Collection Title: North Wales Chronicle and Advertiser for the Principality

Provider: The National Library of Wales

Rights: The copyright status or ownership of this resource is unknown.

View full details

First Previous Image 5 of 8 Next Last
Full Screen
29 articles on this page
THE TRUE METTLE 4

clever enough to select for their, reprisals tialu liop-6 ot Peers, who promptly rose III the [ Aioitee of Lords and attacked the Govern- ment" —an assertion for which there is no 'W,iri a ut. The House of Lords contains a large pro- ii-'Xtion of men over military age, ami among ?em arc numbered many of the most hon- oured and distinguished counsellors of the Nation wjio nave won their reputation in fcvery blanch of public service. The total Hiem;>er.-hip of tne Upper Chamber is 656. Uf these Peers, lb4 are or have been serving .with His Majesty's iorces. In addition, id 1'eers of Ireland and 4 Peers cf Scotland, Who do not sit in Parliament, claim the same hmour. 'Ihe record of the song of Peers °tte.rcs the same spirit, as tiie following figures show:— fcOAS or PEERS (PRESENT HOLDERS I OP TITLES). I Eldest Other OOilH. Sons. Total. who have been; ó}1 ?? serving with H.M. N ?'Mccs 226 219 445 Number killed 2? 21 49 ?mb?r wounded 20 23 43 ¿, UiU (I ?um?er prisoners 3 6 9 .mber missing 1 — 1 It is a matter of common knowledge that Infers and members of their families who are precluded from active military service are among the iiiost valuable and energetic work- ers m the wide field of organisation and charity where every available helper is needed nt. the present time. Tho appointment of Lord Harlech to the command of the Welsh Guards is a highly popular one. Lord Harlech's family has many intimate associa- tions with Wales and the border counties, (J the Border Counties' Advertiser per- tinently points out that "under his lordship's Command there will be a new and apt mean- ing in the familiar old words of 'The March of the Men of Harlech' and, we may be sure, if opportunity comes, they will once more ju&tily Taihaiarn's glowing tribute to the lnJOusfighting powers of the Welsh Warrior."

Advertising

ROWN s ? f CHESTER. K 0 'S K • 1— e g «g, g U p -to- d ate Store with over 20 de p artments # | — ————————————— | i GREAT J ¡  | SUMMER SALE | | kd» ( SATURDAY NEXT, | | ( June 26th. I 3 $8 i To purchase now is to practise true economy. || ? Nearly everything has risen in price and wH) i ? rise still highep-in fact, certain class of Goods will be unprocurable. At present we f t hold large stocks, and during our sale, will i ? ? 0 ?\d' i offep everything at reduced prices. § S Illustrated Catalogue on application. ? All trams from station pass our doors || Doors open at 9 a.m. || 16 Chester. I*& Brown & Co., 34/40,? Chester, § ? « æ

I ITHE EISTEDDFODI

I THE EISTEDDFOD. Though many will appreciate the feelings .fthich actuated the Bishop of St. Asaph in Writing to the Press upon the wisdom of holding the National Eisteddfod at Bangor in t, we are afraid his lordship's letter add to the predicaments of the Executive timmitteo. But for the financial responsi- bilities resting upon their shoulders and in- curred by them before the war broke out the Committee would doubtless have abandoned the gathering long ago. The natural im- pulse of us all at this moment is to decry any gathering which appeals "in lighter vein' to the people; and the weakness of some of Reui- .y Lewis' arguments,, especially that l'elating to the South Wales colliers claiming 11 holiday to attend the Eisteddfod, will not toll-, iiiec ra.(,st people of the necessity of hold- ing the festival. At the same time, the com- mittee have more than ordinary claim upon the indulgence of the public, who probably, hnder the circumstances, will, from feelings .o- sympathy, do all they can to promote its "Uccess. But everything depends upon the Railway Companies.

A DIFFERENCE HEREAFTERI

"A DIFFERENCE HEREAFTER." I 4tr Bonar Law, in his speech at Shrews- wlry School, laid stress upon a point C't supreme importance in the luture develop- ftient of the nation. Hitherto there has been much "horizontal cleavage" amongst us. Class distinctions and social gradations have 40t only acquired a noxious prominence and ft menacing political significance, but under the influence of incessant agitation they have threatened to become a cause of disastrous dissension and' division throughout the com- munity. The war has taught us that we are ad one people, that in the hour of danger Our unity of sentiment and character over- whelms our superficial differences, that noble b"J'a\'erv and sublime self-sacrifice are not the monopoly of any class. We must learn to dispel old prejudices and give the right value to the imperishable fact of cur national fra- ternity, proved, as it has been, on the most terrible battlefields in the world's story.

