Collection Title: Abergavenny Chronicle

Provider: The National Library of Wales

Rights: This resource is the copyright of the Tindle Newspapers

View full details

First Previous Image 5 of 8 Next Last
Full Screen
18 articles on this page
Abergavennys Message to General Smuts

THE PRICE OF MILK. Milk consumers at Abergavenny no doubt "teamed with much gratification that the Local Food Control Committee had fixed e retail price of milk in the borough at 5d. peruart through November, but after a consideration of the circumstances the committee do not con- • sider it advisable to insist on this price. The local milk retailers, who put up the price to 6d. per quart at the beginning of October, have made representations to the committee, pointing out that owing to the increased price to the producer they cannot afford to sell at 5d. per quart. The committee have met the Aberga- venny Dairymen's Association and have agreed to the maintenance of the price at 6d. per quart, on the understanding that no further increase is made in the price of milk throughout the winter. The price will therefore be 6d. per quart until the 31st March next. This is the most satisfactory solution that could be ex- pected under the circumstances, for in any case the matter would have had to be considered at the end of this month and an increase would then have been inevitable, and it might have been that the consumer would have had to pay more in the long run. It has to be remembered that the producers are allowed, under the Milk Prices Order, is. Sd. per gallon for October, is. 7-d.- for November, and is. gd. from Decem- ber to March. Lord Rhondda has stated that -these prices are high, but they have been fixed at this figure in consequence of a pledge given by the Government last April, and the Food Controller and the local Food Control Committees are powerless to alter them. The retailer who purchases his milk has to pay these increased prices, and is therefore entitled to an increased retail price. It is stated that though most of the local retailers are also producers they have. to purchase a good deal of milk from others. Even if a retailer produces the whole of the milk which he sells, the committee could not, of course, penalise him on that account. He is entitled to the same consideration as other producers who sell wholesale. All the con- sumer can do is, as usual, to pay up and try to look pleasant. ▲

Monmouthshire Prisoners of War

Monmouthshire Prisoners of War. More financial help is urgently needed in order that Monmoutht-hir Prisoners of War shall not be deprived of the parcels which they look for- 'ward to so eagerly every week. The County of Monmouth (T.) Prisoners of War Regimental Care Committee have done excellent work in keeping these unfortunate men from absolute starvation and protecting them somewhat from the rigours of the weather by sending parcels of food and clothing. It costs over £ 100 per week to send these parcels, and the funds in hand are only sufficient to meet tho. expense for about three weeks. The committee desire to send sp cial parcels for Christmas, and between now and the end of the year £ 1,000 is needed. We feel sure it is only necessary to make this appeal to cause the subscriptions to flow in, and there is no need to expatiate on the terrible condition of prisoners of war in the hands of the enemy. It is sufficient to say that they do receive the parcels, as the men themselves testify with genuine emotion. Subscriptions should be sent to the hon. secretary, Mr. L. Acomb, at the com- mittee's offices, 6, Skinner-street, Newport, or to the treasurer, National Provincial Bank, Newport.

