Collection Title: Abergavenny Chronicle

Provider: The National Library of Wales

Rights: This resource is the copyright of the Tindle Newspapers

View full details

First Previous Image 2 of 8 Next Last
Full Screen
35 articles on this page
I OUR LONDON LETTER I

I OUR LONDON LETTER. I [From Our Special Correspondent.J I Workers are still wanted for munition making; the supply of skillful and unskilled men and women is not nearly equal to the demand. There are no doubt large numbers of men and women with much or little I lefeure time who would be only too glad to help the country in this way if only they knew how to set about it. The Ministry of Munitions desires to encourage this form of assistance by every means in its power. A certain degree of training is necessary, of course, before the novice can be of any u^e, and, by arrangement with the Board of Education, fifty-seven of the chief technical institutes of the country are giving specialised courses for munition workers. Already about ten thousand men and women have been trained in these institutes, and many more are required. Those who wish to undertake the work should be able to obtain information at the nearest technical institute. The plan of the authorities is to make the pupils specialists in one operation, and it is stated that constant repetition in making one particular part of a shell or cartridge soon enables a person to become highly efficient in that operation. The tuition is free. As the resources of many technical institutes are already severely taxed, it is proposed that facilities for training new workers should be provided in the national factories and the controlled establishments. An attempt is being made to work up an agitation about the defences of London against hostile aircraft. It is stated that they are still inadequate, though it is about four months since Sir Percy Scott took them in hand. There have been news- paper articles calculated to make our flesh creep, and the writers warn us that the next attack will be made on a much bigger scale than any previous ones, that the Zeppelins will be much larger and fly much higher and faster than ever before, and that they will be accompanied by giant aero- planes which, for some reason or other not very clear, the writers declare are even more to be dreaded than the Zeppelins them- selves. And to cap it all, we are warned that the air raiders may come in daylight. Why that should be considered probable is not altogether apparent, for, if daylight (rould increase the power for mischief of the air murderers, it would also make it pos- sible for our airmen to attack them, and one may be quite sure that they would wel- come the opportunity. The daylight warn- ing has caused quite a. lot of excitement among junior clerks and office boys, who are hoping that one of these days when they go out for lunch they may witness the thrilling spectacle of "airy navies grappling in the central blue." So far as the de- fences of London are concerned, the allega- tion that they are being neglected is en- tirely unfounded. The general public, of course, knows nothing about the matter, and the writers of the articles referred to know no more, but it is the general opinion among experts that Sir Percy Scott has done excellent work during the last four months, and that when the Zeppelins come again they will get a much warmer recep- tion than they ever had before. It is a little difficult to understand why some people should be so much perturoed about those "traitor peers," the Duke of Cumberland and the Duke of Albany, re- maining in the British peerage and on the roU of the House of Lords. They are German Princes, they have never sat in the House of Lords, and even if they have ever wished to do so, they would cer- tainly not be allowed to do so now. The House of Lords would presumably be a He to keep them out even if it is difficult to de- prive them of their British peerages. British peerages, it appears, when once created, go on for ever and ever so long as there is an heir to succeed. It may, however, be for- feited by. attainder, but to put the whole of tap machinery cf Parliament in motion for such a purpese, and to summon the delin- quents to appear before the House of Lords to answer the charge of high treason, to find them guilty, and to deprive them of privileges which they will never be able to exercise, seems to border on the farcical. For all that, they certainly ought not to be in the British peerage, and it seems rather abeurd, in the circumstances, that some more summary method of getting rid of them cannot be devised. An interesting Parliamentary event is the formation of Committees to secure the more vigorous prosecution of the war. There are two Committees, one Liberal and one Unionist. Prominent in each are members who have been among the strongest and most insistent critics of the Government. Each of the Committees has already some- where about a hundred members. The chair- man of the Unionist Committee is Sir Edward Carson, and Sir Frederick Cawley, who has lost two sons in the war, is Chair- man of the Liberals. With him are associ- ated Sir Henry Dalziel, Sir Arthur Mark- ham, Mr. Handel Booth, Sir Alfred Mond, and other well-known Liberals, including Mr. Ellis Griffith, whose powerful speech on the second reading of the Compulsion Bill made a great impression. A highly interesting feature in the pro- gramme of the Queen's Hall Symphony Con- cert on Saturday afternoon was Cesar Franck's Symphonic Variations" for pianoforte and orchestra, a work of such attractiveness that it is surprising it should be so seldom heard. The solo was very finely played by Mr. William Murdoch, the bril- liant Australian pianist, who, by the way, was wearing a Derby armlet. There were no novelties in the programme, that being the present policy of the management, but, judging by their numbers and enthusiasm, the audience were very well pleased. They had reason to be, for the "Unfinished" Symphony, and Beethoven's No. 8 were in- cluded in the scheme, to say nothing of Elgar's Cockaigne," and Wagner's "Rienzi" Overtures and the Capriccio Bspagnol," by Rimsky-Kqrsakov. In all the works the perfect understanding between band and conductor was very noticeable, and the performance thoughout was up to the standard of artistic excellence which Sir Henry Wood and his orchestra have taught us to expect from them. Now that compulsory military service is declared necessary, there are some people who say that the Government ought to bring in a measure for compulsory thrift. It does seem as though the oft-repeated counsels to the public on the subject of economy have fallen on deaf ears. There are certainly very few indications apparent to the ordinary observer that Londoners or visitors to London are spending any lees than they do in normal times. Restaurants and theatres are always full, and many of the- latter are booked up for weeks ahead. Week-end motoring seems to be as popular as ever, and altogether people seem to be making the money fly. It would not be sur- prising if Mr. McKenna were to decide that these who have so much money to spend on pleasure should be compelled to lend it to the Government. A. E. M.

