Collection Title: Barry Dock news

Provider: The National Library of Wales

Rights: The copyright status or ownership of this resource is unknown.

View full details

First Previous Image 2 of 8 Next Last
Full Screen
11 articles on this page
Ur BIGHTS Reserved THE MYSTERY OF BEACON HALL

(Ur. BIGHTS Reserved.] THE MYSTERY OF BEACON HALL BY L. T5. REDMOND-HOWARD, Author of John Redmond (A Biography), In the Days of Parncll" (A Novel), &c. SYNOPSIS. DHP'FORD HnpE, r. famous i a, e defective, reoei rs a visit tiom Sir lc)uii Beacon, cf Beacon lIsa. who uuyyges his Berviees to unravel themjsterjr of a murde: ItaymoudJones, it young anthor, has iicen founl (trotr:;eil in tJJX- it-er nen the Hall. Nii, Louis tells Ifope of hi,; rfJIH'ict1nn thtt the author hai been uiurdertd y K.ohard Lionel Brace fold, a luau who has person at. d Tones during a vv-it to Sir Louis and Laujr JJeac >n. Nfithf-r hod met the au lior frevioiisJy, but Lady IJeflCoi; had b< en in'e c-t>.d in h s b.johs, ai 11 had accordingly invite.: him to t!i; ire I and ( aslie 1 a cheque in his ii:inic lor' £ 2 t.'ioo. While th aronet is to ling his tide cews comes of Anoilier tragedy at. Je.icon IIall-L:dy Beacon and hpr maid have bem murdered. nope go s tiowu to the Hd1, ■which is in Suf, ;k. see. tIe bodies. :H!d makes itjve^ijjraMons. The S'2r"an! declare thai the crime* tre due tu tit curse llich broods over ê h. I, use am Ï:m i jr. Hope i J nw.dltufcng in his rú(,llI lute at myht, when he receives a "i,1t ironi the butler. DilmoL the t:;t:cr, had merely c.iH. d, lie said, to » e that Hope bad all he r quire i i:?r the :.igi1t: bat the iict'tlw. h' JSpi('¡.jn ceitfj, qo. » >. <■ hi-tv. 1? Diitnot !t;\i_e nr.j- clue to the ii.ysi: -y. ■ nwvver, he k< ops it to hint .-el  that the bavon.-t and his wif" luijl act been as harpy to. her «ts I'lirnot's statf-im nt might i-B, C ied I itr. to be'iev. £ aler on, ttudy-tig the papers and plans, Hope S::ds that during; n a.iy a number of mysterious t'I\ Jit, have take i ;a.,1.: i;, the same roum at Heacon HuH, Next mo. fa; q he i tix-ives a Utter from Sir I.onis' medical ,I¡" stating tbafc the btironit has been prostraUd by ill NEWS oi his w:fe H murder, that he INTENDS to go abroad at ouee, without waiting for the funs-ral. Hope  covered signs of future genius, "this much at least I have found out. There are lv,-o distinct clues, both equally mysterious. To the first set belong the murders; to the second set the thefts. Both have, I think, the same author, or should have; but, strange to say, they appear to have diffe- rent motives, and this is just what militates against the popular theory which seems to put everything dovvn unthinkingly to Richard Lionel Braceford." "How do you make that out, sir*" "Quite simply, Pat," answered Depford Hope, who never missed an opportunity of impressing upon his assistant's mind there logical methods of thought which he had, in his own case, reduced to a fine art, and in which he stood unrivalled in the whole of England. "Murder, which the public looks upon as 80 inexplicable, is really the simplest and most logical of actions. If a man is a con- firmed thief and someone comes between him and his end, that thief is bound to be- come a murderer. "If a man is a confirmed egoist and some- one threatens his existence, or even his happiness, that egoist is bound to become a murderer. In both cases the law of self-preserva- tion makes him anticipate attack." "Certainly," redlied the attentive Pat. "Hence we n"iit"lqok for an explanation that' will fit ajfl the lads of the jcji^e, and  s, e, an show that the profitless death of tfi^ young author Raymona Yones and the very profit- able theft at Bowden's were accomplished by one and the same person." "Richard Lionel Braceford, of oourse," put in the boy instinctively. "Ah, that is just the question," replied the detective. "Apparently it is so, but what if the name be used merely to cloak another's misdeeds?" The boy was silent; the detective paused in thought. "I must see Sir Louis Beacon at once," said Hope at last, as if some thought had suddenly aroused him from his reverie. Just at this moment there came a knock at the door, and presently Pat returned with something in his hand. "A letter for you, sir," he said. Hope took it r.,? his hand and examined the signature and handwriting; on the back the arms and crest of the Beacons, however, told their own tale. But it was not from the baronet; it was from his family physician. It ran:- "Dear Mr. Hope,—Just a line to say the patient is somewhat better now, but ho passed a most trying night, and I feel most anxious about him. "I have therefore decided that the only thing that can save him from an absolute breakdown is to be taken at once abroad, even though he is most anxious to see Lady Beacon once again before she is con- signed to her tomb. "He has, however, allowed himself to be advised by me. Orders have been given that the funeral should take place im- mediately, and that the body should at once be sent to be cremated. "As to Sir Louis, I am taking him off with me to Hamburg for a few days, as a friend of mine has a small yacht there, and so we can enjoy a few sea trips. "I may add that he tortures himself day and night by a terrible fear that the man who has already wrought so many tragedies in his family and home may have marked him down as the next victim in the series of catastrophes which were announced. "My dear sir, I cannot end without ask- ing you to use all your great genius to track this Braceford to earth, and be assured that in doing so you have the most earnest sympathy oÍ-Yours truly, "FRANCIS MEDINA THOMSON." A shade of displeasure crossed the face cf the detective as he filed the letter among his other papers. Before doing so he was careful to note the hour at which it