Visit of Dr Mary Phillips to Abergavenny

Visit of Dr. Mary Phillips to Abergavenny. On Thursday, October 18th, in the Gym- nasium of the Intermediate School, Dr. Mary Phillips addressed a gathering of the girls, their parsnts, and other friends of the School, on the work which is being done by the Scottish Women's Hospitals in Serbia. Mr. Edwin Foster, who occupied the chair, said that the Intermediate School was proud to welcome Dr. Phillips, not only because of the work she herself had done, but also because an old pupil of the school, Miss Nellie. Beveridge, was now working in'Salonika under the society to which "Dr Phillips belonged. Dr. Mary Phillips explained that the name Scottish Women's Hospitals is rather mis- leading. The scheme was originated by Scottish women doctors, but to-day its staff is drawn from all parts of the United Kingdom. The first unit was raised in September 1914, and worked in Calais during the severe typhoid epidemic among the Belgian troops there. In the spring of 1915 this unit set out for Serbia, but was detained at Malta to assist with the sick and wounded who were pouring in from the Dardanelles. Another unit had already been sent to Serbia in December 1914. They found that the scourge of typhus had already played fearful havoc, and disease and death were laying their devastating hands upon the people. A hospital with 570 beds was established at Kragujevatz, and soon typhus claimed three of its staff as its victims. As the need increased, three otlier units were pent out, and all did magnificent work. Then came the sudden onrush of the Austro-German army, and the Serbians, and with them the hospital units, were 4d riven south. The journey to the coast was one long nightmare. During st. e summer of 1915 men, women, and children, with guns, ammu- nition, horses, bullocks and sheep, were pouring along every available road in an endeavour to reach the frontier. Ammunition and guns that could be taken no further were either buried or destroyed, while many of the horses, as well as the bullocks, had to be killed for food. The King and his counsellors, as well as the poorest and richest of his subjects, formed part of the long stream of refugees-a people rendered homeless, knowing not where they were going. Serbian Boys' Terrible Experience. I It was for one particular section of these refugees that Dr. Phillips appealed. The Serbian Government, foreseeing the great importance of the boys of the nation, endeavoured to send them into safety. A band of 60,000 set out for the coast, but thousands died by the way. Only 30,000 ever reached the frontier, to proceed through the terrible passes of Montenegro and Albania to the Adriatic. When at last .they reached it, and thought their troubles were over, they found that the ships which were to have taken them into safety had been torpedoed by the Austrians, and the food stores at the port had been set on fire by bombs from aeroplanes. They were ordered to proceed southwards, but so many were weakened by disease and priva- tion that only 3,500 ever reached their domina- tion. The French Government now offered to house these poor refugees in Corsica (just as England gave refuge to the Belgians), and they were taken there in French transports returning from Salonika. The Serbian and British author- ities then asked the Scottish Women's Hospitals to be responsible for the medical care of the Serbian colony in Corsica. The number of refugees in the island has varied from three to six thousand. Among the refugees were many mothers and prospective mothers, and the Hospital at once started maternity work. As a result of exposure, privation and shock, there was a considerable amount of sickness among the refugees, and there was ever present the possibility of infectious disease. I L'lle des Morts." I The most pathetic group of all to arrive were the schoolboys and students, many of whom had made the great trek, already referred to through Montenegro and Albania. So many of them had died that the island where they were quarantined came to be known as L' He des Morts." The work among them has been of great value, and it was a. happy day for the Scottish women when they sent 300 boys off to Britain, where they are now being well educated and cared for. Many of them are lads of great intellectual ability. One of them, after being only a year in England, has recently won the class prize for English, his competitors being all English boys But for those who are still in Corsica much remains to be done. The condition of these poor. lads is only known to the doctors and nurses, who, through long and weary months, have tried to -nurse them back to health and strength.—Sometimes, alas, without success, as could only be expected after such privation. Tuberculosis has stepped in and is claiming many victims. France is doing what she can for these homeless schoolboys, but her resources are already taxed to the utmost. Our debt to the Serbians is great. For centuries they have stood a bulwark between Europe and the Turk, clinging always to their faith and to the Christian religion, in spite of everything. Their cause is ours their suffering is ours to share their sacrifice is our opportunity. (Applause). Col Steel, in a few well-chosen remarks, thanked Dr. Mary Phillips for her magnificent address, which carried conviction by its very restraint. S?Houliston seconded the vote of thanks, and included a vote of thanks to the Chairman Dr. Mary Phillips briefly responded, and the proceedings terminated with the singing of the National Anthem. The collection amounted to £ 11 14;5. 5d. Money or gifts from any who are interested in the work of the Scottish Women's Hospitals will be gladly received and forwarded by Miss Houliston, if sent to her at the School.

