Swansea. JUBILEE CELEBRATIONS September 13th to 23rd, 1917. TO-N I G HT- BAND OF HOPE JUBILEE SERVICE, 7.30 p.m. Speaker-Rev. F. SPARROW (Oxford-st.) Musical Pragranime by Fabian's Bay Prize Juvenile Choir (Cpiiatictor, Mr. T. Morris) WEDNESDAY. September 19th, Sunday School Jubilee Service. 7.30 P.,n. Preacher REV. H. O. MANDER (Mount Pleasant) Subject: "The Responsibility of the Church for tho Younc" TKl'KSDAY..September £ 0tb. fi-EV. JOHN THOMAS. M.A.. of Sutton (formerly of Liverpool), will Preach. 4 p.m., at Mount Zion Church; 7.30 p.m.. at Mount Pleasant Church: 5.50 p.m.. Tea at Mount Zion bchcolroom. SUNDAY. September 23rd, Services at 11 a.m. Preacher, Rev. A BEYNON PHIL- LIPS (Pantygwydr). Afternoon at 3. Musical Service. Speaker, REV. A, W. Wardle (Wesley). Chairman. William Thomas. Esq. 6.34 p.m.. Preacher. REV. E WORTHING (Pastor. Collection at each ;'1' in aid of "Church Jubilee tfuad." All are Welcome. MONEY. LOANS! £ 1,030 LOANS! THE" BRITISH" FOR MONEY. British Stands for BEST- in Money Matters. That is why you would bo wise in securing that lean from us. Wo advance the same da.^ if neceeaary, from £10, on pureiy straight. British, business hues. We don't ask you to believe this but to let us rer- aonallv and privately urove that what we say we DO. No Security. Eaey terms. Minimum Interest. THESE are featurea yol cannot afford to pasa by. Will you write or call? SPECIAL TERMS TO FARMERS. THE BRITISH FINANCE CO., 20, Bridge-street, Bristol. Tel. 1676 MORTGAGE—Advertiser has .S9?a to J: Lend on Leaseholds in sums to suit borrower.—Write Investor." Daily Leader. 74A9-2Q DO You Need Money? Don't worry call JLJ' or Bend stamped envelope with parti- culars of your position to M.. Foner, 9, Carlton-terrace. 63A9-27 TRADE ANNOUNCEMENTS. IMPORTANT NOTICE.—Mrs. Hemming. JL Newsagent and Stationer, begs to in- form Customers anrl the General Public that she has Removed to New Premises ai 34. Queen-street. Neath (five doors at)ove old shop), and respectfully Solicits a Continu- ance of their Support. Good' stock of Sta- tionery, Writing Pads. Photo Frames, Post Cards. Books. Magazines. Periodicals, etc.. etc. Note new address: 34. Queen-street, Neatb. C9-22 QALE Now On.—Second-hand Books nnd o Magasines, Welsh and English, must be Cleared to make room fOi New Stock. Bet- ter Bargains than ever at Enoch's Book Ex- change and Mart. High-etreet Arcade Novels as usual. 72A9-20 JOSHUA Jones's Clear-out Salo lteliable Men's Underwear at Greatlv Reduced PricC3.-216. High-street. 79A9-19 B- EETLES:- Beetlee.—Get rid cf them by Busing Champion Beetle Powder. Few Selling Agents Wanted — Deaville 258. Woodboro' -road. Nottingham. 70A9-18 TO UNDERTAKERS.-Ooffins, Elm and JL Oak finished oomplete: short notice: lowest prices; inspect stock.—Morgan R. Morgan. Windsor-road Neath. Tel. 266. «JTC KNITTING Machines. Best and Latest; Lessons Free: Lists Free; est. 1871: best home employment.—W. Gritlitbs, 30. Queen-street. Neata LONDON Timo-Table and Red Rail Guide. JU —The current. issue of this ropular Publication is on Sale at all Railway Book stalls and leading Newsagents. Nearly 600 pages, it deals witl over 3,000 Railway Sta- tiODIt At sixiecco It Is the best and cheapest Uailwaj Guide ever published PENHALE'S RAINCOAT SALE, 232, High-street, Swansea. QAA LADIES' Check-Lined Trench Ram- OUV Coate, 20s.: the Coat that's worth 303. Smart Fawn Tan. and Olive Shades. Secure yours to-da.v. r A DARK Navy Ladies' ?-Merproofa. 50 25s. 6d.: ideal for Red Cro?? Workers. 20 Ladies' Poplin Waterproofs, with Trench Belt. 25s. 6d.; guaranteed Waterproof. M Al DS' and Yoittift' &boo] Raincoats and Waterproofs; over 1,000 Coata, from 10s. lid. to 21s, Girls' Capes and Hoods from 63. lid. _?_ ?r? GENTS' Guaranteed Waterproofs- OW Fawn. 2?3 6d.- Dark Grey. for Clergymen. 35s. 6d. Gents' Slip-on Rain- coats. 25s. 6d.; Trench Coats 

OUR COAL TROUBLES I

OUR COAL TROUBLES. I The situation in the Anthracite Coalfield of West Wales is less ex- citing than it was last week, and, without expressing an opinion as to the ultimate outcome of the dis- pute at Gwaun-cae-Gurwen Col- lieries, we may congratulate both the main body of the men at the scene of the strike and the delegates at Monday's district meeting upon their decision to give the leaders an opportunity for a constitutional settlement. The step demanded- a declaration of down tools by all the miners in the Anthracite area, with a view to a call for a similar sympathetic strike through- out South Wales—is so drastic and unusual as to deserve a big pause before resorting to it, especially in war time. It has, however, served to fix very definite attention upon the dispute and the alleged delays in settling it. Now that the matter has been referred to the Emergency Commit- tee of the South Wales Coal Con- ciliation Board and that it is ex- pected the Committee will meet at the end of this week, a way out may be found without any need of threats, which affect so many thou- sands of people who are not directly concerned. It was in this direction that the workmen's responsible leaders—Mr. T. Richards, M.P., Mr. J. D. I Morgan and Mr. J. James—tried last week to lead the workmen and, fortunately, they have succeeded, as the decision of Monday's delegate meeting, to postpone even considering the man- date of the collieries, proves. Surely the Emergency Committee and the Government Coal Controller can now put an end to the suspense of outsiders and avert the possibility of the disastrous operation of down tools." One point in connection with the dispute we must deal with here. In a-letter to the "Cambria Daily Leader" last week, Mr. R. Ed- wards, checkweigher, Raven (Col- liery, Garnant, stated that In one of the Gwaun-cae-Gurwen pita alone, namely the Mardy Pit, there were 572 cases in dispute in 1916 re minimum wage alone, which had to be referred to the panel for settlement. We find that Mr. Edwards is very much mistaken. Not 572 cases were referred to the panel for settle- ment from this pit in 1916-but five. Of these one was decided in favour of the men, and two in favour of the company, and in two the decision was a compromise so far as the amount claimed by the men was concerned. From 1912 to 1916, the total of the cases from the G.C.G. pits referred to the panel only came to 32, and in the East Pit there was not'a single case so referred during 1916. Mr. Ed. wards has evidently some other matter in his mind. The pretty little quarrel between the stalwarts of the Tariff Reform League and the people who are nursing the forlorn National Party, the bantling of Lord Dun- cannon and Brigadier-General Page Croft, has had some touching developments. The National" Party has a wonderful programme, of which Tariff Reform is an un- obtrusive part, and when it was pro- posed that it should act the part of the whale and swallow J onah Sir Joseph Lawrence arose in his wrath. I am willing [he eaid] to say to the new i party God bless you; do the best you can," but when you ask me to merge this organisation in another and to go with you willynilly, then in the Lancashire vernacular I say, I will 600 you damned first. And it was really too bad of Sir Joseph, after listening to General Page Croft's great peroration- "Away with the old cries, away j with the petty bickerings; come with a rush and rally to the flag. You can light a torch which will set our country ablaze and which no man shall ever extinguish," etc., etc..—to reveal the fact that the National Party had been beaten up by giving a lunch and tea to delegates. How are the mighty fallen. We remember a Tariff Re- form dinner, with a Duke as host, to which you could only get an in- vitation by subscribing a cool thousand to the funds. A correspondent writes expres- sing sympathy with the proposals to establishing an information bureau in Swansea for visitors to the town and district. But," he adds, "it is one thing to attract visitors, and find rooms for them; another to make them so comfort- able that they will not only come again themselves, but influence their friends to pay us a visit. With this latter end in view, there are problems that'must be faced. For instance, what of sanitary con- veniences at the beauty spots around? Cannot some influence be brought to bear on Mumbles councillors which will make them inclined to lend a sympathetic ear to suggestions that very desirable facilities should be provided at Langland, Caswell, and Bracelet? It would of course, be a matter of some outlay; but it need not neces- sarily be a heavy drain upon the rates. Some day, in the not far distant future, Mumbles may be iu the borough, but there is surely no need to wait until that time before doing something. Years ago a Mumbles Council turned down a proposal of this kind, I think, but there is a total different body to- day." Held under restrictions which circumstances necessitated Neath pleasure fair—the oldest of its kind in Wales—has come and gone, leaving behind reflections. There was a division of opinion as to the advisability of keeping up the cus- tom, a controversial subject which is general rather than local, but yet withal one that needs personal application. Those, whose hearts were too sad for mirth, stopped away. There were others who sought pleasure to hanish sorrow for the moment, and whilst con- trasts are to be found it will re- main a human problem to satisfy all. Although but a shadow of its former self, Neath fair was a suc- cess from the showman's stand- point, and the tradespeople bene- fitted by the distribution of money. Law and order was never better observed, and we congratulate Chief Constable Higgins and his depleted staff on carrying out the arrange- ments with such satisfactory results. Printed instructions which have just been issued in connection with the sugar distribution scheme ougat to prevent the blunders which have occasioned so much anxiety and duplication of work at the local Food Control Offices. The careless way in which some of the forms have been filled in is beyond ex- cuse, and householders would be well advised to follow the instruc- tions. If in doubt advice can Le obtained but for the asking. A little consideration for those who have to manipulate the scheme will make a heavy task lighter, and ensure the success which the scheme aims at. At Neath the whole of the preliminary details have been overcome, and the machinery is now in good working order. It is interesting to note that Neath was one of the few towns m the country that adopted a semi- municipal control of household com- modities in the early days of the war; a scheme which worked ex- ceedingly well until the demand ex- ceeded the supply. As for Swan- sea, we tried to clear some of the difficulties yesterday; but doubtless there are others, which we will Jo our best to solve if our readers will drop us a line about them. Publicity is the oil that will grease the Food Control machine.

I 110 CARE OF THE FEEBLE I MINDED Qp

I -0& ■■ «. CARE OF THE FEEBLE I MINDED ——— .Q p SWANSEA GUARDIANS VISIT DRYMMA At the invitation of Mr. J. H. Posnr, chairman of the Swansea Board of Guard- ians, an informal visit of inspection waa paid to the Drymma Institute for the Feeble Minded on Monday afternoon. Over 50 invitations were accepted, and the guests represented the Swansea Guard- ians, their wivea and friends. The chair- man of the Glamorganshire Joint l'oor Law Establishment Committee (Mr. W. B. Trick, J.P.) waa unable to be pre- eent owing to pressure of public engage- ments, but wae deputised by his wife and daughter. Sir John Llewelyn and his daughter were among the guests. The journey was made by train to Skewen, and after two miles' climb to the heights of the Drymma mountain the in, stitution was reached. Originally a mansion, built by the late Mr. Paddon in 1876, the structural alteratiuns necessary for conversion into a suitable home has not altered itg architectural beauty. It affords accommodation for over 80 in- mates, and provision has been made foi expansion, it commands a magnificent view of the surrounding country—indus- trial and pastoral—and the hille and dales, and the winding river of the Neda emptying into the bay adds to the picturesque beauty of the scene. EXTENSIVE AND PRETTY. The grounds are extensive and prettily laid out. They include a fish pond, on which water lillies grow, a tennis ground. and well-kept kitchen and fruit gardens Mr. Rogser and the matron (Mies Cuth. bertson) piloted the guests over the build- ing, and tea was afterwards partaken of in the spacious library. Proposing a vote of thanks to Mr. Rosser, Sir John Llewelyn said the Insti- tution marked a noble and valuable de- parture in the administration of poor law. The unfortunate people for whom that building had been acquired were worthy of their sympathy and help. (Applause). In. tellect was one of the greatest of God's gifts, and these unfortunate people who bad no minds to lose would henceforth be well c-ar-ed for and not sent to a luna- tic asylum. Hitherto thesq poor people had to be cared for in the Workhouse, and ue always felt that it was a very serious responsibility placed upon th< shoulders of the master to decide the kind of training for these poor, feeble-minded people. He came there that day purposely t-i see what could be done for them, and he was happy to think they had found such a beautiful home, and its substantial construction showed that it was erected regardless of expense. As Guardians of the various unions, they ought to fee) proud that it was possible to acquire sucl a beautiful home. The laying of th< water mains, which came pure as crystal from the mountains of Ystradfellte, would see its oompletion in the oourse of a few months, and then they would be able to accommodate from 70 to 80 patients. It was a progressive step, and one that hi was exceedingly proud of. (Applause.) THE ONLY FLY IN THE OINTMENT. Replying, Mr. Roeser said he was pleased to see so many guests. The only fly in the ointment was that he had lef\ the 6ugar at Sketty, and the tea was delayed until that scarce but necessary commodity was fetched. (Laughter.) Sh John had been his foster-father as a Guardian. When he became a Guard-, ian some 15 years ago Sir John took him in hand, and o he obtained more Poor Law knowledge under Sir John's instruction than from the whole body of Guardians put together. He was to-day conceited enough to think that he had been made a decent Guardian (Laugh- tor and apploase). He bad im,&voc be8a-, unkind; perhaps he had been too sympa thetic: but when he found atteanpts baint made to impose he had always been firm. They were not a body to amist loafers, but people who through unfortunate cir- cumstances were unable to earn a liveli- hood, and those people had his full sym- pathy and support. (Applause.) They had endeavoured ns Guardians to impres the County Council to take up the eohemi which had now almost reached fruition, but they held aloof. Nothing deterred, the Guardians had done the work, and he hoped that every sucoess would attcno it in the future. Surrounding the homa they had 150 a-eres of land, and it was the intention of the Guardians to train the inmatee in its cultivation, and help them to think thev were doing something useful in life. (Cheers-.

CORRESPONDENCE

CORRESPONDENCE. ^jg>P — [Letters to the Editor should be brief. to the point, and about something. Cor- respondents «boul.l send their names and addresses, not necessarily for publication. > THE GOWER MOTOR 'BUSSES. To the Editor. Sir,—The continued editorials, press cub tings, and correspondenoe. I think call for a reply from someone intert-fcted in the traffic Dealing with your query as to whether it is safe or desirable for people to ride ou the top of tbesa 'busses, are you awars that the old horse 'busses always carried pe,is le on the topi* I would noin; out that '#» motor 'buases are of best English manuIL-,c. ture guaranteed as to net load capacity (apart from body weight), and vary from two tons to four tons. The roofs are con- structed to carry two tons. and the pre- sent. owners consider it perfectly safe for passengers to ride on the top, or tr.ey would not allow it. I have not heard of a single accident occurring to a naeeenger on tho roof, and the safety of this mcde of travelling must be ludged by the results. As to it being desirable, yes. to manv people. Is it ouggeste4i that double-deckec omnibuses are morv suitable? These would be licensed by any authority and yet the danger would be at least five times greater, as people would get on top when thg inside is on-pty. Why not raiBo objections to the London General Omnibuses, with their deck loall, or even locally double-deckers are licensed P Motor 'bus interests have proved that a. 'bus should bo at least thirty-four seated to be a commercial success, and eithet double-deckers or large single deckers rat quite impossible for local country traffic. Pidine on top is purely voluntary, and through the petrol restrictions it is ios; eible to duplicate only a certain number a ca^s. Pealinff with the Question of Bank Holi. diiv traffic. H. L." will have to drive his own car to get comfort. In any caae he would obtain more comfort ol, a Qower 'bus than any local tram or train service and why should he travel to Gower on Bank Holiday Purely not for business! The present owners. who are also the drivers, drearl Bank Holidays, and would much rather have a holiday than run 'bases, ex- cett that there is a responsibility to the public. -to to joy riding, it is not the ou&- tom of the proprietors to ask people's busi- ness. or whether they ho- i a Class A cer tiflcate for travelling. If the limitation of carrying more than a certain number of passengers is required. will you undertake, sir, to say who is to be left behind ? Gower peopla who may have walked a couple of miles to catch a 'bus will not fancy beinp left. I faaintain, sir, that since the war motoi interests have been hit harder than cny other largo intereet in the country. Any- one with the least knowledge of the Gower traSlo could, and do congratulate th, local interests on the mechanical efficiency of the 'buses and the freedom from acci- < dents of a eerioua nature (not ire fatality having occurred since their inoeption nret eisht years ago), to either passengers or other users of the road.-Yours. etc., ONE OF THE 'BUSBRU, j (Other letters have to be held over ovinfl to preraure upon our spaoe.) 11

WOMEN AT WAR

WOMEN AT WAR. Two young married women were finec 18s. each at Llanelly Police Court for ob. structing the highway in William-street by fighting thereon. The defendant. ,w. Lizzie Ann Brown and Matilda 21 and 17, :Wllham-strt respectiv^r 21 and 17, William-stxftt