Teitl Casgliad: Cambrian news and Merionethshire standard

Sefydliad: Llyfrgell Genedlaethol Cymru

Hawliau: Mae hawlfraint yr adnodd hwn yn eiddo i Cambrian News Ltd.

Gwylio manylion cyfan

Cyntaf Cynt Llun 8 o 8
Full Screen
13 erthygl ar y dudalen hon
ilp a d i the Lj1 t

ilp a d i the \L;j¡1, t. NOTICES TO C OJ U IKS P O XI) EX T s RFTr.PA.YKR."—You cannot cure every miuiicioal ovil at once. it took me vears to get r• 'I of that post m North Parade. Now that split-up wall in Plascrug has been repaired. I shall mobably get rid of that dangerous lamp in the middle of the crossing near the London and Provincial Bank before somebody is killed. TALYBON- F. mining in Wale, could be made much more prosperous probably if the mines were worked locally. The subject is large and very complicated. "THESPIAN STREET. 1 have had that place referred to mo before. Get i somebody to see the Town Council. I have not been inside the enclosure. "GHURCH MEMBER."—It is two thousand years since the Christian religion was founded, and some of its organisations are now antiquated. Faith is not, in my opinion, based on ignorance, but on knowledge. "TEACHER.The whole education system needs overhauling. The subject is too great and complicated for me. I do not know a single education reformer. QTTABRYMAN."—There will be changes. The tactics of the past are being abandoned. MOBE NBTYS. It is reported ina London newspaper that a member of the Swansea Town Council said that there is a larger pro- portion of stammerers in Wales than in any other country, and this defect is attri- buted to bilingual teaching. This is news to me. First, I did not know that there were more stammerers in Wales than in other countries and, second, I did not know that bilingual teaching Wrought about stammering. Education is a wonderful thing. WANTS WORK. Here is an advertisement from a London daily paper. There is something in the advertisement that interests me. GENTLEMAN, Bachelor, age 34, ei desires Post, few hours daily, to Lady as SECRETARY. I wonder what salary he wants and what his hopes and expectations are? Perhaps his chief work will be to write love letters for the lady. He may find a lady who is more than a match for him. LCCKr MI NEBS. At the Convocation of York, last week, the scarcity of teachers was discussed. The Rev: A. E. Sorby said that they could not expect a man in a mining district to qualify as a teacher with no prospect of receiving more than P,60, EBO. or L100 per annum for many years, when he oould earn 10s., 15s., or in some cases JB1 a day in the pit. There were colliers earning JS300 and £ 260 a year. Comparing this with the day school teacher's pittance of VW, cculd 'we wonder at the scarcity of teachers." The foregoing will be news to the solliers of Wales. Just think of colliers earning J3260 a year and taking positions as police officers at a sacrifice of pretty well £W! No wonder coal is dear. CLEMENCY. I ask you my dear Clem, Why should we eare for them We need not make a fuss, They do not care for us. So let us go our way No matter what they say, Until we reach the goal That means the end of all, As far as mortals know, Of joy and pain and woe. If God is true and just, In whom we put our trust, We need not shirk our fate. Or dread eternal hate, But if the devil rules, And we are but his tools, Then we must go to hell And with the devil dwell In regions fiery hot, Should we object or not. I, as a mortal man, Just do the best I can, And what there is to bear I'll bear here or elsewhere In faith that things will mend If life is without end, And God is Lord Supreme And hell but a mad dream. THE WELSH LANGFArrE. Are English people ',oppc\ed to the teaching of the Welsh language in schools? Certainly not. Just think how glad Con- servatives would now be if Mr. Lloyd George was not a master of the English language. The more the English language is neglected in Wales tho fewer openings there are for the Welsh people WOMEN AND FREEDOM. I need not tell anybody who reads thi" paper that I am in favour of the political enfranchisement of women. I think it is monstrous that mer,) sex should exclude women from