No title

I Wednesday—Before Mr. W. H. Routledge (in the chair) and Mr. Edwin Foster. I More Absent Than Present. James Watkins, Cefn Cottage, Llanvihangel Crucorney, was summoned for the irregular attendance of his son Richard. Mr. W. L. Dodd, attendance officer, said that the boy had been absent 79 times out of 125, and during the whole year he was present only 107 out of 396 times. He never made a full week's attendance. A girl had lost 43 attendances out of 125 and had already been before the Court. The Bench considered it a bad case and fined defendant 10s. Mr. Edwin Foster did not adjudicate in this case, Col. Steel occupying the chair. Hobbled on Three Legs. James Thomas, farmer, of Gilwern, was sum- moned for cruelty to a horse by working it in an unfit state. P.-C. Casey said that at 1.40 p.m. on the 23rd he was on duty by the Bridge Inn, Llanfoist, when he saw the defendant driving an aged bay mare attached to a gambo. The horse was ex- tremely lame on the near fore-foot, and it was hobbling along on three legs. Witness asked defendant what was the matter with the horse, and he replied that it had side bones. He said that he had only brought a bit of furniture from Gilwern to th- Gas Works Cottages, and that he seldom worked the horse, as he kept it for breading purposes. Witness fetched P.-C. Trigg, who examined the horse. P.-C. Trigg gave evidence as to the lameness of the horse and said he told the defendant that he could walk it home without the cart. The horse must have been in great pain. It was in good condition generally and could do work on the land. Defendant did not appear, and. his sister stated that he was too ill to appearj as he had got influenza. The Magistrates' Clerk Since he received the summons ?—Yes, I think he took it in the market yesterday. The Magistrates' Clerk He did not take it from the blue paper ? (Laughter).N,o. The case was adjourned for a fortnight so that the defendant could appear. I Thought The Po- ficemen Didn't Mind. J ames Parry, farmer, of Trostrey, was sum-; moned for driving a cart without a rear light, at Penpergwm. P.-C.- Mussell said he saw the defendant at 6.25 p.m. on the 23rd on the Monmouth road. When asked why he hadn't got a rear light he said that it had dropped off, and added I thought you chaps didn't mind so long as the front ones were all right." Defendant was fined 2s. 6d. 1 Maximum Penalty 2100. 1 John Woodley, haulier, Abergavenny, wras summoned for driving without lights on the 25th. Defendant did not appear, but was represented by his employer, Mr. J. D. Gill, who was told that he had no locus standi. I P.-C. Birch said that at 6 p.m. on the 25th he was on duty near the entrance to Maindiff Hospital, on the Ross-road, when he saw the defendant in charge of two horses attached to a gambo loaded with wood. There were no fixtures to put lights on, if he had them. The Chairman said that the defendant ought to have been in Court. The offence was a very serious one, and the maximum penalty was £ 100. Mr. Gill said he was really to blame for the man not being there, as he misled the man himself. A fine of ios., including costs, was imposed. Conscientious Objector as Absentee. I Percy Wall, living at Blorenge View, Mardy, I was charged with being an absentee under the Military Service Act. Lieut. Sidney Harris, R.W.F., of the Ponty- pool Recruiting Office, produced the certificate of entry in the deserters' book. The Chairman He has not joined ?—No. He was called up on the loth of October, and he holds no certificate of exemption from military service. Prisoner I am not an absentee. I am a conscientious objector, and I am exempted under the Military Service Act, section 2, I think. The Magistrates' Clerk You think. Have you the Act ? Prisoner Yes, I have the Act. The Magistrates' Clerk You have two things to prove—that your statement is correct, and that this tribunal have anything to do with it. Prisoner produced the Act and said that under section 2 he had a conscientious objection to military service. The Magistrates' Clerk: The Bench have nothing to do with that. Prisoner But you see that is my case. The Magistrates' Clerk Have you an ex- emption ? Prisoner It is in the hands of the police authorities. Supt. D&vies We have no exemption. He has been warned before. Lieut. Harris He has not produced any exemption to us, and he never made any reply when asked about the matter. An exemption card was handed up to the Bench, and this showed that prisoner was described as a grocer's manager, aged 22, work- ing at Aberaman, and that he was exempted from combatant service. The Magistrates' Clerk:' Exempted from combatant service only. That settles the point. Prisoner It does not settle the point. Can I ask the military representative a few questions ? The Chairman It will be settled by the military people. The Magistrates' Clerk What is your qtestion ? Prisoner He stated that I was called up for October 10th. Have I ,been called up before ? The Magistrates' Clerk I don't think it matters. Prisoner I think it does. I wish to put my case. The Chairman said that there was apparently no reasonable defence for the man not joining up to serve his country. If everyone took the same view as he took, that of conscientious objection, God help them. Prisoner would be fined 40s., and handed over to the military authorities to deal with. Prisoner I am not allowed to make my defence, am I ? The Magistrates' Clerk Take hint down. Prisoner I protest against this, because I have not had a hearing. As prisoner was being taken below, a woman in Court (presumably a relative) shouted It is not justice," and a man by ,her called out More I Prussianism." The Beaufort Arms. I The licence of the Beaufort Arms, Aberga- I venny, was transferred to William Williams, I formerly of the Herbert Arms, Llanvihangel I Gobion. I Nearly Dodged the Constable. I John Thomas, carrier, Abergavenny, was sum- moned for driving without proper lights on the 23rd. I P.-C. Climer said that at 6.25 p.m. on the 23rd he was in Park-street, and saw defendant driving a horse attached to a parcel cart, without an off-side light or a rear light. Defendant said that the front lamp was broken and the bracket for the back lamp was broken off. Defendant I was only going from the house to the stable and I was at the stable when I saw the officer. » Defendant was fined 5s., including costs. The Motor and The Dog. I William Bowen, licensee of the Farmers Arms, was summoned for driving a motor to the danger of the public on the 29th. J. H. Lloyd, foreman porter at the G.W.R. station, said that he was by Mr. Bull's shop in Cross-street when he saw a Ford motor coming down the street at a fairly good rate. It ran over a foxhound by the hind quarters at the corner of Monk-street. The driver did not stop, but went on down Monk-street. Two wheels of the car passed over the dog. Witness should say that the car was going at 20 to 25 miles an hour. The Magistrates' Clerk Could he have avoided the dog ?-There were no conveyances about and there was plenty of room on the other side. Charles Knight, butcher, said that the car appeared to him to be going very fast, for the town. P.-Sergt. Spendlove said that in consequence of a complaint he made inquiries, and told Bowen on Monday night that he was reported for driving the car to the danger of the public, and also for running over a dog. Defendant said I didn't run over the dog I only knocked against it. I was not driving fast. I cannot drive my car fast unless it has gone about three miles. Defendant said that one dog was racing another down the street. He turned asrmuch as he could to avoid them, and he thought the I dog had passed. He asked his companion if the car had gone over the dog, and he replied No, I it has gone off down the street." [ The Chairman said it was a very dangerous i place. Defendant would haY to pay the costs. I A Warning to Trespassers. James Watkins, Cefn Cottage, Llanvihangel Crucorney, was summoned for doing damage to growing grass to the value of 2s. 6d., the property of Henry Henbrow, of Penyparc, and his daughter Alice was summoned for doing mali- cious damage to a fence to the extent of 2S. 6d., also the property of Mr. Henbrow. Watkins said he was taking a short cut. Prosecutor said that the 'last time he saw Watkins going across his fields was on the 22nd, but he had seen him several times previously and had spoken to him about it. The distance he walked the fields was 200 or 230 yards and he had damaged the grass. On one occasion he found the bottom bar of a gate, where defendant went, broken off and laying on the ground in two pieces, and he had to get a man to repair it with another rail. When he had sheep in the field the gate was left open or unlinked and the sheep got through and over a low boundary wall into another man's field, and by the time witness got them back it might take him half a day. On I the last occasion defendant told him You can do as you like there is a path this way." The Magistrates' Clerk Is there a path ? Prosecutor It is made a path, but it is not a public path. Defendant It is made a path by everybody who goes that way. Prosecutor said that he never had any trouble until this man and his family came to live there. Edwin Henbrow, son of the prosecutor, said that when he went to fefch the cows he saw the little girl and her brother crossing another field. He saw them pulling sticks out of the hedge, and he hurried after them, 'and when they saw him they picked up the sticks and hurried home as fast as they could. Prosecutor said that stakes had been pulled out of the hedge and for a distance of 20 or 30 yards there were only two or three stakes left in the fence. I Watkins said that prosecutor could not prove 3d. worth of damage to the grass. The distance he went across the field was only about So yards. I A. fine of ii os. was imposed, and Watkins and the little girl were both warned by the Chairman. Prospective Settlement. Annie Jones, married woman, of Fwthog, had been summoned for assaulting Elizabeth Ann Powell. The Magistrates Clerk said that the parties had been to the office and asked that the case should be set back for a week, in order that they might try to settle it and come before the Bench to ask for their permission to do so. The Bench assented to an adjournment. A,