No title

A proposal to give the teachers a war bonus of .£10 a year—the total being esti- mated at X6,,900 a year—to meet the in- creased cost of living has been rejected by the Carmarthenshire Education Committee.

PRESIDES AT MEETING OF WAR PENSIONS COMMITTEE

PRESIDES AT MEETING OF WAR PENSIONS COMMITTEE. The Prince of Wales on Monday under- took his first work of a public character in presiding at. the first incctiii- of the Statu- tory Committee set up to administer the naval and military war pensions. He also delivered one of his first public speeches at St. James' Palace. In his speech the Prince said "It was with feelings of much diffidence that I accepted the Prime Minister's invita- tion to be the chairman of this important committee, which ha, been created by Act of Parliament, for it is the work of a public character which I have undertaken. "At the same time, it is most gratifying to me that I am considered worthy to pre- side over this distinguished and representa- tive body empowered to deal with a matter of such deep national interest as the pen- sions and allowances granted not only to those who have been engaged in this, the greatest war the world has ever seen, but also to their wives, their families, their widows and dependents. "My dear father and other members of my family are to-day, as in the past, per- sonally identified with all schemes for the welfare of sailors and soldiers, and I am proud to follow their example. "It has been my good fortune for some months to be associated with the daily life of our Army at the Front, and the experi- ences thus gained will leave imperishable memories of the dauntless courage and cheerful endurance of all ranks. "It is satisfactory to know that we shall be able to deal sympathetically with cases of widows and dependents of soldiers who may need more individual treatment than can be given under the necessarily some- what rigid system of Government Depart- ments. "It must be our endeavour to save those who have answered their country's call from the drea d lest, should their lives be sacrificed, their families will suffer serious hardships or any material lowering of the standard of life. "Under ite Act we shall not only be authorised to supplement in exceptional cir- cumstances the scale of State pensions, but also to take into account the position of dependent persons not hitherto recognised by the State." Referring to substantial pensions for dis- abled men, the Prince said: "Our special duties will be to initiate schemes of train- ing and means of finding employment, and thus enable them to feel that they are still active members of the community."

SOLDIERS AND DRINK I

SOLDIERS AND DRINK. I During the hearing of a charge of drunkenness against a soldier at Northamp- ton 011 Saturday, Captain Dyer, 14th Essex Regiment, who paid the soldier's fine, said, as the officer commanding the battalion, he wished to call the Court's attention to the way in which landlords of licensed houses gave drink to men after they were in a state of drunkenness. On Friday he called the attention of one landlord to the state of his bar parlour, which was full of drunken soldiers. He knew they were drunk, but still served them. The soldier was at present a national pet, and he believed that what occurred was often more the fault of the givers than the receivers.

A DRIVERLESS TRAMCAR I

A DRIVERLESS TRAMCAR. I Sixteen persons were injured in a remark- able tram accident at Dudley on Sunday. A double-decked car carrying about thirty passengers in the Wednesbury direction was started from the Dudley terminus, and travelled a quarter of a mile without the driver before the discovery was made' that the driver was not on the platform. The car had by this time got up a good speed on a slight gradient, and before the con- ductor could get to the brakes from inside the car the vehicle jumped the points, tore up the roadway for ten or a dozen yards, and then overturned. Two men were seriously injured.