EDITORIAL NOTESI

EDITORIAL NOTES. I -if8 and Strays. I the North Wales branch of the Church of ~Jigland Waifs and Strays Society is responsible T1)r the maintenance of homes at Tregnrift. Car- narvon, Bodorgan, Dolgelley, and Wrexham, and It:is evidentKfrom the report presented to the an- fcual meeting oil Monday that much good is ac- mplished under the auspices of the society. Ie question of dealing in the most efficacious ""a-y with the little waifs and strays in town and country has received the serious attention of nu- merous phi]anthropists, cod such agencies ae the  represent an ear.Dt and Strays Society represent an carilest endeavour to solve what is to-day an important economical proo-eiii. "The war nas taugnc us to look at the question in a very different light," said the Bishop of Bangor, wnen he alluded to the ilic i present in the rimics ot some that ctolKUen were an incumbrance and a burden to the State generally. The war has impressed upon us the important part which numerical etrength of popu- lation plays in the great conflict. Germany, with a popuiauon ot nearly bo millions, its a Die to place in the fighting line three men to every two that France can place. Although Prance is al- most equal in area. to Germany, yet its popula- tion is only 40 millions. Ihe Waiis and Strays Society and other similar agencies may, as tne Bishop remarked, be looked upon as means to avoid the waste of good material and "to make what might come to be regarded as human rub- bish into good and capable citizens." I Famous Welsh Regiment. I I "Y oa belong to a regiment which bears an ancient and honoured name, which has traditions, and rejoices in a long succession of glorious deeds." These words were spoken by Brigadier General Owen Thomas when he addressed the men of the 18th Battalion Royal Welsh Fusiliers (2nd London Welsh) at Penrhyn Park 0n Fri- day. All who know anything of the history of the famous regiment wid see the force of General Owen Thomas' appeal to the men to maintain the honour and to take pride in the traditions of the Royal Welsh Fusiliers. Writing some months ago to the Times, the lion. John Fortescu-e st.ated that of the three surviving Welsh regi- ments now known to us as the Royal Welsh Fusi- liers (23rd), the South Wales Borderera (24th), and the Welsh Regiment (41st and 69th), the fiiet alone was originally raised in Walev, having been formed in 1689. The deeds of these gallant icgirnents are in themselves graphic records of what Welshmen have done towards the building up and preservation of the Empire. The 23rd is I the only regiment which can boast that it lia3 taken part in the four sternest fights of the I British Army during two centuries Schelleu- berg, NlltiCten, Albuera, and Inkerman. I Bangor Friendly Societies. I As there is a large proportion cf the members of the various Friendly Societies serving with His Majesty's Forces, doubiless circumstances make it difficult, if not impossible, for a good many of them to keep up their contributions and so retain the benefits of their society. The Friendly Societies throughout the country are not behind other sections of the community in doing all they can for the men who have enlisted in the Navy and Army, and it is not too much to expect that those who are at home will make some sacrifice on behalf of their brethren fight- ing for King and country. The regular payment of contributions is one of the fundamental rules of a friendly society, and if arrears extend over a time limit the member ceajsei to be entitled to the I benefits of the society. This is what may happen in the catie of soldiers, and it is to provide against such contingencies that the Friendly Societies in I Bangor have decided to make a small levy upon the members at home. As a correspondent points out, the demand amounts to no more than one I halfpenny per head week y. Surely no one will begrudge such a cinall outlay to make secure tho I membership of gallant men who: rG risking their lin-cs "ii defence of their country. On the contrary the step taker, in Bangor should, if it l-ws not al- ready done so, commend itself to other branches of the Friendly Societies in North Wales. I New Hospital at LianCefni. I The opening of the new tuberculosis hospital at I Llangefni on Tuesday by Lady Magdalen NN il- liams-Biilkeley was a ceremony which aroused considerable interest. It marks the rapid strides made in the county, under the auspices of the Welsh National Memorial, in combating the ravages of consumption. The movement has done well in Anglesey, where over £ 50(30 has been collccted, and tne generosity of the Treborth family, to whom the Hon. Violet Douglas Pennant, one of the Welsh Insurance Commis- sionNJ, paid a graceful tribute, has been of very material assistance in carrying on the good work. Mr H. R. Daviec-, who is now engaged on mili- tary duties, is the chairman of the Anglesey "local committee, has taken an active interest in the movement, and has an ardent supporter in his brot-her, Mr J. R. Davies, of Oris. It will also not be forgotten that the Memorial Association's first acquisition in Anglesey was the Penhesgyn Home, presented by Miss Davies. The accom- modation at this institution haa already been doubled, and w-ill shortly be quadrupled. With the additional facilities afforded by the new hos- pital at Llangefni, the Association's work will be greatly facilitated, and tuberculosis patients will I derive the greater benefit which t he:e philan- thropic institutionc are able to confer. I Sequel to the Pier Accident. I We congratulate the Bangor Corporation and the Town Clerk, Mr Pentiv Williams, on whose shoulders rested the responoibi-ity of advising them, upon the suoce-sful outcome of their action against the owners of the s.s. "Christiana." It will be remembered that during an exceptionally heavy gale the steamer, which tra-des be- tween the North Wales coa.st and Liverpool, col- lided wit.h the pier, inflicting great damage, in defending an action of this nature it is possible to adopt arguments which have often proved 6uocessiul j that the accidcnt was beyond human

EDITORIAL NOTESI

control, t-.te. More than ordinary risk in pursuing the action was therefore undertaken by t-iio corporation advisers, but the jmtness of their claim was recognised by the court. The rate- payers are naturally jubilant, though as damages are assessed on the tonnage of the boat, it j,; probable that the town may not come off entire- ly Acot free from some expanse.