No title

Local Soldier's Good Work.—L.-cpl. W. J. Davies, M.T.A.S.C., an old Abergavenny boy, is in hospital suffering from shell shock. He is a son of Mrs. Davies, Springwells, and a Ion-in-law of Mr. W. Harris, late L. & N. W. guard, and joined in March last. He had lived at Mountain Ash for some years, and he will be remembered by some as starting the revival at Abergavenny with Mr. A. E. Thomas about 14 years ago. His officer has written to Mrs. Davies, his wife, in- forming her that her husband is in hospital, and adding He did some excellent work in rescuing two comrades under heavy shell fire, for which I hope he will receive some recognition. He has always been one of my most reliable n.c.o.'s and an excellent driver." ▲

Crickhowell Auxiliary Bible SocietyI

Crickhowell Auxiliary Bible Society. I Mr. James Edwards, agent to the Duke of Beaufort, presided at the annual meeting of this Society at the Percy Davies Institute, Crick- howell, on Tuesday evening. There was a good' attendance, the largest for many years past, and the proceedings were bright throughout. Tne Secretary, Mr. David Davies, Manchester House, presented the annual accounts, showing that a balance of £ 13 15s. 2d. had been forwarded to the parent Society. Mr. Davies said that at one time he was much afraid they would not come up to last year's record, but, thanks to the efforts of the ladies, viz., Miss James (Der- wendeg), Mrs. Vaughan (Tyronen) and Miss Richards (Post Office), they surpassed it by 3s. gd. (Hear, hear}-. He expressed his grati- tude to the collectors. A vote of thanks was accorded Mr. Davies, and the treasurer, Mr. Joseph Townsend. Mrs. Watkins (Greenhill) was unanimously appointed president. The Chairman, in a pithy speech, introduced the deputation, the Rev. W. Crwys Williams, whose bardic triumphs were known far and wida. The Bible Society was doing a great work in these difficult days, and never perhaps was it more necessary that the Bible should be read and understood by the nations of the earth. The Rev. W. Crwys Williams, in an interesting address, showed how the Society is working in our own Army, and produced a copy of the Gospel of St. Luke, a favourite with our men in hospital. Luke the Physician broug.it with him a healing power which the-cleverest doctor did not possess. Showing great courage, the Society had sent its missioners far afield, and some of them had even been cast into prison. But the bars of the gaol did not suppress their zeal for the Master. To-day the Society needed financial help, and ha appealed to everyone interested in Christianising ttie world to do his or her utmost to assist the Bible Society in sending to all peoples the message of their Heavenly Father. The Rev. E. Rowland, supporting a resolution of thanks to the Rev. W. Crwys Williams, said the importance of the Bible had not yet been sufficiently understood and appreciated in this and other countries. The Chairman was warmly thanked for presiding. — ▲—