LONDONS DARKEST STREET I

LONDON'S DARKEST STREET. I "Accidental death" was the verdict re- turned by a City of London coroner's jury on Saturday in the case of William Gardi- ner, of Hague-plaoe, Bethnal Green. The man was fatally injured by a tramcar in City-road, London, E.C., and a witness de- scribed the thoroughfare as "the darkest street in London." A police constable said he thought the street should be better lighted at night-time and some of the jury wished to add a rider that the streets of London, especially the main thoroughfares, should be better illumi- nated. As the rider was not unanimous it was not accepted.

A GUNNERS BRAVERY I

A GUNNERS BRAVERY. I At an inquest held at Coventry on Satur- day concerning the death of Charles Thomas Smith, aged seventy-four, who threw him- self into the Coventry Canal, the story of an heroic rescue by a soldier was related. Gunner James Hornsey, R.G.A., was near the canal when he heard shouts for help, and though he could not swim he plunged straight into about nine feet of water and succeeded in getting Smith to the bank, but the old man subsequently died. Deceased had a weight of seven pounds tied to his waist. The coroner expreseed the highest commendation of Hornsey's gallant action.

RECRUIT COMMITS SUICIDE I

RECRUIT COMMITS SUICIDE. I An inquest was held at Exeter on Satur- day on Walter Fry, a single man, aged thirty-sis, who, it was stated, drowned him- self because he was only accepted for garri- son duty in the Army. Police-sergeant Banbury pioduced a letter found on the man, in which he said, "Good- bye, I have had enough of this life. They I have only joined me up for garrison duty." A verdict of "Suicide whilst of unsound I mind" was returned.

GERMANYS LOST SUBMARINES I

GERMANY'S LOST SUBMARINES. I Speaking on Saturday at the Holborn Restaurant, London, at a dinner of the British Hotel, Restaurant, and Club Em- ployes Society, Mr. Horatio Bottomley said Germany had sent out a hundred sub- marines to harass mercantile marine and terrorise pea. lir citizens on the seas. Everybody who ik the position to-day knew that eighty fcht of those hundred submarines were lying at the bottom of the sea.

MASSACRE OF ARMENIANS I

MASSACRE OF ARMENIANS. I Lord Bryce has received the following telegram from an Armenian known to him, who went from ifngland to help his country- men. Dated Erivan, January 10, it runs: "Refugees just arriving from Mush state in answer Government amnesty 1,500 Sassun Armenians, forced by famine, cold, surren- dered authorities end November. By order ] Governor, Mush men massacred, women, children drowned Euphrates." The telegram seems to show, it is stated, the final destruction of unfortunate Arme- nian peasantry, who had fled to the moun- tains to escape massacres. They were of the manliest and most secluded part of the Armenian nation, leading a quiet life in their Temote valleys.

No title

Coal shipments in the Tyne last year were 3,400,000 tons less than in the previous year, but coke shipments increased by 39,000 tons. Sheffield's tramway receipts show an in- creased profit of Y,11,884 for the half-year, and it is estimated that they will rise to J220,000 for the year. Giving evidence in a case at Leeds, when two men were charged with embezzling, a detective-inspector said that he hid himself over a pay-box cf the Empire Theatre be- tween the ceiling and the false roof and watched the defendants for seven honts.

TERMS OF SURRENDER TO AUSTRIA

TERMS OF SURRENDER TO AUSTRIA. Following on the fall of his capital, I Cettinje, King Nicholas of Montenegro haa entered into negotiations with Austria. The victors have declared that the first condition for negotiations must be the un. conditional surrender of the Montenegrins, and the laying down of arms by the sol- diers. The country will be systematically searched to render impossible the formation of guerilla bands. Afterwards all males will be deported. In a message from Rome the correspon- dent of the "Daily Telegraph" says the newspapers there are full of the news from Montenegro, and the developments there are the theme of constant discussion in the clubs. It must be admitted that, for a fort- night past, grave doubts have been enter- tamed as to the action of Montenegro, be- cause English and French officers who arrived here from Serbia openly declared that very soon there would be a separate peace between Montenegro and Austria. It had been noticed that the Montenegrins did not trouble themselves to take over the equipment sent by the Allies and brought to Antivari by Italian ships. Thus the news of the capitulation produced much grief but no surprise, having been fully foreseen. It was known in Italian diplomatic quar- ters that for forty years King Nicholas had dreamed of the possession of Scutari as his capital. When at length he did occupy that place Italy discerned that the opposi- tion of Austria to the act was a sham, and that in reality the Ballplatz approved. Thenceforward to Italy it was clear that Montenegro could not be counted on in the hour of the Allies' adversity, and she could not send troops to defend Mount Lovchen to a country which would not have agreed; to the despatch. There is, however, no bitterness herEt: against Montenegro. It is recognised that King Nicholas's aim has been to save his country, and the view taken is that the fate of Serbia drove him into the camp of the Austrians. The hope, however, is enter- tained that the day of the Allied victory will bring a rapprochement between Montenegro and the Quadruple Entente. Much stress in this connection is laid upon the relations between King Nicholas and his daughter, who is Queen of Italy. According to the information in Rome the capitulation of Montenegro involved a formal peaco with the Central Empires, who pledged to her the possession of Scutari as her capital, since as Lovchen, which domi- nates it, is in Austrian hands Cettinje could no longer occupy that petition.

