Collection Title: Haverfordwest and Milford Haven telegraph

Provider: The National Library of Wales

Rights: The copyright status or ownership of this resource is unknown.

View full details

First Previous Image 2 of 8 Next Last
Full Screen
12 articles on this page
Advertising

The Six Cylinder Buick.' "I The 5 lx CYI in d r B uick I This famous Car gives soft and silent running at all speeds, and runs on top from f 4 to 50 miles an hour. There's no noise, no vibration, no fuss. It is an inexpensive Rolls Royce although the cost is only 9700. Delivery is not offered next decade < but NEXT MONTH, we have a 1920 Model and want to give you a trial run. J GREEN'S MOTORS, Limited, Haverfordwest. .f .<

THE RUT I

THE RUT. A SAILOR STORY. (By AUTACORE.) Old Harry muttered disconsolately, to him- self. It was 6 a.mi, the fire had burned lGw, and he replenished it from the near-by coal-box. A brief history of old Harry's life is necessary for the reader's peace of mind-no one could imagine Old Harry without some- thing of a description: You will notice that I invariably prefix the name "Harry" with the descriptive "Old"; again, no one could imagine the Harry of my story without that prefix. It was part of him. "Harry' rounds colourless and insipid and conjures up no memories of the Harry—Old Harry of my story. He was a pensioner—withal a naval pensioner; further, he was a MAN. He' looked about sixty; no man knew his real age; many knew that he had seen 70 summers; but few knew that his eldest son's age was fifty-five years. He was called "Old Harry" by virtue of his age. Not that hQ was in any way de- crepit; he was a fine specimen of an old man, medically plaoed in category one. His knowledge was profound; none but words of true wisdom ever passed those beard- shrouded lips-wisdom culled from life itself. In some things he was as a little child. I marvelled that a man should pass through a mighty Service, as Old Harry had done, and escape unscathed, for the pitfalls are many. Perhaps the clean life he had led accounted for his ripe old age and splendid virility. At the "day" in nineteen-fourteen he had been mobilised as a pensioner. 1His age did not exempt him from this. Reluctantly he left his little garden plot, unwilling to be taken from the rut along which his life had run smoothly with his advancing years. But, coming of Navy stock, his mind immediately embraced the possibility of his being useful, and he quickly adapted himself to his new environment. I saw him enter barracks, the faded uniform which had been treasured for years, well pressed, brushed by those dear fingers so long still, his collar adorned with two gold badges which told all passers- by his denomination. He relieved me in a certain responsible position. I immediately became on "draft," and, as I passed from ship to ship during the ghastly period we misnamed war, Old Harry gradually became a memory. Only his youngest daughter wrote to me. I have reason to bless the writer of those war let- ters; in convoy and patrol her face was ever with me—a loving guide and comfort. In Janury this year, when my destroyer reduced crew preparatory to he? being placed in the hands of those who would send the soul of the old boat on her long, last r'stuut," I returned to barracks and made my way to the room where I should pick up the threads of the job I relinquished in 1914-tbe "dushy" number. i found Old Harry there. He was in his element, and I was loth to usurp him in the capacity in which lie had served so well those war years. Given a subordinate position, I started again with Old Harry as' my com- inander-in-chief. To hark back to the commencement of this story: Old Harry mumbled disconsolately to himself. This 'in itself was strange; fie was rarely given to discontent. His i turning out at 6 a.m. was his usual custom. His mania for spotless paint-work and snow-white floors had never abated, and Old Harry always led the way with a "pu.sger's' I scrubber. But this par- ticular mprning he seemed a different Old Harry to me. As I looked into his face, I was shocked at the sight I saw. He was aged —I could swear be had aged during that night. Those eyes that had flashed so knowingly seemed pale and misty; his cheek- bones stood out with painful clearness; his gait was unsteady. What had wrought this change, I asked myself—,what had made a mere shadow of the fine old man of yester- day ? « A few hours later I knew the reason. I can imagine the thoughts that must have surged through Old Harry's hoary head- demobilised! Here was the crux of the whole matter. He had been pulled out of his garden-plot-rut and had survived the ordeaL The new rut suited him and he worked hard and conscientiously for over four years, giving his vitality unstintedly to his King and country. To be plucked from the new rut and placed back in the old was more than he could contemplate; he seemed to crumble up under the weight of the thought. I did not mention that I married Madge when I came home. Possibly Old Harry thought of this—his last child gone— what was there to live for? I • am firmly convinced that, 'had Old Harry stayed her. he would have still retained that steady hand and ocear eye, would have still turned on*. :»t 6 a.m. and showed the O.D. the best way to clean paintwork. Good-bye, lads, he said, when all his demobilizing troubles were over.. "Maybe I'n get a Q boat. I've been told often enough to get one He smiled grituiv N.d closed the door, and I think the door of his very existence closed then. f Oh! you who see the grey otd man with brass buttons and badgeless cap peticring about in his little garden, think as you look —and marvel! And oh. too, vou young sailer friends o' mine, as you observe the aged pensioner limp slowly by, think—think hard—before vou shout after him "Get a 0 1-.0:1t. old There are tiny cracks already opening up for you and me—ruts in the making. »