had been posted—6.30. Rather early, he thought, to have decided the trip abroad to the port for "American Liners." He looked at his watch; they would already have left Harwich; besides, of course, not having a word of evidence, he could not stop them, even if they had not. The great problem now was to placo "Richard Lionel Braceford" in this chaotic series of coincidences. The "Beacon Hall" facts could net, of course, be quite explicable bv supposing that he never existed, and yet this had at first been the uppermost thought in the mind of Depford Hope. That he was a i" real per- sonality was proved conclusively, he thought, by this daring robbery, and fcr this reason he lost no time iu going off at once to the scene of the incident narrated above, in order to draw at first hand thoso oircuinstances of detail which form the principal points in the brief of these hunts- men of criminals. It had evidentily been in Braceford's inte- rest that the telephone communication should be severed between Beacon Hall and town. As to Dilmot, ho might, of course, have been a tool of Bracefoid's, but cer- tainly it had b^en made sufficiently elear that there could be no public peace or security as long as the ruffian was abroad and at liberty. It never took Depford Hope long to make up his mind; and in the preeent case it took him less time than usual. "Taxi! h,- said suddenly. "Right, air." replied Pat, and in a few minutes Hope was going as rapidly as Oxford Street traffic would allow him to Bowden Stores. He sent in his card by a messenger, iiid at once the general manager came down, the official smile of affability but thinly veiling the anxiety which the morning's adventure had caused. "Mr. Depford Hope. I see," said lie. look- ing at the diminutive piece of pasteboard1. "Yes, that is mj- name; perhaps you may know my profession." "I think there are few, indeed, who are ignorant of the most celebrated name since the days of Sherlock Hohnes." "I hate compliments, sir," replied the de- ttvtive somewhat -sternly, "I do my duty, that's all." "Excuse me, Mr. Hope, the phrase was merely a way of expressing my gratitude for tho great public set-vice you render," said the manarj-er, "and I only hope that it will continue. ;> We have just, is no doubt you already know, bron ourselves victims." "That is just the very point I liave come to you about." "Thank you kindly, Me. Hope. It was certainly a considerable sum to lose at o.1 swoop." H Can you give me the details of this strange business?" "I am afraid that beyond what is already common property in the public press I can ¡ give you no further information whatsoever, but, at any rate, it has cost the firm too ¡ much already, and will do more, to throw away any opportunities for facilitating the necessary investigation." "I shall not detain you long." "I am entirely at your service," answered the manager, "and I may add confiden- 1 tially that our firm has decided to offetr a reward of one thousand pounds to anyone giving information that will lead to the, re- covery of the stolen diamonds." Depford Hope gave him one of his cold looks of disapproval, and simply remarked: I "My profession is a vocation, not a busi- ness." The manager then leading the way, Hope followed into the jewellery department, where he instantly began cross-examining the clerks." "There were two men, you say? "Yes, sir, two." "How old? "Could not say, sir; both middle-aged." Did they speak English?" -k B "Partly English, partlj Spanish." "Did they have a taxi? "No, a private motor." "What number?" I co L.B. 603." "How did you find out? "Well, only just a minute ago; when the news had become publio a tramp called in to say he had noticed it." "Where is he?" He went off again, .ir." Did you give him slnythi'n He would not take it, air. Strange." Yes, he did look strange, sir. It must have been about half-past ten at the time." For a moment Depford Hope paused to think. "Shall I look up the 'Motor Guide, said one of the attendants brightly. "You may if you like," Ireplied Hope, walking off without waiting for the result. "lie won't be a minute," chimed in tho manager. "It will be a splendid clue too." Depford Hope smiled benigulv. "As if the man who was capable of such, a magnificently planned stroke would have gone about with that note of identification round his n^ck "I can't find it, sir," said another atten- dant, coming up with the book in question. "Tell the gentleman who inquired," was the curt answer of Depford Hope, for if there was anything which the famous de- tective disliked it was what a barrister Wô. call "volunteered information." It w' rarely to the point whelt rIe, never •when not 60; and it was not often that Hope omitted to ask any question the answer to which oould throw any light upon his case. "I should like principally to get some information about the private detective." No one had, apparently, however, taken much notice of him, though every one had at their fingers' etids the features and man- nerisms of the Duke and the Duke's secre- tary. The fact that both had. spoken Spanish was certainly a clue, and accordingly Dep- ford Hope wander-ed back into the book department, and pulled out a new copy of the "Medical Directory." "Thomson, Francis Medina, son of Dr. B. Thomson, of Edinburgh, and Cousha Aguilar, of San Eulalia, Brazil, educated Glasgow, Paris, and Madrid. Sometime professor of anatomy in Melbourne; retired 1879. London address, Harley Street Man- sions, 3B. Clubs: Carlton and Royal Yacht, Cowes." He closed the book and returned it to the shelf. "A professor in Melbourne does not re Lire, on a pension," he thought to himself, "nor is it likely that his practice has given him sufficient to join the clubs he seems to frequent. I want to know more of you, Dr. Thomson." (To be Continued.)