LANCASHIRE DOUBLE INQUESTI

LANCASHIRE DOUBLE INQUEST. I A double inquest was held at Wigan on Tuesday on Jane Morris, the seventeen year old mill girl, who was found strangled on waste land near the centre of the town on January 11, and William Kearsley, an eighteen year old colliery drawer, who was found drowned in the Leeds and Liverpool canal at Wigan on Monday. Kearsley had been wanted by the police in connection with the affair. Alice Kay, the dead girl's companion, stated that after attending a dancing class together Kearsley met them, telling the witness to go, and adding that Jennie, with whom she left him standing on the market square, was not going home that night. In the case of the girl a verdict of "Wilful murder" against Kearsley was re- turned, and in the case of Kearsley a verdict of "Suicide."

CLERGYMAN SUMMONED I

CLERGYMAN SUMMONED. I A lady on Tuesday asked Mr. Hedder- wick, the North London Police-court magis- trate, for a summons for assault against her husband. Observing that the applicant was a woman of education, the magistrate suggested that the matter might be ar- ranged without an appearance in court. "Suppose" he added, "I send the mission- ary to see him?" The Applicant: My husband in a clergy- man. Mr. Hedderwick: It is not much use send- ing a missionary to talk to a clergyman. There might be a fracas. I don't know who would come off best. You may take a sum- mons for assault.

FATAL SHELL EXPERIMENT I

FATAL SHELL EXPERIMENT. I A shell which had been brought from France was being experimented with at the ironworks of Messrs. J. and F. Howard, Bedford, on Tuesday, when it exploded, causing the immediate death of two men and two boys. The names of the dead are: John Wildman. David (or Donald) Francis, George Trueman (aged sixteen), and Arthur Farrington (aged seventeen). Wildman and Francis were married. Herbert Papworth was injured, and is now lying at the County Hospital. It is stated that the explosion occurred as John Wildman, who was an old soldier, was in the act of sawing through the shell, which had been brought from the battlefield by an employee of the firm.

DEATH OF SIR A SCOBLE I

DEATH OF SIR A. SCOBLE. I The Right Hon. Sir Andrew Scoble died at his residence, Chivelston, PaTkside, Wimbledon Common, on Monday night, in his eighty-fifth year. Sir Andrew Scoble was born in London in 1831, and was edu- cated at the City of London School. Called to the Bar at Lincoln's Inn, he went to Bombay as Advocate-General, and later became a member of the Legislative Council. Returning to this country, he was from 1892 until 1900 Conservative member for Central Hackney. In 1899 he was a Treasurer of Lincoln's Inn, and after leaving Parliament was a member of the Judicial Committee of the Privy Council.

BLIND GIRL READS I

BLIND GIRL READS. I At the North London Police-court on Monday a girl of fourteen, who had been certified by the Education Committee's doctor as blind, proved that she could see by reading fluently from a newspaper in court. The mother bad been summoned for not sending the girl to school, under the Act of 1893, which makes it obligatory to send a blind child to school up to the tge of six- teen. It appeared that the child had re- covered her sight under treatment at the Great Northern Hospital subsequently to her examination by the doctor. The sum- mons was dismissed.

PRIVATE SIR J ODONOHOEI

PRIVATE SIR J. O'DONOHOE. I Sir James O'Donohoe enlisted on Tuesday as a private in the 10th Dublin Fusiliers, his object being1 to aid recruiting in Ireland. Sir James O'Donohoe was knighted by King Edward when his Majesty visited the city. Sir James is a member of the urban council, a harbour commissioner, and a Poor Law guardian.

ESCAPED GERMANS RECAPTURED I

ESCAPED GERMANS RECAPTURED. I August Boykneyer and Karl Grattrnam, the two German eeamen who escaped from Oldcastle, co. Meath, on Saturday, have been recaptured at Rathowen, co. West- meath. They were in disguise and were making their way to the port of Galway or Derry.

