Teitl Casgliad: Cambrian news and Merionethshire standard

Sefydliad: Llyfrgell Genedlaethol Cymru

Hawliau: Mae hawlfraint yr adnodd hwn yn eiddo i Cambrian News Ltd.

Gwylio manylion cyfan

Cyntaf Cynt Llun 8 o 8
Full Screen
11 erthygl ar y dudalen hon
IIp alto flom the tostI Selected J

IIp alto flo&m the (tost. I [Selected J. ROW TO BEAD. I sometimes think it would be & good thing tor the young if they were taught the difference between beautiful exprevy- gion and expression that is not beautiful. To the great majority of the people it probably does not matter whether words: are well chosen or not, or whether the thought is adequately and delicately ex- pressed or not, and yet I am not sure that even the most careless readers do not feel the attraction and ibeauty of choice lan- guage. I have been reading some magazine articles, and I have also been reading some standard books. The magazine articles were dreary and tiresome. The books were interesting and exhilarating. Sometimes in the magazine articles the writer gave a quotation that conspicuously struck a much higher note than was to be found in his own composition. I have no space in which to give speci- mens, but if any of my readers would like to test what I am trying to explain, let him read some good author and then pass to an ordinary magazine, and he will feel the drop—the painful drop. If I were going to advise a youth as to his reading I would say avoid badly-written books as you would avoid badly-trained men and women. The one will be as likely to drag you down to a low level as the other It is astonishing how many people who pride themselves on the care with which they choose their human companions, have no care as to the choice of their literary companions, but associate with any sort of literary feebleness and incapacity. I suppose very few people believe that tHere is an art in reading as there is ah art in writing, but there is and it is well worth acquiring. WHAT TH SEA SAID. I had been away from it a long time, and when I returned I was not thinking about it. My mind was far away, but in- sensibly it became conscious of the sea's mighty presence, and I listened to what it had to say. Perhaps the sea never says anything to us that we are not more or less articulately saying to ourselves: but then, you know, nobody can ever say anything to Us intelligibly which we are not saying to ourselves. There was no breaking of the waves—no hissing of the wind—no long, monotonous roll of the surf: there was nothing of this. The sun shone on the wide expanse as it heaved and heaved like a. mighty living thing. I thought it was breathing with slow pulsations, giant-like. In the misty distance the mountains stood guard. Over the waters, in swing- ing flight, were great birds. Every now and then a thin stream of foamy water went shivering and sighing up the level sands as if it were seeking for something that had gone shorewards and had been lost. I felt the presence of the unchanging, incomprehensible sea, and it spoke to me as it has spoken through the long ages to the baffled, weary, heart-broken wanderers on its margin. What did the sea say to me P I should have to tell you. more than that before you could understand; but what it said to me it will say to you when the time comes and you can hear. We cannot repeat the awful things which are said to us by the sea when we are face to face with great renunciations, but if you have ever stood baffled and alone—if you have ever felt that life was. dropping away from you and that desire was dead and hope was faint, well the sea said to me what you would have liked somebody to say to you at that time. And then I knew that in a little while the personal element will drop away and the sea will still lie in the evening sun- shine and—there will be an end. I wonder if you know what the sea said to me ? Do you really know? MODERN CHIVALRY. Ko days men ever lived beneath the sun I Gave fairer field for belted knight or squire, Oc fitter chance for chivalry, than ours. All act or circumstance is common place j Unblessed, unsanctified by high resolve That glorifies each deed and makes it great. To him whose aim is pure, whose life is clean, The cry of conflict rings out loud and • clear, And every day provides a joust at arms Where nothing but the battlefield has changed Since great King Arthur strove with all his knights. Love lie in women's eyes as in the past, And in men's (breasts strong hearts still bravely beat; The sun still shines, the earth is greenly rich, And God Most High still makes and lovas the world. To men of sordid aim and life impure No times since time began were good or great; <=> But every day where virtue makes its home Some noble deed grows out of high desire, And lifts men upward like a sacrament. OBSERVATIONS. Death, knowing our fate, laughg when he hears us talk of our friends whom we think are about to die. Time is that speck of eternity which men note as they stand with the measure- less past and the measureless future on either hand. Thousands of men would gladly do great deeds which, only one in a thousand has fitted himself for. It is not the great occasion, so much as the great prepara- tion, that is lacking. It is not he who commands, but he who serves, that is great, and he would be greatest who could be the servant of all in all their needs. Wise men leave the search of fame to fools, knowing that accident decides which name shall be handed down the ages and which shall be lost. The profoundest questions that engage the world's master minds spring unbidden in the brains of the humblest of men. Those who fret and fume at delays, and who waste themselves in affairs, forget that this is the time of their life, and that nothing they can win is worth more than they are paying for it. We minimise the sorrows and losses oi other people and exaggerate their joys, pleasures, and successes. The whole work of life should be finished every day, as no to-morrow mav be ours. Some men talk of the divine origin of the Bible as if all things were not of divine origin. The man who is elevated to the govern- ment of kingdoms and to the wielding of great power knows that he is still the same as in the days of obscurity, and has gained nothing. He, too, who, is stripped of wiealth and station finds that ho has lost ,nothing. Every man carries in his own akin all that is of real value to him. No man discovers that he is old. He only comes to beHero it by much telling. -I ti>f.A'dC' 6:u{;.e; He who gives his life for the means of I living buys that what he cannot use and other: will abuse. The Coast. J.G.