GROSMONT

GROSMONT. DISTRICT NURSE.—A public meeting was held in the Town Hall on Friday last, in connection with establishing a nurse for Grosmont and district. The president, Mrs. Henry Partridge took the chair, supported by the Rev. Gomer Davies, Mr. Henry Partridge, and the hon. sec., Miss Hudson-Evans.—Mr. Henry Partridge said it was encouraging to see so many people present that evening, thus showing their interest and sympathy in the good cause, and they must all agree that a district nurse would be of untold benefit to them all. The subscription list had been started locally and had met with a ready response. Something like £ 20 had already been subscribed and promised, but it had been decided to canvass every house in the district and make an appeal to all the landowners, resident and non-resident, by those of the committee willing to act as collectors, and the point to be re- membered was that subscribers had the privilege 01 paying reduced, tees when employing the services of the nurse. Mr. Partridge then read the rules to be adopted as laid down by the Mon- mouthshire Nursing Association.—The Rev. Gomer Davies said that Grosmont was one of the few places in Monmouthshire without a trained nurse, and they had resolved to make good this deficiency, if possible, without further delay. The outlay, especially at the start, would be considerable, but Grosmont in the past had shown itself capable of rising to the occasion required, and it was hoped the scheme would soon be placed in working order and a nurse installed. For many years the midwifery and urgent cases had been undertaken by Mrs. Leonard Davies, a most careful, capable, and clever nurse, but the time had now come when increasing years and failing health had made it impossible for her to continue to nurse in the outlying scattered districts, but her services would long be remembered by many grateful patients. Th? committee and officers nominated were as follows :—President, Mrs. Henry Par- tridge treasurer, Miss Tompkins, Kentchurch Court lion. sec., Miss Hudson-Evans com- mittee, Mrs. Gomer Davies, Mrs. Hampton, Mrs. Vaughan (Duffryn), Mrs. Watkins (Bare House), Mrs. Jones (Pentwyn), Mrs. Garnet Bevan, Mrs. Cross (Rhoan Oak), Mrs. Frampton, Mrs. Vinson, Mrs. Gladwyn, Mrs. Freeman, Mrs. W. Morgan (Grosmont Wood), and others not yet ap- pointed. The meeting concluded with votes of thanks to Mr. and Mrs. Partridge for attending and taking such an active and keen interest in the scheme. Since residing in Grosmont they had always supported every charitable public work in the village and endeared themselves to the hearts of all. A vote of thanks was also given to Mrs. J. E. Cole, the energetic Pontrilas secretary, for her attendance and valuable in- formation on the subject in hand.

Advertising

J The Welshman's Favourite. I r MABON Sauce 11^" As good as its Name. § DON'T FAIL TO GET IT. a BLNMCR% NL POW at.. cama