PERSONAL

PERSONAL The Lord-Lieutenant (Mr J. E. Greaves) and Mrs Greaves have returned from Glangwna, and are now in residence at Bron Eifion, Criccieth. Gertrude Lady Penrhyn attended the memorial service held yesterday at St. Paul's, Knights- bridge, for Lieutenant C. J. Dudley Smith, Grenadier Guards. Lord and Lady Harlech entertained at Brogyn- tyn over the week-end General Sir Henry Mac- kinnon and his A.D.C., Mrs Arthur Egerton, Mrs Waldorf A-tor, Mr Bobbie Shaw Aster and Master Astor, and Lady Valda Machell. The Earl of Powis, who has been confined to bed at W aleot with a severe attack of pneumonia, is making satisfactory progress towards recovery, lie has been advised to take a complete rest from public business for some time. Mr J. Eric Hartley Bibby, eldest eon of Mr J. Hartley Bibby, of Plas-yn-Roe, Roowen, has passed out of the Royal Military College, Sand- hurst, and was gazetted to the Royal Welsh Fusi- liers on June 16th. The Hon. Ina Sandbach, wife of General Arthur E. Sandbach, Inspector-General of the Royal Engineers, and sister of Lord Penrhyn, is appealing to the Montgomeryshire people to provide a motor ambulance for Red Cross work with tho-British Armies in Flanders. Lord Harleoh's only son, Lieut. the Hon. W. Ormsby-Gore, M.P., who has been doing duty since the outbreak of the war as A.V.C. to Brigadier-General Herbert, C.B., Com- manding the Welsh Border Mounted Brigade, was lat week appointed staff captain in place of Capt. Donaldson-Hudson. Mr W. F. Kneeshaw, J.P., of Glanabcr, Aber- gele, has gone to the front as a eeoond-licutenant in the 4th Battalion Royal Welsh Fusiliers. Oil the outbreak of the war Mr Knee.;haw enlisted ze a private in the University and Public Schools Brigade, and in November he was gazetted second lieutenant. The engagement is announced between Hubert Constantme Smith, Second-Lieutenant, the Man- chester Regiment, youngest son of Sir Frederick H. Smith, Bart., J.P., and Lady Smith, of Queen's Lodge, Colwyn Bay, and Dorothy Edith, Penelope, only daughter of Brigadier-General E. J. Kempster, D.S.O., and Mrs Kempster, of 1, Sheen Gate Gardene, East Sheen, London, S. W. The marriage arranged between Cecil Clive Ash, captain M.T.. A.S.C., youngest son of Mr and Mrs T. II. Ash, of The Mount, Edgbaston, Birmingham, and Dorothy Lilian, elder daughter of Mr ana Mrs James Sorter, liertniwya, \Oil- way, will take place very quietly at Conway Parish Church on Thursday, July 8th, at 2 o'clock. Miss Bronwen Cecilie Vincent, daughter of Mr and Mrs Hugh Vincent, of Bronwydd, Bangor, who "is a s-tuuent at Girton College, Cambridge, having been educated at Wycombe Abbey School, BUCKS, has been placed in the first division d the second ciasj in the examination for the His- torical Tripos.

THE BANGOR EISTEDDFOD

THE BANGOR EISTEDDFOD. BISHOP OF ST. ASAI'll'S PROTEST. The following letter appeared in the Manchester Guardian of liiur&aay:— ai,e Hidden to concentrate and mobilise the whole forces of the nation. At such a moment, is ales going to draw on from this life-aiid-deatn struggle the labour, the forces, the enthusiasm wmcn arc involved in the preparation for and in the holding of the Eiste-ctufod r The spectacle of Sir Henry Lewis and the Eisteddfod fiddling while the Empire is on fire is not edifying.i ours, etc., A. G. ASAPH. The Palace, St. Asaph, June 21st. NATIONAL EISTEDDFOD NOT A HOLIDAY. A correspondent, on Thursday, was able to ascertain the views of a number ot prominent sup- porters of the National Eisteddfod regarding tne protest of the Bishop of 8t. Asaph against "con- tinuing fiddling while the Empire is in dangEr." The section of Welsh thought, admirably voiced by the Rev. John Williams, chaplain of the Welsh Army, claims that the postponement, will bring home to Welsh people as nothing else possibly could that we are in the throes of an unparalleled .Struggle. "Uur language, our system of education, our national institutions, everything is in danger," one bard remarked, "and sterner work than sing- ing and musical competitions demand our atten- tion. Sir Henry Lewis, who is the leading worker in connection with this year's festival, states that the Eisteddfod is no mere hoiiditY gathering, but the meeting of the university of the common people of Wales, and therefore should be held in days of stress and tumult even as the university capping ceremony was to be held. the fact remains that the Bishop's protest may pvoduee unexpected developments. PREDICAMENT OF THE GUARANTORS. "Eisteddfodwr" writesWith reference to the Bishop of St. Asaph s letter, the local guarantors find themselves committed to all expenditure of from £ cC00 to £ 3000. The further postpone- ment of the Eisteddfod is quite out of the ques- tion. If it i's abandoned, will the Bishop and those who think with him raise a fund which will enable the guarantors to meet their obliga- t; onsl If so, 1 feel sure they would welcome such a solution of their difficulties — difficulties which are unique in the history of the Eisteddfod.

WELSH INDUSTRIES ASSOCIATION

WELSH INDUSTRIES' ASSOCI- ATION. Lord Abcrdare was unable, owing to the death of a relative, to presido at tne meet- ing of tho Welsh Industries' Association at Ivlv and Mrs Mashiter's residence in Prince's Gate, London, yesterday afternoon, and his place was taken by Sir David Brynmor Jones. Among those present were the Coun- tess of Dundonald, Lady Eva and Misvs Wyndham-Quin, Lady Llangattock, Eleanor Lady Gort and Colonel Benson, Lady Bryn- mor Jones, the Hon. Mrs Arthur Sandbach, Mrs Mackintosh of Mackintosh, Sir John and Lady Llewelyn, Mrs Inglefield, Mrs Stuart Erskine, Sir John Rees, Sir Vincent Evans, and several others. The hon. secretary, Mrs Mashiter, sub- mitted the report, showing that satisfactory work had been done through the branches at Anglesey, Breconshire, Cardiganshire, Car- marthenshire, Carnarvon, and Glamorgan. The business of the London branch had been most satisfactory, the sales having consider- tobly increased. The total sum realised in London was £ 798, compared with Y,556 in the previous year. Reference was made to the fact that Mr F. Trevor, tho hon. secretary of the Anglesey Branch, had been killed in action. Lady Eva Wyndham-Quin, the Countess of Dundonald, bir Vincent Evans, the Hon. Lady Herbert of LI an ax th, Mrs Mackintosh, and Lady Llangattock spoke in eupport of the work of the Association.