No title

A seagoing engineer named John Briggs was at Southampton fined £ 20 for being absent from his ship without leave. Captain the Hon. W. F. Forbee-Sempill (Master of Sempill), R.F.C., Special Re- serve, has been entered as a flight com- mander for temporary service, says the "London Gazette." "Pneumonia causing asphyxia" was found at the inquest recently at Paddington to be the cause of death of Private Joseph Murphy, thirty-five, Loyal North Lanca- shire Regiment, who died when returning to the front on Saturday.

DEVASTATION FOLLOWS BURSTING OF THE DYKES

DEVASTATION FOLLOWS BURSTING OF THE DYKES. Enormous damage nas been caused in Holland by the bursting of the dykes, which has let in the sea over a great area of the country north of Amsterdam. The disaster is the worst since the great floods of 1825. The island of Marken, in the Zuider Zee, has been swept by the sea. In a message to the "Daily News" from Rotterdam, a corre- spondent says:- Communication -with the island by boat has not been affected, and we know that six- teen people have lost their lives in the floods, cattle have been swept away, that the wrecks of the picturesque old fishing craft lie piled up on each other in the harbour, and the remaining inhabitants peer out from their attic windows upon an immeasurable waste of angry grey water. Eight bodies have. so far, been recovered. When the fierce north-weet gale drove the sea down into th3 Zuider Zee the water came like a tidal wave, casting into the sea the walls of the mainland, and mounted the dykes of Marken on all sides. No boat could have got people off in time, and, leav- ing the cattle to its fate, men and women climbed to the attics of their dwelling or perched on piles, fearing the worst, but hoping that the skilful work of their fore- fathers would hold against its ancient enemy. It is a tribute to the Dutch engineers that eyery soul on the island is not lost. As it is only four houses escaped damage. Every- one is still in danger, and it is not impro- bable that more lives have been lost. In the mad rush of the waves solid fishing-boats were smashed like tinder; two small vessels were lifted on to the roofs of a group of houses, wrecking the dwellings and drown- ing the inmates. From the meagre details at present available we learn that in one of them a man, his wife, and two children were drowned. In another house, which was crushed, eight people clambered from beam to beam as the house settled down, and last of all clung for dear life to the rafters, screaming for help that could never come. As their strength failed they dropped into the swirling waters one by ono and were borne away, the beam still pointing up- wards as a mocking monument to their struggle for life. In another house the three daughters were surprised in their beds, and Marken beds are like huge cupboards, the children sleep- ing on the no"r. the parents on an ample Ipng-c ahove. Their bodies have just been discovered, the girls locked in each other s arms. When the house cf Claes De Waard was washed off its foundations a woman was last seen screaming from a top window for help. Everyone in that household is miss- ing. The liouse was carried over one hun- dred yards, then struck another and was wrecked. Happy Marken, once the joy of tourists, is one huge wreck. While no loss is reported from mainland floods, they are far more extensive, and the financial loss is enormous. All land in and around the Dead Cities of the Zuider Zee- Edam, Volendam, and Monnikendam—is under the sea. THE ALARM BELLS. I The Amsterdam correspondent of the "Daily Chronicle says that immediately the danger became known, all the bells in the church towers in the threatened regions were set sounding the alarm. Knockers-up went from door to door throughout the vil- lages and farms, warning the inhabitants. Bands of men and women rushed from the villages to collect the cattle. Landstrum men were soon marshalled and joined in the work of rescue, and in a short time the roads were crowded with droves of cattle and laden wagons on their way to the neigh- bouring towns. It was no easy matter to gather in the horses, which seemed to be aware of the peril and were mad with fear. Many cattle fell into the dykes alongside the road, but immediately there were scores of willing hands to pull them out. On arrival of these large masses of cattle, horses and pigs in the town, it was, of course, quite impossible to sort them out according to their owners. But Dutch honesty is pro- verbial, and no complaints have been heard or are exoeetcd. A large part of the inun- dated regions can even now be reached only by motor-boat. In many places such as Brosk and Water- land (near Amsterdam) the alarm was given too late. There was a sauve-qui-peut. Scores of people had to break through the roofs to escape from their houses and re- mained islanded among the chimney pots until they were saved by boats. Many were forced to climb the trees and telegraph Sosts. A vast number of cattle have been drowned. Hundreds of corpses of pigs and sheep are floating about. Families saved themselves by constructing rafts from their household furniture. Deeds of heroism and devotion are too numerous to describe. A twenty-two year old girl at Purmerend lost her life in trying to save a cow that was the only support of the family. The inhabitants of Wirder, realis- ing that not only their village but a neigh- bouring one was threatened by the bursting of the dam gave no thought to saving their own cattle and household goods, but volun- teered to a man to labouring for the repair of the dam. There they worked all night, young and old, men, women and children, in a biting gale and knee-deep in icy-cold water; even the little children laboured with spade and shovel to hold back the pouring floods. Women and girls brought up loads of straw and hay and sand and everything that could be used as an ob- stacle to stop the inrush of the water.