I MUNICIPAL MEMSI

I MUNICIPAL MEMS. I I EXTRACTS FROM TOWN COUNCIL MINUTES. I I The following are extracts from the minutes I of the various committees of the Town Council I adopted on Monday night I Household Coal. The Town Clerk submitted to the Finance Committee prices from the various coal mer- chants as to the charges made for coal, which varied from 31s. 6d. per ton on railway yard to 33s. 6d. per ton delivered in cellars and 34s. delivered and stacked. The Town Clerk was I instructed to obtain particulars of the pre-war I price in each case and report. Land Values Conference. The Finance Committee considered a letter from the Welsh League for the Taxation of Land Values, inviting delegates to a conference at Cardiff on the loth November next, to promote the restoration of the land t.P the people through the rating and taxation of land values. The Committee did not appoint any delegates. Local Honours of War. The Finance Committee considered a letter from the Abergavenny L. & N. W. Rly. Co. Loco. Dept. War Relief Fund as to the advisability of recognising the services rendered by the in- habitants of the town and district who distin- guish themselves in the present war. The Town Clerk reported that he had communicated with Carmarthen and Tenby, and the former had decided to confer the honorary freedom of the borough upon their local men who had gained distinctions of both British and Allied countries; and Tenby men who have received honours during the war are to have conferred upon them a similar honour, but no decision has been arrived at as to others who have fallen, or who have served in the present war. The Committee will consider this matter at their next meeting. Bathing Facilities. I The letter and resolution from the National Union of Railwaymen asking the Council to reconsider this matter and provide suitable public swimming baths and wash-houses for both sexes was referred to the Sanitary and Water Committee. I Proposed Purchase of Gwatkins' Estate. The Finance Committee considered terms from Mr. J. B. Walford as to a three years' tenancy, coupled with option of purchase of 28\ acres of land, including the allotments ad- joining the Grammar School and field adjoining Fair-field, late A. -V>-A. field, and three fields further east (next,/to Nurseries). The rental asked is £ 200, and the purchase money ^4,200. The Committee recommended the purchase of this land, subject to the sanction of the Local Government Board being obtained for same, and the Town Clerk was instructed to communicate with the Board on the matter and report. Professional Auditors' Report. The Finance Committee considered the report of the professional auditor on his audit of the accounts for the year ended 31st March, 1917, which were certified as correct. The question of checking the slot meters was referred to the Gas Committee. The Committee will give effect to the recommendations referred to by the Auditor. Messrs. Leicester & Co. were re-appointed as professional auditors for* the current financial tear. The Elective Auditors also report they have audited the accounts and find same to be correct. Rate and Water Collection. Mr. Rest all's collection since last meeting is as follows :-Poor rate, £ 1064 lIS. 8d. Im- provement rate, 4-575 14s. 8d. water, ^165 ios. total £1805 16s. 4d. The Collector sub- mitted his report dated 22nd October, 1917. The rate book for the past half-year is being balanced, and same will be completed this week. In future the preparation of the rate book is to be done by the Rate Collector, instead of a portion in the Town Clerk's office and the re- mainder by the collector. The Collector's duties are amended accordingly. Fitter. Two applications were received by the Gas Committee for a fitter, viz., Mr. J. James and Mr. Vaughan. Mr. J. James was appointed at iod. per hour plus war bonus. Coke Machine. Tenders were submitted for a coke machine, viz., Messrs. Avery, £ 20 is. 6d. and £19 6s. Messrs. Pooley & Son, £ 22 4s. Messrs. Davies and Co., ^21 ios (Avery's), £ 23 7s (Pooley's), £ 16 12S. 6d. (Hodgsons & Sons). The tender of Messrs..Davies & Co., for £ 16 12s. 6d., was accepted. -0 Price of Coal. t" J'I 1'1 J betters read irom tne various contractors tnat in consequence of an increase in the miners' wages as and from 17th September the Coal Controller had authorised an increase in the price of coal of 2s. 6d. a ton to correspond with this advance. Messrs. Vipond had also stated that their price of 26s. 4d. would, on the present contract be reduced by is. 6d. a ton from September last. Gas for Motors. The matter is still under consideration, and the Gas Manager is obtaining further informa- tion. Public Lighting. The Gas Committee resolved to support the Newport Town Council in their petition to the Home Secretary for increased public lighting pf towns in South Wales and district, and the Mayor was empowered to join the deputation to the Secretary of State if same is necessary. The Chairman and Councillor W. J. Tong were deputed to approach the Chief Constable with a view to getting an additional number of lamps lighted, and the Gas Manager was instructed to light the number sanctioned when the consent is given. All these lamps are to have a 3in. green band on the top of the side panes and the rest clear, the top portion being darkened. I Stokers' Application for Increase. The stokers have applied for an increase of .7s, 6d. a week in their wages and time and a half to be allowed for Sunday work. The Manager is enquiring as to the rate of pay in other towns, when the matter will be con- sidered. I Ploughing at Llanfoist Farm. The Town Clerk reported to the Sanitary and Water Committee that the Monmouthshire War Executive (Food Production) Committee had notified the occupier of Llanfoist Farm that the allotment of additional land to be ploughed for 1917-1918 harvest was 25 acres, and that he had been in communication with Mr. Gaisford thereon, who proposed to offer no objection unless the Corporation or the tenant thought the same unreasonable. The Committee have I no objection to a Cultivation Order being issued by the Executive Committee. Public Mortuary. I The Sanitary and Water Committee con- sidered the letter from the Guardians asking for the erection of a small public mortuary, as the Local Government Board have forbidden the use of the Workhouse mortuary except for those who die in the Workhouse. The Committee recommended that the Victoria Cottage Hospital be asked to allow the use of their mortuary for this purpose and a subscription of £ 2 2s. per annum be paid for the privilege. Infectious Disease. I The Medical Officer reported the following I cases of infectious disease during the montlj. One scarlet fever, one measles. Water Supply. I The water supply is at present 728,500 gallons per day, made up as follows :-248,500 gallons I from Llwyndu and the adjoining spring, and 480,000 gallons from the springs recently ap- propriated. Water Analyses. The Borough Surveyor reported that he had submitted two samples of water from the ifactory. and the same were found to be satis- reservoir, and the same were found to be satis- I High Street Property. Messrs. Howard Davies & Co. have written pointing out that this is the year for the exterior decorations, according to the lease, and they are prepared to give an estimate for the work. The Streets Committee decided that owing to the I restrictions oh certain materials the work stand over for the present. I Welsh Town Planning, &c., Trust, Ltd. I I Letter read from the above Trust offering their co-operation and services of the officials in the I question of housing. The letters were referred to the Housing Committee to be appointed on i the 9th November. I Housing Return. I The Committee again considered the queries from the Local Government Board and suggested replies thereto in reference to the building of houses for the working classes at the conclusion of the war. Stone Cot Tenancy. The Borough Surveyor reported that he had made enquiries regarding the tenancy of Stone Cot, and had been informed that as Mrs. Peake's daughter-in-law could not live in the cottage alone, she had left, and one of the workmen had been living there until about three weeks ago, but he had now left their employ, and the house is being occupied by a woman employed by Mrs. Peake. I Overhanging Trees and Shrubs. Eighteen notices have been served in reference to overhanging trees and shrubs, and the Borough Surveyor reported he had not yet com- pleted his inspections in this respect. [ The Council's Horses. Iine veterinary surgeon has examined the whole of the horses and reports them to be in Igood health and well looked after. I Castle House. I Mrs. Holding has given notice to vacate the Castle House on the 25th March next, and if the premises are required before then to deliver up same. The Town Clerk was instructed to ad- vertise the Castle House to let. I Collection of Tolls. I The Borough Surveyor and Market Supt. were instructed to confer together and make a report with regard to improving the collection of tolls in the markets. Christmas Markets. I The Great Market before Christmas was fixed for Friday, 21st December, 1917. The Markets Committee decided to give the usual prizes, as' follows :—For the largest and best collection of dressed turkeys reared by the seller, £ 1 is. ditto geese ditto, £ 1 is. ditto ducks ditto, ios. 6d.; ditto fowls ditto, ios. 6d Fat Stock Market. I The Committee could not fix the date of the Fat Stock Market, as it is not certain whether one will be held. If a Fat Stock Market is held the Committee agreed to give the usual prize, namely, a silver salver value £ 3 3s. plus inscrip- tion, for the best butchers' beast sold by auction at the above market. +