STATES GREAT MEAT I PURCHASES

STATE'S GREAT MEAT I PURCHASES. The President of the Board of Trade states that the Government have made large purchases of meat in South 'Aner-I*ca, aiid-tlie whole of the frozen meat output available fcr exportation of New Zealand, Queensland, New South Wales, Victoria, and South Australia. Sales will not be made to speculators.

NATIONAL REGISTER TO BE FORMED

NATIONAL REGISTER TO BE FORMED. Mr Asquith announced in the House of Com- mons yesterday that a Bill for a national register will be introduced next week. The scope of the register was not indicated in his statement, other train that it will be a regis- ter of national resource;, presumably both of men arid material.

iCOMMAND OF THE WELSH GUARDS

COMMAND OF THE WELSH GUARDS. APPOINTMENT OF LORD HARLECH. The London Gazette on Saturday con- tained the announcement that Lord Harlech has been appointed to command the regiment and regimental district of the Welsh Guards, with the rank of temporary colonel while so employed. Lord Harlech was educated at Eton and Sandhurst, and his first military service was with the Coldstream Guards. Afterwards he joined the Shropshire Yeomanry, of which he became colonel, retiring in 19U9. His only son, Lieut. the Hon. Ormsby-Gore, M.P., Shropshire Yeomanry, who has been doing duty since the outbreak of tho war as A.D.C. to his kinsman, Brigadier-General Herbert, C.B., commanding the Welsh Border Mounted Brigade, was last week appointed staff captain in place of Captain Donaldson- Hudson. BAND FOR THE BATTALION. A CHEQUE FROM CARDIFF. At Wellington Barracks, London, on Tues- day, in* the presence of the full battalion of the Welsh Guards and of a distinguished company of officers and ladies, the Lord Mayor of Cardiff (Alderman J. T. Rieliards) presented a cheque for .£527 to Lord Harlech, the officer commanding-in-chief of the Welsh Guards. The cheque represents subscriptions which the Lord Mayor has collected from friends in Ca-rdiff and elsewhere for the pur- pose of providing a band for the battalion. The battalion was drawn up in parade order under Lieutenant-Colonel Murray-Threipland On the arrival of the Lord Mayor's party they inspected the lines, being conducted by Lord Harlech, Sir Francis Lloyd, and Lieu- tenant-Colonel Murray-Threipland. They were then drawn up three square, and the Lord Mayor was introduced by Sir Francis Lloyd. The Lord Mayor spoke of the pleasure it had given him and the other members of the Corporation to attend that magnificent parades The Principality had for many years entertained the ambition that there might be a battalion of Welsh Guards, and the King having graciously acceded to the request the result was the formation of that magnificent body of men. As some acknowledgment of his Majesty's gracious favour, the city of Cardiff desired him to present a cheque to- wards the cost of providing a band for the battalion. He hoped they would live up to the honour conferred on the Principality, and would strive to equal, if Dot to excel, the other Guards' battalions. Lord Harlech, in accepting the cheque, ex- pressed to the Lord Mayor, on behalt of the officers and men of the battalion, his best thanks and his gratitude for the great per- sonal interest the Lord Mayor had taken in raising the fund. The battalion had already bugles and fifes, which were on parade that day. The instruments, which would be pur- chased by the maguittcent cheque that had been presented that day, would be taken the greatest care of by the regiment, and would be a lasting memento of tnat iiiornin, a pro- ceedings. The battalion very much appre- ciated that the Lord Mayor and his council- lors should come there to express the sense of the honour they all felt the King had con- ferred on the Principality, and their appre- ciation of the gallantry of the three Welsh regiments recruited from the Principality. He hoped the Lord Mayor of Cardiff would return the best thanks of the battalion to every subscriber to the fund. DISTINGUISHED CONDUCT MEDALS. Then followed the presentation by Major General Sir Francis Lloyd of two distin- guished conduct medals "to members of the 1st Battalion of Welsh Guards. The first to receive the medal was Quartermaster Sergeant Thomas, whose special act of gallantry was that on November 6th he held on to his trench during heavy shell and rifle fire, after being twice buried by shell explosions, with only two of his men left,, and with the enemy in the rear of his flank. In heartily congratulating Thomas, Sir Fiancis Lloyd said he hoped that that would not be the last honour gamed on the battle- field by the Welsh Guards.. The General heartily shook the recipient by the hand. The second medal was presented to Corporal I' McDonell, of the 1st Battalion, who on the 27th September made a first-rate recon- naissance of an unsuspected German trench. In shaking his hand the General told McDonell that he could only repeat what he had previously said. Sir Francis Lloyd then presented to Lieu- tenant-Colonel Murray-Threipland, on behalf of Lady Lloyd, a handsome silver-mounted shield to be held by the best football company of the battalion.

LATEST WILLS

LATEST WILLS. Captain Herbert Owen Johnes (77), of Gartnmill House, Garthmyl, Montgomery- shire, an Indian Mutiny veteran, formerly of tho 7th Hussars, left .£958:2. Mr \V. Jones, of the National Provincial Bank, Colwvn Bay, left £1947. Alderman William Henry --piull (79), ex-Miyor of Oswestry a pronviaent Fteemason, architect, and for many years surveyor far the Diocese ot St. Asaph, left estate of the gross value of jio22J. ESTATE OF LIEUT. COLONEL FRANCE- HAyHURST. Lieut.-Colonel Frederick Char.es I ranee- Hay h una t, of Bostock Hall, near Middlewich," Cheshi, of the 4th Battalion Royal Welsh Fusi- hers, eldest son of the lato Colonel Charles Hoskn France-Hayhurst, left estate of the gross valuo of £ 415,150 :1d, with net personalty £ 29,788 3s 7d. He suoceeded to the family estates only twelve months ago. HiB death occurred on active ser- vice at Zmebek, in Franoe, on the 9th May last. The testator leaves an annuity of £ 50U to his eister E.izabeth Helen France-llayhurst; an an- nuity of £ 200 to his sister Evelyn IVlary Snakerley Ackers; an annuity of .£1000 to hi, brother Cecil lla.st.ed France-*iayhur-t (Commander Cecil Hals ted France-Hayhurst, R.N., died on active service in February iafit); to George Herbert Shakerley Ackets £ 100; CIW to Charies Frederick Coryndon Luxmoor. Ail manors, lands, advowsons, hereditaments, he leaves to his brother William lioeken France- liayiiurst for life, with remainder to his first and other sons in tail male, with remainder to his brother Cecil Hahted Frunce-iiayhurst and his hret and other sons, and in the event of failure of these trusts as hia brother William Hosken }"rali