Mr W H John Kilmorey YH

Mr W. H. John (Kilmorey), Y.H. Nid oes eisieu anghydfod yn Solva mwy gan fod yna dri o ynadon hedd o fewn ychydig latheni i'w gilydd, sef Mr Samson Williams, Mr H. W. Evans, a Mr W. R. John, Mae Mr John wedi bod yn amlwg iawn ym inywyd yr ardal er's blynyddau, ao wedi bod yn dal cysylltiad ag Addysg am ryw bum mlynedd ar ugain. Wele restr o'l swyddi sy'n son am ei lafur a'i lwyddiant (yn yr iaith fain) Labour CjC., member of late School Board, ex-chairman of local school managers, chair- man of Dewsland War Savings Association, chairman of Agricultural Council Labourers' Union of St. Davids, Whitchurch, Llanrian, anti Trefgarn district, honorary member of North Pembrokeshire Discharged Soldiers' and Sailors' Association, ex-chairman and hon. member of Dewsland District Discharged Soldiers' and Sailors' Association, member of Pembrokesiiire Education Committee, mem- ber of local War Pensions Committee, mem- ber of Old Age Pensions Committee, governor of St. Davids Intermediate School, member of Haverfordwest Rural District Food Con- trol and Profiteering Committee, member of Appeal Tribunal Profiteering Committee for the County of Pembroke, a dyma fe bellach yn ynad Heddwch Dyna restr go faith o swyddi sy'n dweyd ystori ei lwyddiant yn groew iawn. Nid yn y swyddi hyn ý- iuae si ogotiiant pennaf. Nid am ei fod yn aelod a swyddog o'r pethau a nodais, ond am ei fod yn swyddog ac aelod ffyddlon o'r Eglwys Annibynol yn y lie, diacon ac ysgrifennydd, ac aelod o'r cwrdd gweddi, yr ysgol Sul, a phob cyfarfod yng nglyn a'r eglwys, Mae ei law, ei logell ei air a'i ysgrifell o blaid pob achos da yn yr eglwys a tliu allan iddi. Mae'n gymeriad diargyhoedd, yn bersonolia.eth swynol, ac yn gyfaill trwyadl. Gwyr sut it wneud cyfeillion, a'u cadw. Mae wedi "en- uill ei bÎwyf" ym mysg ei gydnabod, ac wedi cael anrhydedd yn ei wlad a'i ardal ei hun, a.'i frodyr a'i chwiorydd ef gyda ni. Ymbriododd a Miss Beatrice Harries. o'r un lie, Dilynodd ei "Beatrice," fel Dante y bardd, hyd ym mharadwys, He mae'r ddau er's blynyddau bellach, a dau ereill gyda hwynt erbyn hyn. Mae'n llwyddianus. iawn gvda.i grefft. fel argraffydd, ac nid oes a'i cura am droi allan waith chwaethus—"a thing of beauty." Mae'n barod ei feddwl, a. chyn baroted a hynny i'w fynegu—ei air ef a red yn dra buarn Pe dewiswn un gair i'w ddarlunio, riyma fe, MYND! Gwelir hyn yn ei gerddediad, a'i ysgogiad, a'i feddwl, ei air, a'i weithred. Mae wedi myn'd yn lied ddaed eto! Fel hyn y canodd hen gyfaill iddo: "Y llawen wr Ilonna'i wedd,—yn gwisgi Esgyn 1 anrliydedd; O'i wneud o yn ynad Hedd, Kilinorev sy'n cael mawredd.