Crickhowell Supports Electric Light Scheme

Crickhowell Supports Electric Light Scheme. The Rev. H. P., Somerset, Rector and Chair- man of the Parish Council, presided at a meeting of the residents of Crickhowell at the Town Hall, Crickhowell, on Friday night, to consider pro- posals by Mr. H. O. H. Wenman, Bishops Castle, to set up electric light plant in the town. There was a fair attendance. A long communication from Mr. Wenman, setting forth the advantages of electric light and its cheapness compared with gas, having been read, Dr. Hill stated that a meeting of tradespeople over which he presided, decided to support any reasonable scheme. The present lighting was not satisfactory and the gas was impure. Mr. David Davies said that for a long time they had been like Moses in the dark "—(loud laughter)—and the time had arrived to go in for an improved system of lighting. Mr. T. J. Allen said they could obtain a suit- able place in the town to set up the plant. Electric light could be provided at a cheaper rate than gas. The cost to the average householder would be less. Mr. Cyrus Thomas said the question of Par- liamentary rights would arise, and they wotild have to be careful how'they proceeded. Mr. W. Townsend said that question did not arise. What Mr. Wenman wanted was the support of the people of Crickhowell, should he set up electric light. After further discussion, Mr. T. J. Allen moved a resolution asking the District Council to fusnish Mr. Wenman with facilities for carry- ing out his scheme and to enter into arrange- ments fbr lighting the town with electric light. Mr. C. T. Hudson seconded and it was carried without opposition. 4.

I Abergavenny Stock Market

I Abergavenny Stock Market. There was a good supply at the market on Tuesday, and trade was up to the average. Fat calves were dear, lambs made up to 55s., and ewes up to Szs., mutton and lamb being firmer than the previous week. A large supply of cattle met with a good trade, bullocks making up to -144 ios. and maiden heifers up to /3S. Pigs met an extraordinary trade, baconers making up to £ 22 apiece and porkers up to £ 7 155.) the demand being greater than the supply. +

I Nevill Hall as Tuberculosis Hospital

I Nevill Hall as Tuberculosis Hospital. I I. TOWN COUNCIL'S OPPOSITION. I It will be remembered that recently there was a proposal to use Nevill Hall as a private asylum under the control of the Monmouthshire County Council, and it was understood that the estate was purchased privately with this object in view. This proposal has, however, fallen through, owing, it is said, to the refusal of sanction to borrow the necessary money at the present time. It appears that negotiations have been opened with the King Edward VII. Welsh National Memorial Association for the purchase of the< property for utilisation as a tuberculosis hospital. Members of the Town Council have had an interview with representatives of the Association at Nevill Hall, and were informed that the Association would b- prepared to hear the views of the Council on the matter. As the result of a special meeting, and after hearing reports prepared by the Medical Officer and Surveyor, the Council have passed the following resolution, which has been forwarded to the Association :— Resolved unanimously that this Council, whilst appreciating the desirability and necessity for the provision of hospitals for the treatment of those suffering from tubercular complaints, considers Nevill Hall unsuitable on account of its proximity to the river, the surrounding marshy ground, and the prevalence of fogs, and having heard the reports of the Medical Officer and Surveyor (copies herewith), the Council are also of opinion that the establishment of such a hospital at, the place above named is neither in the interests of the patients themselves or con- I ducive to the welfare of the inhabitants of the borough." AL