WELSH OFFICER WOUNDED

WELSH OFFICER WOUNDED Lieutenant Noel Hugh Joaes, of the 4th Batt. Royal Welsh Fusiliers (Territorial Foroe), who was seriously wounded in 1rance on June Lith, is the son m Mr Llewellyn Jones, Official Receiver for Chester and North Wales, and of the firm of Messrs Evan Morris and Co., solicitors, Wrexham. The wounded officer had got out in front of the trench occupied by his company, and was trying to adjust a maxim-gun witieh had been upset by the enemy's fire. The Germans haa Kept up an intermittent peppering of the emplacement, and Lieut. Jones wsw-struck, Lieut. Jones' friends will be glad to learn that he is re- covering.

iTHE LATE LIEUTENANT N A Y LOR LE V LAN D

THE LATE LIEUTENANT N A Y LOR- LE V LAN D. A POSTHUMOUS HONOUR. Lieutenant G. V. Naylor-Leyland, of the Royal Horse Guards, whose name appears among those mentioned by Sir John French in despatches, was reported wounded in September last, and subsequently died. He was twenty-two yeai« of age, and the younger son of the late Sir henry Naylor-Leyland and Lady Naylor-Leyland, of Nanteiwya Hall, Ruthin, aud Hyde Park House, London. His father was a'so an officer of the Royal Horse Guards, and was elected M.P. for Southport in 1898, but died before taking his seat in the House of Commons. King George waa godfather to the late lieutenant.

No title

I Baron Buck master of Cheddington, the Lord Chancellor, was installed oh the wwleftck of the j House oi 03

MENTIONED IN DESPATCHES

MENTIONED IN DESPATCHES. I OFFICERS AND MEN OF WELSH REGIMENTS. A supplement to the London Gazette was published on Tuesday night containing a despatch I from Field Marshal Sir John French bringing to the notice of the Secretary for War the names of those whom he recommended for gallant and distinguished service in the field. The list in- cludes officers, non-commissioned officers and men. Virtually every arm of the service is mentioned, together with the nursing services and represen- tatives of the British Red Cros3 Society, and the Canadian contingent and Indian army also figure prominently in the long list. The following officers and men of Welsh regi- ments figure in the despatches:— 1ST BATTALION, WELSH REGIMENT. Marden, Lieutenant-Colonel T. O. Salmon Captain L. M. B. Evans-Jones, Lieutenant H. G. (killed). DavÎ3. Lieutenant H. W. W. (killed). Oates, No. 9878, Company-Sergeant-Major S, Gamsworthy, No. 10113, Lance-Corporal J. Reynolds, No. 10234, Lance-Corporal W. &ott, No. 13373, Private T. 4 2ND BATTALION. WELSH REGIMENT. Hore, Captain W. M. Hewett, Lieutenant W. G. Weeding, Second-Lieutenant J. R. B. (killed). Harvey, No. 6064 Lance-Sergeant W. Mack, No. 6907 Acting-Sergeant C. Martin, No. T11679 Corporal W. J. Phillips, .No. 6387 Acting-Sergeant W. (killed). 1ST BATTALION, ROYAL WELSH FUSILIERS. Cadogan, Lieut.-Colonel H. O. S. (missing). Barker, Captain R. V. (killed). Parkes, Temporary Second-Lieutenant H. F. (killed) (attached 2nd Battalion). 2ND BATTALION, ROYAL WELSH FUSILIERS. Williams, Major O. de L., D.S.O. Chi.de-Fieeman, Captain J. A. C. Minshull-Ford, Captain J. R. M. Owen, Captain and Adjutant C. S. Samson, Captain A. L. Wood, Captain C. E. (killed). Alston, Lieutenant L. A. A. Cottrell, Lieutenant J. Mostvn, Lieutenant P. G. J. 4TH BATTALION, ROYAL WELSH FUSILIERS. Wilson, Major W. R. Bury, Captain T. O. Hugnes, rieoond-Lieutenant J. A. (died of wounds). Davies, No. 4546 Acting Sergt.-Major R. P. Lcdsham, No. 3220 Lance-Sergeant W. Swainson, No. 7041 Private h. I OTHER OFFICERS HONOURED. I Lieut.-Colonel G. E. Holland, the London and Nortn-Western Railway Company's marine superintendent at Holyhead, was early in Decem- ber appointed Deputy-Director of Transports (In- land V\ ater Section) lor the British Expeditionary Force. Soon after the outbreak of war Colonel Holland rendered considerable eervico in the re- cruiting movement at Holyhead, the No. 2 (Holyhead) Siege Company Royal Anglesey Royal Engineers formed as the result of nis .efforts, and his son, Lieut. B. G. Hol.and, is in command of the company. Captain Norman S. Stewa.rt, of the 2nd Royal Scots, is mentioned in Sir John French's de- spatciiej as having rendered gallant and distin- guished service. He is a son of the late Capt. N. P. iStewart and of Mrs Stewart, formerly of Pias Lodwic, Bangor. Second-Lieutenant W. G. Dyson, Special Re- serve (attached to the 56tii battery it.F.A.), is the son of Mr E. A. Dyson, of Sunderland, for- merly head of the Inland Revenue Department at isangor. Lieutenant Dyson was a student at the University College of North Wales. Capt. Malcolm Gordon Douglas, Adjutant in the Honourable Artillery Company, is the eldest son of the late Mr Malcolm Percy Douglas, ban ister-at-law, and nephew of lur and Mrs Keiirnuir Douglas, or Llangollen Fechan, Llangollen. Althougn young Captain Douglas has been at the front for about ten months. Captain H. C. L. Howard, of the 16th Lancers, is the £ on of Colonel Howard, of Wigfair, St. Asaph. Major and Brevet-Lieutenant-Colonel A. R. HosJans, D.S.O. (temporary colonel), of the North btalis. Regiment, is a son-in-law of Mr T. J. Williams, of Lothian Park, St. Asaph, i Captain li. M. Pryce-Jones is the youngest son of Sir Pryce Pryce-Jones, Dolerw, and crother of Colonel E. Pryce-J ones, M.P. Lieutenant Hilary Evan-Jones, younger eon of the Rev. R. Evan-Jones and Mrs Evan-Jones, Llanllwchaiarn Vicarage, and brother of Lieutenant Basil Evan-Jones, of the It. W.F., belonged to the Welsh Regiment. The late Second-Lieutenant J. A. Eliaa Hughe: of the 4th Battalion of the Royal Welsh Fusiliers, formerly of St. Asaph, was killed winie endeavouring to assist a wounded soldier in front of his trench in France.