A WATCHMAKERS EPITAPHI

A WATCHMAKER'S EPITAPH. Usually we do not print epitaphs, for most of those that are curious are in bad taste. But we make an exception in view of the in- genuity of this example, which appears above the grave of a watchmaker in Lydford Churchyard, on the borders of Dartmoor:— Here lies, in horizontal position, the outside case of George Routleigh, watchmaker. Whose abilities in that line were an honour .to his profession. Integrity was the mainspring, and prudence the regulator all the actions in his life, Humane, generous, and liberal, his hand never stopped till he had relieved distress. So nicely regulated were all his motions that he never went wrong, except when set going By people who did not know his key; Even then lie was easily set right again. He had the heart of disposing his time 30 well that his hours glided away in one continuous round of pleasure and delight, Till an unlucky minute put a period to His existence. He departed this life November 14th, 1802, Aged 57. wound up, in hopes of being taken in hand By his Maker, and of being thoroughly cleaned, repaired, and set agoing, In the world to come. <

Advertising

,I, II I. I I I' r'l VJ IS REMARKABLY NUTRITIOUS 1 TJECAUSE it is an all fat, pure c- | IB and refined dripping, rich in | vita mines, the most remark- | ? able of recent medical discoveries. | | Vitamines am absolutely ??n. 1 | tial to human growth and are = | only present in animal lat. aueb | | .a Brisco. Vegetable lata arc H devoid of them. | i Feed your chil- | | f dren on econ* I omiealBriseo- | | THEY LOYE IT h ,¡ I. r. Bi y 