political power and statutory equality, but should not free them from legal, or municipal, or political responsi- bilities. As long as sheer brute force rules the world, the male will hold first place, but surely the time has come when religion and civilisation,, and, art and science, and mercy and justice and devotion do not depend on sheer brute force. It is 'a pitiful thing that in this eountry women should not be treated as the equivalents of men. In this column, on January 23rd, I wrote about the need for royal honours to be given to women. There is now, I see, a probability of something being done. A DIFFICULTY. There is nothing that has been more diffi- cult for me to do than to persuade superior persons that their supposed inferiors in position are, after all, actual human beings. Do Conservatives know that even Mr. Lloyd George is really a human being! Why, even I am a human being, although I was once burnt in effigy, and if I live another fifty years I shall very likely re- ceive a letter from the then Sovereign on my one hundred and twentieth birthday in the year nineteen hundred and sixty- four. BEAUTY SPOILERS Professor A. G. Rusht-on, of the Leeds University, lecturing on "The Influence of 6moke on town vegetation," said that he .Lad seen on Lake Coniston A film nr grease, which undoubtedly was the tarry deposit which had come across from the industrial towns of Lancashire. The smoke pall of Leeds shut out forty per cent. of sunshine, so it would be seen what an important factor the smoke of Leeds was in limiting the growth of veg,etation in Leeds. If Professor RusJiton ever comes into Wales, I will tell him where he can find trees whose trunks are covered with smoke deposits. There aro many people who depend on visitors for a living who shut out many per cents, of sunshine. It is no isse remonstrating with the beauty spoilers, and the local governing bodies, the Aber- ystwyth Town Council, for instance, do JKJthirJg. OBSERVATIONS. The wise are not troubled about what the world will lose by their denth. What- ever work they do either someone else will do, or the world will get along without it. There are more ways than one of bear- ing sorrow. The wise bear it once-whim it comes. The unwise bear it twice-I)e- fore it comes and when it is there. The fool bears it thrice—when it cornea, when it is there, and afterwards. One of my hopes is that I have .some- times said what others think and feel but have not been able to express. I ana- no more ashamed (-If my ignorance than I am proud of jry knowledge, i.or do I blame for L:Y folly any mor" than 1 claim merit for my wisdom. I have spent a large portion of my life in trying to sea and understand the meanings of things which many people apparently do not deem to be worthy of observation or thought. Fear of saying things that others may consider to be unwise should never deter you from saying what you think and feel. Sheep and fowls and cattle and game and other creatures do not know, and cannot be made to know, that they are bred by millions merely in order to pro- vide food and pleasure for human beings. KEEP CALM. I am sorry for people who find it difficult to keep calm in times of agitation and turmoil. Half a century ago the tragedies and comedies of the world were not served up daily in newspapers, and the danger then was not excitement but monotony and dreariness. The course I take is to remember that as regards the affairs of the world gener- ally I am an aloof outsider. One of the aims of my life is to reduce anxiety, even about my own personal affairs and con- ditions, to a minimum, so that I can see the beauty round about me and avoid trying to obtain things that I really do not want, merely because some other people want them. The clangor of the world now rings in the ears of every individual if the in- dividual does not try to keop calm by seeking peace and finding it, as it certainly can be found—at least that is my ex- perience. Some people have to go to re- mote places in the world in order to find that peace. I can find it Itist where I am, as I am finding it now by writing these lines, which are a sort of lecture