Advertising

All SIMPLE SIMON asks is a, homo, in your boiler. SJRM The marvel-work- ing soap. Ask your grocer; he knows. Costs 3id. Worth Ess »

BARRY COUNTY SCHOOL GOVERNORS

BARRY COUNTY SCHOOL GOVERNORS. I A meeting of the governors of Barry County School was held on Wednesday last, Mr. J. Lowdon, J.P., in the chair. The members present were Mrs. Sib- bering Jones, Mrs. Longdon, Mr. J. Marshall, J.P., Dr. P. J. O'Donnell, J.P., the Rev. D. H. Williams, M.A., Mr. S. R. Jones, Mr. J. R. Llewellyn, and Mr. J. Felix Williams. There were 120 applications for the post of caretaker for the Girls' County School, and at the suggestion of the Chairman it was decided to make the appointment from amongst loca'l candi- dates, these applications, of which there were nineteen, being referred to a committee composed of the Chair- man, Mrs. Sibbering Jones, and Mr. J. R. Llewellyn. Amongst other business, application was made for a bursary by the parents of one of the scholars, and the matter was left to the Chairman and Head Master.

INDIGESTION CAN BE WARDED OFF

INDIGESTION CAN BE WARDED OFF! Most of us art-, liible to have indigestion. Our ever-changeful climate severely taxes the j digestive organs, our modern habit of d(piiig everything in a hurry leaves the stomach little repose, and we can't always spare the time to eat slowly and rest awhile afterwards. On!y a strong healthy stomach can stand the conditions of modern life, and if you toward off pains after eating, a sense 01 uilness and weight, ihituiencc, and all the other miseries of indigestion, you must keep your stomach healthy and strong. If for any reason your stomach loses tone and efficiency, take Mother Seigel's 'Syrup after your meals for a while, and note the improvement in your health—the increase of your vigour. Be sure you get the genuine Mm her Seigel's Syrup. No other remedy before the public possesses its splendid powers of toning up and strength- ening the stomach, and of gently stimulating of.lhfeJ.iver.and bowels

