Collection Title: Barry Dock news

Provider: The National Library of Wales

Rights: The copyright status or ownership of this resource is unknown.

View full details

First Previous Image 2 of 8 Next Last
Full Screen
6 articles on this page
Advertising

iii' — ——————————————————, _—————————— ??K?\ !SEMeA6EMEKTsWEOBtNE 7 ?< ?B!jB??????? |S§|r8 ?? the most fitting symbol is a Ring from H. ;-=e l 's. Here you will be sure of getting ? I   S<'?!?E?? TS?B??? ???? ?? money can buy—? King of riing va l ue, exquisitely fas h ione d of fl ? ?????? ?SNt?,. 3F^«y > i!i!filJi 1 'atest design, an d one that wi'! he a joy for a lifetime. And at H. Samue l s the /?JM?t )) ?? iK??' Mext to Factory Prices )———— ————— ) !f!M???? ??' Vy({UnJiJi ? t save Money for you! I XMAS WEDDINGS. L/??T? ?' it Yn-x!?n\ X ?I DIAMCWD EWSAC £ McHT RlfjOS. S t J \?.. 1 im digestive system are speedily dispelled by I BEECH AM'S $ -}; r!J' i PILLS i J There is yet another point that you should mark on the tablet of yor 5 memory. Beecham's Pills, in addition to their acknowledged value m 1 ? kidney, liver and stomach disorders, have a specially beneficial effect in 5 $ »uch ai1D tR as are peculiar to women, many of whom endure needless $ > pain and ill-health through ignorance of this important fact. < 'WM,VUUMi\'tV\VVVU\MV\V\WVVVU*WV\ wwwvvwwvwwwww* W I ''

jBARRY CYMRODORION j SOCIETY

BARRY CYMRODORION SOCIETY. WELSH IN SCHOOL ANI) CHURCH. This was the title of an address delivered to the Barry Cymrodorion Society on Tuesday week last by Air. 0. Jones Owen, Hiigiher Elementary School, Porth. Mr. \V. Bryn Davies presided. Mr. Owen prefaced his remarks by referring to attacks that are, sometimes made against Welsih. These outbursts were praotioalLy always made by Welshmen, and were the result of an extra dose of snobbery," arising out of ignorance concerning the commer- cial, mental, moral, and religious bene- fits to be derived from a thorough knowledge of Welsh. An Englishman is always true to his language, and when will thesie snobs understand that they will never be a-dtiiired when they try to betray the traditions and aspirations of their homeland, by aping foreign traits. Instead of stabbing the Welsh movement in the back, as it welre, when such valiant attempts are being made to claim for the Welsh lan- guage its proper sphere on the time tables of schools in Wales, such men should blame the spirit of the age, the old-fashioned methods in use in our schools and churches, our failure to understand the pyschology. of ohild: mind, for the failure they attribute to the use of the Welsh tongue in Sunday schools. Mr. Owen proceeded to cite authorities who favour and support bi- lingual training. The Welsh Depart- rnent of the Board of Education, and the cream of tho talent of our country, atirongly advocate an advance in child f world on rational and national lines, and, with the exception of a few Welshmen who are out of touch with the inner Ife of Wales, the real Welsh atmosphere, and, more or less ignorant of the educational possibili- ties of a bilingual training, the con- sensus of opinion is on the side of the nationalist. It should not be forgotten that practically all prominent Welsh- men are bilinguists of the first order; moreover, they are scions of the cottage and not of the court. And that order of things should he preserved. The labour group could hardly >do better than encourage a national trait that is so democratic in iiid prac- tice; and the Labour movement •in Wales could be more rapidly furthered by a closer attention to the inherent characteristics of the nation, and would permeate the whole of the coun- try along natioiiial lines. Surely the opponents of Welsh Nationalism would not liko the literature of Wales, not- ably pure and moral in matter, and soul elevating in its influenc-e, to re- niain a hidden treasure from future generations.. Educationists state that from a moral point of view, history and literature are the subjects most in- fluential ill the formation of character. Is it then not natural to conclude that the history of his own country, and its literature, would appeal more to the Welsh child than that of foreign nations. The preservation of the ver- nacular is consequently a sine qua non if Welsh children are to develop on national lines. A -nation which allows her language to go to ruin, is parting with the best half of her in- tellectual independence, and testifies her willingness to cease to exist and further, "-To lose your native tongue, and leeirn that of an alien, is the worst badge of conquest—it is tho chain on the soul. To have lost en- tirely the national language is dealth- the fetter has worn through." The lecturer criticised severely the heresy of a few who wish to anglicise Welsh places of worship on the plea that the language difficulty is a hindrance to religious growth. He reminded his compatriots in Barry that a short cut is all very well, when the issue is known to beoonenclial, but that a leap, with open eyes, into a condition proved to be a failure, is to commit national suicide. The Welshmen of Barry should not give the fatal blow to Welsh life in its best aspects; they should not deny their children the best things that Wales can offer them, its sermon, hymn, Sunday school, and eisteddfod. They do not desire the ex- cellent educational possibilities of our system of two languages, which is un- known in England, to disappear, and a monoglot system substituted. Prof. Miall Edwards says that such a step would be a stab to our nationality, and I a serious loss to thb religious thought of the world. Mr. Owen advocated ap- proaching the English parent living in Wales to point out the serious loss to his child—from a commercial, mental, and also moral point of view, accruing from the preisent methods of teaching the Welsh language in our schools. Two languages are always better -thlan otne: a'nd especially when the chance is afforded of acquiring a thorough conversational knowledge of the second language. Why should not the Eng- lish parent demand that his child be taught his second language in a cldss of his own compatriots; in other! words, before an English child can learn Welsh properly, so that it can be of practical value to him, the Eng- lish and Welsh children should be .1.1 !=! taught separately. Sueih an arrange- ment should be made compulsory in our schools, more especially for the sake of the English child. I-lo&tts under the National Insurance Act,. and other Acts yet- due to Wales, would thØll be open to the English pupils. They would also bo more of an asset in the churches as prieslt or pastor, in our schools, in commercial offices (accord- ing to Mr. E. T. John, M.P., a success- ful ironmaster iin the North of Eng- land), in places of business, etc.- Such a training would help the English pupils to learn other languages with greater facility, a,nd fit .them to be- come consnls, agents, etc., in other countries, who would be able to graspo the new situations much quicker from their previous experience of two lan- guages and two peoples. At present this is the weak spot in the schools of England: and the English pupils in Wales have a chance of a better and more beneficial training, such as is afforded in continental countries. Pub- lic representatives should be elected who are alive to the best methods of education in other countiries where two languages, and more, are taught. Mr. Owen concluded his lecture bv giving suggestions of programmes for Welsh societies, the best methods of teaching W elsh, and valuable hints to church home, and school. A hearty vote of thanks was accorded the lecturer, on the moition of. Mr. Arthen Evans, seconded by Miss; Evans, B.A.