to myself on how to ke-ep calm. I am not one of those who run after excitement, but I like to see the various' sides of things, and I seem to get enjoy- ment, rest, calm, and peace, out of what is of no apparent value to others. A person asked me the other day how I liked the sort of weather: it was rain- ing. I told him that T liked all sorts of weather, and what I told him is true, but I keep out of some of it. The great thing is to keep calm and to not worry about what is really of no con- sequence. HOW TO THINK. In a London daily paper a correspondent raises the question how pupils in schools may be taught to think. More than once in these columns I have written about how to learn to think. The subject is interesting, important, and complicated. A large number of people never learn to think. One of the first conditions of being able to think is tm be able to observe. There are, for instance, thousands of things which can be seen or heard, or felt, or dreaded, or desired, or sought, or shunned, or loved, or hated. If I were asked how to begin to teach the young to think I would try and per- suade them to ask themselves questions, and to write down the answers. Why, for instance, are your fingers not all the same length? Has a bird any sense of taste? How does a swallow get the mud it builds its nest of not to crumble away ? How are the bones and feathers of a fowl developed out of an egg in which you can see no trace of them ? What period of time does a seam of coal eight hundred feet below the surface mean? What do the fish in the sea know about the birds in t the air, or wild beasts in the woods, or wireless telegraphy It is not easy even to learn to see things that are quite close to you. Per- ception and observation are something much more than mere vision. Differences of opinion in reference to religion, politics, right wrong, good, bad, and many other things, are due to people not being able to see the same sides of things—not having the same powers of perception or the same nowers of thought. If a youth asked me how to make pro- gress, I would say, learn to think. If I was then asked how to learn to think, I would say, look steadily at things and learn to observe, not only what is there but what is not there. The temptation is to say a good deal more, but I will abstain. The subject is a very difficult one. A large dictionary will explain what to think means, but how to think is a matter for the individual who often does not even know how to make a start. DO LIKEWISE. I am glad to see that the Llandudno Council, at its last meeting, decided to adopt the principle of incorporation and to appoint a committee to consider the question of enlarging the boundaries of the town. One of the things that greatly puzzles me is why centres of population like Bar- mouth, Bala, Corwen, Portmadoc, Cric- cieth, Festiniog, Dolgelley, Newtown, Machynlleth, Tregaron, and many others do not get themselves incorporated. No labour or expenditure should be spared in trying to improve the status of centres of population. It is a great thing to be a citizen of no mean city. I have often been pleased to remember that I am a native of an ancient town and county of which the King is Duke. Lampeter is incorporated, and I am sure the natives of that town are glad to remember the fact. It is a great deal for a town to have a mayor, aldermen, and magistrates. I have tried hard to induce the inhabitants of towns all over this large district to do honour to themselves mainly for the sake of those who have had to go to live elsewhere. If I had the power, which, alas, I lack, I would not only make it easy for towns to get themselves incorporated, but I would give dignity to County Councils, and to Rural District Councils, which they do not now possess. AT L-1ST. I have had a letter from somebody in London offering to lend me amounts of money from JE30 upwards, on note of hand alone. I entertained the idea of asking for RI,COO,OW for twelve thousand months The form leaves space for observations. The observation I may make is that if the lender is as great a fool as he hopes I am I may get the money. The Coast

iiBERYSTWnZ

iiBERYSTWnZ Deanery Eis-teddfcd.-Tlie winners who did not respond to their names at the eisteddfod meetings are:—Pryddest, Mr. T. Oswald Williams, V.C.W. telyneg, the Rev W. M. Wright, Llanbrvnmair, Mont., who also took the )prizo> for the hymn engivn, the Rev. R. Jones, "TTeuor Aled," Talvhont Uterary.—Mr. Dan Thomas, Great parltgate-strret, has an interesting article m the current issue of "Cymru" in which hf chattily describes his cxnoJ'e" on walking tour through F )m,- of the wilder end most romantic parts of North Wales. SJiire Horse Society.—At the Islington .'•Lire Horse Show, on Tuesday, "Bayham Gallant," the hors hir-r] from Sir Edward Pryso by the North Cardiganshire Shire Horse Society, was highly commended in a strong classe of fifty-one entries for shires over 16.2 hands and between five and ten years of age. 'I .Police Cases.-Cii Monday before the A i ay or and Peter Jones, Esq., David Edwards, labourer, Pendre Cottage, Llan- Lcidarn, was lined 10s. for having been (trunk and d sorderly fl1 Great Darkgate- strcet cn the 21st September. On Tuesday before- Capt. Doughtcn, J. Gibson, and Edwin Mouis, EVqrs.. James Edwards. labourer, Newpcre, was charged with hav- ing begged alms in Northgate-street en the 24th. P.t\ E\an J. Evans said the dc- fendant was begging from door to door and as there were complaints about him iocs him to the Polico Station. Not a penny was found on him. Defendant, whose boots were very dilapidated, said he reckoned that ask tag tor a pan of boots was no crime. He had walked frpm e_ Machynlleth and arrived too late to get into the Workhouse. He had not been able to work for six months, having been knocked down by a motoi car in Bristol and had his shpulder knocked out. De- fendant was sent to prison for fourteen days. There were no cases at the weekly sessions on Wednesday, the magistrates present being Peter Jones, Esqr., and Captain Doughton. Death of Mr. Benbow.-The death occurred un Friday morning at Bryneirion, Aiexanura-road, ox Mr. huward iienbow, ret.red engine driver, at the age 01 bd*eaty-seven years. ivlr. iienbow had been ailing for some time oast, but was confined to his bed for one uay only. He was attended by Dr. Abraham 'lhomas. He married Miss Sarah Jones of Borth f arm, Llandinam, who predeceased him about three years ago. There were seven children of tne marriage, six of whom sur- vive—vYlrs. Jones, Treiierbert; Mrs. D. B. Davies, Caergog; Mr. J. J. Benbow, Smiihneld-roati; Mrs. Griffiths, Bron- co ion; Mr. Richard Benbjow, Alexandra- road and Mrs. Thomas, Erith, Kent. His eldest son, Edward, was stationinast-er ac Llanbrynmair up to the time of his death. The three grandchildren are Miss Nellie Benbow, Mr. J. E. Benbow, and Master G.yn E. Griffiths. Mr. Benbow formed one of the Enghsh fresbyterian congre- gation, worshipping at the old Temperance Hall, and was the oldest surviving mem- ber of the English Presbyterian Church in Bath-street. Reference to his death was made by the Rev. R. Hughes, the pastjor, on Sunday morning and the Dead March was played in the evening. Mr. Benbow came trom Montgomeryshire to Aberystwyth in connection with the open- ing of what was then known as the Man- chester and Milford Railway, about the year 1865, the railway having been con- structed by the late Mr. David Davies of Llandinani. He had charge of the first engine on the M. and M., the ".Mont- gomery." It was brought to Aberystwyth tyver the Cambrian Railway and taken to Llanybyther on a huge trolly drawn by between forty and fifty horses. Mr. Ben- bow drove The Montgomery" for the contractors and when the line was opened between Pencader and Lampeter he drove the engine attached to the first passenger train. Mr. Benbow subsequently drove the "Lady Elizabeth," which commenced running m 1866 and continued to be worked fpr twenty-five years and, with new boilers, for another fifteen years when she was put "out of steam" at the same time as lr. Benbow retired from engine driving, after nearly fifty years of faithful service. The funeral took nlace on Tues- day morning, interment being made at the Cemetery and was attended by a large gathering of eld friends to pay their .r !)uie of resnect. The Rev. Richard Hughes officiated. The mourners were John and Richard, sons; Mrs. Davies, Treherbert. Mrs. D. B. Davies, Caergog, Mrs. Briffitlis, Broneirion, Mrs. Thomas, Erith. Kent, daughters; James, brother; and Mrs. Owen, Garthmyl, George-street, s'st-u-. Among those present were Mr. Wm. Thomas, Mr. David Lloyd, North- parade; Mr. Richard Jones, Mr. Speller, Councillor Griffith Williams, Mr. Young. Mr. Salmon, Inspector Humphreys. Mr. James Rees, Mr. R. Bickerstaff, Inspector Banford, Dr. Thomas, Messrs Danel Jones, J. Evans, R. J. Roberts, W. James Evan Lewis, T. Clarke, D. Davies, D. Jones. J. G. Williams, Richard Jones G.W.R., Edwin Jones. Albert Potts, E. E. Ellis, R. Jones, D. Thomas (guard), J. Roberts, W. Warrington. John Thoma, I Gomer Morgan. W. Williams, D. M Jones, David Ellis, R. G. Bennett, T. E. Owen (county surveyor), W. Miall Jones. and E. Felix. The funeral arrangements were satisfactorily carried cut by Mr. J. Lewis Evans, Great Darkgate-street. Wo'sh Society.—Dr. Davies Rees, Caer- sws. addressed a crowded meeting at the Presbyterian Schoo.room on Monday even- ing in connection with the Wel-h Society on "Welsh Folk Songs." Mr E. Williams, chief constable, presided. Dr. Rees sa d that folk songs are the cumulative fruit swing and a rhythm, as well as beauty of form and expression as evidenced by Dio 'n mynd i Dowyn." which was sung by Mr. W. L. Williams. The lecturer ana ysed the component parts of the true f;olk song. There were two classes of musical pro- ductions—the cultivated and ornate pro- duct of system and method, and the '.other the product of natural spontaneous ability, which germinated in the masses of the people. The folk song was of the latter class and authorship was difficult, if not impossible to ascertain. His theory was that folk song are the cumulative fruit of many efforts, spread jover an extended that folk song are the cumulative fruit of many efforts, spread jover an extended period—communal rather than individual in their origin. They conformed to the theory of evolution rather than to creation in their continuity, variety, and selection of theme and expiession and were handed down by oral tradition and transmission, being continually added to and varied by succeeding generations. That assumption was instanced by "Aeth fy Ngwen i ffair Pwllhe'i," sung by Miss Nesta Morgan, in which the theme and treatment showed' evidence of being added to in the course of time. Dr. Rees showed how the music, easy catchy and rhythmic, was evidently added to the words already composed, without regard to the major or minor keys. It was simple enough to be sung by even those who were not gifted with a voice necessary for the proper rendering of an ordinary solo, composed on the lines of the schools; He traced folk songs back to the Greek form of music of seven scales. Miss Bertha Jones sang the" Golome-n" to illustrate the speaker's theory. Passing lightly over the various classes of Welsh folk songs—the songs of labour, domestic subjects, maritime songs, and cumulative songs such as "The House that Jack built" and Y nyth ar y bryn"—Dr. Rees emphasised the fact that Welsh folk songs did not comprise songs of the hunting or drnking variety, associated with English folk song. T'• > lecturer regretted the decline of folk wng. due to the introduc- tion of the tonic solfa system and to the introduction of railways and modernity which have broken up old communal re- Iat:onships which existed before their in- troduction. Re impressed the importance of the preservation of folk song, not alone because of their antiquity, but as models of perfection in musical expression, as shown in the delightful cadences and quaint fancies of "Yr hen wr mwyn" (sung by Mr. W. L. Williams; "Lliw gwyn blodyn yr haf" (sung by Mr. Jack Edwards and Miss Bertha Jones), in wh'ch the optimism of the old man resting on Irs oarr. is contrasted with the incurable pessimism of the young man onnressed by thoughts of the future; and of "Haulwen" (sung by Miss Nesta Morgan). Another song— Y ddau farel,tlie lectu'-pr said, was re-cued from oblivion by Professor T,7 (I w It was sung bv Mr. W. L. Williams. Miss Nesta M'T- fan singing "Cyfri'r Geifr Miss Bertha Jc-»ss sang "Y Saitli Rhyfeddod." an ex- c^Uent example of the sarcastic song Miss Jones also sang "Tri neth sy'n hawdd ei s'g'o." which was simple and charming and full of swing and rhythm of the true folk song. Dr. Rees urged the collection p nrl preservation of the best examples of f,lk songs in order "that an essentiallv Welsh branch of the prospective British I 

