Collection Title: Haverfordwest and Milford Haven telegraph

Provider: The National Library of Wales

Rights: The copyright status or ownership of this resource is unknown.

View full details

First Previous Image 3 of 4 Next Last
Full Screen
51 articles on this page
I HOW CAPT HOWARD DIED

HOW CAPT. HOWARD DIED. The mystery surrounding the fate of Captain Howard seems to be entirely dispelled by a letter written by Private R. Frederick Thomas, of the 1 Jth. a native of Llandovery. Prvt. Thomas says: Daring our advance I ought to mention that poor Capt. Howard, of Haverford- west, was killed. He passed away with the words It's all over, boys," on his lips. Later we laid him gently in his grave, mourning for the loss sustained by our gallant regiment, and placed there a wooden cross."

VIVID ACCOUNT OF THE FIGHTING IN THE DARDANELLES

VIVID ACCOUNT OF THE FIGHTING IN THE DARDANELLES. "Back with Bayonets Fixed They Went." i The following interesting letter, which probably gives the most vivid account of the fighting at the Dardanelles yet published, has been written to Mr Henry Phillips, of Prendergast Boys' School, by Signaller Walter P. Phillips, of Cartiett:- Monday, August 30th, 1013. Dear Mr Phillips,-Having occasion to look into my pocket book, I found that I had your address inscribed therein, and having once promised you that I would write whenever I went on foreign ser- vice, I am now making use of my spare time in so doing. As you already know, the 4th Welsh have been in action, and have fared very badly, although I am thankful to say the majority of our casualties con- sist of wounded. We landed on the Peninsula on Monday, August 9th, and after a slight experience of shell fire we made for the firing line without loss of time. Our way lay across a sand plain which, in winter time, is under water, and beyond which was a wide expanse of moorland, dotted with trees and shrubs. This moor had a very gradual descent of about two miles, and ultimately ended in a rugged ridge, on which the enemy artillery was mounted. On the side of this gradual slope are little hills, and one of these bills was our objective. We spent the Monday night on this moor, dodging stray bullets, and on the Tuesday morning we advanced to the firing line. As we advanced we were subjected to a slight rifle fire, and after a few casualties we gained the support trenches. After a short time we advanced to the foremost trenches, and then the Turks started. They seemed to be firing at random, simply sweeping the hillside with a hail of bullets. These bullets, owing to the very gradual slope, went a long distance, hence no man within a mile and a half of the fore- most trenches was safe. Our brigade kept firing at the enemy until about noon, when, as rumour hath it, a German officer got into our lines and shouted "retire." Consequently the whole line retired, and it was then that the losses were heavy. But no sooner bad they retired than back with bayonet fixed they went, and regained the lost trenches again. We held our own until five in the evening, when a general advance was ordered. On went the men under a heavy fire, but finding no room had to again retire to the foremost trenches. Again during that retirement the losses were heavy. Then came the crowning mistake of the day. No sooner bad our men regained their trenches, when the order came down the lines to cease fire, as we were firing on Indian troops, who were really Turks dressed as Gurkhas. We ceased fire and on came the Turks, who advanced to within 50 yards of our trench. Seeing our bayonets they wavered. Then we let drive. There were so many men in our trench that there was a rifle every foot along the parapet. When we fired the noise was deafening, and such was the i fire that the Turks dropped without exception. Hardly a Turk that was seen escaped. We held the trench that night and on the Wednesday we held the third line of trenches in which the 1th Welsh were collected. In the evening we left for a safe bivouac for the night, but we found ourselves in a nest of hornet's, for we must have run up against an unknown number of Turks, who did nothing but fire on us from some hiding place. Not knowing the ground and the number of the enemy, we were withdrawn to a place of safely, where, utterly ex- hausted, we slept until dawn, when were moved further back to dig support trences. Since that time until Friday, August 27th, we have been making support trenches in various directions, sniped at day and night, and sbrapnelled regularly at meal times. In fact it came in the bill of fare. Since the Friday just mentioned, we have been close to the landing beach enjoying a few days' well- earned rest. It is a great relief to be out of the zone of snipers. The country is teeming with them and they have various positions such as wells, gaps in brushwood, trees well marked. They sniped all day and night and were not particular as to what kind of bullets they used. They are not at all averse to using explosive bullets, which make terrible wounds. Although back from the scene of action, we are still under artillery fire. The landing beach for stores and troops is about a quarter of a mile away, and that place gets its share of the daily shelling. We are in dug-onts and comparatively safe, although in the line of fire. The food is good, varied and plenti- ful, and being supplied with blankets we are able to have a good sleep. The days are very hot, while at night just the reverse. Water is fairly plentiful, but in deep wells. We had a Church service with Holy Communion on Sunday morning and a service again in the evening. As yet my health has been very good, and through God's mercy I have been spared to go on with the work a little longer. Somehow or other I have confidence that I shall come back safe and sound. Give my kindest regards to Mrs Phillips and all at Prendergast School. Levi Owen, having been mentioned in dispatches, was unfortunately killed by a strav bullet when comparatively safe. Kindest regards, WALTER P. PHILLIPS. WALTFR P. PlilLT,TPI,.

The Boys Had Beards Like Old Men i

The Boys Had Beards Like Old Men. *Mrs Jane Jones, 3(5, Milford Road, has kindly sent us the following interesting letter written by her son George from the Dardanelles. Private Jones went out with the 1 1th and was one of the men who were detained at a port on the way but subsequently followed the regiment. The writer's reference to the reception accorded the Harfat lads when they met their old pals in the trenches is very touching. He says: "August 27th. Dear Mother,—Just a line in answer to your letter which I was very glad to receive. I am writing this letter to you from the trenches. We arrived here on the 21st, and had a fine reception when we got into the base. The shells started right among us but luckily no one was hit. When we got to the trenches where the rest of the boys were they were overjoyed to see us. Our appearance was like someone coming from home to see them and their delight was unbounded. They had had to go into action as soon as they landed, and had been kept busy at it for a fort- night. They are now back behind the firing line digging trenches and we are with them. Most of them have beards like old men and we could hardly recognise them. There are a lot of snipers about and they pop a lot of the boys off from day to day when they go to fetch water. I had a narrow squeak myself one day I was coming back from the well with my mess tin full of water when a bullet from a sniper hit a hole right through it without touching me. We get plenty of food but I think that with every bit we eat we swallow a mouthful of dirt. It is very hot in the day, and awfully cold at night and we haven't any- thing extra to put on but we are smiling just the same. We get a supply of cigarettes but not enough and I want you to send me some Woodbines, Jimmy Jones is all right. With him I bad my first meal in the trenches and we had a long talk about home. He is disappointed at not receiving a letter from home so just mention it to Annie and tell her he would be delighted to get some cigarettes from her. Tell Mary I am sorry I have not written to her. I wrote one letter but I was too late to have it censored as we were moving from the main base. Tell her to keep on sending me the Telegraph" as its so nice to get all the news from the old place. Dear mother, I don't think I have anything more to say now but I will have a lot to tell you when I come home which I hope to do as there is a rumour going around that we are to be moved somewhere else. Give my best love to Fred, Mary and the children and tell the children that I shall have some nice tales to tell them when I return. Also remember me to Cecilia, Gertie, and Johnnie. I must come to a close and don't worry about me but hope for the liest.-From your loving son, GKORGIK.

A Bullet Through My Helmet i

A Bullet Through My Helmet." Private Eddie Gibbon, Barn Street, writing to his parents says:—" As you will see by the address in this letter, I am in hospital in Alexandria with dysentery and rheumatism, but I am feeling very much better already. I have been away from the Peninsula now a fortnight. Oar Battalion has lost very heavily in the fighting; we have been in three engagements and have bad a bayonet charge. I can never forget it-it was really awful. We were in the front line of trenches the day after we landed. We made a bit of an advance but they were popping us off like peas. I have had some narrow escapes, among others, a bullet through my helmet. I have several valuable curios-a Turkish revolver, bayonet, etc. It is a very trying climate. Captain Howard died like a hero."

Harfat Lads Fairly Cheerful l

Harfat Lads Fairly Cheerful. Mr and Mrs George Lewis, of Lexden Terrace, in common with several other parents, were beginning to feel very anxious about their boy Philip, from whom they had not heard since the engagement in the Dardanelles on August lith. Their anxiety how- ever is, for the present, allayed, as they have received a letter dated August 30th. He was then all right and had been brought back to the base for four days' rest, and then expected to return to the trenches which were just as safe a place as another. While writing this letter the Turks are busy shelling the R.A.M.C. very close to us. I am glad to say all the boys from Harfat are fairly cheerful considering what they have gone through since we have been out here. We shall all be glad when this war comes to an end. In a later letter he says he was up to his neck in water when landing and his watch stopped so he would be glad to have a cheap one sent him. Thev were supposed to have had it hard at Scoveston, but that was a treat compared to what they had to undergo now. The first week they were there he thought they were in hell, and he didn't wish to go through another similar experience. He also asked to have the Telegraph sent him every week as so far they had had nothing to read.

Thanks to the Rev BaringGould

Thanks to the Rev. Baring-Gould. Privt Jack Noott, of North Parade, writing to Miss M. E. Phelps says he is glad to say be is quite well, and was pleased to receive the magazine which the Rev Baring-Gould sent him. He wished Miss Phelps to thank Mr Baring-Gould for sending it. He also says he can do with all the fags that may be sent to him. j

IAnother Harfat Lad Deadj

Another Harfat Lad Dead. Mr and Mrs T. Griffiths, North Gate, on Friday last received the melancholy intelligence that their son Ivor had died as the result of an attack of dysentry. Young Griffiths who was a private in the 1 1th Welsh Regiment had been in the trenches at the Dardanelles where it is supposed he contracted the disease. He was previously employed by Mr Seth Griffiths, boot and shoe maker, Bridge Street, and was a steady well behaved young man of 21. His death is a sad blow to his sorrowing relatives, and he will also be deeply mourned by his comrades with whom he was very popular. Mrs Griffiths has just received the following letter from the Army Chaplain who travelled on board the steamer which took young Griffiths back to Gibraltar. Woodleigb, Altrincham, September 17th, 1915. Dear Mrs Griffiths, Mav I send you my sincere sympathy in the great trouble that you must have in the sad loss of your son, Ivor Griffiths, Private 115, 4th Welsh Regiment ? He was taken ill with dysentry which is a very weakening complaint. He was brought from Gallipoli to Madras Harbour in the Island of Lemnos. There he was put on board the ship Franconia on which I was chaplain. We started for England, and on our way there had got as far as Gibraltar. Ivor grew very weak with the disease. He talked to me about you and his father and brother and sister. I understood from him that his home was at Haver- fordwest. We prayed together and he died on Sat- urday, September 4th. He was buried on shore there where soldiers are buried. The Army Chaplain at Gibraltar took the service. I saw Ivor a number of times on the ship; he was a good young man and thought so much of you. It must be very hard for you to lose him and I do send you my sympathy to you and the other members of your family. Ivor is in God's keeping, and I pray God will comfort you all. I am. Yours very Sincerely, ALAN D. JOHNSTON, Chaplain to the Forces, (Church of England).

Playing Havoc With The Turks I

"Playing Havoc With The Turks." Private A. E. Rust, of the 1,4th, son of Mr Rust, late of Milford Haven, writing to bis parents in Plymouth says he did not expect to be in the Dardanelles long as they were playing havoc with the Turks. The letter says W. Williams (of Milford) is all right, but Capt. Howard and Stanley Bowen are killed.

Shrapnel For a Birthday Present I

Shrapnel For a Birthday Present. The parents of Private Fred Morgan, of Dew Street, have endured much anxiety about their son who went to the Dardanelles with the 1 1th. He now writes under date of September Hth to say he is quite well and that on his birthday when be expected a parcel from home be got instead only shrapnel and bullets, but fortunately none of these hit him. The parcel sent by Private Morgan's parents had not reached him when be wrote although it was despatched several weeks pre- viously.

Harfat Boys as ChefsI

Harfat Boys as Chefs. Private Mossy Llewellin, son of Mr John Llewellin, Bridgend House, writes a cheery letter to his parents under date August 2t;tb, He tells them to keep their spirits up, and says the boys are well off for food and water but they have to do their own cooking, "and I can tell you we can make a fine dish. You wait till we come home. The cook will be able to have a day off then whenever she likes. I am sending you a photo that a few of us have taken. What do you think of the (mistake) I have grown since I left England? I would like to have the "Telegraph" as often as you can possibly send it as we want to see all the news from horne, We are gaining ground every day and if we keep on as we are at present I think you can hope to see us shortly. "LIKE RABBITS IN A WARREN- AND NO RENT TO PAY. Writing again on August 30th Private Llewellin is still in a merry mood, and after assuring his parents that the wound received by his brother Ben was of a trifling nature says: "You would smile to see our rest camp. We are like a lot of rabbits in their burrows. We live in dug-outs about six feet square by five feet deep, and the earth is all banked up on the top. It is quite comfortable. We have our waterproofs to sleep on, and blankets to cover us and are as hot as toasts. And don't forget we have no rent to pay! We are tlve in our dug-outs and all Harfat boys, W. Gwilliam being one of them. I have not heard from Ben (his brother) yet, but don't worry as his wound is absolutely nothing. Yon see you have to go into hospital if yon only get a scratch. How is dear old Harfat looking ? As quiet as usual, 1 suppose? You said in your letter that Ben and 1 used to talk about going abroad. My word, there's no place like old Harfat after all. We had a church service yesterday and it was really grand. You ought to see how interested we all were. This war has sobered many a young man. In the trenches you hardly ever hear a bad word spoken now, it's done that much good. With fondest love to all, your affectionate son, MOSSY.

Wound Quite Healed NowI

"Wound Quite Healed Now." Private Ben Llewellin, Mr J. Llewellin's second son, writing from hospital at Malta, says his wound is quite bealed now, and be felt ten times better since be had received letters from home. We are still setting good news from the Dardanelles, so we are all of good cheer. I think the Turks know that they are up against the 4th Welsh." When fully re- covered he expected to be sent to Cairo for a spell. The letter concludesWho would ever have thought of brother Ben being in Turkey? He has often got outside one."

Best Wishes to all from Stump I

Best Wishes to all from Stump. I Harfat bovs are not laoking in humour even under the stress of war, and writing to Mr Guss Hugh, boots at the Castle Hotel, Prvt. Harry Morgan, who is now in France, asks how are things going in Harfat. I see by the Telegraph that the boys have had a rough time at the Dardanelles just as we have had it here. How are Charlie's boys ? I hope they are all right." After wishing to be remembered to several friends, he winds up "I will now close with best wishes to all from STUMP."

Fine View of the Pyramids I

Fine View of the Pyramids. I Mrs J. Jones, Colby Scott, has received a letter from her brother George, in which he states that his thigh is a little bit better. He had been sent to a Hed Cross hospital at Giza, in Cairo. It is a lovely place, and they had fine views of the Pyramids, which were not very far distant.