ABERYSTWYTH

ABERYSTWYTH Commission.—Q.M.S. Fred S. Holmes, R.F.A., son of Mr. W. Holmes. formerly brigade sergeant-major of the Cardigan Artillery, at Aberystwyth, has been crazetted second lieutenant in the R.F.A. at the front. County Council.—Mr. Henry Bonsall, Pendibryn, has been elected unopposed to represent Uanbadam district on the j County Council in the place of the late Major J. J. Bonsall. Mr. Griffith Evans, Lovesgrove, was also nominated, but with- drew rn favour of Mr. Bonsall. | Welsh Hospital.—As will be seen from an official statement in another column. Miss Emily Evans, matron of the Infirmary, is now matron of the Welsh Hospital at I Net ley. She belongs to an old and well- known Aberystwyth family and is a sister of Mr. J. Lewis Evans, architect, Great Darkgate-street. Bishop's Visit.—The annual sermon of the Church Students Society was preached on Sunday afternoon at St. Michael's Ohurch by Dr. Russell Wakefield, bishop of Birmingham. His lordship, who is an army chaplain and was attired in khaki, preached to the large gathering of the troops at the Coliseum on Sunday morning Sylvan Palace.—Next week Vrnon and Gaertner's star variety combination of six first-class artistes will give entertainments at the Sylvan Palace nightly. A special feature will be Kelly's pig comic singing competition after Wedlesday evening's entertainment. (Intending competitors should send in their names before Tuesday to Mr. Alex Vaughan the jnanager. Colege Lectures.—Commencing on January 29th, Professor Fostei- Watson, is giving a series of six public lectures on the relations between England and Bel- gium in the sixteenth century. On Wed- nesday evening a lecture under a special endowment was given by Mr S. O. Karnes Smith, M.A. in the Examination Hall on Greek art. Principal Roberts presiding. Mituary The death occurred on lues- day evening at Morolwg, Buarth (the residence of Captain and Mrs. D. H. Jones), of Miss E. Richards, Brogininfach, Penrhyncoch, at the age of twenty-nine years. She had been in the service of Captain and Mrs. Jones for the past thir- teen years and was a member of the Welsh Wesleyan Chapel. She leaves a mother. The funeral will take place on Saturday, leaving Morolwg at twelve o'clock tor Bontgoch. Belgian Officer .Last week Sergt.- Major Van de Noot, an officer of the Belgian Army, visited Aberystwyth on a rl few days' leave, and returned on Friday morning to his duties at the front. His wife is one of the Belgian guests staying I in the town. He was welcomed by his fellow-countrymen and it being the first appearance of a Belgian uniform much interest was taken in his visit by the Territorials and townspeople. At the Coliseum picture show he was enthusiast- ically cheered by a crowded audience. Wedding.—St. Paul's Church, Knights- bridge. S.W., was the scene of a quiet but interesting wedding on the 6th February. The Vicar (the Rev. F. Leith Bowl) offici- ated. The bride was Miss Mary. Elizabeth Edwards, only daughter of the late Mr. David Edwards and Mrs. Edwards. East- wood. Aberystwyth, and the bridegroom was Mr. William Simpson, eldest son of Mr. Thomas Simpson, Walton, Liverpool. The bride wore a three-piece suit of ivory taffetas and gabardine, black fox furs of the bridegroom) and a black velvet winged hat. An informal reception was afterwards held at tho Alexandra Hotel. I Hyde Park. Military Hospital.—The Matron dfsires to thank the following for their kind gilts to the Military Hospital, Bridge-street ,— Mrs. Mathias. Kingsheath, £5 E. Tabernacle collection, £ o Is. ICd. Miss Ricks, furniture, linen, fruit and flowers; Mrs. Burdwood Evans, furniture andj linen; Misses Tncmpsons, Llanbadahi Road, and Mrs. Roberts. 'Treathro," crockery; Mrs. Jones Powell, line-a; Mr. crockery; Mrs. Jones Powell, lineH; Mr. Hartley, sack of flour and linseed meal; Mrs. Captain Jones. Mrs. H. Roberts, Laura Place. Mrs. Ballinger and Lady Pryse, fruit and flowers; Miss Bonsalt, I Fronfraith, vegetables: Mrs. Walter Evans, South-terrace, and Mrs. Rodru, provisions; Mrs. Lloyd, Workhouse, cigarettes; Mrs. Evans. Dyffrvn, books. Further donations will be gladly received. Motor Collision.