CORRESPONDENCE

CORRESPONDENCE. The Editor deaitee to nate bart A8 does not neoesSArijr endorse the opinion expressed by Correspondents. Give mt ahove all other liberties, the liberty to knew, to utter, and to argae freely, according to conscience."—John Milton. RECRUITING. To the Editor of the Barry Dock News." Sir,—I find that there are hundreds of men in my Recruiting Sub-area (Barry. Penarth, Dirias Powis, and the districts around), who have not at- tested under the Group System, nor obtained certificates of exemption under the Military Service Act. I write to appeal to all men to come up and join the Group System whilst it is open. The Recruiting Office is open from 9 until 8 every day, and the last day for Single men joining will be Wednesday next. J. A. HUGHES, Col. R.O., Barry. BARRY CHAMBER OF TRADE AND PRICE OF GAS. To the Editor of the Barry Dock I News." Sir,—In your issue of the 18th in- stant, in the report of the Barry Dis- trict Council meeting, it is stated that a letter was received from the Barry Chamber of Trade expressing disap- proval of the action of the Gas and 'Water Committee in not raising the price of gas. As a matter of fact, the letter of the Chamber of Trade ex- pressed approval of that course, not disapproval, and I should be glad if you would publish this letter.—Yours faithfully, A. T. HAMMOND, Secretary. I 11 A DANGtER TO THE COM- itUNITY." To the Editor of the Barry Dock News." Sir,-In last week's issue was a let- ter signed A Britisher." Permit me to say how little the writer knows of what he speaks. There needs to be very little foisting done to attain to office; as a matter of fact, look where you will, you will find that the most I active trade unionist, as a rule, is an I.L.P.'er, and he gets there through sheer ability and usefulness. He naturally comes to the top in spite of himself, and to-day is giving the lead to the trade union movement through- out the country. Secondly, as to being pro-Germans. This proves how ignor- ant any person must be as to what the I.L.P. stands for. If there was as little pro-German about many individuals and companies that we have in the country to-day, as there is in the I.L.P., it would be a good job for us, and we would not then be getting fleeced like we are now, but should be having the necessaries of life at a much more normal rate. Thirdly, as to being wind-bags, soap-box orators, and ver- min, only a person who has no argu- ment resorts to such utterances. There are no more able men in this country than those who are leading the I.L.P., and while we are to-day taking the stand which makes us unpopular, we shall, soon or late, have our turn. Our business is to do what we know to be right, and that we mean to do, and to call us such names but honours us. One was crucified because He did what He thought was right. LOCAL MEMBER, I. L P LOCAL fEMBER! I.L.P. EMPLOYMENT OF ALIENS AT DOCK WORKSHOPS. I To the Editor of the Barry Dock News." Dear Sir,-AVill you permit me, through your columns, to warn fellow- workmen of a grave matter which at present gives promise of menacing our future occupations, unless prompt ac- tion be taken to prevent such an occur- rence. I mean the gradual introduc- tion of foreign labour (skilled and un- skilled) into the dock workshops. Lately the employment of aliens has increased to an alarming .extent, and it is not a very cheerful proposition to find these foreigners jumping into jobs formerly occupied by men who are now somewhere in France," and also of others who have been called up by the group system. Surely it was never the intention of the Government to allow those responsible for the working of the controlled establishments to in- I suIt our fighting men in this fashion. It is common knowledge that as far as our sea-going population is con- cerned, the Bristol Channel ports were in the past the dumping ground for the world's riff-raff, and we shall undoub- tedly have an experience of this in our workshops unless we immediately lodge a protest. Having had considerable experience in connection with the em- ployment of labour, I can candidly as- sure my fellow-workmen that once the susceptible alien gets firmly established he will take some shifting, and will never go back home. Furthermore, we must not lose sight of the fact that as soon as this war ter- minates, there is bound to be a big slump in the ship-re-pairing trade, when tho presence of the alien will be most strongly felt. Therefore we must prevent him making a bed of roses of the job Tommy left behind. Our ab- sentees are fighting for their King and Country, and for the interests of the employers especially, and it is the duty of those who are exempt from military service to' see that the great sacrifices made shall be appreciated by the em- ployers otherwise than by filling the gaps with aliens.—Yours faithfully, FRED J. TUCKER. I 24, Llewellyn-street, Cadoxton-Barry.