Christmas Parcels for Llantillio Pertholey Soldiers

Christmas Parcels for Llantillio Pertholey Soldiers. The house-to-house collection in the parish of 1\ Llantilio Pertholey for the purpose of raising funds to provide Christmas parcels for the men from the parish who are serving at home or? abroad has been well supported. It appears that there are over 100 men from the parish who are serving their country, about So of whom are serving abroad. The collection has amounted to about £ 38, and this will enable a good parcel to be sent to each man. It has been decided to send to each man serving abroad a parcel of the value of 8s., and to each one serving at home a parcel of the value of 4s., exclusive of postage in each case. The subscription list will remain open for a few days, and it is hoped that sufficient additional subscriptions will come in to defray the cost of postage. In the meantime inquiries are being made of various firms as to what they can supply for the amounts mentioned. +

No title

Victoria Cottage Hospital.-The Committee have pleasure in acknowledging, with their sincere thanks, the receipt of /io as a donation from the Abergavenny Workmen's Hospital Saturday Fund.

Family Notices

I BIRTHS, MARRIAGES & DEATHS. MARRIAGE. LEIGHTON—SAYCE.—On the 25th October, at the Parish Church, Windsor, by the Rev. Deacon, Ernest Albert (Canadian Exped. Force), son of the late Capt. and Mrs. R. O. Leighton, of Hull, to Cecilia Mary, third daughter of Mr. and Mrs. C. H. Sayce, of Teignmouth, and granddaughter of the late George Hand, of Beckbury, Salop. DEATHS. -NICHOLLS.-On October 22nd, at 17, Cross- street, William Henry Nicholls, L.D.S., aged 63 years.

TOBACCO FUNDI

TOBACCO FUND. I Already acknowledged .373 16 91 This week 0186 This week o 18 b ^374 15 3 10s. Clydach Male Voice Party, per Mr. Jenkins. 3s. Miss Morgan. 2s. 6d. Mrs. Butt. 2s. Mr. Gunter. Is. Mr. Green. ▲ ————

No title

A splendid selection of Writing Pads, from 2d. eac 1, at the Cluonicle Office.

PEEPS INTO THE PAST

[ PEEPS INTO THE PAST. LOCAL RECORDS OF OVER 50 YEARS AGO. ARTICLE XXLIV. f AR T,ICLE -91 As stated in the last article, the Commissioners owf etre considering the question of the provision of a new Cattle Market. After going into the details of the matter the General Committee? unanimously passed the following resolution: That it is the opinion of this committee, after I duly considering the danger and personal annoyance of permitting cattle, horses, sheep I and other animals to be exposed for sale in the public streets, that the Board of the Aberga- venny Improvement Commissioners should pro- ceed forthwith to take such steps as may be deemed desirable towards the construction of a general Cattle Market to provide sufficient I accommodation for 8,000 sheep, 600 cattle, 500 horses, and 400 pigs, together with suitable con- veniences in the way of sheds and other appur- tenances which are usually erected in cattle markets." In order to obtain a good general idea of the acreage required to accommodate the above-mentioned number of animals, the Clerk was directed to write a letter to each of the three fallowing gentlemen who were deemed com- petent to give an opinion on the subject, viz., Thos. Dyne Steel, C.E., Newport Mr. J. Curley, engineer, Ludlow and Messrs. Elmshe ic Co., architects, Hereford. Mr. Curley reolied that 3] acres would be required, Messrs. Elmslie & Co. 4 acres, and Mr. Dyne Steel 3 acres 12 roods 29 perches. The charges for these estimates were respectively two guineas, seven guineas, and two guineas, Mr. Steel's estimate was accompanied by a carefully-drawn ground plan of the Cattle Market in the mode which he proposed lm con- struct it. The committee thought it advisable to obtain two plans of the market, one from each, of two individual, for if only one plan was ordered the person furnishing it might be so attached to his system as to be averse to making any alterations, and his system might be such as the Board could not wholly approve. Designs for the Cattle Market. A committee was appointed to proceed to Ludlow to inspect the new cattle market being erected there and to obtain from Mr. Curley any information which they deemed desirable, and also to invite him to view the ground intended for the Cattle Market at Abergavenny. On June 20th, 1862, the deputation atroointed to visit Ludlow reported that they had called at the Hereford Market on the way and were given'' various particulars with regard to that market by the lessee. The greatest number of sheep ever known to be penned at Hereford was 3,500, and, consequently, the accommodation orovided proved to be more than required. The tolls charged were: Sheep id. each, pigs i Id. each and under to in number, and id. each over, entire horses is., ordinary size 6d., colts 3d. each, bulls 4d., other cattle 2d., and calves id. each the area of the market was 3 a. y. The committee afterwards visited Ludlow. where the an'a was similar and the total estimated cost of the market was £ 4,iS 3. The Board adopted the report of the com- mittee and requested Mr. Curley and Mr. Dyne Steel to furnish designs for the cattle market, to provide accommodation for 6,000 sheep in pens, 000 cattle, 400 horses, 400 pigs. They were to be paid £ io for their trouble, and the Board expected that the fee of the successful designer would be merged in the percentage of com- mission to prepare the plans and supenir: