Collection Title: North Wales Chronicle and Advertiser for the Principality

Provider: The National Library of Wales

Rights: The copyright status or ownership of this resource is unknown.

View full details

First Previous Image 3 of 8 Next Last
Full Screen
18 articles on this page
Advertising

FINANCIAL. NO PRELIMINARY FEES. Money Lent Privately IN LARGE OR SMALL SUMS (not less than CIO). On Simple Promissory Note. ESTABLISHED FORTY-SIX YEARS AND p NOW LENDING Upwards of f-80,000 Annually PROSPECTUSES, Terms of Advances, or any I- information desired, will be rupplied free » of charge on application, either personally or by letter, to George Payne & Sons, 3, Crescent Road, Rhyl. IMMEDIATE LOANS. WE MAKE NO CHARGE WHATEVER UNLESS CASH IS ADVANCED. London & Provinces Discount Co. LIMITED, 64. LONDON ROAD, LEICESTER. f A DVANCES from £10 to 91000 on NOTE of HAND ALONE, or other Security, to all respectable classes. If desired, a Representative will attend at your home with the Cash, and carry out the advance THERE and THEN. Call, or write (in confidencel to the Manager, G: K. HOWE, 64, LONDON ROAD, LEICESTER. jj|- QWE^T INTEREST IN THE COUNTRY. NO FEES. £10 to £ 5000. NO BONDS. J310 repay tll. C50 repay £55. £ 20 repay £ 22. £100 repay CIIO. Bills of Sale or Loans paid off and increased. L. LIVINGSTONE (TeL 3071 City), aOPE CHAMBERS, 107, MARKET-STREET, MANCHESTER. From S10 to £1000. JTilOR any immediate use. Cash sent by Post, L \I:' if desired. Genuine Applications never tefused. Advances can be paid back by Monthly, Quarterly, or Half-yearly Instalments; or, if desired, the Advance can remain out up to Five years by paying Interest only. Distance no ob- \ect. Interest and Repayment Lowest in England ? and Wales Strict Serecy guaranteed. It will ? cost nothing to inqui e, but may save you Pounds by applying, in strict confidence, for our Free Prospectus, to rrHE NATIONAL ADVANCE & INVESTMENT SOCIETY, LTD., 41, CORPORATION ST., MANCHESTER; or to our North Wales District Offices: Ø2. Farrar Rd., Bar.gor; 16, Station Rd., Colwyn 'Bay; and 19, Queel. St, Wrexham. ASS to 91000 fcr agreed periods. 'dB10 repay B'O 10 0 C30 repay £31 10 0 :£15 „ £ 15 15 0 C50 £ 52 10 0 J920 M 0 o 2100 „ 2105 0 0 ■ THE MANAGER, 24, BANGOR STREET, CARNARVON. BORROW from an OLD-ESTABLISHED i.IJ WELL-KNOWN FIRM, noted for Honest Dealings. £ 10 to £1000 ADVANCED DAILY to all Classes worthy of credit on NOTE OF BAND ALONE. i INTEREST THE LOWEST IN ENGLAND AND WALES. NO FEES. NO SURETIES. Rio from 23 6d weekly. JB20 from 4s weekly. 1E50 „ 8s „ £ 100 „ 15s „ Special Low Rates Charged for Short Period i Loans. Call, write, or 'Phone (2975 City), in strictest Confidence to Actual Lender, H. HARRIS, 71. MARKET-STREET, MANCHESTER. > S3 KEATING'S C M? t E N C jS!?\\? KILLS jp JBUCS FLEAS MOTHSVMW F BEETLES TINS- 113! f)t- f LADIES FREE. JL" YOU ARE WISE before parting with your money for useless remedies, write to me jor a FREE SAMPLE, sufficient for a cure of py renowned treatment for all irregulantiea. No nauseous drugs. No useless "eotions. ?UARANTEED ABSOLUTELY EFF ?CTIVE ?nder one hour. Acts like magic in the most tinate and unyielding cases. Failure impos- ?Ho, so why worry? SEND NO MONEY. ample. "THE MANUAL OF*WISDOM," an teresting book, Sworn Testimonials, guaranteed enuine under penalty of £ 5000, sent ABSO- TL) FREE. The MANAGERESS, LE VURASSEUR SURGICAL CO., LTD. (Dept. B.T.), BIRMINGHAM (Sufficient address). Tel. ?o.: Midland 2598. Telegraphic Addresses: rdeshir, Paris," and "Surgical, Birmingham." ;l7 orks: Pasay-Paris, France. cl FREE TO LADIES. IRREGULARITIES, etc., removed by an ta. up-to-date and certain method WITH- OUT MEDICINE or PILLS. It is speedy and simple, and a scientific system which has been practised with wonderful results; does not interfere with household duties. 1 MEDICAL SCIENCE knows no better i CURE. I have received letters of thanks daily testifying that they have derived the -F greatest benefit. I guarantee every case. Send at once for FREE particulars and testimonials, guaranteed genuine under a penalty of £5000. MRS STAKEMAN MORRIS (81 Dept.), 162, Stoke Newington-road, London, N. Established 20 yeast in Islington. EADIES' BLANCHARD'S PILLS are un-. ,)LJ rivalled for all Irregularities, etc.: they jfoeedijy afford relief, and never fail to heviate 1 suffering. They supersede Pennyroyal, Pil ia, Bitter Apple, etc. "Blanohard's are the t of aU Pius for Women." Sold in Boxes, Is lid, by Boots' Branohee, Timothy White's Branches, and all Chemists; or post free, same Brice, from Leslie Martyn Ltd., Chemists, 34, Alston Lane, London. Free Sample and valu- able Booklet, post free, Id stamp. o yon CM Belr On teme?y. In "cher SM. for ?*p 1 in idribia M't?M?tf (roa Crlurr 0r8U rant. P

iLONDON TIMETABLE AND REDRAIL GUIDE

LONDON TIME-TABLE AND ] RED-RAIL GUIDE. The current issue of this popular publication IS on sale at all railway bookstalls and lead- ing newsagents. The London Time-Table and Red-Rail Guide," of 3, Kingswav, London, Bxtends to nearly 600 pages, and deals with over 5000 railway stations, and as it is sold at Two- pence. the publishers may fairly claim that it is tha best and cheapest Railwaj Guide ever pub- lished. It contains, in addition to the Railway Time-Tables, a mass of information that is In. not only to Londoners, but to all vini. TORS to London; and ALTOGETHER it is a surprising .w,opennyworth.

MR LLOYD GEORGE AT KINMEL

MR LLOYD GEORGE AT KINMEL. AN APPEAL FOlt FAIfTPLAY FOR ALL SECTS. WHAT THE WELSH DIVISION DID AT MAMETfc WOOD. (From Our Own Reporter). On Sunday the Nonconformist soldiers at Kinmel Camp were brought face to face with the new War Minister, received encouraging words from him, had their position as Nonconformist soldiers clearly ex- plained, and heard on the highest authority of the gallant deeds of their comrades in France. The occa- sion was the formal opening of the ne.v hut, which has been erected through the generosity of Noncon- formist friends as a rallying plae3 fur soldiers of all denominations, where they can worship or fratern- ise under ideal conditions. The Wesleyans provided a hut at Kinmel some months ago. This was found inadequate, so also was tho provision made by the Y.M.C.A. and other organisations, and a joint appeal by local Nonconformist leaders resulted in this more commodious structure. The Wesley an Connexion ex- pressed their willingness to help in the campaign, al- though they had already done a great deal. The Calvini»tic Methodists (through the generosity uf the Misses Davies) guaranteed A;1000, and it was left to the Baptists, Congregationalists and the Wesleyans to find the remainder of the money necessary. A strong working committee was formed, the Itev. J. H. Davies (Abergele) acting as hon. secretary, and Mr D. S. Davies (Denbigh) hon. treasurer. Plans were pre- pared by Mr Gilbert Smith, architect, Prestatyn, and the contract was entrusted to Messrs Alban Richards and Co. The fine new building has been, erected on a site facing the camp, and is to afford seating ae. commodatiou for 1000 men. In addition to the main hall there are a canteen, writing and reading rooms, a games room, and the usual offices and ante-rooms. The building is now being, furnished, and the total cost will be about £ 2C>G0, the larger part of which has already be,'n subscribed. It will be in charge of tho chaplains representing the various Nonconformist bodies, namely. Col. the Rev. John Williams (Bryn siencyn), Keys. Hew. Lloyd. W. D. Owen, Edward Jones, and Abi Williams. It was not intended to open the building until a later date, but when it was found that Mr Lloyd George was coming to Wales for the Eisteddfod he was prevailed upon to take part in the formal open- ing ceremony on Sunday last. There' was a large gathering of civilians at Kinmel, but as it was meant to bs a purely soldiers' service, it was found impos- sible to if.,ue tickets to more than a few directly con- nected with the work. Disappointed in that direction the civilian visitors, lined the roadway in crowds. and cheered Mr Lloyd George On his arrival. Ths War Secretary was accompanied into the building by Sir Herbert and Lady Roberts, the Masters Roberts, Mr and Mrs Herbert Lewis, Col. the Rev. John Wil- liams, Mr D. S. Davies, Mr Simon Williams (Colwyn Bay), Brigadier General Dunn, Brigadier Cuthbertson and others. The service opened with the singing of well known Welsh hymns, followed by prayer and the reading of selections from the Scriptures by the Rev. H. Elvet Lewis (London). The sermon was preached by the Rev. John Wil. liams, who took as his text the words "Righteousness exalteth a nation." lie pointed out how necessary It was for a man to do what was right in the eyes of the law, and how much more it was necessary that a man should do right in the eyes of God. Righteousness was good in its entirety. Amongst individuals there were quibbling and quarrelling, and the same thing was true of nations. So it was necessary to have righteousness amongst nations as well as amongst in- dividuals in order to secure unity and what was best and true. Righteousness should be the object of every- one, as without it the right could not triumph. It was useless for a man physically to develop one part of his body, as it was useless for a man morally and spiritually to develop but one part of his better self. It was useless to make treaties if they were not kept; so was it for a man to say he would do what was right unless he did it. It was necessary to have righteousness through and through. The history of the world showed that while wicked nations might triumph for a time they fell in due course, and in private life one often wondered that the wicked were allowed to prosper as they did, but they could depend upon it that with the individual as with nations the day of reckoning would come. So long as Great Britain maintained its hold on'religlon it would never fall, although some people could not understand why it was that there was such a great sacrifice in this war. They could depend upon it that there was a great deal of poison behind this war, and that in the end truth and right would triumph over the wicked and might. Might would never exalt a nation when pitted against one that was defending the right. The Old Book said "No" to might being exalted; Wales, said "No" to the same thing, and so long as the British Empire had faith in the Old Book and built itself on religion and right its future was assured. ALL SECTS STRIVING TO THE SAME GOAL. At the close of the service Mr Lloyd George ad. dressed the gathering. He said he had no great mes. sage to give them that day; he had called in to see them and the work that was being done. Continuing, ho said:I have come here to express my-approval and joy. I congratulate you and I congratulate all those who have taken part in getting the hut ready. These are days of national unity of purpose and ac. tion, but that does not pre-suppose unity of faith and unity of creed in all matters relating to the people. There may be unity of purpose and action without unity in all matters of belief. The only true basis of unity is equality—(cheers)—and national union pre- supposes equal justice for all faiths and all creeda (hear, hear). I am very glad that that is recognised, not merely from what I observe to-day, but from what I hear in Kinmel Park Camp (hear, hear). I attach great importance to it. You remember the order 01 the old sergeant, "Church of England to the right, Catholics to the left, and all fancy religions stand where they are" (laughter and cheers). In some men their beliefs are a faith. The beliefs of others are a pure fancy, and the only way you can attain national unity is by recognising that there is a variety of faiths and creeds and that unity is only possible by recognising each one in its own channel and giving fair play to aU. I looked at the rivers as I was driving up to-day from Criccietli, running in their own channels, run. ning through many valleys, running in different di. rections, to all appearances, some running to the east, some to the west, some to the north, and some to the south, and yet somehow all were making for the same great sea. If you dig down in your faith deep enough you will find that is the real example of it. I was I BORN NEXT TO THE BAPTIST RIVER. Some of us were born next to the Methodist, others next to the Anglicans, and others next to the Catho- lies, and wo have got into those waters which are running apparently in different directions, flowing in different channels, and yet you will find that all faiths flowing into different courses are making for the same great ocean, the same great eternal home (cheers). That is the first lesson in tolerance. It was my privilege—one of the first things I did as Secretary of State for War-to set up an inter. denominational committee in the War Office to advise tha Secretary of State and the Army Council as to the best way of making religious arrangements so as to suit the exigencies of the new great national army. We never had an army like this before. This is an army of citizens. This is a real national army, not only men coming from every county and locality but men of all faiths, men of all sects, men of all creeds. men of all conditions of life in endless variety. It is a real national army, and it is essential above all in an army of that kind to recognise fairly and justly the great variety of creeds, opinio^, and faiths amongst those who have Joined it. There never was an army whose success depended moref upon moral, and I will tell you why. Owing to the exigencies of the war we can only have a short training for a prolonged trial, and moral is more essential than ever in an army of that kind, and you don't improve the moral of a people by snubbing their shrines (cheers). That is why I feel it essential that you should have fair play for all creeds, and all Sfccts, and all faiths, and I am very glad to be able to say. after consulta- tion with leaders of all religious faiths of this coun- try, that there is a real anxiety on their part that every denomination shall receive equal freedom (cheers). We have chosen as representing the Free Churches of Wales the Rev. Elvet Lewis. There has never been for the nation and certainly for the sol- diers of the nation a greater -need for the comfort and strength which religion alone can give. I THE GREATEST HUMAN SERVICE. You soldiers will be facing experiences when all the human emotions will reach a pitch which you have never felt before. Under those conditions you will require more than ever the comfort, sustenance, anl the strengthening power of religion. It is too often forgotten that the best disciplined army, and I think on the whole the best army that this country ever saw, was a religious army. There are some people who think its objects very bad. I refer to the Iron- sides. We could not all agree about its objects, but I have never met a soldier yet who did not en y t discipline and cohesion, the iron strength, of that great army, and that undoubtedly was ah army that was animated by a strong religious belief (cheers). History teaches us that nations that make sacrifices in the course of time get requited for that sacrifice, but religion alone teaches us and gives us the as- surance that the sacrifice of the individual man shall be recompensed. There is no greater human service that can be rendered than that given by our men to-day (cheers). Whatsoever a man soweth that shaH tie also reap, and that comes from religion alone, and I am very glad to find not merely here, but every- where throughout the whole of this great army which has been raised, that arrangements have been made for the spiritual welfare of the vast multitude of men who are quitting their homes, turning their backs on their native land, to face a cruel foe. That has been done both here and abroad, and I am extremely grate- ful, especially to the volunteers who have been giving so much of their time to the development of this great work (cheers). I BRITAIN'S "YEA" AND "NAY." 0_' I congratulate those who have taken part in this I great work, and I hear of tha excellent work that bae been carried on at Kinmel. We are fighting for the (highest possible principles* the prindiples of your faith. That is what you are fighting for-we are fight- ing for our plighted word (cheers). Great Britain has given her "yea" and her "nei" to the nations, and your "yea" shall be "yea" and your "nay" shall be "nay." We are fighting for the fundamental prin- ciples of Christian faith (cheers). We say "nay" to any man who tramples upon the rights of a small people, and we said "yea" to others who asked 118 to joint in preventing those little people from being wiped out. Let your "yea" be "yea" and your "nay" be "nay" (cheers). We are fighting for one of the fundamental principles of the Christian faith common to all denominations, all sects, and all creeds. What more could we fight for? (cheers). Weare fighting to protect the weak against the ruthless, cruel, jjnscru- pulous, inhuman, strong, the men who abuse the strength the Almighty endowed them with. The most contemptible of men aro those men whom God has given, strength and musclo and who use it to oppress, to torture, to trample on, and to crush those whom Providence has been less kind to. We are fighting for the protection of the weak against the bullying strong (cheers). That is why I have no hesitation in talking .about these things in a place consecrated to the wor- ship of God- Let us teach such a lesson 

ITHE LLANRWST SHOWI

I THE LLANRWST SHOW. I I FURTHER AWARDS. I In several sections the judging at. the Llanrwst Ohampionship Show was not completed until late in the evening, with the result that the list of prize-winners published in our columns last week was incomplete. Mrs E. K' Le Bart was credited with having been third with the Pekingese Winsome," whereas tihe prize waa awarded to Miss C. Bain- bridge, Mra Le Bert being v.h.c. The awards in the following classes (North Wales section) wer-e:-Fox Terriers: 1, F. Lynch, Wrexham; 2, T. J. Williams, Llangollen; 3, D. H. Roberts, Llanrwst"; r., B. Watts, Colwyn Bay. Welsh Terriers: 1, John Owens, Blaenau Fes- tirniog; 2, J. Bamford, Bangor; 3, D. E. R. Grif- fith, Chepstow. Terriers: 1, James Lorimer, Wrexham; 2, E. Davies, Conway; 3, W. Wil- liams, Llangollen. The North Wales Pekingeae and toy challenge oups were awarded to Mr H. M. Brigg, Llan- dudno. Mr W. S. Glynn special prize of S2 2s for the best terrier in the show was awarded to "Brent- moor Blinker," an Irish terrier, the property of Mr W. A. Pritchard, Brent, who also won the terriex challenge cup. The following were awarded the Kennel Club ahallenge certificates in their various sections:- Great Danes: Dog, Mr Alfred E. Taylor, Fai r- field bitch, Mr M. B. Kirwan, Thornton. Labrador Retrievers: Dog, Mr T. W. Twyford, Whitmore Hall; bitoh, Major A. Wynne Corrie. English Springers: Mr Charles E. Terry, Colwyn Bay. Bulldogs: Mr Soam Crabtree, Manchester. Blaok and Tan Terriers: Mr C. Hopwood, Man- chester. Collies (rough): Dog, Mr W. W. Stans- field Rawstenstall; bitch, Mr T. R. Jones, Pen- madnno. Collie (smooth): Mr Bart J. Hewison, Seaton Dalaval. Wire Fox Terriers: Dog, Mr J. F. Hitohings, Cwmaman; bitoh, Miss Lewis, Paignton. Smoot-h Fox Terriers: Dog, Mra T. Losoo Bradley, Nottingham; bitoh, Mr J. A. Hooker, Bournemouth. Welsh Terriers: Dog, 11r John Owen, Blaenau Festiniog; bitoh, Mr Isaac Jones, Abergele. Airedales: Mr James Lorimer, Wrexham. Seajyham Terriers: Dog, Mrs Pnootor, Chertsey; bitoh, Lady Gooch, do. Irish, terriers: Dog, Mr W. A. Pritchard, Brent; bitah, Mr J. K. Grimshaw, Burnley. Weet High- land White Terriers: Dog, Dr. H. Drinkwater, Wrexham; bitoh, Mrs Cyril Paoey, HindhJey. Dalmatians: Mr A. R. Hughes, Aberystwyth. Beagles: Mr A. R. Hughes. Japanese: Dog, Mrs Gordon Gratrix, Wolverhampton; bitch, Mrs Gordon Gratirix. Pugs: Mr J. Airey, Leeds. Pekingese: Dog, Mrs Calley, Swindon; bitoh, Mrs Maud Vlasto, Henley-on-Thames.

ISHOW RECEIPTS TAXED I

I SHOW RECEIPTS TAXED. I I SHOULD THE "NATIONAL" BE EXEMPT? I Mr 0, Isgoed Jones, J.P., presided over a meeting of the Executive Committeo of the Vale of Conway Agricultural Society, at Llanrwst, on Tuesday, when practically every member attended. The Chairman, referring to the show, said it was one of the largest ever hefd in the Principality. He, however, complained of the conduct of some of the stewards who failed to carry out their allotted task, thus putting some of the sections somewhat out of gear and throwing the burden they should have borne on the shoulders of others who were already busy w:th their own sections. He hoped that in future no mem- ber would accept such a position unless ho was pre- pared to undertake the duties allotted him. The Secretary reported that the tax imposed on the takings amounted to over £ 47. He pointed out that the Royal Show, where the prizes were almost invari- ably won by royalty, the nobility, and 'great land- owners, was exempt from the tax, yet a tax of 2d for every ticket sold was levied on the Llanrwst show, which was almost solely devoted to tenant farmers. He suggested that the society should bring the matter before the authorities with a view to securing similar treatment. Mr D. G. Jones remarked that the action of the Treasury in exempting the Royal Show and imposing a tax on the Llanrwst Show was a glaring instance of favouritism, by which a great and powerful society was spared the burden imposed upon a smaller organ- isation. He was astonished any Government should stoop so low. Mr F. C. Cobden, in moving that representations be made to tho local members of Parliament on the sub- ject, said the Royal Show was exempted on the ground of its utility to agriculture but as its chief supporters were amateurs and not bona fide farmers, such as the supporters of the Llanrwst Show, the lat- ter was of far more utility to agriculture and should therefore be spared a burden which was only meant for entertainment& Mr D. G. Jones seconded the motion, which was carried. On the motion of Mr 'Kendrick, seconded by Mr Rowland Hughes, it was decided to pay 917 from the show profits towards the funds promoted by General Owen Thomas, in aid of Welsh Wounded Soldiers and Sailors' Fund. On the motion of Mr John Williams, seconded by Mr Cobden, a vote of thanks was accorded General Campbell for the loan of tho captured German gun. Thanks were also vote, all judges who undertook their duties free of charge and to all the stewards who performed their duties so effectively in spite of the somewhat trying climatic, conditions. A sub-committee composed of the following members was selected to consider protests lodged by competi- torsMessrs D. G. Jones, J. Roberts, Fron Francis, F. Porter, G. Roberts, and W. Jones, The Hand.