—A serious collision took place on Friday morning between two I motor cars near Newtown. Brigadier- General W. H. M. Lowe who after in- specting the Welsh Horse Reserve at New- town on Thursday was the guest of* Lord Kenyone, the colonel of the regiment, at Broneirion, Llandinam, was returning to undertake a mounted drill inspection of the Welsh Horse when his ear and that of Captain Arbuthnot-Brisco, going in the I direction of Aberystwytn, collided. Mrs. Hugh Peel, wife of Manor Peel, of tho Welsh Horse, was in the car with the Brigadier, and both were thrown heavily out and sustained serious injuries about the head and hod. Mrs. Arbuthnot- Brisco, the occupant of the other car, and her chauffeur, were also badly cut and bruised. Mrs. Pee! and the. Brigadier were conveyed to the house of Dr Shearer in Newtown, and Mrs. Arbuthnot-Brisco to her home at Newtown Hall. They all suffered from severe shock. ueatn Of Mr. hicnaril Ee/Joow.—His many rriends m all parts or tiro count,y WlLl regret. to learn or tHe. deatli 01 Mi. Richard. -benbow, grocer, Aiexandra-road, wnicii tOOK place at mict-mglit on T noay at the age ot torty years. Mr. jbenOow had not oeen in ruoust iie-altlr ior seveial years, but his death came quite unexpectedly, he having taken to his.oed only the previous Aionuay with an attach of liifkienaa, which developed complication. Mr. Benibo* was the tnird son or tHe lawe Mr. Edwanl lienbow, Broneirion, Aicx- anara-road. to, twenty years he was iu the.. ompioy of Messrs. Vames ana Co., grocers, until three yearS ago when he opened on his own account at the corner or Alexandra-road and ChaiyLs-eatc-sueec where he was building up a turning busi- ness. A native of tne town he enjoyed the esteem and goodwHlol a large nuxnoer of friends. 'He was a member 0.. the Eng- lish Presbyterian Church, Bath-street, where he devoted his energies, particularly to the work of the Sunday school, or which he had been superintendent. nè had also been secretary or the Literary and debat- ing Society or that church. Deep sym- pathy is extended to Mrs. Bonbon in "her bereavement. The funeral took place on Wednesday morning, when interment was made at the. cemetery. The Rev. R. Hgbes. M.A., officiated at the house and at the graveside. The chief mourners were:—Mrs. Ben bow (widow); Mr. J. J. Bmbow, Smithfield-road .(brotlier;; Mi's. William Jones, Blaenrhondda (sister); Mrs. Benbow Davies, Caergog Villa, Aberystwyth, and Mrs. bBnbow Griffiths, Broneirion, Alexandra-road (sisters). Mrs. Thorns Erith, Kent (sister of the deceased) was unavoidably unable to be present. I Mr. Thomas Hopkins, Nantybyr (father- in-law); Mr. W. T. Hopkins, London (brother-in-law); Mr. James Benbow (uncle); Miss Emily Hopkins (sister-in-law); Nellie, John and Glyn (niece and nephews); Miss Owen, Garthmyl, and Savage, George-street, Aberystwyth (cousins). Wreaths were sent from sorrowing widow, brother and sisters, Tilly and Jack, sister and brother-in-law; Miss Emily Hopkins, Mr. and Mrs. W. T. Hopkins; My. and Mrs. Moody, Streatham. brother and sister-in-law; Mr. and Mrs. Haimes, London; from his pals, Bob, Dai, Llew Uoyd, Pete and Pugh; Mr. and Mrs. E. G. Evans, Rhyl; Mr. Parry, Bryn Awel, Aberystwyth Master Eddie Savage Mrs. and Miss Owen, George-street (aunt and oousin). The following members of the Ancient Order of Foresters acted as bearers: Messrs. Edward Owen, E. Edwards. J. Jenkin Jones, John Powell, T. Savage, J. Salmon. T. H. Collins, D. T. Jones, Uriel Jones, R. D. Jones, Albert Potts, with Mr. W. Williams, secretary. Among those present wei-e Prof. D. Jen- kins, Mus. Mac., Messrs. Edward Williams (chief constable), David Lloyd, David Ellis, R. J. Bennett, David Jones. David James, Tom Rees, T. E. Evans, W. Warrington. E. E. Ellis. J. G. Williams, D. H. Pughe, A. Uoyd Williams, P. B. Loveday, R. Bickerstaffe (junior). William Jamos, D. T. Daviee, W. Tregoning. R. Jones, Miall Jones. Edwin Jones, and Mr. Francis North-road. The funeral arrangements were under the supervision of Mr. J. Lewis Evans, Great Darkgate-stneet. The bereaved widow desires to convey her heartfelt thanks to the numerous friends for their kihd expressions of condolence. i 1 :): -■ "I Shorthand.—W. Stanley Evans, 3, Stanley-road, has obtained Pitman s elementary certificate. He is a pupil of Mr. D. Evans, South View, Llanbadarn- road. Sudden Death.