How It Was and How it ShouldI Have Been

How It Was and How it Should I Have Been." Prvt. Eric Edmond, writing to his parents under date of September 9th, says My dearest Mother, Father, and Brothers,— I received your letter and fags to-day quite all right, and was delighted to have it. Glad to hear every one at home is alright. I am Al, and in the pink. It is very hot here to-day, but we are quite aclimati- sed now, and don't find it half so bad as at the start. Dear Mother, there is not much news and I don't know what to say. I saw the "Telegraph" for August 11th, and 18tb, here to-day, and was very glad to see them. Fancy Harfat having a D.C.M. It was quite enjoyable to read about how the reception was and how it should have been. I have also seen the "Telegraph" with the departure of the 4th Welsh, by Eye-witness, in it. Also the one giving the descrip- tlon of our meeting with the battle cruiser. I was very glad to bave the letter from Willie too, they w vr. given to me in the trenches, Well dear Mother, I must close, as there is nothing more to say. Give my love to the boys. I hope they are all airight. I am just going to write a letter to Willie after, but I shall have to enclose the two in one envelope, as I don't know where to rise one here. Please send that writing-paper as soon as you can, Dear Mother,as I shall be so glad to have it. Give my love to Mrs. Daye and Alice. I hope they are alright, also to any-one who should enquire after me. Have you seen our casulty list yet? I wonder it it's out. Jack Farrow is alright and wishes to be remembered to all. well,dear Mother, and Father, I must close now, hoping to hear again soon. With fondest love, I remain, your ever true and ever loving son, ERIC." Mrs Walter Richards, Pearston, has received a letter from a former employee Rifleman A. T. Evans, 1st Batt., Rifle Brigade, who is in France, thanking her for a parcel. In the course of his letter Evans writes: Parcels cheer us up. You would not believe how miserable it is here sometimes. When we get rain, we are up to our knees in mud, and we have to let our clothes dry on us. I am writing you this letter in my dug out."

How Harfat Lads Meet

How Harfat Lads Meet. Signaller Walter Phillips, of Carlett, writing to his parents on September 5th says his company is now attached to the 2nd Battalion of the South Wales Borderers, and a fine Jot of chaps they are. He says: I have not seen Tommy Bowen yet but I met Edwin Phipps, Molly Pbipps's nephew. He used to go about with a fish cart. I did not know him at first but when he enquired for the Harfat boys we had a long chat. On the 7th inst., Signaller Phillips says:- The Telegraph of the 18th mentions Major Bowen and Captain Linton as being wounded, but unhappily many more officers find themselves in the same position. I am extremely thankful to God for sparing me so far as I have had some very narrow escapes.

Tell Tommy Bowens Parents

Tell Tommy Bowen's Parents. Signaller Walter Phillips, writing aga.in on bept;, I 2nd says that a man belonging to the S. W. B. bad just told him that Tommy Bowen of Merlin s HIll, was up in the trenches and as Bowen had not written home since he left England his parents might wish to know of his whereabouts. 1.

Private Fred Morgan Well

Private Fred Morgan Well. Mr T. H. Morgan, of Dew St, has beard from his son Fred to the effect that he is all right so far. Mr Morgan has been very anxious about nis boy as this was the first letter be bad received from him since he landed at the Dardanelles. Private Morgan says be could not imagine what war was like bo- fore but now he could realise what a terrible thing it is.

Lieutenant Harry Williams

Lieutenant Harry Williams. We are pleased to learn that Lieutenant Harry Williams, whose remarkable escape from death after being shot cleauthroaghthe body has attracted so much attention, is still progressing satisfactorily. His parents received a letter from him dated Sept. 2nd, in which he stated that, although still confined to bed, be was making satisfactory progress, and the doctors hoped he would be able to get up in about a week from that date. Two cable messages have since been received, viz.: on the 13th and 19th inst., stating that the progress recorded above was being maintained. The gallant officer's esoape will probably prove one of the most remarkable in this terrible' war, and although it is impossible for re- liable data to be obtained in wounds of this des- cription, it is safe to say that very few similar cases will be recorded amongst the millions of soldiers who have been wounded since the war began.

I See By The Telegraph

I See By The Telegraph." Jack Owens, Prendergast, in a letter to his parents dated August 29th, refers to the deaths of Captain Howard, Stanley Bowen and Levi Owen and says there are a lot more wounded. He saw by the Telegraph," which he was very glad to receive, that Albert and Gilbert had kept up the reputation of the family at the sports on Bank Holiday. He would like a box of Players as they were very short of cigarettes.

Former Milford Haven Bank Clerk

Former Milford Haven Bank Clerk. The following letter has been received by Mr T. H. Hopkins, of the London City and Midland Bank, Milford Haven, from Private T. J. Griffith, of the 6th Batt. Royal Welsh Fusiliers (T.F.), who has been invalided from the Dardanelles suffering from dysentery. He was also formerly at the Milford Haven branch and belongs to Carnarvon district:- "27 A2, Medical, Royal Victoria Hospital, Netley, Hants. Dear Hopkins,—I received your letter, for which many thanks. I did not receive the letter Mr Cole wrote, very likely it will be sent after me. Yes, it is a pity that poor Mr Howard has gone, and it is 1 awful to think we shall never see him again. The 4tli Welsh Regiment were in the trenches on our left in Gallipoli Peninsula. I had gone down to the base one evening, and about 12 o'clock at night came across some fellows from the 4th Welsh. I enquired about Mr Howard and they told me he was killed that day. It is cruel out at the front. We lauded on a Saturday morning and climbed to the top of a rock. After we had been there a couple of hours the Turks found us out and started shelling us with their shrapnel. Luckily very few were hurt. Some time in the evening we made a move for cover to get something to eat, and afterwards made our dug-out for a sleep. On Sunday morning we advanced to- wards the firing line. Well, this was worse than hell. The shells an,d the bullets were flying about us. By the time we reached the trenches, through the trees which were full of snipers, nearly all our officers were killed and wounded. Some of these snipers are women painted green. I assure you I am not looking forward to going back and I hope that I shall be sent to France or get my discharge. Kindest regards to all at the Bank, not forgetting yourself. Sincerely yours, T. J. GRIFFITH. I

Private Willie Saies I

Private Willie Saies. Private Willie Saies, of Portfield, brother of the .lad Tommy Saies, whose death we reported in our last issue, writes to inform his father that he is quite well, and had received the parcel and cigarettes. The latter he enjoyed very much as he was dying for a smoke. Water was very scarce and had to be fetched from wells while shells from the Turkish batteries fell all around. Fruit was plentiful, and consisted of figs, mellons, and other kinds.

Fighting For Our Homes I

Fighting For Our Homes." In an interesting letter to his mother, Prvt George Williams of 47 Predergast, says be was anxiously waiting news from the home-laud. He hoped to be spared to see the dear ones at home once again, but whatever happened they would have the satisfaction of knowing that they had done their duty to their country. Their General told them that they were out there fighting as much for their homes as if they stood on their own doorsteps. The letter also contained interesting references to animal life on the Peninsula and says there are plenty of big tortoises and grass hoppers as large as ones hand, also big snakes, eagles, and vultures, and all sorts of pretty birds.

II Poor Levi Owen Missed Very Much I

Poor Levi Owen Missed Very Much. Ben Owen, the brother of the brave lad Levi writes to his parents under August 27th and says he received his letter but poor Levi never received his. He was glad to get the box of cigarettes and letter but was very sorry that poor Levi did not live to have bis share. Dear Mother I have missed him very much for be used to make breakfast for me and Willie Harries and now we have to make it ourselves. I have a good job now and am orderly for Mr George Adams who has been made lieutenant of our company, and both he and Sergeant-Major Rees of Portfield are very good to me or else I should not know what to do with myself." Again on August 31st Just a line to let you know I am alright, but I cannot help thinking of Levi but the boys are all very kind to me. Levi was made ———— ———— ——— but I don't know whether he will get it. lie bad it for bringing nine wounded men out of the firing line to safety."

Brave Soldiers Buried in Wheat andI iPotato Fields

Brave Soldiers Buried in Wheat and Potato Fields. Private Chas. F. Jenkins, of sG Barn Street, writing to his brother from the trenches in France says he is at a place which has been entirely demol- ished by shell-fire but which must have been a nice spot before the war. He was very proud that a member of his own battalion is the first man in the 19 Divis. to obtain the D.C.M. He performed a very brave act in cutting a fuse attached to a German bomb which had fallen in their trench and by doing so he saved the machine and mortar guns from being destroyed and the lives of many men. It is a very pathetic sight to see the graves of brave soldiers buried by the roadside in wheat and potato fields just where they fell.

A Harfat OptimistI

A Harfat Optimist. Private A. Glass writing from France to the Telegraph says:- Dear Sir,—Many thanks for the cigarettes which I received quite safe..1 am still keeping well myself trusting this will find yourself the same. I was very much upset reading in the "Telegraph" of how so many of our native regiments from Wales have been so badly handled, but never mind we shall have to still look on the bright side of things as it is only our duty. The Haverfordwest people especially have had some awful times but I hope that the whole of the town will be proud of them the weather is not too bad out here at present, but we are thinking of what we shall get later on in the winter so we dread talking about it, anyway we will stick it even if we die in the attempt. Well I am sorry 1 cannot write you a lot, but time will not allow me to do so, hoping you will not mind, so I shall have to conclude now with good lack to you and everybody at home. Au revoir. Still remaining, yours sincerely, A. GLASS.

Were All Taffies And Will StickI it to the End

We're All Taffies And Will Stick I it to the End." There is a true ring of British pluck in the letter of Pte. Walter Francis, of the l/4th Welsh, youngest son of Mr and Mrs Francis, North Farm, Spittal, who writing to his parents on Sunday, August 22nd says Dear Mother,—At last I have the chance of writ- ing a few lines to you, to let you know how I am. I am back here with the Red Cross for the last few days. suffering from dysentry. I am getting better slowly. We landed here a fortnight to-morrow and went straight into the trenches and have remained there ever since. It is a terrible experience being under fire at first, but one soon gets used to it. I am writing this letter now under heavy shell fire, but I am lying behind my little bank of sand so I don't mind it much. One thing I hope is that I shall be spared to come home again. To-day is Sunday, ana I am picturing you all at home getting ready for chapel. I would give anything to be with you all. Remember me to all. I hope I shall see them all some day again. We hear all sorts of rumours about peace, but don't know any facts yet. This is a very hot country. The heat is awful by day, and it's bitter cold at night, which makes it very bad for us in the trenches, but we're all Taffies, and we'll stick it to the end. I have bad some narrow escapes from being hit myself. I have felt bullets passing by me, and one even made a mark on my tunic, but I have escaped so far unhurt. I have an idea I shall see you all again when this is over, as I was rushed away from England without seeing you. Perhaps you have heard that one of the Harfat boys has been recommended for bravery on the field, and has been promoted to the rank of corporal already. Poor old Bunt is one he carried back under are. Your affectionate son. WALTER. I

French Beer Dont Make YouI Zig Zag

French" Beer Don't Make You I Zig Zag. Sapper J. Griffiths, of Albert Street, writes an amusing letter to his parents from France, where he is attached to the 20th Signalling Company. He says: I am going on fine and you need not worry about me as I am as safe here as you are in England. We are not very far from the firing line and go up there now and again. I am very glad to hear that Phil (his brother) is alright. The poor Terriers got it pretty bad at the Dardanelles, and I am glad we did not go there. We get plenty to do out here and are at it from morning till night, but that does not trouble me as I have got to do my bit as well as the others. I met one of the Rodneys here the other day. He is in the Artillery. The French beerlis a penny a glass and you can drink it from morning till night and it won't make you zig zag as the French people say. I really think I shall learn to speak Drench if I am out here ten years. I forgot to tell you about the French people giving their children beer and I think they give it instead of tea. I bad a feed of frogs the other day. and they were quite all right. Isuppose you don't know how Stump (see letter to Guss Hugh in this issue) is getting on? With best  from your loving son, JoH?. »if|f f Griffiths has also received a letter from his son Phil who is with the 1¡4th at the Dardanelles. He was all right on the 29th of August.

Advertising

 [BORWICKS]  ?? BAKING p?'??"" 

IMAJOR A B HIGGON OSO

IMAJOR A. B. HIGGON, O.S.O. KILLED AT THE DARDANELLES. Another gallant Pembrokeshire officer has fallen in the war. Capt. Archibald B. Higgon was killed at the Dardanelles on September 10th, whither he had been drafted just a month previously. The deceased was 35 years of age and was the third son of the late Capt. Higgon, of Scolton, who occupied a prominent position in the public life of the county several decades ago, and whose tenure of the position of cha,irman of the Haverfordwest Board of Guardians extended over a longer period than any other chairman previously or since. The deceased's father will be remembered bv the older generations as a gentleman conspicuous for his bluff and some- what curt manner, but his sterling character and MAJOR A. B. HIGOON", D.S.O. lofty principles won the respect and esteem of all classes, and if he sometimes appeared a bit over- bearing or impatient in the transaction of busiuess at the Board's meetings, no one was ever known to question the sincerity of his opinions, while beneath the apparent harshness of his manner there existed a kindness and sympathy which never failed to make themselves manifest in all deserving cases. His son, the gallant officer, whose death we all lament, was more genial and affable than bis parent, but he, nevertheless, was a strict disciplinarian and a fine officer, a fact borne out by the military dis- tinctions bestowed upon him. He served all through the South African War and had the King's and Queen's medals with five clasps. Going to France at the outbreak of war, he took part in the memor- able retreat from Mons, and was mentioned in dispatches, receiving the D.S.O. for gallantry on the Aisne, and was also decorated with the Cross of the Chevalier of the Legion of Honour. Major Higgon married about two yers ago Isobel, daughter of Mr Thomas Deuroche Smith of Balkerry, Perthshire, but leaves no issue. His brother-in-law Lieut. A. Denroche Smith, of the 18th Hussars, was killed in action just a year ago.

The Late Second Lieut J S M Tombs

The Late Second Lieut. J. S. M. Tombs. The death of this young officer from shell wounds received in Belgium, will,' we feel sure, be a cause of sincere regret to many in Haverfordwest and neigh- bourhood. The son of Mr J. S. 0. Tombs. M.A., formerly headmaster of the Grammar Setiool, Joe, as all his friends called him, received the major part of his education under his father's tuition. Another of his teachers alwavs remembered by him with affection, was Mr W. y, Edwards, now second master. After some five years at the Grammar School, during which he reached the top of the highest form, he passed to Loretto School, where he spent rather less than three years under that famous international. Mr H. B. Tristram, M.A.. brother-in- law and successor of the renowned Dr. Hely Almond. Here he distinguished himself in athletics. getting his colours for the first teams in cricket and football. Here again, he rapidly found his way to the top of the school and in his last examination was bracketed equal with a boy who passed first into Woolwich. On leaving Loretto, Mr Tombs entered the firm of Messrs. Hall & Paterson, Old Hall Street, Liverpool, later on becoming a partner, and before the war was a week old, he enlisted in the ranks of the Liverpool Scottish, with whom lie spent most of the winter in the trenches. In April Mr Tombs obtained a commission in the 148th Brigade, R.F.A. He had been less than a week in Belgium when he received his fatal wound from a shell which wrecked his dug-out. He lived but a few hours. "He was very plucky," an officer writes, "and immediately enquired for another officer who had been wounded near him, and gave us your address." So has come to its close a life of the greatest usefulness and promise. A native of the town, lie lived the great part of his short life here. and made many frfends, who will learn of his passing with regret, but also with the pride which tempers sorrow.

No title

FLIGHT SUB-LIEUT, E. ,1. BURLING, Of the Royal Naval Air Service, who gave up his career at Cambridge University to offer himself for the War, and qualified in a remarkably short period and obtained a commission in the Air Service. Mr Burling was a master at the Haverfordwest Grammar School for five years, during the headmastership of Mr Henson, and will be remembered by many in Haverfordwest and Milford as a distinguished foot- ball player and cricketer. He is at present engaged in seaplane work on the coast.