I A Staggering Application

A Staggering Application. Milford Council Officials and their Salaries. WHAT THE TQWN CAN STAND, Milford Haven Council on Friday night granted a further increase of 5s. a week wages to their workmen. The men were entitled to this under an arbitration award. On. behalf of the officials there waa an ap- plication for an all round increase of salary. Thi9 so staggered the Council that except Mr Boutcher, who came with elaborately prepared statistics, members had little to say. Tjhe first application was from the National Amalgamated Labourers' Union for increased wages for their workmen. The Council were asked to give an increase of 10s. per week on present earnings, and were reminded that the wages fixed by arbitration were intended to be national in their application. The Clerk pointed out that the award pro- vided for an increase of 5s. per week, and Mr Boutcher moved that the 58 increase be granted. This was seconded by Mr Howell, and agreed to. The increase will take effect from the first pay day in December. SALARIES OF OFFICIALS. A communication was received from the Association of Local Government Officers dealing with a proposed new scale of salaries for the sta.ff of the Council. The letter pointed out that since 1914 there had been an entire re-arrangement of values, which had been met to a greater or less degree by war bonuses. Many councils were now re- vising the remuneration of their staff on a more permanent basis, and the following proposal would be found to be quite moderate having regard to the fact that the coet of liv- ing was to-day 130 per cent. above the nor- mal and the value of the sovereign about 7s 7d. The Council were assured that the desire of the offioers was for the folfeat co- operation with them in every way, and the hope was expressed that the' scale now sub- mitted would be adopted, and that if the Council had any hesitation in doing so a de- putation might be received in support. If the Council preferred that the decision should be given by an arbitrator appointed by the Ministry of Labour, the officers of the Council would be quite willing to abide by the decision. Appended is the scale sub- mitted for the Council's consideration:— Boys, clerks of 14, £39 a year. Boys of 15, 952. Grade A.—Boys of 16, £ 70. Boys of 17, R80. 18-19 years of age, £ 100. 20 years of age, £120. Grade C.—21 years of age, £160, increas- ing by £10 per year up to 31 years of age. Clerk to the Council, S:540 to £ 660 by £ 20 increase per annumi Gas and water engineer, 9565 up to £685, by zE20 increase per annum. Sanitary inspector and surveyor, 4:480. up to £ 600, by JZ20 increase per annum. Assistant clerk to the Council and collec- tor, £375 to £ 450, by L25 increase per an. num Assistant collector, £ 275 to £ 3o0, by an increase of £ 15 per annum. "Gentlemen," said the Chairman, that is what you have to Consider." Mr Boutcher asked whether the Council's officials accepted the basis of the demands that had been put forward. The Clerk (Mr Lewis): Most decidedly, speaking personally. Mr Morgan W. Howell said he understood that some time ago the Council increased the officials salaries in accordance with the Local Government Board scale, and he wanted to know what was the position now. Had there been any further communication from the Local Government Board? The Chairman replied in the negative. The Clerk: These. figures are sent on by the Association in London. Mr Hdtoell argued that the man. who re- ceived £4.. week was not affected by the increased cost of living to the same extent as the lower paid class. There was their carter, for instance, who had to keep a family on 30s a week. Under the latest in- crease he would go up to £3 10s. a week, and that was a reasonable increase. The salary of Mr Lewis, their clerk, had been advanced from £ 193 to £ 300 a year, which he also con- sidered a reasonable increase on the cost of living. The cost of living was the same now as when the last increase was given. Mr Boutcher: No. Mr Howell said there was very little fliffe- rence. Mr Boutcher replied that the Board of Trade fignres. had gone up from 115 to 130 per cent. Continuing, Mr Boutcher said the Council had a duty to the ratepayers as well as their employees. He realised the seriousness @f the position. There was no doubt that the present application was a big proposition. An arbitration. board had been sitting on the claims of the whole of tbe civil servants for a rise of wages owing to the increased cost of living, and that board found that the cost of living had advanced from 115 to 130 per cent. He had prepared some figures which he merely laid before the Council as suggestions, and as a basis for consideration, because, in common parlance, they might as well face the music first as last. For comparative purpose-, lie gave demanfls made on behalf of officials, their pre ent and pre-war salaries. The new demands amounted to i totnl sum of £ 2.679 per annum, equiva- lent to a rate of 4s. Oid. which. added to the £2,208 14s now to be paid to other employees, would mean a total rate of 7s 5d in the £ for salaries and wages alone. The amount paid in pre,war days was L895 12s 6d, equal to a Is 4d rate, and the present salaries ana wages represented a rate of 2s 6d. The last Government award made this month was:— Rate of bonus payable to persons over 16 years of age shall be increased 30 per cent. on their ordinary remuneration. Take first the case of Mr Lewis, the clerk. His pre- war salary was iEl93 2s 6d, and his present salary E300 and under the present award it would go up to 9310. He knew that civil servants were up in arms against the award, but for the "present they muit abide by the award. After considering the matter care- fully, he had taken the Trade Union rate asked for as a basis, and having regard to the fact that the lower paid men had need of a bigger proportional increase than the others in order to buy the necessaries of life he suggested the following deductions :—In the ease of the E100 man he had knocked off 10 per cent; £ 100 to L200 man, 20 per oent., 9200 to f.300 man 30 per cent., and in the case of the 9400 man he had knocked off 40 per cent. from the demand. In the present state of the country it was their duty to do without luxuries. Mr Lewis would get his Trade Union demand, less 40 per cent, which would make his salary £ 324, an increase of 924 on his present wages, and 914 on the Government award. Mr Calderwood was in a more unfortunate position. Before the war he received 1165; under the Government award he would be only entitled to £274. His present salary was £ 300; under his scheme it would be £339, an increase of £ 65 on the Government award. Personally he did not believe that the pre-war figure could be con- sidered as a basis for percentages for the simple reason that the pre-war figures were .not a fair criterion of the worth of a servant. Mr Morgan, the surveyor, received 9150 be- fore the war; his present salary was £ 242; under the Government award it would be £255, and under his scheme E288-rather a Dig increase, but they must be consistent and adopt the scheme as a whole; Mr Maurice's pre war salary was put down ftt E150, but th*t as tiie salary of his pre- decessot wasaboT???tS.??TetBMt?etf ?«'- sent salary was £ 180; under the Government award it would be £196, and under his scheme £ 225; an increase of £45. Mr Jones's pre- war salary was £ 95; present salary £165 under the Government award £ 183, and under his scheme he went up to 4:193, a net in- crease of £ 28. Mr Wilkinson's pre-war- sal- ary was t78--he believed the pre-war figu was really ;C55-hi.8 present salary was £ 122 ltts., under the Government award it would be £131, and under his scheme E136, an in- crease of £13 4s. As to Miss Manson, no demand was put forward for ladies. At present Miss Manson was getting £ 77; undei- the Government award she would get £ 92; and under his scheme L96. As to Y olland, the Government award did not really apply to anyone under 16 years of age. Under his scheme the former would get an increase of £ 14 10s and the latter X8. The Medical Offi'cer of Health he had advisedly left out of his calculations. The total increase under his scheme would come to E-z36 a year, and this, added to the increase granted to the workmen, would mean an additional 7d rate. The rate required to pay the salaries of officials before the war was Is 4d, at present it was 2s 4d, under the Govern- ment award it would be 2s 5d, and under his suggested scheme it would be 2s 8d. The amount spent on salaries and wage3 at pre- sent meant a 5s 2d rate, and under his scheme it would mean a 5s 9d rate. If the demands by the workers and officials were granted it would mean a 17s 5d rate. Mr Boutcher claimed for his scheme the merit of gradua- tion, and tried to meet fairly claims based on the increased cost of living. Mr Jones understood tha4 Mr Boutcher's figures were minimum figures, and that there would be future increments. Mr Boutcher replied that annual incre- ments would depend entirely upon the future cost of living. The Government had abso- lutely refused to increase wages, they had made what they called war bonuses, and the last award was a war bonus. The wages of civil servants were the same as before the war plus £ 60, plus 30 per cent., and it was all war bonus. When they came to consider increments next year they might find that the cost of living had gone down by 20 per cent. In further reply to Mr Jones, Mr Boutcher said that so far as civil servants were con- cerned a drop in the cost of living would be followed by a reduction of the war bonus. Mr Thomas suggested that thlt Council hold a special meeting to discuss the applica- tion. Mr Kelway said it seemed to him that the demands were altogether excessive, and lie thought a reply should be sent to the Asso- ciation of Local Government Officers to the effect that the Council could not consider the application until they were in a position to put forward something more reasonable. Af- terwards they might be able to enter into negotiations. The difference was so far apart—a matter of £ 1,000—that they could not hope to settle on "that scheme"—(pre- sumably Mr Boutcher's scheme), Mr Howell said that Mr Boutcher's scheme coincided with the views which he had put before them. He did not know that it was any use going to arbitration. Mr Boutcher said the Government had al- ready set up an Arbitration Court, and he had given their award. There could net be a different award by another court. Mr Jones thought that #seeing the civil servants were not satisfied with the Govern- ment" award, the Council could ho; the:1' hand until it had been settled. If the civq servants were a strong body they could force the Government to give a better wage, and (Qpotinaed at foot of next column). <

I A Staggering Application

(Continued from preceding column). then the Council could treat their officials the same. Mr Howell said the Council had a1 ready j giviii the officials a reasonaVc i:c: £ a;f, -aid when asked by the Local Government Board they would again fall into line. Mr Boutcher said they had got to be con- sistent. Under his scheme there would practically be 100 per cent, increase on pre- war rates. Mr. Howell: And undoubtedly as much as the town can afford. Mr Boutcher: I quite agree with that, Mr Yeandle supported the adoption of Mr Boutcher's scale. He honestly thought that officials and workmen should be satisfied. with it. Mr Meyler said that having regard to the great disparity in the figures he did not think the Association of Local Government Officers could accept Mr Boutcher's scale without sustaining a great loss of dignity and with- out attempting to get better terms. He agreed with Mr Kelway I views. Mr Kelway said the demands were quite exorbitant, and on his motion it w as decided to reply to the application to the effect that when the Associaion put forward a more re--i- sonable request the Council would consider I

I TRY THIS FOR PILES I

I TRY THIS FOR PILES. I Former sufferers gives the simple prescription received from & Harley Street specialist. This has avoided hundreds of operations. If you are afflicted with such painful de- bilitating and nerve-racking physical calami- ties as piles, haemorrhoids, pruritus, etc., you not only want relief from them, but you want the relief quickly-not to-morrow, next day, or week after next. Moreover, the pains and discomfort are not the only things to consider. You must remember that delay in adopting proper treatment always renders the cure more difficult in the end, and in some cases delay may even prove to be downright suicidal. When piles develop to a point where the tissues rupture and bleed- ing results, there is special danger of infec- tion and blood poiaouing. To keep the affected parts asoeptic or surgically clean is practically impossible. Sacs of pus form and eat their way through walls of the in- testine, until there is a false passage. Then you have a case of fistula to deal with, or even tumour, ulcers, cancer, and other complica- tions, Many of these are incurable, and defy even the best surgical skill, but the simple piles or haemorrhoids from which they de- velop may be cured with comparative ease. All you need is a tube of Nemolin, which any chemist can supply for only 3s. 6d., including a special applicator for internal piles. The manufacturers of this remarkable formula, which was originated by a famous specialist in rectal disorders, guarantee it to stop all aching, itching and burning within one hour, and to reduce all swelling and inflammation within six hours. Time required for a com- plete cure, of course, depends upon the severity of the pileø, but the healing action of Nemolin is extremely rapid, and one tube is usually sufficient for the average case.

I WISTONI

WISTON. I Obituary.—We regret to record the death of I, Mrs. Rees Owen, of Th Cottage, which took < lady was the daughter of jth' e la7te 1»«rtirnn