—On Thursday evening John Evans, Tyddyn-y-parc, Gors, died suddenly in the hairdresser's shop of Mr. William Warrington, Terrace-load. De- ceased, who was fifty-nine years of age, went into the shop for a haircut. While waiting his turn he expired without saying a word. It transpired that he suffered from heart faliure and an inquest was not necessary. The body was removed on the police ambulance to his lodgings at 10, Edgehill-road, the home of his daughter, Mrs. Margaret Mathias. Deceased was employed as a labourer at the National Library and had previously been in good health. 1 Organ Recita1.-The organ recital given by Mr. J. Charles McLean, F.R.C.O.. at Tabernacle Chapel on Tuesday evening, was attended by a large audience. Mr. McLean commenced the recital with a fine performance of a military symphony by Haydn as well as with two fine pieces by Wolstenholme. Mr. D. J Lewis sang with expression the recit and air entitled "Lend Me Your Aid." Mr. McLeans rendering of a fantasia (composed by him- self) on the hymn-tune "Aberystwyth" was received with approbation. Miss Annie Jones was heard to advantage in the song "Nant y Mynydd." She was loudly applauded. The second half of the pro- gramme was commenced by Mr. McLean with a fantasia in E Minor on "The Storm" by J. Lemmens, his efforts being loudly applause. Private Williams, the R.W.F., gave pleasure by a song "Arglwydd. Arwain Drwy'r Anialwch." A j duet, "0 Lovely Peace," by the Misses Annie and Blowen Jones, South-road, was finely sung and was encored. Mr McLean also gave a fine rendermg of a military march, "Pomp and Circumstance," by [ Edward Elgar. The recital closed with the singing of the National Anthem. The collections were in aid of the Young People's Literary and Debating Society. PETTY SESSIONS, Wednesday, February 10th.—Before C. M. Williams, John Watkins and Peter Jones, uqrs. Sunday Trading.—Jack Levenson and Hy. Longley, Terrace-road; Annie Morgan, Castle Dairy, Great Darkgate-street; and David Taiel, Terrace-road, were charged by Superintendent Phillips with Sunday trad- ing.—Defendants admitted the offences and the formalities and were fined, as usual. 5s and costs, except in the case of Taiel, which was adjourned owing to his absence. ( Charge of Assault.—Mrs. McGlory was summoned by Mina Nelson, both in service at the Waterloo Hotel, for assault.—Com- plainant alleged that Mrs. McGlory used bad language and struck her on the face on Sunday afternoon.—-Defendant denied that she struck the other woman. She was chasing a soldier boy who ran against com. plainant and knocked a cup of tea out of her hand. There was too much hard work at the Waterloo for fighting. She had never struck anybody and did not think she looked like a blackguard.—A witness for the defence also denied that there was an assault or bad language.—The case was adjourned for a week, in the hope that a settlement will be effected. CAERLEON HOUSE GIRLS' COLLEGIATE SCHOOL. EXAMINATION SUCCESS FOR 1914. Cambridge locals.—Senior examination Third-class honours, with distinction in re- ligious knowledge and English, E. V. ood, Rochester Third class honours: G. Oldham, Ashbourne. Pass: J. I. Evans, Llanfarian. Junior Examination.—Second-class hon- ours, with distinction in religious know- ledge and English, B. Evans, Abervst- wyth; pass, E. Edwards, Aberystwyth. Preliminary Examinaticn.-Pass: L. Williams, Machynlleth. Music.—Associated iBoard of the Royal Academy and Royal College of Music. London—Piano, higher division: p, M Oldfield, Stockport: A. M. Lewis Llan ddeiniol. Lower division: E. M. Horsfall, London; G. Peacock, Eairbourne; S: Thomas, Pontardulais. Elementary divi- sion. with distinction: M. Tombe, Drog- heda. Pass: M. Rogerson. Liverpool; M. Felix, Birmingham; J. L Davies Binning, ham; M. h. S. Davies, iiirmingharn; V. Williams, Aberystwyth. Primary division with distinction: A. Thomas, Pontardulais: with distinction, N. Roberts, Machynlleth. Pass: Margaret Jones, Llanbadarn. ° Violin.—Primary division, pass: S. Thomas, Pontardulais. 1\1. F. S Davies Birmingham- J. I. Evans. Llanfarian. Theoretical.—School examination divi- sion I: P. M. Oldfield, Stockport* A. M Lewis, Llanddeiniol; E. Horsfall, London; D, Nealon. Rachdowney. Division II: M. Bsett. Aberystwyth J L. Davies Bir- mingham; K. Tombe, Drogheda.

d Drowning Accident

d Drowning Accident. GALLANTRY OF TERRITORIALS. William John Wilson seven years of age son of Mrs. Margaret W ilson, 3, Bridgend- place, was drowned in the sea in front of the Queen's Hotel at 12.40 on Saturday He left home at noon with his sister Gwkdvs (lZ) who was taking a parcel of washing clothes to Alexandra Hall. The boy was walking along the beach when was caught by a strong wave at ebb tide and cai i ied out to sea. A number of military men immediately attempted to fescue Sec-Lieut. E. S. Price, A.S.C. (Cheshire*; made a gallant attempt and rushed into the water. He fell twice and then lost sight of the body. A gallant attempt was also made by Private Bryn Evans, R.A.M.C., of Llanelly, who has been promoted lance-corporal in recognition of his bravery. The body was found washed ashore on the beach at Clarach on Wednesday morning and an inquest was held in the afternoon at the Corporation Offices before John Evans, coroner, and a jury of whom Mr. Sylvanus Edwards was foreman. The mother, who was in great sorrow gave evidence of identification and the sister described how the boy accompanied her to the Hostel. She was wheeling a truck and the boy left her after passing the Queen's Hotel without telling her. Private Jack Clifford West wood, of the Avenue, Bromyard, Worcester, attached to headquarters A.S.C. and billeted at Ochr- ybryn. Trevor-road: Corp]. Mervvn Griffith, O.T.C., The Marine and Lance- Corporal Bryn Evans, billeted at Gweny-1 don. Cliff-terrace, gave evidence describing their efforts to rescue the boy. Sec.-Lieut. Price also gave evidence. He was pro- ceeding along the road on his motor cycle when he saw a number of soldiers in the water with their clothes on. He also went to the water and saw the bov with his face upward fifteen yards away. He considered it wa.s an urgent case. He rushed into the water. The soldiers tried to form a chain. The waves, however, were eight or ten feet high curling over. The shore was steep and composed of loose pebbles. There was no foothold for the men which made it difficult for them. The wares came against the sloping shore with a tremendous force. One big wave caught him in the chest and threw him back against the wall. When he got up another wave knocked him in the chest and some- body held him un. Not only were the waves high, but there was a strong under- wash which with the shifting beach made it impossible to make further efforts to rescue the boy, though he (witness) was an experienced swimmer. Mr. William Edwards. Gwenydon. of the jurors, asked why no endeavour was made to use the lifebuoy, and it was stated that the buoy was available in summer only. Evidence of finding the body shortly after eight o'clock that morning iriven by Mrs. Margaret Taylor, Glanydon, Clarach. The Coroner said it was a sad case, but one feature which redeemed the aiffair was that four men who were on the snot were ready even to risk their lives in attempting to rescue. The jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Drowning," and a passed a resolution expressing appreciation of the gallant efforts of the officer and three men. The Coroner said he would be nleased to c*mmuniictto with the Royal Humane Society and Lifeboat Institution. The funeral takes place this (Friday) morning, starring from Bridgend-pl^ce at Weven o'clock. I

THE TROOPS

THE TROOPS INSTRUCTION AND RECREATION. This week the principal feature has been the inspection of various units of the Welsh Territorial Reserve Division by General Mainwaring. Tne inspection, which extended over a number of days. was carried out on the Promenade, and the fitness and smartness of the troops were favourably commented on. The health of the troops is good. An interesting account of the route march of the 1st Monmouths appears in another part of the paper. Lieutenant G. R. Lougher, of the" ehl, Casualty Clearing Station, arrived in Cardiff on Wednesday to make arrange- ments to recruit the unit up to full war strength. The unit is purely a Cardiff Territorial one, and men of good character and well educated are wanted. Im- mediately they are equipped they will sent to Aberystwyth where they will be billeted during training. On Tuesday evening classes for soldiers, organised by the Cardiganshire Education Committee commenced at Alexandra-road School. Soldiers who have volunr or intend to volunteer for active service, are invited to attend the short courses which are specially adapted to the needs of the troops. Tuition in given free in French, English, and arithmetic. No fewer than eighty-four soldiers attended on the opening night the majority taking 1 French. Instruction is given by Dr. D. J. Davies, Dr. A. B. Thomas, and Mr. Emile Evans. The College authorities have also < free educational facilities to the soldiers who care to join the special classes. Already 1,000 recruits have expressed a desire to benefit by this generous offer and spend a portion of their leisure in acquir- rw? a conversational knowledge of French. On Monday evening Mr. J. Morgan Rees tutor to the University Tutorial Classes' commenced a. series of) lectures fc:" tihe benefit of the troops. In his first lecture he dealt. with economics, with special reference to war conditions. Professor VY hitehouse gives geographical lectures daily, and Professor Brvner Jones has held classes for members of the Army Set- vice Oorps. Glider the auspices of the Y.M.C.A., in the Skating Rink, enjoyable concerts and other attractions are provided nightly A wrestling contest was held on Wednesdav eWllling of last week between Private Fred Withers. 3rd Monmouths. the 30st 71b. champion of Monmouthshire, and Private Nolan, 7th Cheshires. winner of the lOst. championship. There was no fall, how- ever, and the referee announced the re- sult as a draw. On Saturday afternoon tour boxing contests were witnessed bv a audience. Private Jack Morgan, R.E. (Sst. 4Ib.) defeated Private Smith. 3rd Monmouths (8st. 71b.). In the second I contest Private Smith, 5th Cheshires, secured the verdict over Lance-Corporal Owen, R.T\ .F. The third exhibition be- tween Private E. Hughes, R.W.F., and Private Silverthorne, 3rd Monmouths, re- sulted in a victory for the forme". The match between Private Jones. R.W.F., and Private Smith, 3rd Monmouths, encJe, in a draw. The referee was Private Sam Ihomas, 3rd Monmouths A football match took place on Saturday at the Smithfield between Cheshire Brigade and the Herefords. which resulted in a Yctor for the Cheshires bv eight goals to ml. I he scorers were Drivers Murrav, iBlackwen, Hushes (3), Agnew, Roberts, and Corporal Harrison. The referee was Corporal Williams., Cheshires. On Wednesday night a successful ball was given at the Queen's Hotel by the officers of the 5th R.W .F. who invited their brother officers and a number of friends. In an interval .for supiper the Health of General Mainwaring was hon- °/^ri, on the proposition of Captain Corbett, adjutant. In 'reply. General Mainwaring. refen-ed to his previous con- nection with the Fusihers and said it gave him great pleasure to receive orders to take over the command of the Brigade in Aberystwyth. The ball was held in the Assembly Hall which had been prettily decorated. The gathering numbered roo and all concurred in expressing the omnion that the arrangements made by Mr. Jervis, the manager, were excellent. The success of the ball was largely due to the efforts of Lieutenant Nicholis.

TREGARON

TREGARON. St. Canons Guild.—The meeting on Thursday night was presided over by the Vicar, and Mr. Isgarn Davies delivered an address on "Twin Shon Catti a'i Am- serau." The meeting was well attended and the address full of interest. The speaker was warmly thanked for his labours. Y Cymdeithas Lenyddo!.—The Society held a sucessful concert on Tuesday night. Mr. D. Thomas. Cambrian House, con- ducted the meeting in an excellent manner. The following was the programme :—Piano- forte duett, Miss Sally Olwen Jones and Miss Mary Williams. Recitation com- petition for girls under twelve years of age: 1, Divided by Miss Enid Jones, Del- fryn, and Miss Arianwen j^ewis, Arwel. Solo competition for boys under twelve years: 1, Divided by Mr. Cledwyn Watkins and Mr. Tommy Jones. Recitation com- petition for boys under twelve years: 1, Mr. Victor Thomas. Rose-terrace. Solo competition for girls under twelve years 1 Divided by Miss Nancy Evans, Chapel- street, and Miss Enid Lewis, Arwel. by the County School Party; solo, Mr. E. Brython Jones, Ardwyn. Dialogue com- petition: 1, Mr. John Davies, Blaencaron, and Mr. David Evans. Blaencaron. Reci- tation competition for boys under sixteen veais 1, Mr. D. James Jones, Llanddewi Brefi. Song by the County School Party • recitation, Mr. D. Jones, Blaencaron; solo, Miss Jones, Monarch House; song bv the Society's Choir. The adjudicators were —Music, the Rev. T. Madoc Jones, B.A., vioar literature. Mr. Jenkin Llovd, Pant; and Mr. G. T. Lewis M.A., Arwel. The secretarial duties were carried out by Mr il° ^vans> Penddol, hon. secretary of the Societj'. Belgian Refugees.-A public meeting in connection with the Belgian refugees was held on Wednesday evening. The Rev. T. Madoc Jones, B.A.. vicar, presided, ihe report of the canvassers was taken, and after a. lengthy discussion it was agreed to invite a party of eight. A depu- tation from Llwynpiod was present to re- their district would be respon- sible for two. Personswere appoiuted to obtain accommodation for the party and several houses in the town were reported as vacant. The subscribers were asked to start their contributions this week, paying four weeks in advance. The secretaries have forwarded the invitation to the Central Committee.

HARLECH

HARLECH. Geology and Botany.—On Friday even- ing, at VV ernfawr Hall. a lecture in Welsh was delivered by Mr. D. A. Jones. F.L.S., to the scholars attending the upper classes of Harlech and Llanfair schools, as well as those from the district who attend Bar- mouth County School. The subject was The Geology and Botany of Diablerets and Chamonix," illustrated by original lantern slides. The views of glaciers received special attention and the slides illustrating those in the Alps were particularly fine. There was a good attendance, in spite of the stormy weather. Mr. Jenkins was suc- cessful in manipulating the lantern and helped materially in making the descrip- tions clear to the young audience. Welsh Journalism.—In spite of cold and stormy weather, i large circle assembled at Wernfa wr on Tuesday to meet Mr. W. R. Hall of Aberystwyth, who gave an entertaining lecture on "The Humours of Welsh Journalism." The meeting was presided over by Mr. George Davison. The Lecturer kept the ball rolling for about an hour and highly amused the audience by excellent stories and narration of incidents in his career as a Welsh journalist, some of them relating to Har- lech, Perfrhyndjeudraethy Ffestiniog, and) other places in Merioneth. It was (writes a Harlech correspondent) the first visit of Mr. Hall to the circle at Wernfawr, and all the members hope it will not be the last. A hearty vote of thanks accorded the lecturer on the proposition of Mr. Davison seconded bv Mr. Hooper, brought an enjoyable evening to a close. Before and after the lecture Mr. Davison per- formed several classical pieces of music on the magnificent organ at Wernfawr which were highly appreciated.