BACK TflT LIFE I

BACK TflT LIFE. I Hook Man Reported Dead, But Still Alive. A curious experience has happened to a native of Hook. Jimmy Brown, son-in-law of Mrs Folland, The Lake, Hook, enlisted shortly after war broke out and went to France, where he saw a good deal of fight- ing. One day came the sad news that Jimmy had died a soldier's death, and his widow and family went into mourning. In the usual course the wife received the simple belongings of her soldier bus- band, consisting of his pipe, tobacco box, watch, and a few other things. Then in May last, Billy Folland, brother of Mrs Jimmy Brown, enlisted, and was duly drafted to France. Three weeks ago he wrote to his mother at The Lake, Hook, stating that he was all right, and that the first Welshman he met was his brother-in- law, Jimmy Brown, and that far from being dead, Brown looked-quite fit and had been appointed field police-man, thus the sorrow of the family was turned into joy., The mistake arose, it is thought, through the man having been taken illund sent into hospital. How- ever, we are glad to learn that Brown is now quite well, and is serving his King and Country with zeal and efficiency.

I Prisoners in Chains Murdered I

Prisoners in Chains Murdered. LOCAL OFFICER IN W. AFRICA. Iteuter's Ageucy has details of the capture by the Allied forces of the important centre of Ngaundere, i in the Cameroons, some 150 miles south of Yola. On J nne 17 a mixed force, under Lieut.-Colonel Webb-Bowen, left Garaa for Ngaundere with the object of denying the latter place to the enemy. Nino days later at 5 P-iii. the column began to ascend to the Ngaundere plateau. After five hours' climb the advance guard, under Captain C. H. Fowle, came upon an enemy outpost. A tornado was raging, and this enabled the advance guard to approach within a hundred yards of the enemy before their advent was observed. A short, sharp engagement ensued, as a result of which the Germans ran. The column at once moved on to Ngaundere and occupied the place without fighting. The garrison bad cleared out in a hurry, and the line of their retreat was marked by the corpses of murdered prisoners still in chains. on the evening of June2iHbe enemy attacked the Allied force in Ngaundere, but was driven off, our losses being two natives killed and a few wounded.

MECHUmMO i

MECHUmMO. Recruiting has been fairly brisk lately, the follow- ing having enlisted since the sth inst.:— A J Edwards, R.E., Portfield. W Evans, R.W.F., Haverfordwest. i Wm. Richards, R. W.F., Haverfordwest. Albert Morgan, R.A.M.C., Penally. G Skone, A.S.C., Llangwm. W Reading, Labour Batt., Haverfordwest. A E Rees do do A Arran do do W H Edwards do do Geo. Furness do Nottingham. W Phillips, Public Schools Battalion, Dew Street. Jno. James, R.G.A., Walton West. E Jenkins, P.I. Yeomanry. I Morgan, Motor Transport, Haverfordwest. E Griffiths, do do Fred Day, do do W Reynish, Ordnance Corps, Haverfordwest. James Pearman, R.F.A., Brawdy. R Thomas, Ord. Corps, Freystrop. W Cousins, do do Jaraea Cole, R.E., Picton. j

LOCAL WAR ITEMS

LOCAL WAR ITEMS. Barker, the young recruiting sergeant who is now in the town, has bad a very extraordinary experience, and as a result of an explosion caused by the bursting of a shell in France was blown nearly twenty yards and when picked up was unconscious and deaf and dumb. He remained in this condition for nearly three months and when in hospital learnt the deaf and dumb alphabet. One night, however, he was attacked with excruciating pains in the chest, and in his agony made a superhuman effort to cry out. Great was his astonishment when in a paroxysm of pain his voice returned, and his yells of agony resounded throughout the ward causing the attendants and others the greatest surprise of their life. Since then Sergt. Barker has retained his faculties but he still bears the mark which a partly spent bullet made on his forehead, and on other parts of the body there are scars which the brave bov- sergeant will carry with him to his grave. Sergt. Barker has the cheerful optimsm so characteristic of Tommy Atkins, and he has already secured quite a number of recruits. Private Willie Drinning who has returned from the Dardanelles with a wound 6 inches long and 2 inches deep in the left thigh, is progressing as satisfactorily as can be expected, and is now being wheeled about in an invalid chair. He is an inmate of a military hospital at Manchester. Mr Evans, of Llwyngorras, who as a reserve soldier went to the Dardanelles, and was reported missing, has not since been heard of, and his rela- tives now fear that be has been killed. Mr Mark Thomas, of Rosepool Cottage, is the father of a very patriotic family. He has five sons serving with the colours, and the sixth endeavoured to enlist but was rejected because of defective eye- sight. Private Jack Merriman, vounger son of Mr and Mrs Merriman, Prendergast, is still missing, and his parents continue very anxious about him. Private Merriman was attached to the J 4th and was drafted to the Dardanelles. Mr C' G. Williams, Science Master at the Haver- fordwest Grammer School, has just been given a position in one of the High Explosive Factories, and has left the town to take up the appointment. Mr Williams bad been on the Grammar School staff for about 18 months. Private William Davies, late of Barnsley. who joined Kitchener's Army, is now in hospital suffering from gas poisoning and fever. Private Davies pre- vious to enlisting was employed with Messrs Williams Brothers, contractors, Prendergast. Lance Corporal George Pritcbard, of 82 Portfield, who recently joined the South Wales Borderers, is now on his way to the front. He writes to his wife to say he is the only Harfat boy in his regiment. Corporal George F. Shankland, eldest son of Mr George Shankland, Fishmarket Square, is in hospital suffering from a dislocated thigh. Corporal Shank- land is an old campaigner, and bad gone through the Boer War. When the present war broke out be joined the South Wales Borderers, and has been fighting in Flanders. He served his time with Mr Charles Codd, Quay Street, and is 41 years of age. Machine Gunner Tom H. Davies, of Merlin's Hill, and an uncle of Mr Ritchie Davies has just returned to Flanders after a brief visit to his friends. Gunner Davies has been in Flanders for ten months, and during that period has experienced many exciting incidents. In the trenches Gunner Davies met a gentleman from America who was acquainted with the proprietor of this journal, and who bad attended the Sealyham terrier show at Slade 18 months ago. When Gunner Davies met him he was doing the work of a private in the trenches, but be has since had a commission in the 4th Dragoon Guards. He went to France at biil own expense from America to do his bit for the old country. Gunner Davies bad completed 9 years' service in the Army and at the outbreak of war at once enlisted in the R.G.A. He has seen service in Malta, Hong Kong and other parts of the world. Two out of three of Gunner Davies' nephews are also with the colours. ———— There seems to exist some mystery in the case of William. J. Thomas, son of the late Mr Joseph Thomas, shoemaker, Barn Street. Thomas joined the A.S. Corps shortly after war broke out and was reported missing and as no definite information could be elicited his relatives concluded that he was dead. His sister, Mrs Daye, of Barn Street wrote to the authorities and has now received R communication stating that her brother is serving in the 151th company of the A.S.C. and that he would com- municate with her as soon as possible. U, p to the present however she has not heard anything further. Driver W. J. Morgans, 2nd Sec., 2nd D.A.C., British Expeditionary Force, France, writiug to the Telegraph on September 15th, says he bad just seen our issue of September Sth, and was grieved to find in it a letter from his cousin, Ben Owens, re- ferring to his brother, Levi's, death. He was much grieved that be did not live to receive the decoration for his brave deed, but his heroism would never be iorgotten by his townspeople. Driver Morgans further stated that he had worked underground in Glamorganshire with Levi, and had always fouud him a straight-forward good natured lad. The letter concludes, "When I read your paper it almost brought tears to my eyes, and all I can do is to express my deepest sympathy with my relatives in their sad bereavement." Mr and Mrs C. Griffiths, Plasterers Arms, Dew-st., have received a note from their son Harold, stating that be is quite well. He was sorry to say that his chum Walter Griffiths, and his cousin Stanley Bowen, had been killed. Their company had had a very rough time. He thanked his parents for their letter and the "Telegraph" which he was very glad to receive. Mr W. J. Hughes, formerly dispenser with Dr. Wilson, has joined the Army Service Corps—motor transport. He has beeen in France for the oast fortnight. Staff Sergeant Sidney Garrett, R.A.M.C., has just been home for a few days. He is now stationed at Winchester. Private Hugh Jones, High Mead, 4th Welsh, has come home for a few days leave. He has been in hospital suffering from the effects of a mule kick. Private Edgar Williams, yourger son of the Town Clerk, spent the week end on a visit to bis relatives. Private Williams is attached to the 18th Battalion Royal Fusiliers City of London Regiment which consists of public school boys. Prvt. George Green, son of Mr Fred P. Green is in the same regiment. We are glad to learn that Sapper Wylie, younger son of Mr Wylie, Relay Office, who was hit in the ankle with an explosive bullet at the Dardanells, is steadily improving. Bertie Jenkins, sonjof Mr T .F. Jenkins, Uzmaston, is a prisoner in the hands of the Turks. He was in the Australian contingent. Mr Jenkins emigrated in 1912, and previous to that date bad been employed in a large drapery establishment in London. He was with Mr Allen Thomas before be went to London.

Haverfordwest Boys Brigade

Haverfordwest Boys' Brigade 8TH ROLL OF HONOUR. Pte. Francis Davies. 1 4th Welsh, Merlin's Hill. „ T. R. Davies, 1,4th Welsh, White Hart, Hill Street. Jack Davies, 1 4th Welsh, White Hart, Hill Street. W. H. Drinning, 1 4th Welsh. Church Street. Willie Evans, 1 1th Welsh, hti, Prendergast. „ T. R. Edwards, 9th Batt. R.W.F., Dew-street. W. G. Gwilliam- 1 1th Welsh, Haylett cottage. -■ Willie Griffiths, 4 7th London Transport. Willie John, 2 nth Welsh. 23, Portfield. R. H. Jones, Australian Contingent. late High Street. Willie James, 7th Welsh Cycle Corps, 4fi, Citv Road. Sapper Willie Morgan, R.E., North Street. Edward Mitchell, R.H.A.. Bridge Street. Pte. W illie Noott, 1 4th Welsh, Perrott's Kew-road. .1 Levi Owen, 1 1th Welsh. Prendergast. Shoeing Smith Ben Phillips, Pemb. Yeomanrv, Mason's Arms. Trooper Hubert Thomas, Pemb. Yeomanrv. Dew Street. This list brings the number of old Brigade boys serving up to date-It;(;. Sergt.-Major Pearce would be glad if the parents, or old bovs themselves, would send in the names of those who they know had been in the Brigade and who are now doing their bit for their King and country.

Advertising

HOW TO MAKE YOUR OWN BREAD. Small delicious loaves and rolls can be made easily aud quickly by using B 0 R W I C K'S n A KIN G POWDER. Full directions on every package Obtainable at all Grocers. 17

THE NEW BUDGET

THE NEW BUDGET. Important and almost revolutionary changes in the system of national revenue were announced bv Mr McKenna in his Budget speech in the House of Commons yesterday. The 'principal changes in JI taxation are the foJIowmg Income-tax.-An increase of 40 per cent. on exist. I ing rates. The new minimum will be 2s Id in the f, and the new maximum 3s 6d. with increased super- tax in addition. The exemption limit is reduced from ri60 to X130. and the abatement is reduced from zEI60 to C120. Payments will be by instalments. I Farmers will pay on full rent assessment, instead of one-third, as hitherto Excess Profit Tax.—A new tax on pronts of industry and commerce amounting to 5u per cent. of the excess profits over the normal, to be calculated after income-tax has been assessed. Tea, coffee, chicory, cocoa, tobacco, and dried fruits.—Increase of 50 per cent. Sugar.—Tax raised from Is lOd to 9s 4d per cwt., but with little variation in retail prices. Beer and spirits.—No change. Import duties of 33,1 per cent, ad valorum on imported motor-cars, motOT-cycles, cinema films, clocks, watches, musical instruments, plate-glass, and hats. Motor spirit:Increase of 3d per gallon. Patent medicines.—Increase of 100 per cent. Post Office revenue.—Increase in telephone charges. Abolition of the half-penny postage. Reduced maximum weight for the penny letter postage. Higher scale of parcels post charges and postal-order commission. New minimum of telegraph charges—9d for first twelve words.

Advertising

THE I MEXICAN I HAIR RENEWER. I Do KOT LET GKEY HAIRS APPEAR. Restores Grey or White Hair to its original colour, where the glands are not destroyed. Pre- vents Dandruff, and the Hair from coming out. Restores and Strengtheng the Hair. IS NOT A DYE.

Haverfordwest Sessions i

Haverfordwest Sessions.! [The lortmghtly Pettv Sessions for the Haverford- I west Borough were held at the Shire Hall on Mon- day. the Mayor (Aid. T. H. Thomas) presiding, the other magistrates present being Messrs Wm. John, A. H. Saunders, John Evans and W. H. Reynolds. THE SUNDAY TRADER AGAIN. Amoe Amorette, refreshment house keeper, Bridge Street, was summoned for Sunday trading on September 5th and 12th. Defendant did not put in an appearance. The usual fine of 5s was imposed in each case. NO COLLAR. uuuu .jeuhius, larmer, Buillorci, was summoned for allowing his dog to be in St. Thomas Green with- out a collar on September 17th. P.S. Morgan stated the facts and said the defen- dant's son was with the dog. Defendant, who admitted the offence, and said he and his son bad tried to send the dog home, but failed, was ordered to pay a fine of ls. ) BLAMED THE GIPSIES. if llenry Jenkins, labourer, Lower Marsh, was sum- moned for being drunk and disorderly on Sept. (iLh. Defendant gaid he had had a drop of beer but was 1 not disorderly. P.S. Parry said he was in the Square at 5.45 p.m. when he was told there were some people fighting I on the Marsh. He proceeded there and saw defen- dant sitting on a wall near his house, in a drunken condition. There were some gipsies near, hut thev were sober. After a few minutes defendant got off the wall and on to the road. He was drunk, stagger- ing and shouting. Defendant admitted having had some drink, but said he was annoyed by the gipsies, and Bosweli struck him, felling him to the ground. While he was on the ground Boswell kicked him several times on the shoulder. After he had kicked him, Bosweli told his son to fetch a constable. He had not been able to work for a week after the affair. The bother started because he objected to Boswell's van being placed right up against his back door. I D.C.C. James Boswell did not make you drunk. Defendant No, but be knocked me about. Defendant was fined Is. DRUNK IX CHARGE. Robert Llewellin, Neyland, was summoned for I being drunk in charge of a horse in High Street. Defendant did not appear, but the Clerk said he I had called upon him on Saturday and had expressed I his sorrow, saying it should never happen again. I Fined 2s fid. n AFFILIATION. J J. ne .bench were occupied for a considerable time m hearing an a^ation summons against Bertie \W?' ilnli-ams, 17 (nipper on the G. W.R), 76 Prendergast, the compJainant being Clarice Miriam Owens (n.. 14 Jtepney Terrace, Prendergast. I The Bench made an order for 2s 6d a week, w?Lb I costs and advocate's fee. 1

I GOLDEN WEDDING I

I GOLDEN WEDDING- I Congratulations to Mr and Mrs Edward Eaton- Evans on their golden wedding which was celebrated on Sunday last. September 19th. Mr and Mrs Eaton- Evans were married at Llanstadwell Church on Sun- day. September 19th, 1«65. the officiating clergvman being the late Rev. Owen T. Phillips, vicar of Lawrenny, assisted by the late Rev. Peter Phelps. of Ambleston, who at that period was curate of Llanstadwell parish. The guests present at the wedding were limited entirely to the immediate relations of Mr and Mrs Evans. and the only sur- vivors of the wedding party so far as we have been able to ascertain are Miss Fortune, of Leweston. and Mr C. W. li. Stokes, of Tenby, brother of Mrs Evans. Mr and Mrs Eaton-Evans are. our readers will be pleased to learn, in the enjoyment of excellent health, and Mr Evans regularly walks in to town from Avallenau notwithstanding the fact that he is now in his sist year. The golden wedding was celebrated bv a very pleasant family re-union, those present being Mr and Mrs W. G. Eaton-Evans and their little boy; Mr aud Mrs C. S. Eaton-Evans, and a few other relatives. A puotographjpf the group was taken on the lawn, but Mr Eaton-Evans's aversion to publicity was exemplified in the stipulation that no copy should appear in the press and obedience to this wish precludes our illustrating this important event by I publishing a block of the auspicious gathering. I

No title

I THE LATE LIEUT. TOMBS. H.F.A. 1'.) the /Ù:Wor of the J/ilford RavIn Telegraph." Sill.I thought you would be interested in the enclosed cuttings from the "Liverpool Echo" and "limes with reference to the sad death at the front of Lieut. J. S. M. Tombs. R.F.A., eldest son of An .J. S. O. Tombs. late headmaster of the Grammar School. As an old Grammar School bov I recollect we were gin-eii a half-holiday on the occasion of his birth a good many years ago now During last Autumn, when he was serving with the Liverpool Scottish, some excellent letters used to appear in the CJIO written from the front bv Private Tombs as he then was. Yours faithfulh\ G. B. S, Li"cr¡,ool. Sept. 19th. The ljotice so kindly sent-bv our correspondent appears m another coluinii.-Ei,.

I New Wesleyan Ministers I

I New Wesleyan Ministers. I RECOGNITION SERVICE AT MILFORD I HAVEN. On Thursday evening the two new Weslevan ministers of the Haverfordwest circuit, Rev. Edgar J. Bradford (supt. Haverfordwest), and Rev. Henrv J. Barber, (Milford Haven) were welcomed at the Priory Road Wesleyan Church. It is a most unusual experience for the circuit to receive two new ministers the same year. The rev. gentlemen had already commenced their duties and been well received by the members of the connexion. Mr William Farrow the senior steward presided, and was supported by the ministers of the town. He said he was pleased to welcome their two new ministers Mr Bradford and Mr Barber. Thev bad received many ministers into the circuit and had always been glad to see them start their work. Some ministers in some places had heavy burdens because they were not supported but be was thankful to say that at Milford Haven there were willing workers who were ready to uphold the man who had come amongst them. Rev. W. H. Prosser bad pleasure in extending the hand of welcome to bis brethren, and hoped they would have cause to rejoice in being led to this sphere. Rev. D. Garro Jones said he had written a speech, but for pertinent reasons had kept it in his pocket. He expected to see a number of his own people present but they were not there and he had been making some ammunition for them (laughter). On behalf of his church however he was certain they were in loving sympathy with them and he came to give a hearty welcome to the new ministers. 1-tev. E. V. Tidman gladly responded to the invitation of the chairman to give a few words of hearty christian greeting. He was himself even yet somewhat of a stranger and had not taken the pulse of the place vet. Proceeding be said he had happy recollections of the Wesley brethren because he had much helpful service from them when be first began to preach, and to his friends Mr Bradford, and Mr Barber, on behalf ot his church at North Road be extended a hearty welcome. Rev. E. J. Bradford rising to respond to the words of his brother ministers said it had been a great pleasure to be received in this way and to have such kindly tbougbt shown them both in Haverfordwest and Milford Haven. He had a very kindly welcome in Haverfordwest and be felt the same here in Milford. He believed that the enthusiasm of the Church was overflowing and that they would support his friend Mr Barber in his ministry. Lev. H. J. Barber was the last speaker and said this was the most happy hour of his life. He had always delighted in his work and in coming to them he believed be was coming to a belpfui atmosphere and he felt that if he was not successful it would be his and not their fault. He concluded by again thanking them for their welcome and also his brethren in the ministry for their kind words. A happy gathering terminated with the benediction, by Mr Bradford.

n YLAND NEWS1i

n £ YLAND NEWS. DEATH OF MR. DAVID LEWIS, OF HAZELBEACH. The death occurred on Saturday of Mr Dauiel Lewis, of Hazelbeacb, at the ripe age of 81. The deceased had been bedridden for manv months. He wos employed for many years as a' shipwright in If-Al. Dockyard, and has been in receipt ot a pension since he retired from the Dockyard. He leaves one son, Mr George Lewis, a well-known local yachts- man and also a local preacher. DEATH OF AN OLD NEYLAND INHABITANT. fo We regret to record the death of Mrs Martin a former Neyland inhabitant, at the age of 40 Her husband, Mr Martin, was an engine-driver on the G.W.R. She leaves a husband and daughter to mourn her loss. i < WEDDING. A very quiet wedding took place at Llanstadwell Church on Sunday morning last at 8 a.m. The con- tracting parties were Mr Harry Roch, son of Councillor George Roch, and Miss Lilv Morgans, daughter of Mr Wm. Morgans, engine-driver. The Rev. D. L. Davies officiated. TEA AT WESLEY CHURCH. A" recognition" tea was held at Wesley Church on Thursday last. A large number of friends were present to meet the Rev. Thomas Rilev, of Pembroke. Dock, and the Rev. W. Wildblood, of Pembroke.. I SCHOLASTIC. We should have stated last week that Miss Chris- tiua Polhill bad passed the senior witb three dis- tinctions. Miss Winifred Mary Phillips is proceed- ing to Bangor Lniversitv in a fortnight's time. HARVEST THANKSGIVING. We understand that Hope and Bethesda. Baptist Churches both hold their harvest thanksgiving services on Sunday next.

Advertising

RELIEF FOR ALL. BROWN'S BRONCHIAL TROCHES. I IN THE SUMMER TIME when your THROAT is dry and irri. table, or if troubled with ASTH- MA, or a FIDGETY COUGH, you will obtain great relief if yon give these TROCHES a trial. The Lozenge for singers and speakers. 277