I SMARTING PILES CURED

I SMARTING PILES CURED. I FARMER'S WIFE AND ZAM-BUE'S I FA-R.Afl,,R,S IVIFE A-i\']D Z.A?NT-BUK'S i I POWER. II Further clear proof of Zam-Buk's great soothing and healing power is furnished by Mrs. A. L. Burbage, of Taylor's Farm, Burton Green, near Christchurch, Bournemouth. "I suffered terribly from itching, burning piles," sa;"d Mrs. Burbage to a "Bournemouth Guardian" reporter. "They were so bad that I was away from work at the dairy about two months, and for a fortnight I had to stay in bed. Sleep was impossible, and the constant irritation fairly wore me out. "Having found Zam-Buk very use- ful for painful cuts and bruises, I now tried the balm for my piles. A few ap- I plications of soothing Zam-Buk con- vinced me that I had found the right remedy at last, for this herbal balm allayed the torturing pain. As I kept up .the treatment, the smarting piles went away. I have been quite free from this distressing complaint for some time. ".This lis not the only time I have used Zam-Buk. Living opposite the village sciiool, I often have children brought to me when they hurt themselves. One little boy, wlion playing on the village green. was cut on the head by a slate. Zam-Buk quickly healed the place. A nurse who saw the boy remarked how splendidly the broken skin had knitted together. "A young woman fractured her leg in a cycle accident. Although treated by a doctor, the limb, after being set, would not heal properly. I advised her to use Zam-Buk. IV, hilst treating her leg with Zam-Buk, some splinters of loose bone that had prevented the wound healing came away on the band- ages. The place was then quickly healed up by Zam-Buk. "In many other cases I have recom- mended Zam-Buk, and always with the best results. Be sure you get Zam-Buk. Beware of cheap imitations and useless substi- tutes. )

I TO APHRODITE

I TO APHRODITE. Thou art more fair than April's sunny lfower, Half hidden in the dewy grass; More radiant than the trembling leaves in shower, As sunbeams thro' them pass: More pure than winter's raiment white, When moon-beams kiss the sparkling ground; More dear to me than summer's golden light, On Nature's brow with autumn leaflets crowned. Thy smile, to me, a gift of rarest worth, Can compensate my saddest thought; Thy life brings fragrant beauty to the earth, A radiance God has wrought. My heart, thy lovely face to greet, Leaps up for joy, when thou art nigh; Across thy path, I fling all flowers sweet, With one heart's wish that they would never die. I Barry Pocks. G.M.T. I

BARRY SCRIPTURE EXAMINAI TION

BARRY SCRIPTURE EXAMINA- I TION. The Rev. J. Lewis Evans presided at a meeting of the Barry District Sunday School Union on Tuesday evening last, at Salem Schoolroom, Barry Docks. On the proposition of Mr. S. R. Jones, it was decided to apply to the Education Authority for use of the schools for the annual scripture ex- amination on March 10th. The President intimated that the number of entrants showed a decrease of 38. The following were appointed super- visors of the examination:—Messrs. Fred James, A. Francis, Harry Wil- liams, James Rodliffe, C. Mitchell, H. Wickett, J. H. Edwards, Miss G. M. Ferguson. and Mrs. Campbell. The examiners last year will again officiate this year.