ARMY CHAPLAIN KILLEDI

ARMY CHAPLAIN KILLED. I News has reached Southampton of the death under tragic circumstances of the Rev. J. R. Stewart, formerly a local curate, whilst acting as a chaplain to the Forces "somewhere in Flanders." Mr. Stewart was conducting a military funeral, when during the service an enemy shell exploded in the midst of the mourners. The reverend gentleman was killed instantaneously, and many of those in attendance were seriously wounded. He was thirty-five years of age. His father and mother and younger brother were among other missionaries massacred at Hwasang during the anti-foreign riots of 1895.

BIG GAMBLING RAID I

BIG GAMBLING RAID. I The sequel to a big gambling raid by the Glasgow police was heard in the Glasgow City Court on Tuesday, when seventy-two men, mostly Jews, were charged, seven with managing the premises, and the remainder men, mostly the l  rhe ii the police riished the with gaming. When the police rushed the club, which had an iron barred door, they found cards set for faro; money lay on the table, and one man, evidently the banker, had £30 in a bag and < £ 20 in his pockets. The managers were fined £ 5 each, and twenty of the others were fined a guinea each

NEW POSTMASTERGENERAL

NEW POSTMASTER-GENERAL. Mr. J. A. Pease, M.P. for Rotherham, has been appointed Postmaster-General in suc- cession to Mr. Herbert Samuel, now Home Secretary. Mr. Asquith announced the appointment in the House of Commons, and. replying to a question by Mr. Handel Booth, stated that Mr. Pease had already relinquished his political pension. Mr. Pease will not have a seat in the Cabinet. —.——— —————

No title

The King has given his annual subscrip- tion of < £ 1,000 to King Edward's Hospital Fund. Twopenny stamps must now be affixed to all receipts for X2 and more in New Zea- land, and to all cheque forms. Mr. Ryan, the lately elected Queensland Premier, has decided to come to London in the spring, says the "North Queensland Register." For allowing beer to be taken from his house after 8 p.m. on a Sunday, Edwin New- man, a Mitcham licensee, was fined £ 10 at Croydon under the new drink restriction order.

GERMAN EFFORTS TO SOW SEDITION IN AFRICA

GERMAN EFFORTS TO SOW SEDITION IN AFRICA. The Secretary of State for the Colonies has issued the following notice for publica- tion The following document is a translation of a letter from (Sount Falkenstein, the Officer Commanding the German forces on the Nyasaland frontier, addressed to a certain Mwalima Isa. Hwalima Isa is known to have been a leading Mohammedan, who exercised a great influence over the large Mohammedan population living on both sides of the British-Portuguese border near Lake Nya-sa, and the letter is of interest as showing what efforts are being made by the Germans in this district, as in other parta of Africa, to stir up sedition among the natives, and especially to undermine the loyalty of the Mohammedans. To MWALIMA ISA. Greetings, and after that I inform you that your letter has reached me here. All of your news we have received. The holy war now is throughout the whole world. In Egypt holy war, Morocco, lunis, Algiers, Tripoli, Afghanistan, Baluchistan, and Persia, half of the country of India, Sudan, the Nubians country, in fact, everywhere there is holy war. The Mohammedans, together with the Germans and the Aus- trians are fighting with English, French, Italians, Serbians, and Japanese. The enemy everywhere are defeated. The Turks with Padisha of Stainboul have many times defeated the Russians. They have sunk many English and French men- of-war. In Morecco the French are com- pletely clearod out. In Tripoli the Italians have been severely defeated by the Moham- medans. In Persia our Russian enemies and the English have been driven out. In Afghanistan and Baluchistan the English have run away. Now the children of Padisha have entered into power. The askari of holy war are in the Punjaub and in India. The Germans and Austrians have everywhere de- feated the French, Russians, and English. French and Russians are practically fallen, and the English not quite yet, but many of their soldiers are killed outright, very many of their battleships are sunk. Of their steamers more than 500 have sunk. Here in East Africa soldiers (? our) have reached close to the English railway at different places. The English railway, its roadway our askaris has destroyed. Three railway bridges have been destroyed by our askari. Many railway wagons have been destroyed. The Europeans and many English askari have died there. The Belgian askari have everywhere been defeated, many have died, many taken prisoners. Furthermore, here in Nyasaland there are many German askari. Many Mohammedans and we ourselves will make a great "business." And now all Mohammedans are knowing when they die. Furthermore, they are dying for God. He has seen their flag of holy war with his own eyes. And you do not fail to bring new to me immediately and the names of those Angoni we are wanting their "marks and their chieftain. Ask them quietly. Dispose clever men well for the hiding of our secret, and you will be happy in the Government, together with vour people. FALKENSTEIN, Captain. —

MINERS AGAINST COMPULSION

MINERS AGAINST COMPULSION. At the Miners' Federation Conference at Westminster Hotel, the voting on the Mili- tary Service Bill resulted as follows:— Against the Bill 653,190 For the Bill 38,100 Nei,itral- 25,240 Ultimately the resolution against the Bill was put and carried unanimously. The conference decided to Iry* a report on the figures to the Prime Minister, and the Executive Committee were empowered to call a national conference to consider future action in the event of the Bill be- coming law. The proceedings were private, but it is stated that Mr. Smillie, the president of the Federation, went fully into the terms of the Bill, and examined critically the speeches of the Prime Minister and mem bers of the Government in regard to tho measure. The miners' opposition was based on the opinion that the necessity for such a measure had not been demonstrated, and that the inte- rests of the workers would be prejudiced.

A HERO AT FIFTEEN I

A HERO AT FIFTEEN. I The "Evening Argus," published at Brighton, contained a remarkable story of a boy of fifteen years of age who has been through all the fighting in France for the past eight months. His name is Harry Janaway, and until Tuesday last he was a gunner in the 130th Battery, R.F.A. On January 24 last year he went to Chichester and persuaded the military authorities that his age was 18. After a period of training he went to France in May, and took part in the fighting at La Basee, Armentieres, Ypres, and Loos, being slightly wounded on two occasions, and ex- periencing many narrow escapes. It was not until the military authorities made inquiries as to the age of some of the soldiers that his real age was discovered, and he was sent home on Tuesday last, which was his fifteenth 'birthday. He was very much annoyed at the discovery. I <

NAVAL AIRMAN KILLED II

NAVAL AIRMAN KILLED. I I Flight Sub Lieutenant Cecil Horace Brinsmead, who left for the Mediterranean at the end of October, has been killed on active service. He was twenty-two years of age, and was a son of the late Mr. Horace Brmsmead, managing director of the famous piano firm. After an adventurous experience as an apprentice at sea he won his second mate's certificate. He was gazetted second-lieu- tenant and probationary flight sub-lieu- tenant on the same day, having determined to fight for his country in which ever of the services he could secure a commission. His younger brother, Noel, was severely wounded in the second battle of Ypres last May with the 2nd Buffs, and has been in England on the sick list ever since.

ENEMY ALIENS AT LARGE I

ENEMY ALIENS AT LARGE. I Mr. Brace, Under Secretary for the Home Office, has informed Mr. Joynson Hicks, in the Commons, that available figures showed that there were in prohibited areas the fol- lowing male enemy aliens:— Germans. Austrians. East and South Coast 353 48 Northumberland 74 17 Kent 15 2 The total number of Germans is 442, while the Austrians number 67. Mr. Brace further informed Mr. Joynson Hicks that there were at large in Great Britain the following male enimy aliens: Germans, 7,449; Austrians, 5,088. Women of enemy origin number about ten or eleven thousand.

PROBATION ACT SUCCESSI

PROBATION ACT SUCCESS. I "As one who has worked the Probation Act for all it is worth, I can say that it has saved several hundreds of offenders from be- coming habitual criminals," Sir Robert Wallace said at the London Sessions. Only two or three per cent. of prisoners placed on probation in the past year were again con- victed. "The result is far beyond anything we ever dreamed of," he added.