Milford Haven News

Milford Haven News. ARTIFICIAX TSKT3.—Edward England, Limited, now attends at Mr Mevler, Chemist, Charles Street, Milford Haven, every Monday. See large advertise- meut. Estimates free. English and American Artificial Toeth. Teeth fixed by the Company's Parent Suction, requiring no fastening. For articulation and eating they are equal to the natural teeth. Mu. J. H. LLEWELLIN, Hamilton Terrace, Qualified Ophthalmic Optician, is in attenduoe. daily, and will be pleased to give advice to anyone whose eyesight is defective; also to provide Spectacles (if such are necessary) after a thorough and careful testing. W W PRIORY ROAD PRIVATE SCHOOL, Principal-Miss Hodges. Autumn Term begins September 14. Lessons given in Painting.—ADVT. SUDDEN DEATH. A particularly sad and sudden death occurred on Saturday evening when a maiden lady Miss Morris living alone in Great -Vorth Road was discovered in her house dead. The deceased had been ill all the week, but was able to get about. Some neighbours were talking to her early in the evening but later on when some of her relatives went into the house it was found to be in darkness and the deceased was by the table dead. The doctor was sent for but of course life was extinct. Miss Morris was well-known as a laundress and was a faithful member and regular attendant at the Tabernacle Congregational Church. No inquest is to be held. NORTH ROAD BAPTIST CHURCH ANNIVERSARY. Successful anniversary services in connection with North Road Baptist Church were held on Sunday when the special preacher was the Rev. Benjamin Thomas, of Pembroke, late of London, whose first visit it was to the church. The rev. gentleman preached eloquent and timely sermons in the morn- ing at 11 and evening at 6. In the evening the con- gregation was especially large and preaching from 1st Cbron. 29, 9. Mr Thomas delivered an im- passioned discourse in which be cogently drew a parallel between the call and response to ;tbe servioe of the nation to-day and the need of the same response to bis hearers for sacrifice in Christian service. The services were continued on Monday evening when Mr Thomas again preached. The pastor, Rev. E. V. Tidman, also assisted in the service. Special anniversary offerings were taken on behalf of the Church funds and were in excess of last year. OUR BOYS' FUND". Relatives of the Milford men serving in Franoe or the Dardanelles are urgently asked to hand in with- out delay to the Council Offices, the names, regi. mental no, and regiment of such men, and at which of the above places they are serving. PICTURE PALACE. Tbe New Manager at the Robert Street Palaoe, Mr Hugh Phelps has had an encouraging start and we doubt not, the traditions of this popular bouse will be fully sustained under his guidance. Mr Phelps has had over :J»0 years' experience as manager at the Masonic Hall so that no one knows better the tastes of Milford folk in the matter of entertainment. This week a very striking melodrama For Love of the King" has been shown in 3 acts and concludes to-night. To-morrow night the second of the series of the serial" The Man who disappeared comes on, and last week's parts has whetted the appetite for succeeding parts. Next week's programme is announced in our advertisement columns' and is a particularly strong one. A pioneer exclusive "Tricking the Government" is as interesting as the title suggests. It is a southern drama dealing with the perilous work of customs officers and detectives rounding up the illicit whiskey stills, and a strong character study of a young girl's heroism in saving her lover is played by America's star picture artiste, Miss 'a-lent-ine Grant. This is a three-part film. It is to be accompanied by a two act drama, "The Painted Lady," the story of a sister's sacrifioe, featuring Miss Daphne Wavne and is a touching example of a girl's daring and devotion. In addition there are other films of comedy and education throughout the week. PATROL MAN'S BRAVE ACT. A deed by a naval reserve man which happened recently has only just become known and is worthy of notice. A number of children were playing on the Slip down on the beach when one of them, a little girl fell into deep water. Almost unnoticed a patrol man was sitting in a boat some distance away and he immediately jumped into the water and got to the child just as she was on the point of drowning. After she was brought round, the sailor went back to his boat to await his officers and convey them to their vessel. So modest was he that he would not give his name. NVADBROOK'S* CINEMA. There is a dazzling act on view at Wadbrook's Cinema, Market Square, this week. From time to time a nnmber of mystic performances have been introduced by the management which have set the town talking. Amasis is one of thp greatest of them, and is regarded as the King of Egyptian Wonder Workers. His performance certainly is a remarkable one. The company consists of seven, and the ward- robe and effects are stylish and pleasing. The whole act is an entertainment in itself. The picture side includes another absorbing series of the great serial, "The BlacK Rose" which runs up till to-night (Wednesday). To-morrow (Thursday) and for the remainder of the week a special exclusive is being shown. The Pearl of the Ganges" a wonderful production, the latest in annimal acting and Indian scenery. The usuai series of comedv films to form a first rate programme. Large houses" have again been recorded. BT—% MILFORD COUNT I SCHOOL. T'T_1J ['0 T.1.'1 jamroia \.7. neain, tne nephew of Mr John, printer, Charles Street, and Helena L. Oswell, eldest daughter of Rev. F. T. Oswell, have been successful in passing the Sgnior Stage of the C.W.B. in the subjects which are equivalent to Welsh Matriculation. Miss Oswell will proceed to Aber- ystwith College for training as a teacher, we wish ber a successful career. Mr Gilbert W. Skone is proceeding to Egypt for foreign service. MILFORD PORT SANITARY AUTHORITY. APPOINTMENT OF MEDICAL OFFICER. A special meeting of the Milford Port Sanitary Authority was held at the Lord Nelson Hotel, Milford Haven, on Monday morning, when there were present: Mr S. W. Dawkins (ohairman). Messrs Dan Davies, J. Rogers, Pembroke; J. Thomas, Lamnhey T. H. Thomas, Haverfordwest; J. Skone, Xeyland; T. Griffiths, Arnolds Hill; W. C. Jones, Waterston; J, T. Ll. Davies, W. E. Evans, C. T. BJetbyn, J. B. Gaskell, Milford kaven. The meeting was convened for the purpose of appointing a. Medical Officer of Health to the Authority, vacant by the death of Dr. W. S. Griffith. There were two applications-Dr. T, B. P. Davies Milford Haven, and Dr. H. 0. Williams, Milford Haven. The business was taken in committee, and Dr. Williams was appointed.

THE TELEGRAPH CIGARETTE FUND

THE" TELEGRAPH" CIGARETTE FUND. ADDITIONAL SUBSCRIPTIONS. i 6. d. Mr W. N. Hyde.? 0 I 0

APPROACHING EVENTS

APPROACHING EVENTS. Sunday, September 26th. Tabernacle Congregational Church anniversary services. Pre&ckar • Rev. J. Lloyd Williams, B.A., Tenby. Sunday, September 26th Anniversary Services at Penuel, Roach. Preacher, Rev. E. Laurance, Pope Hill. September 26 and 27.—Meilin's Bridge Weeleyau Chapel Harvest Festival. Sunday: Flower service at 11 Preaching services, :L;:iU and G. Preacher, Mr R Sinnett. Monday, Preacher, Rev. Mr Bran ford. October 3rd.—In consequence of the Taber- nacle Anniversary being fixed for Sunday next, the harvest thanksgiving services in connection with the Alba.uy Church have been postponed until the above date. Particulars to follow. October-League of Honour.-A speaker from headquarters will visit the town m October next. Particulars litter, 3^0 Sunday and Monday, October 3rd and 4th.-Marloes and Saudy Hill anniversary services. Preacher- The Rev. G. F, TausiU, Mardy, Glamorgan- shire. Order of services: Sunday, Marlon, 10.3U a m. ?udv Hut, (; P'm' Monday evening at Marloee, 7 o'clock. Sunday, October 10th.,—Harvest Festival Services at Bethesda Church.

Dates to be Remembered at Milford Haven

Dates to be Remembered at Milford Haven. October.—Grand sale of work at H&kin National Schools, particulars later. October 3rd and 4th.—Thornton Baptist Church harvest festival. Preacher Rev. J. W. EvaDi, (pastor ). Sunday, October 10th. Tabernacle Sunday school anniversary. Prencher: Rev. Griffith Evans, B.A. Swansea. Sunday and Monday, September 26th and 27_ th.—Wesleyan Church, Priory Road, harvest festival. Preacher: Rev. E. J. Bradford, Haverfordwest aad Rev. H. J. Barber. Sunday, September 26th. Rehoboth Chapel, Hakin, anniversary services. Preacher: Rev. W. P. Jones, B.A., Penffordd. Sunday, Oct. 3rd. The Harvest thanks. giving services will be held at Middlehill Congregational Church. Services at 10.30. 2.30, and 6.15 p.m., Preacher' Rev. Samuel Jones of Zion's Hill.

Family Notices

DEATHS. TOMBS. Died of wounds, received in Belgium, September 13th. Joseph Simpson McKenzic, Second-Lieut. 148th Brigade. R.F.A. (prcYiously Lance-Corporal. Liverpool Scottish), dearlv loved elder son of James b. 0. Tombs. M.A.. formerly headmaster of Haverfordwest Grammar School-

Advertising

w ■ B ■ n l| flavour. ■ I li Jl i | k II f-a-ia. 'ier fji rtt. H