Advertising

Keep Peps handy as the one sure and safe for coughs and colds. The Peps medi- cine reaches every part of the throat and chest and makes it easy to kw defy the weather perils of

I KfcVIEW OF PUBLICATIONS I

KfcVIEW OF PUBLICATIONS. I SOUTH WALES SHIPPING AND DRY DOCK COMPANIES, 1916. Vve have received for review the an- nual booklet published by the Business Statistics Company Ltd., Cardiff showing the capital of each company, last balance sheets, profits and: divi- dends. The booklet is published at 1/- nett, and should be welcomed by all needing information concerning South Wales shipping and dry dock com- panies.. SIMPLIFYING CALCULATIONS The u\\ ireless World" has made a special feature for many months past of original articles providing ingenious niet-hods of avoiding cumbersome for- miulse and elaborate figuring in wireless calculations. These are unpublished and unobtainable elsewhere. They I have been thoroughly appreciated by practical men, and in the current issue Lieut. Bertram Hoyle, R.N.V.R., of H.M.S. Excellent, adds another to the series. This writer was in peace time well-known in connection with his wireless work for the Mane-Hester School of Technology, and since the outbreak of war has placed his expert knowledge at the disposal of his coun- try. His article will make a special i appeal to all students and others inter- ested in wireless telegraphy.

BARRY DOCK WESLEYAN ORGAN RECITAL

BARRY DOCK WESLEYAN ORGAN RECITAL. A grand Organ Recital will be given at Barry Dock Wesleyadi Church on Sunday afternoon next, by Private George Crofts, A.R.C.O., Lancashire Fusilieirs, Mr. W. Smith in the chair. Sülections from Dr. Peace, Beethoven, Cowen, Guilmont, Wolstenholme, and Silas. Miss Dilys Jones, Penarth, will be the soloist, and Mr. G. Waters the elocutionist. Mr. T. Vivian Rees will conduct a special service at 11 a.m.; and the Rev. H. C. Weaver, B.A., will offi- ciafn- in the evening.

ST PArIR ANNUAL SALE

ST. PArI/R ANNUAL SALE. The annual sale in connection with St. Paul's Church, Barry, was HH on Wednesday last, in the Mission Room, when a large display of plain and fancy needlework, jams, jollies, chutneys, vegetables, etc.. were dis- posed of. Through the kindness of a well-known manufacturing firm, a nake compctitio.n took place. a.nd proved keen and interesting. The proceeds, as usual, represented a substantial sum.