LLEDROD

LLEDROD. Funera!.—The funeral took place on Tuesday afternoon of Mrs. Anne Parry, wife of Mr. John Parry, Penlanlas, who died on the previous Wednesday at the age of seventy-three years. The Rev. John Evans, Tabor, officiated at the house and the Vicar in the Church and at the graveside. The chief mourners were the husband, two sons, a daughter, grandson, and grand-daughter. The funeral was largely attended by friends and acquaint- ances from Aberystwyth and the country district.

VALE OF AYRON

VALE OF AYRON, Agricultural Education.—Mr. Tom Evans, Fro Farm, Felinfach, was awarded a scholarship for a continuation course in agriculture at the 1/ast meeting of the County Education Committee, and not Mr Tom Evans, Cefngarthenor, as stated in the report of the meeting.

NEW QUAY

NEW QUAY Conoert.-A miscellaneous concert was Igi/en at Towyn Vestry on Wednesday evening, when the Rev. E. Aman Jones, B.A., presided over a large audience. Ca!l.—Mr. Evan Jones, B.A.. Penrhiw- francis, has accepted a call to the pastorate of Porth English Congregational Chapel.

HARLECH

HARLECH. Workmen's Houses.—Tho Deudraeth I Rural Council have appointed a special committee to consider a report by the Medical Officer that there is an insufficient number of suitable workmen's houses in Harlech.

No title

The Bishop of St Asaph states that there is not one word of truth in the announce- ment published in some newspapers of his engagement to be married. The portrait subscribed for by tho Unionists of the Denbigh Boroughs. for presentation to the Hon. W. Ormsby Gore, M.P., on the occasion of his mar- riage, is now nearly completed, and the presentation is expected to take place at Easter.

Advertising

C'AMBFTTAN RAILWAYS.— Approximate reiurn ff traffic receipt* for th "Cfk eucling Feh. "300; train traffic, 12 289 Goorls train traffic, £:,049; Total for the wck, £!}.:3:8; Aggregate from enrrrnenoemert of year, loS. Actual ■raffia receipts for the corresponding Wtek last y nr—Pttt^B^nger train traffic, £2224; Goois 1 rain traffic, £2,979; Total for dl week, £ 5.203 from commencement o' y*;sr, £ 37,428 Trcreate fir th- week— P»B«er.ger trai l traffic, £65 G o'lutrain traffi :£70; total for the week, £ 135 increase hr ) "e wetk V; eseng«r trail1 tiftffic £ Goods trljn traffic f Total for t e k, £ o\rf'g'H,< iocr-- e* --P

WEST WALES ASYLUM I

WEST WALES ASYLUM. I A deputation from the counties of Car- J digan, Carmarthen, and Pembroke waited on the Home Office authorities in refer- ence to the Asylum dispute on Tuesday. The deputation included the Rev. T. Arthur Thomas, Mr. C. M. Williams, and Mr. Evan Evans. They submitted to Sir William Byrne, chairman of the Board of Control, certain points in the long-stand- ing dispute between the three counties, the representatives of which had agreed to abide by his decision. The question of quotas was decided by the arbitrator on the basis cf the average of pauper lunatics chargod to each of the three counties dur- ing the last five years. As to representa- tion it was decided that Carmarthenshire d should have a representaitve extra, so that the future representation would be eight for Carmarthenshire, six for Pem- brokeshire, and four for Cardiganshire, making the total eighteen instead of seven- teen. These decisions were accepted and the arrangement will be in force for five years. The deputation also went to the Local Government Board and the Lunacy Commissioners in reference to technical matters relating to the Asylum.