IMILITARY INTELLIGENCE I

I MILITARY INTELLIGENCE. I I REGULAR FORCES. I Commands and Staff.—To be staff captain: Lieut. the Hon. W. A. Ormsby-Gcre, bhrop- shirc Yeomanry, T.F., Vice Captain R. V. Donaldson Hutison, T.F. Reserve (May 28th). To be staff captain, attached to neauqiiarter units, Temporary Capt. C. W. Jones, 4th Royal Welsu Fusiliers. To be draft-conduct- ing officers: G. A. H. Howard, late Royal Welsh Fusiliers, to be temporary capt. (June 7th), and Lieut.-Col. and Hon. Cci. C. H. Rees, late 2nd V.B. R.W.F., and to be tem- porary major (June 9th). Welsh Guards.—Hon. Colonel G. R. C., Lord Harlech, retired list, to command the Regiment and Regimental District, and to be temporary Colonel whilst so employed (June 16th). Royal Welsh lusiliers.-Gep-tlem-en Cadets H. D. T. Morris, A. C. Banks, J. E. H. Bibby, and J. P. TowTisend from the Royal Military College to be eec.-lieuts. (June 16th). w Royal Welsh Fusiliers.—12th Batt.: Tem- porary Lieut. F. W. Anderson relinquishes nis commission on account of ill-health (June 1Uth).-18th Batt.: Temporary Major J. Bowen, from 15th Batt., to be temporary I major (Feb. 8th). 18th R. Welsh F. (2nd Lond. Welsh).—To be temp, sec.-lieuts.: E. L. Davies (June 4th), I Temp. Sec.-Lieut. D. W. Morgan, from 12th Welsh (June 11th). 19th 1:t. Welsh F.—To be temp, sec.-lieuts. April 19th, 1915, but not to carry pay or allowances prior to dates specified: A. C. Morris (May 20th), H. Ward-Jones (June 7th). To be temp. sec.-lieuts. April 19th; J. Wil- liams, P. L. Williams, D. D. Phillips, R. T. H Ellis, R. C. Evans, F. Hargreaves (June 6th). 10th S. Wales Bord. (1st Gwent).—To be temp. sec.-lieuts.: F. R. E. Kenward (April 20th), H. F. Schofield (June' 8th). TERRITORIAL FORCES. 4th R. Welsh F.—Capt. C. W. Jones sec- onded na Staff capt., attd. to Headqr. Unite (May 39th). Montgom.—Sec.-Lieuts. to 00 temp. lieuts, May 16th: T. E. Thomas, M. Woosnam. Welsh H.—Capt. G. R. Pryse to be temp. maj. (May 17th). Lieut. W. D. Thomas to be temp. capt. (May .21st). Sec.-Lieut. R. Southby to be temp lieut. (May 21st). Denbighshire (Hussars) Yeomanry.—Major E. W. Tate, Retired List, Volunteers, to be major (temporary), with pay and allowances of a captain (May 20th); Sec.-Lieuts. J. B. Springman and J. J. L. Williams to be lieuts. (May 19th).

IINTERESTING LIVERPOOL WEDDING

I INTERESTING LIVERPOOL WEDDING. At the Newsham Park Welah C.M. Chapel, Liverpool, yesterday, the wedding of Miss Dilys Evans, of "Silvexmere," Newsham Drive, daughter of the late Mr William Evans, J.P., and DT. Edward Lewis, of "Qiiirtai," Anglesey, and Cardiff, took place. There was one bridesmaid-namely, Miss Elsie Evans, the bride's sister, and the best man was Major Herbert Williams, R.A.M.C. The officiating ministers were the Rev. John Owen, Anfietd, and the Rev. R. Aethwy Jones, M.A. Miss Gwladys Pritchard pre- sided at the organ.

No title

Mr J. D. Ellis, son of the Rev. J. J. Ellis, Rector of Llaneilian, Anglesey, has received a commission as second-lieutenant in the 19th Bat- talion Royal Welsh Fusiliers. He was educated at Christ Hospital, and at the completion of his j training as a mechanical engineer juried the. Leeds "Pale" EatUlion at the outbreak 01 ttA WAC.