IISUCCESS OF BARRY VAD WHIST DRIVE

II SUCCESS OF BARRY V.A.D. WHIST DRIVE. On Thursday last, at the Masonic Hall, Barry, a highly successful whist drive and dance was held in aid of the funds of the Barry Red Cross Meirs Detachments. The hall, which had been specially decorated for the occa- sion, was crowded. The prizes were given away by Mrs. T. P. Prichard, Beaconsfield. The MJC. for the whist drive was Mr. McCoy; whilst Mr. W. Hopkins acted as M.C. of the dance. ¡

LOCAL PLACES OF PUBLIC 1 AMUSEMENT 4

LOCAL PLACES OF PUBLIC 1 AMUSEMENT. ,4 THEATRE ROYAL, BARRY. 1 Visitors to the Theatre Royal, B?rry? 1 on the first three evenings of this we4 1 have been treated to a -thoroughly en- joyable bill of fare. One visits the Theatre, and experience promotes one to anticipate a programme worth see- ing. "Destiny," or "The Soul of a Woman," was the star item, and was supported by such excellent dramas as His Two Patients," and At the Pos- tern Gate." Charlie Chaplin, in one of his amusing comedies, was responsible for roars of laughter by his antics and mischievous pranks as champion writ server. Other comics were Avenged by a fish and For better but worse." The exact state of affairs at the front were vividly illustrated in Pathe's Ani- mated Gazette, and part three of the British Army iij France. The title of part three was "The making of an officer with the Artists' Rifles," and was greatly enjoyed. Marse "Covington," a Metro film, will be the principal item of a really great programme of pictures to be screened to-night (Thursday), and the remainder of the week. "The Secret of the Cellars," and episode eleven of the splendid serial, The Broken Coin," will support the star. The eleventh episode cf this enthralling serial shows the war between Coronia and Koinardia, and the part taken therein by Lucille Love, Roleaux, and Hugo Loubeque. Roleaux and Hugo engage in a terrific fight on the train. The comedies are Fickle Flo's Flirtation and A' Lucky Leap," whilst Pathe's Animated Gazette concludes a decidedly enjoy- able exhibition. On Monday next Mr. Fred Clements, who recently scored such a success at Barry with his popular pantomime, Aladdin/' will present the same com- pany in a musical revue, entitled, "I'm Sorry." The revue was written by Mr. Jimmy Coyens, who takes a leading part in the production, and the caste includes such clever and capable ar- tistes as Miss Mabel Hind, Miss Evely-a Grace, Messrs. Willy Cave, Jimmy Coyens, and Sidney Bray. Novel and unique.dances will be presented by the Brewster Quintette of dancers. The varieties include Newco and Sullo, the eccentric pair, Ada Durham, comedienne and dancer, the latest comedy picture, and Brocks Comedy Cyclists. The chorus will consist of a bevy of bright and beautiful girlss who combine clever acting with sweet voices, and the augmented orchestra will be under the capable direction of Mr. Arthur Rawson. I'm Sorry will undoubtedly prove as great a suc- cess as Aladdin." No higher praise, can be bestowed. ROMILLY HALL, BARRY. This week end, "The Stolen Actress," an engrossing story of Bohemian life, in three reels, will be the star item of a well arranged programme at the Roinilly Hall this week end. This production in one of Pasqnal's best. The photography and plot aro exceptionally good and the acting excellent. Part 4 of Our Navy will also be included in the programme. Next week, the first of a series of Great World Productions will be screened, entitled "Alias Jimmy Valentine," Paul Ausking's famous play; featuring that capable artist, Robert Warwick. This picture, which is in five reels, created a great sensation in America, and has been very favourably receivpd in this country wherever shewn. It is of really extraordinary merit, :a detective crime drama in the very front rank of film accomplishments. A veritable feast of sensation and isetitiment. Striking characters and some of the most magnificent acting ever witnessed on the screen is shewn in this film. It was recently exhibited in Sing Sing Prison and the remark of Jimmy Valentine that every crook would go straight if he got the chance, was cheered to the echo. Fancy fourteen hundred men imprisoned for every known crim^, wildly cheering- the buri< d instinct of good, the yearning fora better life beingbroughtto the surface by this excellent picture play. KING78 HALL, BARRY. One of the most popular productions of the celebrated Metro Film Company will be produced on the first three evenings of next week at the King's Hall, Barry, "When a Woman Loves" being the feature of an attractive pro- gramme. This film deals with the sacrifices a woman will make when she loves and is not loved. Supporting When a Woman Loves will be the latest war pictures and "The British Army in France," part four, showing a machine-gun school at the Front. A full programme of the latest dramas and comedies will be shown.

Advertising

i |^Hr j ?H?RME??j I !??'????????????B B j P&'Omilz oi One-Outor fertac. j I Archergs j I lc:ti,)I,de,n Returns; «