No title

Professor Niermever, of Utrecht Univer- sity, states that the Germans are seeking professors in Holland, and offering them ap- pointments in a German-Flemish university which is to be founded at Ghent. Tho women who have been acting as school attendance officers in London in place of the men who have gone to the Front have done their work so well that stops are to be taken permanently to retain their services.,

No title

OUR CHILDRENS CORNER

OUR CHILDREN'S CORNER. BY UNCLE RALPH. My DEAR CHILDRM,- How are you all getting on after youi holidays? No doubt you have been looking forward to seeing the names of the prize winners of the Geographical Competition in my column this week. I had a very hard job to judge them, so many being nearly correct, but at last I have finished, and the names are as under:— First Prize.—Edward C. Pinkard, Box of Fry's Chocolates-. Second Prize.—Muriel C. Smith, Fountain Pen, 14-carat gold nib. Third Prize.—Gladys M. Troke, Box of Fry's Chocolates. Fourth Prize.—Mary Lancaster, Box of Fry's Chocolates. Fifth Prize.—Cyril Milner, Box of Fry's Chocolates. Sixth Prize.-lisobel M. Johnson, Box of Fry's Chocolates. I am so pleased to hear that one of my little nieces has had a letter from a soldier, who has received her woollen scarf, and I hope to hear soon that some of my other little nieces have received letters also. Well, children, I promised you last week that you should have another painting to do, and I have managed to find a very pretty drawing, although I am afraid this little boy is rather naughty, as you will see by the hat on his head. But never mind, we are all naughty sometimes, and I really do think he looks awfully sorry and very miserable. Now try extra hard with this picture, and let it be more difficult than ever for me to pick out the six very best. The first prize will be a Fountain Pen, with a 14-carat gold nib, and there will be five other very nice prizes. The closing date of the com- petition is February 12, so hurry up and fetch out your paints and start right away, so that you can take especial care with it. And what results I shall expect to see, so please do not disappoint me! With love to you all, from Your affectionate, UNCLE RALPH. THE CHILDREN'S CORNER UNION. FOUNDED BY UNCLE RALPH. (Open to Boys and Girls under 15 yeam4 Please enrol me as a Member of the "CCU." My age ia yean, Naine Addrtt* .<< J)Ggc WHEN aigncd poet to UNCLE RALPH,3, LA Bbllm I. BAUTAGB, LOUDOK, B.C. Mtnbtri dolrlne an IWnrainattd mwitnU* earl, suitable for framlnc. should eacl. Donal stamp with this form. ANSWERS TO LETTERS. WINIFRED WALL: Thank you so much for your very interesting letter. I am glad you. are fond of flowers and animals, and I shall look forward to receiving the flowers you. have promised to send me. If Marjorie does not mind, perhaps you would like to write to her. The address is Miss Marjorie Calvert, Glenbank, Portadown, Ireland. MARJORIE CALVERT Winifred Wall wished to write to one of my little nieces, and I have given her your address. I expect you will hear from her shortly. VERA EVANS: Thank you for your letter. Constance Ash- wood was the three thousandth member, and her address is 31, Kenilworth-road, Kilburn, London, N.W. CONSTANCE ASH- WOOD Vera Evans, one of my little nieces, wishes for your address, and as you will see I have given it to her. I expect you will receive a letter shortly. AMY HOLMES r Thanks for your welcome letter. I hope that I shall receive many more from you. SIZZIB TAYLOIT I am gla-d you had such a good time at Christmas. You were lucky to have such lovely presents. H. STEVENSON: I am indeed glad that you have won four years' free education, and I think you are very lucky. THOMAS W. HOLDBN: Thank you very much for your letter. I am glad you like the Children's Corner. Your number ia 2,743. CHILDREN'S CORNER UNION. Founded by UNCLE RALPH. Open to all Boy* and Girls undor IS ytan of ace. RULES OF MEMBERSHIP. 1. To do a good turn to someone every day. 2. To be bright and sunny from morning till night. 3. To be kind and considerate to others. 4. To be truthful, honest and diligent. 5. To be unselfish in thought and action. 6. To be kind to all animals. I WONDER WHY. My Dutchie Dolly is ever so sweet, From the crown of her head to the soles of her feet. Her dress is quite faded that once was so gay, The red of her lips has been kissed all away. She hasn't got fingers or ten little toes, But ugly black feet, and a snub of a nose. She can't say Mamma" or "Papa" if she And she sleeps every night with such wide- open eyes. I teach her her lessons, but fear she's IL dunce, For she cannot remember her one times one once, And I really believe that, when everything's said, She's not an idea in that shiny black head. In history or sums, if I set her a task, She never will answer the questions I ask. Yet, though I don't know why thing* happen that way, I love Dutchie better and better each day. My wooden Dolly is ever so sweet, From t her shiny black head to her stumpy black feet.

No title

Lord Crofton has been chosen to sit in the House of Lords as an Irish representa- tive peer in the room of Lord Ashtown who has become bankrupt.