Advertising

SYLVAN PALAOE, PI,Y I N GR !VE, ABEKY-TVVYI H. TUESDAY, MARCH 3H, 3914 BOXING: JEI6 GREAT TEN HOUNDS £16 At Catch Weights. J. ABDALE v. A. K GL\DWIN Aberystwyth. B >w Stress. Mid- Wales Champ'on. Ex Army Champinn of I'-dia. WRESTLING Best of 3 Pin Fal s f! r Club Prz-% THE UN KNOWN v. THE WELL KNOWN Commence 8 p m. Admission 2A. (Reserved). h, 6d (L y353 204th iear of the Offfce. SUN FIRE OFFICE FOUNDED 1710 THE OLDEST INSURANCE OFFICE ——— IN im WORLD -—— OFFI E j Copied from Policy dated 1126. ns urances effected on the following risks FIRE DA-NIAGF. Resultant Loss of Rent and Profits. Employers' Liability & Workmen's Compensa- tion, including Accidents to Domestic Servants Personal Accident. Sickness & Disease. Fidelity Guarantee. Burglary. Plate Glass, LOCAL AGENTS- ABERYSTWYTH Mr HUGH HUGHES Aherayron Mr Thos. Pugh, Paris House Bala Mr R. L. Jones Mount Place Mr J. R. Jordan Cardigan Mr D. Thomas Davies Dolgelley Mr Thomas P. Jones-Parry Mr .John Richards Llandyssul Mr J. R. Harris Llanon. Mr John Thomas Lampeter Mr Wm. Davies, 26, Bryn Road „ Mr H. W. Howell Llanhyther Mr D. Thomas, Blaenhirbant Newquay Mr D. Meredith Jones Sarnau Mr J.Nicholas Talsarn Mr Llewelvn Davies. J owyn Mr E. H. Daniel. x979 CANADA. CANADA CANADA The success of the large number of men whom we sent out last year to Canadian Farmers has been very satisfactory that we have again this year r-een asked to send a number more out to guaranteed situations in Nova Scot,in, New Brunswick. Ontario, and Western Canada; also a number of Married Couples and Domestic Servants, Guaranteed work for all on arrival at Wages from 25s- per week and upwards ptr A eek and upwards with Board. I T I _j|L Book your Passage at once{ with U9 and save trouble and expense 18,00p tons, the Largest & Fastest to Canada Fare from ;E6 5s. Od. All our passengers are met at Liverpool by our own agents and con- ducted to the boat. English and Welsh hand- books free. Send or call for particulars to GRIFFITHS AND GRIFFITHS, Shipping & Emigration Agents, Llanidloes Booking Agents to all par ts of the World. y2 FAIRBOURNE, SO. THE NEW SEASIDE RESORT. Merionethshire, N Wales. Ynysfaig Hall Hotel. OPPOSITE BARMOUTH. At tractions-Sea. Bathing-, Boiling, Golf, Tennis tnd Croquet, Easy Ascent to CALER IDRIS. Golf Linktl-lose to the Hotel. Trout Fishine (Lakes and Streams). Good Sea Fishiny—Bang, Plaice, Mackerel, etc. Good Rough Shooting and Wild Fowllrg free. BOARDING TERMS from 428. PER WEEK. Accommodation for Motori ts, Terms-Si.turday to Monday, 181; inclusive. Telegrams—Hornby, Fairbourne. y294 HARRY H. HORNBY, Proprietor.

LLANON

LLANON. Obituary. --Nli-s. Eleanor Jones, late of 2. Tvmawr, Ghapel-street. widow of Mr. J-oshua Jones, parsed away at 57, Picton- street, Merthyr, the home of her daughter- in-law, where she had resided for the past few months. The funeral took place on Wednesday, when a short service was con- ducted at the house lby the Rev James Jones, pastor of Craig, Abercanaid, at which relatives and friends were present. The body was conveyed to Llanon by motor, and after a service in the O.M. Chapel, conducted by the pastor, the Rev. Moses Davies, the body was conveyed to Llan- sitntffraid Churchyard for interment The mourners were Mr. and Mrs. E. Jones, Wvndh am-street, Gilfach Goch, son and daughter-in-law; Mr. J. Jones and Mr. Herbert J. Jones, Pentwyn House. Cwm- twrch, son and grandson; Mrs Edwards, Dolyfelin-street. Caerphilly, daughter; Mr and Mrs Morgan Jones, Varteg Brick- works. Ystradgvnlais, son and daughter-in- law; Mr. and Mrs. S. Eivans, Church-row, Trecynon daughter and son-in-law; Mr., Mrs., and Miss Morgan, Belle Vue, Tre- eynon, daughter, son-fn-law, and grand- daughter; Mrs. Thomas Jones, Miss E. M Jones, and Mr. J E. Jones. 57, Picton- street, Merthyr. daughter-in-law and grand-children; Mrs. Evans, oar, Cilcen- nin, niece; Mr. T. Jones. Glowmint, Tal- sarn, nephew; Mr. and Mrs A. W. Grif- fiths, builder Pentwyn, Cwmtwrch: Mr. H. L. Thomas, grocer. Cwmtwrch; Mr. J. D. Jeffries, Owmtwrrh: and Mr. FJ T. Davies, Cloth Hall, Merthyr.

Advertising

mum±l ,j, „ PERFECTION ACHIEVED m cdmondsoms u|l IDEAL. il^ TOFFEE I Wholesale Agents: THE CARDIGANSHIRE SWEET CO., Great Darkgate St., Aberystwyth. x69 42, TERRACE ROAD, ABERVHTWYTB, THE Shop for all kinds of BOOTS AND SHOES An the Lowest Possible Prices. REPAIRS promptly and neatly done on the premises with the best bark-tanned Ljeathor.

Family Notices

firths, arttagcø, anb gcaths. BIRTntf. Baird—February 24th, at Annandale Bath- street, Aberystwytb, to Mr and Mrs J. Baird, a daughter. MARRIACE8. Davies-Roberts-Februay 20th, at Rhosy- gwalia Church, Mr Evan Davies, Aran. street, Bain, and Miss Agnes Roberts, Rhosygwalia. Jones—Lewis—February 21st, at the English Congregational Church, Dolgelley, by the Rev. T.H. Jones. pastor, in the presence of Mr Thomas Parry, registrar, Mr William Stephen Jones. 17, Maestalarran terrace, to Miss Winifred Lewis, 3, Wesley-terrace, both of Dolgelley. Thomas—Roberts—February 4th, at Llan- fachreth Church. Mr Evan Thomas, parish clerk, Glasuiruchaf, to Miss Jane Roberts, Sarn-road, Dolgelley. Thomas—Elli-,—February 23rd, at Christ Church, Bala, by the Rev. Jame3 Davies, M.A., Mr H. Jones Thomas, 12, Soutbdale- road, Liverpool, and Miss Annie Jane EUi. 144, Arenig streel, Fata. DEATHS. Benbow -Fel),-titry 20th, at Bryneirion. Alexandla road, Aberystwyth, Mr Edward Benbow, retired engine driver, aged 77 years. Evans February 20th, at Tynyffordd, Cnwcb, Crosswood, Mr Morgan Evans, aged 89 years Hughes—February 19'h, at the Royal Naval 1 Hospita1. Gi^raltv, from tuberculosis of the JUllfrS, Wiliam Hastings Hughes. R.N. (of DolgelU-y), Signal Boatswain H.M.S. •' Antrim." y335 Owen—February 19t.h, at Waterloo-street, Dolttelley, Mr Evan Owen aged 31 years. Thomas—February 22nd. at Prysg, HarJeeh. Mrs Jane Thom-is, aged 92. Williarus-F,t)ru;iry 22nd, at Bracelands, Buartli-ro Aberystwyth, E-izabeth, tb" wife of the Rev. T. Williams, B A., aged 66 yeai s. Printed by J. Gitwcn, and Public,. by him in 'Ter¡.r¡.('f' Road, Aberystwyth, ID the County of Cardigan at LI. Stationer, Higb-si.reet. Sal. and Jo he Evans and nephew. Statlonix*, G?«r ytaar House Barmouth In the Oonoty :J Vter loneth; and at David Lloyd''?. Pctn-v.v 4"1 !n the County of Caraar^n, Friday, February 27th 1914.