No title

A property sale of conallerable Interest to Welshmen is to take place at an early date in Montgomeryshire, when "Bronygan," Cemaes, will be offered for auction. The house was built by Mynyddog, the famous poet 1 and Eisteddfod conductor, and he lived there till his death.

Advertising

0' j IPOR l -.e8 INDIGESTIOND I BILIOUSNESS-WIND CONSTIPATION no remedy in the world is so Q excellent, or so well recom- [1 mended as Mother Seigel's t Syrup. If you have any such j □ ailments, take the Syrup today! □ MOTHER | SEIGEL'S SYRUP y U. The 0 site contains three times the 113. j ,iqc= IC=3p

WELSH NATIONAL FESTIVALI OF SONG

WELSH NATIONAL FESTIVAL I OF SONG. MR LLOYD GEOnGB ON THE POWER OF I MUSIC- OLD HYMNS OF WALES. I The Cymanfa Ganri Genedlaethol held at Aber- ystwyth. on Friday, under tnJ auspices of the Nation- al E.sleddfod brought together a body of about three thousand members of choirs and congregations of two or three counties. The committee set out with the purpose of selecting for the festival a number of the best known Welsh hymns wedded toxoid tunes, rend- ered as far as possible in their original forms, vare was also taken to make the selectioa representative of both the Anglican and NoiicotiforniiA, Churchc3 in Wales. The Secretary for War himself gave every encouragemnt possible to the idea. It was his owu suggestion that the Eisteddfod this year should in- clude a singing festival, and he showed his approval of what had been done in this direction by taking part in the proceedings. The Eisteddfod pavilion was quits inadequate to accommodate the 6000 or more people who came together. The morniug session was held under tho presidency of the Dean of iiangor, who was supported on tne platform by Mr Lloyd George, Mrs Lloyd George, and their daughter, Megan; Mr Herbert Lewis, M.P., Junior Lord of the Treasury, and Mrs Lewis; Mrs T. E. Ellis and her son, Sir Frank Edwards, Messrs Llew. elyn Williams and John Hugh Edwards, members of Parliament, Mr Francis Lloyd. Mua.Doc-, 4r Alten, Aftis.Doc. (Oxford), lIr. Lynn Thomas, the Rev. John Williams (Brywsiencyn), and many others. The festival was opened with prayer by the Arch- deacon of Cardigan (the Yen, David Williams, of Aberystwyth), alter which the singing commenced, under the cotidtic-torship of Mr David KVans, Cardiff. THE lHUN OF BANGOR. In the course of a short address the Dean of Bangor gor said that the festival was a new departure in the history of the National Eisteddfod. The gravity of the times demanded that the music of thj Eisteddfod should be crowned with the hymns of the sanctuary. The days of the Eisteddfod were the days of national unity on that platform. There was no welcome except to patriotic unity. Sectarianism was forgotten and party politics ignored. He also thought that there existed three reasons by which they might hope to have religious unity in Wales- They all believed in the same Bible, they all observed the s ime Sabbath, and they all also sang the same old Welsh hymns. There was little likelihood of our uilpi-iziclipled- and relentless enemy in the present war being affected by prayer or praise, but he was positive thai the famiiiar hymns learnt by Welsh soldiers bofore they left their home were proving oil inspiration and a source of courage to them in the face of danger (cheers). THE BEGINNING OF A NEW EPOCH. At the afternoon session, tnt ttev. John Williams- Brynsicncyn, presided, and the opening service was conducted by the It-ev. D. Tccwyn Evans, Birkenhead. The liev. John Williams described the festival as the first of its kind in which ali the religious denom- inations of the country were represented. He hoped it marked the beginning of a new cpoch. Their aim was the same, and why should they not sometimes unite to achieve it? (cheers). There must be some- thing out of place in a religious body which rendered it impossible for it to join with others in a campaign against the common enemy of mankind. The festival was really ths forerunner of many blessings that would result from the war. The nation would, per- haps, be poorer in material wealth, but. infinitelj richer in character. He had no idea what the peopto of Eugiand or Scotland or Ireland might be doing these day, but in Wales, at any rate, they had the spectacle of the people assembling in their thousands to praise God in the midst of the war, with the Minis ter of War on the platform (cheers). Principal W. U. Hadow.-of Armstrong Co lege, New- castle, and Dr. H. 1'. Allen spoke at the evening meetiner. • .m- MR LLOYD GEORGE. WELSH ORATORY IN SONG. Mr Lloyd George, who spoke at the afternoon meet- ing, was received with greet cheering. He said he had been invited there merely as a stopgap. But he rose, as a member of the Executive Committee of the festival, to thank them all for having made it such a success. He certainly was very glad to have had a small share—(a voice, "A very big share, sir" and clieers),-iii bringing together such an exceptional gathering. Apologising for his late arrival, the Secretary for War said that was entirely due to his inability to tear himself away from the beautiful scenery of the neighbourhood (cheers);, As he gazed at their Rheidiol Valley he regarded Tiimsclf much as he did the Rheidiol River as it meandered towards the sea—it seemed incapable of leaving the land of Cored i,- ioii-(cheers)-a nd wound slowly along in spite of the music of the sea (cheers). There was a peculiar appropriateness in holding the festival that day. As a Welshman lie gloried in its success. Why? He would tell them. There was no quarter of tho United King- dom-he doubted very mach whether there was any part of the world-where men and women from all the parishes of two or three counties who had never met each other before cculd have been brought together to sing so beautifully and in such perfect unison and tunc and with such "hwyi" (cheers). There was a peculiar appropriateness in holding the singing festi- val in a time of war because they could express in song feelings which they could not voice in words. There were emotions surging in the soul of a nation which could not, be put into words, which could not be expressed from pulpits or platforms in words- One of the world's greatest musicians had composed a series of "Songs without Words," and, in fact, every great song was a Eong without words. There wer< things they could not describe by the spoken word. That was why the great old preachers of Wales, in his opinion, were the best orators in the world. Wales had reared more first-class orators in fifty years than any other nation ever did (cheers). When those old giants found their feelings had got bsyond words their soul overflowed and they tuned it (laughter and cheers). He had heard his friend the president do it —(laughter)—and he know then that he had got the Welsh "hwyl." That was the Welsh "liwyl" they had., just heard--that grand old tune "Llanllyfnl." Who composed it? (a voice "John Jones, Ta.lysarn"). That was so; he was one of the greatest orators of Britain. Look at it. Is it not a tune? It is the oratory of John Jones, Talysarn, in notes (cheers). The "hwyl" of John Jones in old notation. WHAT THE OLD SONGS OF WALES WERE. Now that was what the old songs 01 wales were, and he came there because he wanted to hear them lIe was glad of the new tunes. for they must have new ones, else the people of the next generation would have no old ones left, but he loved the old ones. He was not enough of a musician to select good new ones, but time had chosen the old ones for him. When they heard an old air it must occur to them that it must have had a splendid constitution to be able to walk across the ages down to them and to stride over the hills of the centuries without tiring. The old airs were as fresh to-day as they were three hundred years ago, and they would continue so until the last trum. pet resounded over the hills of Wales. They would notice in their programmes many of the tunes were head "Alaw Gymreig." On one occasion John Curwen said he liked those tunes composed by Mr Allo Jimrick (loud and prolonged laughter). He (the speaker) liked that composer too (renewed laughter). He was a good, powerful composer, breathing the soul of the people. The tunes were not merely eongs, but the music of the Welsh harp expressing the soul of Wales (cheers). In conclusion the right hon. gentleman said he hoped this would not be the last ftsstiVal in con- nection with the Eisteddfod, for there was an inspira- tion in it (cheers). He congratulated the able con- ductor for the way in which he had let the massed choir and the spirit and unity he had put into the work. This was one of the things which Wales might be proud of (loud cheers). Mr Lloyd George, accompanied by Mrs Lloyd George, Miss Megan Hoyd QjM?e, Colonel David Davies, M.P., the Rev. J ohn6, and Mr and Mra William George, arrived at Criccieth at six o'clock on Friday evening by special train from Aber. ystwyth. ^mmmimmwmmmmmmM

IA PATRIOTIC LLANDUDNO FAMILY

A PATRIOTIC LLANDUDNO FAMILY. l THREE SONS DECORATED, FIVE WITH THE COLOURS. There are few mothers in Britain who have greater reason for pride in her children than Mrs Cadman, of Cioverley Lodge, Little Orme, Llandudno, who has five sons with the colours and a daughter attached to Queen Alexandra's Imperial Military Nursing Service. One of the sons, Lieut. U. J. Cadman, U. i., was awarded the Military Cross in January of this year, and therefore claims priority in that respect over Sergeant-Major Frank Thompson, who was stated last week to be the first Llandudno man to gain the dis. tinction. Lieut. Cadman had been previously twice mentioned in despatches and (Jflvep a commission for service in the field. He received the decoration the hands of the King at Buckingham Palace r > March 4th last. On the same day, by a happy coincidence, an of Mrs Cadman's sons. Lieut. James Old R.tV.R., was presented by his Majesty with the lstlnguighed Service Cross, and only a few wows previously another son, Prof. John Caaman, D.Sc., had been invested a companion of the most Dis- tinguished Order of St. Michael and St. George. A fourth son, Lieut. W. H. Cadman, B.Sc., of the Man- chester Regiment, was severely wounded 1n the Galli- poli campaign in June of last year, and, now after five months in France as an observer in the Royal Flying Corps, the fifth son, Lieut. R. CA Mall, has "taken his wings." Miss Cadman is now on duty at a military hospital in England after twelve months' service in Malta.

Advertising

REST FOR ALU MRS, WINSLOW'S SOOTHING SYRUP. For Children Teething. If your baby Is restless and cannot sleep, give this old-fashioned remedy a triak, as it curet Wind and Teething Diarrhoea. You will all have a good night and baby will wake up bright and fcappr

IFALL TY1 LLANDUDNO PIEat

I FALL TY1( LLANDUDNO PIEa..t A VICTIM OF THE DRUG HABIT. I I At Llandudno, on iuesday, Mr J. l entir Wu- iiiime, ooronor, held an inquest touching the deith of William Sexton Rogers, Belmont, North I'arado, Llandudno, who died at the Cottage Hospital the previous day. Mr John Frodoriek Moss identified the body • as that of his father-in-law, a refired dentist, who was 65 years of age. Deceased had been a ,• drug taker practically tiE his life and when, owin.7. to Government restrictions, tho sale of opium waa stopped lie beoamo very depressed and irresponsible. Mr John Roberta, pienr. aster, staited that aoout C 30 on Thursday evsjain# he was standing on the pier jetty when ho r.otiood people rushing towards the side of the pier. He ran along the passa#o and heard the cry of a man In the water. He got a lifo'oolt and threw it over the railings right into the hmds of the man, who took hold of it ard liumj on to it until the pier beat rescued him and brought him on to the pier. A dootor oame up and administered first aid. Replying to the Coroner, the Piermaster said that the pier railings were only 2ft. tin. higher than the seat, so that anyone standing on the seat might overbalance and fall over. Deceased's hait and stick were found on the seat. The Foreman IMr Reeves Hug-hes): He might have stood on tho soat to look over and fallen into the sea. Inspector Breeao said that a wounded soldier had stated that he saw the deceased jump from the piN railings into tho sea. The Coroner said that as the wounded soldier was not present that statement could not, strictly speaking, be .admitted as evidence. Dr. H. Bold Williams said he was called to attend to the deceased a.t the end of the pier, where he found that two visiting doctors had rendered first aid and had succeeded in restoring 'brc-athmg. It was a case of partial drowning, a.nd he ordered the man's removal to the hos- pit,-al,as ho wtes in a state of collapse. At the hos- pital the next day lie got a. little better, but afterwards gradually got weaker. On the pre- vious Saturday the man came to his house and askfd for some opium, which he refused him. Nurse Jessie Menpes stated that the deceased was admibted into the Cottage Hospital on Thivrsd'ay, and died there on Monday. The jury returned an open verdict of death from exhaustion, but found that there was not sufficient evidence to show whet,her deoeased met his death by accident or design.

IANGLESEY FARM SERVANTS BREACH OF CONTRACT

I ANGLESEY FARM SERVANT'S BREACH OF CONTRACT. John Edwards, farmar, Trescawen Farm, Llan g'lvyllog, claimed damages, at Llangefni Police Court on Monday, amounting to E7 from Owen William*, for breotoh c-f contract. The plaintiff said the defendant letft llirr; without notice, leav- ing 14 acres of hay unharvested. PjaintifJ had a farm of 240 acres, and had now only one man (defendant's brother) cn the farm. The defendant said that whon he was engaged he did not agree to stay till .the end of the term, lie left last Wednesday because the plaintiff was continually "a.t him" for not doing enough work and said ho took two days to do one day's work. He was not willing to õro ibaok. He wanted WOI4k, but he would rather be without work than rofaurn to plaintiff. Plaintiff, replying to questions, said he did not blame the defendant personally, ibitt rather blamed the lballiff he had. wtho, he alleged, tempted tho defendant and his brother to join with him in ileaving work without notice. After a retirement, tho Ile-uch fined the de- fendant JB5 And 9a ooafcj, but expressed the view that the plaintiff ought also to have summoned his bailiff. ^Tlie defendant said he had not lnd his wages for ten weeks.

ITHE NATIONAL LIBRARY I

I THE NATIONAL LIBRARY. I While at Aborystwyth for the National Eisteddfod, Mr Lloyd George made a private visit to inspect the new buildings of the National Library of Wales. He was accompanied by Mrs Hoyd George and his young- er daughter, and was received by Sir John Williams, tho president; Mr Evan D. Jones, chairman of the Building Committee; Mr John Ballinger, the librarian, and others. Mr Lloyd George, before leaving, warm- ly congratulated the president upon the successful realisation of his dream of a great library for Wales.

Advertising

DUNLOP fjt PHILOSOPHY f_J PHILOSOPHY I It is sound national economy to buy British tyres in preference to foreign ones; and sound personal econ- BHSHHRBran omy to buy Duniops HHH mBb in preference to others.

LLANDUDNO PIER CONCERTS I

LLANDUDNO PIER CONCERTS. I ARTISTIC MUSIC ATTRACTS LARGE 1 AUDIENCE$. I A crowded audience attended the twelfth spe. eial concert, on Saturday night, when a pro- gramme, bothattraotive and varied, was given by the orchestra. Included in it were such favourite works as Bizet's selection, "Carmen;" Weber's famous pieoe, L'invitation a It valse;" Blon's popular idylle, "The whispering of the flowers;" Teale's march, "Old Comrades;" Sibelius' valse. "Triste;" and Rossini's overture to his last and- greatest opera, William Toll," which was given by special request. Mr George Atkinson played with the orchestra Liszt's Hungarian fantasie for pianoforte a.nd orchestra, and it was well received. By request, Mr John Bridge contributed the vio- j lin solo in Mr Payne's andante in F, and played it in a delightful manner. The vooalists were Madame Alice Wilna and Mr Robert Charles- worth. Madame Wilna opened with an impres- sive dramatic rendering of Cavatina" from Meyerbeer's "Tho Huguenots." In the second part of the concert Madame Wiliia again afford-, ed much pleasure by the rendering of Landon Ronald's Captive Lark" and He rbert Oliver's popular song, "On the march." Mr Charles- worth was given ample opportunity for display- ing his declamatory powers in Leoncavallo's pro- logue to "Pagliacci," of which he took full ad- vantage, and was deservedly recalled. He was equally successful in lighter vein, when he gave Wilfrid Sanderson's popular song, "Up from Somerset. At the conclusion of the concert, Madame Wilna and Mr Charlesworth gave a charming rendering of Woodforde-Finden's duet, "Kingfisher Blue." At the sacred concert on Sunday, Mr Charles- worth sang in a devout manner the immortal aria, "It is enough," from Mendelssohn's "Eli- jah." Coningsby Clarke's song, "Tho Blind Ploughman," was another of his contributions. Miss Bessie Brough ajso appeared at the saored oonoert, and in her rendering of C wen's "The Birthday," she utilised her rich soprano voice and clear enunciation to much advantage. A popular feature of the programme was Bach's sonata for pianoforte, flute and violin, artistically given by Messrs Atkinson, Halstead and Bridge. A programme of popular music was given on Monday, which included such favourite pieces as Masoagni's fantasie, "CavaUeria Rusticana;" Ni?i.?. overture, "The Merry Wives of Wind. sor;" Massenet's suite, Scenes Pittoresques;" Joyce's waltz, Love and Life in Holland," etc. The vocalists were Madame Annie Nelson and Mr Robert Charlesworth. OPERATIC CONCERT. I An operatic concert was given on. Tuesday, when the programme included &elections from such po- 0peras as "The Mikado" (Sullivan), Tho- mas' "Mignon," Verdi's "Aida," Leoncavallo's "11 Pagliacoi," Verdi's "II Trovatore," etc. Mr John Bridge effectively played the violin solo in Donizetti's andante from "La Favorita." The vocalist was Miss Lilian Stiles-Allen, who opened with an artistic interpretation of Verdi's recit and air, "Ermani Involami," for which she was loud- ly reoalled. Site was equally successful in Lane Wilson's song, "Before you came." A request concert was given on Wednesday, when all the items in the programme had beet requested by members of the audience. MI Arthur Payne, the conductor of the orchestra, contributed a violin solo, and Miss Lilian Stiles- Allen was again the vocalist. An attractive programme has been arrange d for the thirteenth special concert next Saturday at which the vooalists will be Miss Doris Woodall a.nd Miss Emily Breare. Miss Breare will also 6e the vocalist at the sacred concert on Sunday and at the popular concert on Monday; and on Tuesday Miss Winifred Lewis, the well-knowa Welsh contralto, is due to sing.

CHAPLAIN TO BLINDED SOLDIERS

CHAPLAIN TO BLINDED SOLDIERS. COLWYN BAY MINISTER'S APPOINTMENT. The National Institute for the Blind, whose presli dent is Sir C. Arthur Pearson, have selected the Rev. David Griffiths, the blind Baptist minister of Colwyn Bay, for the post of Free Church Chaplain for the United Kingdom, and he will enter upon his (hitloa early in October. The Institute, in addition to all its other truly great work for tho blind in general, has in hand the training and care of all the soldieri and saiiors blinded in the war. Though blind himself, Mr Griffiths has spent tel successful years in the ministry. Born in 1878, he il a native of Rhosymedre, near Ruabon. When a little more than six years of age he lost his sight as tht result of scarlet fever. Five and a half yoars iatei he entered Henshaw's Blind Asylum, Old TraffortA Manchester, where he received the first part of hit education, remaining there seven years. Aftcrwardt he joined Ebenezcr Baptist Church, Cefnmawr, Wrex- ham, and soon showed marked abilities as a punch- er. It was on the recommendation of this church that he seriously gave hi atteution to entering the Baptist ministry as his life's work. f With this in view he became a student at the Academy, Pontypridd, for 18 months, and at the end of that time he was received for definitely theological training at the South Wales Baptist College, Cardiff. where Principal lidwards, and the staff of the college naturally took a very special interest in Mr Griffith* as he was the only blind man ever received iuto the college. Mr Griffiths was also very early in great request among the churches and travelled hundreds of milet to fulfil preaching engagements, eveu during his firal year there. becoming very well known in the whoh of the English-speaking part of his denominatioi throughout Wales, and in several parts of England At the close of a -thoroughly successful career at cot lege he was appointed pastor of the Baptist Church Welshpool, a position he held until he took up hit present pastorate at Colwyn Bay, seven years ago Though totally blind he, of course, performs everl part of a Baptist minister's usual work with perfec! ease, immersing new members to the church, abset utely without aid from others. For his Scriptun lessons, marriage and burial services and private reading he uses the well-known Braille type for ttis blind, which he himself writes as well as reads. Mr Griffiths was married ten years ago, his wife being at that time assistant mistress at Hopkinstown School, Pontypridd. They have four bright children.

No title

I To meet the increased cost of bread, the New- port (Mon.) Guardians on Saturday increased thl evtra war relief to-all outdoor paypers from 34 to 6d per woek.

Advertising

MONKEY BRAND.* 1 'I I 1 (  TWO STEPS TO EASY HOUSE CLEANlNGt 1 lllBSBB ARE FOUND IN MONKEY BRAND AND? POWDER MONKEY. THEY MAKE LABOUR ■ Wl|lfl|HHHni i LIGHTER AND HOME BRMHTER. AS good as an extra pair of hands, they spee have the house shining and spotless from floor to ceiling, inside and out-Wood and Paint- ?SBBHtHN work fresh as new; Brassware bright and iNM??? glittering like gold; Tinware, Copperware, Steel HH and Iron gleaming gaily; Cooking Utensils spick SNHin and span; Bath and Oven clean and wholesome. HR They polish China, Glassware, Enamel, Marble, Tiles and Linoleum-but they WON'T WASH CLOTHES. For some parts of the work Powder, Monkey is handier than Monkey Brand. Both should be in every household. m Use MONKEY BRAND Use POWDER MONKEY VHSfB for cleaning and polishing for Scrubbing Floors, Tables, Tin, Copper, Brass, Marble, Dressers, Cupboards, Sinks, Enamel, Linoleum, China, and for cleaning Gas Stoves tHBpbfcP Glassware, &c. and Cooking Utensils, .ffg WBK BENJAMIN BROOKS & CO. LIMITED. .I