IBANGOR LIBERALS AND ARVON VACANCY j

I- BANGOR LIBERALS AND ARVON VACANCY- j I QUAUFICATION FOR VOTING. I I AMUSING INCIDENTS. I The members of the Bangor Branch of th,e Arvon Liberal Association spent a very lively hour at an adjourned meeting held on Satur- day night for the purpose of finally deciding which of the six aspirants they would send up to the association meeting, to be held at Conway next Saturday, when the final selec- tion ola-Libertl candidate will be made. Mr T. J. Williams presided over ahout 100 members and electors, and read a long letter from Mr Pentir Williams, the general secre- tary of the Association, setting out the method of procedure in the election of one or two of the aspirants for submission to the Association meeting next Saturday. It was explained that it was not necessary in order to qualify for a vote at that meeting to be an elector in Arvon Division, so long as one was a Liberal and had paid a shilling for membership of the Association. It was also explained that the delegates to the Associa- tion meeting at Conway would be the same as before. It was then decided that the names of all present who had paid or were willing to pay the entrance fee oi a shilling should be taken. This having been done, a member asked if Pentir electors, of whom there were several present who had not paid the membership fee, could vote at that meet- ing and pay afterwards. The Chairman promptly replied that that could not be done. Then a member suggested that the meeting should be adjourned till the following Friday to give all who had not paid an opportunity of doing so. Another member who had paid exclaimed that he could not attend next Friday, and if the suggestion was adopted he wanted his shilling back (laughter). The discussion continued with considerable heat as to the right of those who were electors but who had not paid to vote that night, the chair- man sticking doggedly to the rules. Eventually a member moved that the chairman leave the chair The Chairman (promptly): Any seconder? Several members at once seconded the motion, but the Secretary (pro. tern.) addressed the meet- ing, explaining the position aa defined by the rules which were adopted by the Association. The discussion was then again resumed with some feeling At last a member said he would pay the mem- bership fee for the Pentir voters who had not the money with them, and several other members agreed to do the same. Some of the Pentir electors, however, for a while stood out against accepting this, but finally this modus vivendi was agreed to. a,d carried into effect, and then the voting began. The Chairman announced the names as follows: -Messrs Caradoc Rees, E. W. Roberts, E. R. Davies, A. Rhys Roberts, Howel J. Williams, and the Rev. M. Phillips. The first voting resulted as under—Rees, 43; Roberts, 39; E. R. Davies, 8; Rev. M. Phillips, 3 Mr Rhys Roberts was proposed but not seconded, and Mr Howel J. Williams was not proposed. The second voting, taken amid great excite- ment, resulted as under:— E. W. Roberts, 41; Caradoc Rees, 40; E. R. Davies, 6. The supporters of Mr Roberts cheered victory when the figures were announced, but the Chair- man intimated that a final vote would have to be ta ken between Messrs E. W. Roberts and Caradoc Rees. This roused a storm of protests, during which several members left the room. The final vote was then taken, the result being: -E W. Roberts, 45; Caradoc Rees, 40. The meeting afterwards decided by a large majority to seiuTonly two names to the Associa- tion meeting for next Saturday, viz., Messrs E. W. Roberts and Caradoc Rees.

THE FINAL SELECTION OF 1 LIBERAL CANDIDATE

THE FINAL SELECTION OF LIBERAL CANDIDATE. PREPARING FOR TO-MORROW'S MEETING. There are twenty-one local committees in the Arvon Division who, between kheu are entitled to elect 105 delegates to vote at to-morrow's meet- ing of the Arvon Liberal Association, at Conway, for the final selection of a Liberal candidate for the division, the Unionists having decided not to contest the seat. Up to Wednesday ten of the local committees returning an aggregate of forty-two delegates to the Conway meeting have decided, with the re- sult (excluding other aspirants) that forty dele- gates have been instructed to vote for Mr Caradoc Rees and two for Mr E. R. Davies. The Bethesda division should have voted on Wednesday night, but the question of who were entitled to vote being raised, a letter from Mr Pentir Williams, the general secretary of the Association, was read stating that all voters in the dnision were entitled to vote whether tney had paid their subscription or not. This vas at varia.,CLI with the rules as read and acted on by the Lant;or branch on the 19th mst., but the com- mittee decided to act on the secretary's ruling, but, in order that all voters should be fully in- formed of the conditions under which they may vote, the meeting was deferred till this evening. The Llandudno Liberal Association met last night in the Town Hall, and a vote by ballot was taken on the six candidates nominated, and Mr J. H. Jones, on behalf of the scruitinecrs, an- nounced the result as follows:—Mr Caradoc Rees, 511; Mr Evan R. Davies, 178; Rev. W. F. Pn-'lips, 4; Mr Ellis W. Roberts, 3; Mr A. Rhys Roberts, 0; Mr Howel T. Williams, 0. The Chairman said this shortened their labours, as clearly Mr Caradoc Rees was the first choice of the meeting, and Mr Evan R. Davies second. He accordingly declared this to be the result. Llandudno sends nineteen delegates to to- morrow's meeting, all of whom will therefore vote for Mr Caradoc Rees in the first instance, and for Mr Davies if a second choice is necessary. The Llanberis vote was taken on Wednesday night, and resulted thus:—Mr Caradoc Rees, 61; Mr E. R. Davies, 30. CANDIDATE RECOMMENDS THE NORTH WALES CHRONICLE. Mr E. W. Roberts, one of the candidates for nomination, speaking at Penmachno, on Monday evening, referred to the County Council, and re- commended all present to buy the North Wales Chronicle if tney desired to read a full and accurate report of the proceedings.