Fishguard Council

Fishguard Council Mr. David Rees, J.P., 0.0., presided at a meeting of the Fishguaxd Council on Monda.y evening, when the other member present were: —Messrs. W. J. Vaughan, B. G. Llewholin, J.P., C.C., J. R. Richards, John Evans, E. Darvit-b, O. D. Jones, M. B T. Maurice, and J. Philips. CHRISTMAS MARKET. It was resolved that this year's Christmas Market should be held on Monday, Dec. 22nd. PROFITEERING TRIBUNAL. The Clerk (Mr Hodges) mentioned that he hed received a letter from Mrs. O. D. Joneli resigning her seat on the local Profiteering Tribunal owing to pressure of other work. Mr. B. Q. Llefhelin also stated that as he had been appointed on the Appeal Tribunal for the county he could not very well sit on the local tribunal, and wished to tender hia resignation. On the roposition of Mr. Maurice, seconded by Mr. B. G. Llewhelin, Mr. J. R. Davies, Ptm- slade, was appointed. in the place of Mrs. O. D Jones, and Mr. Enoch Davies, proposed by Mr. J. R. Davies and seconded by Mr. Maurice, in the place of Mr. Liewhielin. ANNUAL AUDIT. A letter was read from the auditor expressing satisfaction with the accounts for the year ending 31st March last, and it was resolved that a hearty vote of thanks be accorded to Mr- i O. D. Jones for the valuable assistance he had j rendered in the preparation of the accounts. i REPORTS OF COMMITTEES. j Arising out of the reports of committees, the ] council expressed thanks to Mr. Vaughan for his offer to supply stones free of charge for the proposed winding at Brynymor. The high- ways committee is to inspect the road and reort. In the event of the Penslade Improvement 3 Committee consenting to nominate seven per- > sons to co-operate with an equal number of v the council to form a Town Improvements' S Committee, the following were appointed to represent, the council:—Messrs. Llewhelin. Vaughan, J. Phillips, M. B. T. Maurice, J. R. Richards, W. L. Williams, and Francis George, with the Chairman and Survepor ex-officio. J t ¡;;anit- Committee, the coune are t ma-e inquiries whether moneys can be advanced to owners ot dwelling houses in order to make the houses habitable, and Sir Evan Jones, M.P., is to be invited to meet the council to discuss the housing question as ib affects Fishguard. On the recommendation of the Finance Com- mittee, the Council repeated its protest against the amalgamation of Fishguard with the rural district for fuel overseership purposes. EMPLOYMENT OF SCHOOL CHILDREN. Mr. J. Phillips said that on Wednesday week he was standing on the square about a quarter to twelve when he saw two motor-cars passing driven by two local gentlemen. On thecal's were two little lads, taken from the schools, to go out shooting for the day. On the following Friday and Monday the same thing happened except that on the latter occasion only one gentleman went with two little boys and three or four dogs. The boys were of school age. -Air. Llewhelin, speaking as a member of the Education Committee, said that if Mr. Phillips would submit the names of those gentlemen who took those boys away from school to the Education Authority the gentlemen concerned would be immediately prosecuted. The Chairman thought Mr. Phillips had done his duty in bringing the matter forward. NO WATER. Dr. Hawkins complained that the water sup- ply had been cut off that day without notice, and several members said they had been incon- venienced. On a satisfactory explanation being- given by the Chairman, the matter drppped.

ST DAVIDS

ST. DAVIDS. Horticultural Show.—A committee meeting in connection with this show was heldØt the Reading Room on Monday evening week, when there were present:—Messrs. W. D. Williams (chairman), T. Lewis (joint secre- tary), H. G. Owen (treasurer), D. Price, Di. Jenkins, Heth M o rris, J. Thomas, and J. Morris. Mr Jenkins stated that fifteen per- sons had consented to become vice-presidents of the show. A letter was read from Mr. Evan T. Davis, M.A., Director of Education. in which he stated that Mr, J. G. Watson, horticultural lecturer, of the University Col- lege of Wales, was available for delIvering, lectures in the county during the nwnth. It was unanimously resolved to apply for his J services, the date of holding the lectures t? | be fixed later.—The next business was to 1 draw out a schedule of the exhibits, and it was decided to ha.ve tUree classes-Class A., ?! open-flowers, cut nowers. and vegetables Class B (amateurs only)—nowers, cut flowet-. 1 fruit and vegetables; Class C (for cottagers) -flowers, fruit and vegetables. Prizes are also to be given to boys and to girls for the best bouquets of wild flowers. It was also decided to have exhibits in eggs, butter, and cheese. The date for holding the show was fixed for Wednesday, the 11th August, 1920. On the proposition of Mr. Jenkins, seconded by Mr H. G. Owen, it was unanimously re- solved that Mr. D. B. Miller-Williqnls be nominated a Fellow of the Royal Horticul. tural Society. j Î

Advertising

( THERVS A LONG, LONG TRAIL \? Bu g s, Fleas, Flies, B t ?' BMiles, Mosquitoes B < t?? etc.,a//M/??jy KEATIN$'S ef 1 ??-?.?M.??   r  '?—?'-sse??