NEW DIRECTOR OF RECRUITING

NEW DIRECTOR OF RECRUITING. OSWESTRY OFFICER'S APPOINTMENT. Major-General Robert Arthur Montgomery, who has been appointed Director of Recruit- ing, is a first cousin of the Earl of Pow is, Lord Lieutenant of Shropshire, and resides at Pentrepant, Oswestry. Entering the Royal,. Artillery as far bacK as 183S, General Mont- gomery became Deputy-Inspector General of Ordnance in 1897, a position he held for five years. He afterwards commanded the Southern District, and in 1903 was given the command of the Portsmouth to assume command of fh-e Transvaal District, and re- turned to England two years later. Since the outbreak of war he has been in command of a division of Lord Kitchener's Army at I Seaford.

WELSH DOCTOR HONOURED I

WELSH DOCTOR HONOURED. I Sir John W illiams, of Aberystwyth. president I of tha National Library of Wales, has been elected an honorary Fellow of the Royal Society of Medicine. This honour is very rarely given, and still more rarely is it given to the Society's own Fellows. In the 110 years of the Society's exist- ence the diploma granted to Sir John is only the second bestowed upon a Fellow. Sir Richard Douglas Powell, who is the recipient of a similar honour, is also ft Welshman by descent.

Advertising

WARTSKI'S Assist yenr enjoyment of Summer wth their dainty, light and fresh looking clothes. New Golf Coats, "Linens and Frocks are ar- riving daily, all in keeping v | with the Sum- iner Spirit. The Sum-ner Girl" 1 (illustrated) is wearing a Panama Hat finished with a loose band at 10/6. A Mus- lin Blouse held by a soft Crepc-de-chene bow at 1/6. WARTSKFS Designers and Producers J of Ladies' Tasteful Wear. By Bangor Cathedral. J

MR LLOYD GEORGE AND IMUNITIONS j

MR. LLOYD GEORGE AND MUNITIONS. j VICTORS OR DEFEAT DEPENDS ON SUPPLY. PROGRESS MADE IN NEW WORK Mr Lloyd George made his speech on muni- tions in the House of Commons on Wednes- day night. The main points oi it were:— Ultimate victory or de-fe-a t de pndcd oiL the supply of munitions. iiiat was, the cardinal military factor. We have undoubted superiority in men.; Central European Powers iue turning out 250,000 shens per day. 0 nave tq improve upon that. 'iho surplus of our engineering resources avaiiauio lor war was gieatcr tnan thatoij France. If we produced within the next' few months as large an amount usr we were likely to produce, the Aliies would hav.' an overwhelming superiority o*er thfl enemy. Our problem was how to organise victory,- and this could only be done oy mobilising the whole engineering and cneiuical re- sources of the Empire. They recognised that the arsenals in exis- tence were inadequate to supply the newj and old armies. To be quite frank, the armament firms had been inadequate for the gigantic task thrust upon them. lie had been assured by business men that London would soon be anotiier Wool-' wich Arsenal, and that they wouid be abla' to turn out a prodigious quantity ot shells. They had secured the new offices of the Board of Agriculture for the business ot the new department. There wouid be a great central advisory committee of busi- ness men. In each department of the new work real progress was being made. Lord Moulton had rendered splendid' service, and he was fortunate in securing the services of Sir P. Girouard. > They had decided to organise the country,, into districts. There would be tell muni-' tion areas, each under a committee of man- agement of local business men. An extra engine-r would help the local committees, and a general organising ECCye- tary, representative of the W ar Ofhoe and Admiralty, would be associated with each' centre, which would act as the clearing- house for labour and information. All time lost was full of the possibilities of disaster, and so each district would undertake work for itself. There were, he was sorry to say, indica- tions of the holding up of supplies in cer- tain quarters in view of the higher prices, causing serious delay. This must be brought to and end in the interests of the nation. It might be necessary for the State later, on to take complete control of the metal' market. It would take some months before w. could attain maximum production. It is vital that every machine gun that can be turned out shall be turned out with- in the next few weeks. There will be temporary suspension of restrictions at present imposed by trade unions as to output of labour.

MARRIAGE OF LIEUT VERNONI LEWIS

MARRIAGE OF LIEUT. VERNON LEWIS. A wedding of some local interest took place on Tuesday week at the United Free Church, Langbank, Renfrewsnirc. The bridegroom woa Lieut. C. Vernon Lewis, 11th Battalion (2nd Gwent) South W:i:e Bo-rderers, son cf Mr and Mrs T. Charles Lewie, The Sycamores, Conway, who was accompanied by his coucin, L-.t,,it. Et;gar Lloyd Jones, K.S.L.I., as his beet man. Ih. bride waj Mifits Edith Isabel Collmgwood Alex- ander, second daughter of the Rev. Dr. A. B. D. Alexander, of The Manso, Lang ban k, her joung- eet sifiter acting as bridesmaid. The ceremony was performed by Dr. Alexander, the father of tiie bride. and she was given aw&y by her brother, Lieut. J. Browning Alexander, M.D. After the ceremony the newly-married couple left to spend their honeymoon Perth- shire. VVhikt waiting for the arrival of th. bride at the church, which was prettily decorated, the organist played the National Antnems of t-he Al-ies and-a number of Welsh and Scotch airs.

No title

The Bishop of St. Asaph has offered the living of Llanasa, Flintshire, vacant owing to tho death of the Rev. W. L. Prothcroe, to the Rev. T. E. Timothy, vicar of Rhcsycae, Flintshire.

Advertising

GOLDEN GOAT, CARNARVON, FOR Smart and Reasonable Goods. Dressmaking & Millinery Best & Latest. PLEASE CALL. > Pierce and Williams.