THE WAR

THE WAR Beyond spasmodic attacks and artillery duels there have been few operations on the western front during the past week. it was stated in the House of Commons on Tuesday that the British losses in killed, wounded, and sick from the commencement of the war up to the beginning of Febru- ary totalled 104,OCC. Mr. Harcourt, the colonial secretary, in a message read in the Canadian Parliament, estimates the German losses at two and a quarter million. On the eastern front, Germany's violent offensive on the River Rawka seems to have exhausted itself. It appears now to be recognised that too much has been made of the attacks on the Borjirnoff-Bolinioff hoiit; that the Germans were, perhaps, not so foolish as to expect to break through to Warsaw'' with forces depleted by calls for reinforcements from regions which have become more important; and that the object may have been to distract the atten- tion of the Russians from those regions and chain their forces to the Vistula front. The suggestion has gained weight now that the new Russian offensive against the Southern frontier of East Prussia has been disclosed. The determined nature of the attacks is not a matetr for surprise, for the Germans fully recognise that in such cases half measures are useless. The Germans, having concentrated their reserves locally available against the Rawka front, and having thus weakened their line elsewhere, gave the Russians an opportunity, for a counter-offensive, of which they promptly availed themselves. By that means the Russians not only gained a local advantage, but compelled the Germans to redistribute their forces to oppose the attack on the line of the Lower jBzura. There our Allies carried a strong point d'appui on Sunday near to Kamion, on the left bank of the Bzura. at its confluence with the Vistula, and directly opposite Wysograd. The operations, regarded as a whole, are significant of the confidence of the Russians in the adequacy of their forces to maintain their defensive positions in front at the Middle Vistula while pursuing the offensive on extensive fronts in East Prussia and in the Carpathians. The pur- suit. of such different objects, involving great dispersion of force, can only be justi- fied by marked superiority. The Russians, in developing their offensive aganst East Prussia and the Carpathians, are attacking the enemy in the most vulnerable quarters. Their advance on the southern frontier of East Prussia threatens to turn the whole defensive position of the Masurian Lakes. while the attack on the line north of the lakes has obliged the enemy to move re- serves to that locality. The Germans having the interior position, with several railways at their disposal, have the advan- tage of being able to move reinforcements rapidly to threatened points. The Rus- sians therefore rely on their superiority of force enabling them to press the offensive simultaneously at more points than the enemy can adequately defend. In the Carpathians the problem is different, be- cause the spurs and valleys make lateral movement equally difficult for both sides. Hence the Russians progress in some localities, principally, for the moment in the neighbourhood of Dukla Pass while the enemy have been successful at other points, and are making marked progress in Bukovma. The advance of the Russians, if it continues, will ultimately oblige the enemy to withdraw and concentrate forces to oppose it. The situation in the bukovina is of secondary importance be- cause the advance of the Austrians in that region threatens none of the Russian lines of communication. The Turkish attack on the Suez Canal seems to have been effectively disposed of. nothing being left within twenty miles of the Canal except small rearguards which are steadily retreating. Whether a further I attempt will be made or not it would be rash to prophesy; but it may be supoosed that the lUrkSj and their German guides have learnt that if it is to be renewed it must be made in much greater force to offer any promise of success. The force employd approximates closely'to that with which Napoleon marched into Syria in 1799. The Turks are stated to have numbered 14,000, with six batteries of artillerv. Napoleons army composed 13,000 il- fantry, 900 cavalry, and 49 guns. The force employed on the present occasion was only a. rraction of that assembled on the Syrian frontier during the past three n (Ilth, which has been variously rumoured to com- prise 45,000 to 90,000 men, and it mny be presumed that the water supply and con- siderations of transport prohibited the em- ployment of larger numbers. If enter- prise is again attempted it will, therefore, probably be deferred pending tile provision of a railway which is rumoured to be in process of construction. A Petrograd communique issued on Tuesday by the Great General Staff that day says the Germans, who were gradually concentrating in .Eastern Prussia, after having brought up fresh troops during the past few days, have made reconnaissances m force, and on the 7th February they passed to the offensive with large forces in the sector Chorzelle-Johannisburg. The Germans undertook active aÐd simultaneous operations on the two wings on the East Prussian front, in the region of Lasdehnen, where, in repulsing a Ger- man attack, we succeeded in exterminating almost entirely one of the attacking battal- ions, and also on the Rypine railway lines, where our cavalry concentrated towards Sierpe. To judge from the bodies aban- doned before our position, the Germans seem to have lost in killed and wounded during the six days' attack on the posi- tions of Borzimow, Humin, and Voliashid- lowska tens of thousands of men. In the Carpathians fighting continues in the region of Bartfield and Svidnik. The enemy attempted active operations, but, being unable to stand the fierceness of he ficht, retired, leaving many prison- ers behind. In the region of Lupkow Pass our offen- sive continues. During the day we cap- tured sixty-nine officers, 5,200 men, and eighteen machine guns. German forces, having crossed the Tucholka Pass, made on the 7th twenty- two violet attacks against the heights in the region of Koziomoka. occupied by us. The Germans attacked in massed forma- tion, several ranks deep, under our violent cross-fire. The enemy twice seized one of the heights, but was dislodged by a counter-attack by our infantry after a long bayonet fight, without precedent in history. The German losses were exces- sively serious. Attacks by the enemy in the region of Wyszkow were also repelled. IN THE TRENCHES. Private R. S. Brown, of the 2nd Lin- colns, who was formerly employed as billiard marker at the Belle Vue Hotel, Aberystwyth, and is now in a Nottingham hospital, has written an account of his trials in the trenches at the front. He was buried for four hours in soil by an explosion of a "Jack Johnson," and luckily escaped wih severe injuries toliis eyesight. He is now recovering. "Some seem to have had a happy time," he writes. "I am afraid my experience in the firijig line was different. "Tipperary" was not in my mind whilst at the front. I admit I had a fine time on arrival in France on November 5th. We disembarked at Le Harve, receiving a good reception, having a few hip. hip, hurrahs on the march to the train which made us feel jolly to start for the firing line. We had twenty-four hours riding in cattle trucks with a sharp wind blowing snowflakes in amongst us before reaching our destination—Merville in Northern France. Not knowing our next stop we started marching again and our footprints continued in the snow until there was a sudden stop and an order to keep under cover from German aeroplanes. There we lay in the freezing snow for two hours waiting for dusk. On arising our limbs were so stiffened that our marching pace was slackened; but we brightened up. thinking we could soon rest for the night. No. we did not halt. No sound was heard but the sound of our feet on the stones until a faint sound of guns came to our ears ana we saw flashes on the rising ground in the distance. Hence, we knew that the firing line was near. Louder and louder came the reports, deaf- ening us, and shattering the nerves of all the regiment. Wondering when my bullet was coming, I marched with the rest .into the deadly smell of a battlefield. We singled out in file and walked in the trench amid the bursting sEells. Then I heard a whisper from behind "Halt! fix bayonets and load rTBes." When doing so I found a. loop h In which to put my rifle. Again came a whisper. "Pass down, rapid fire," I did so and started firing like. mad. The Germans returned bulleta, knocking the dirt into my face and shaking my nerves, thinking the next was mine. Our first night passed with a continuous firing and banging of guns, the flashes illumina- ting everything around me. For three days the enemy kept their guns repeating causing a few casualties in my company. There were horrible sights of the wounded who were slowly dytng for the want of a doctor, it was impossible for us to move out of our trench without getting killed. After our first day we had no food what- ever and no way of getting any until the enemy slackened their fire at the end of three days when we were relieved by another regiment. At this time all of us were nearly dropping and speechless with weakness and cold. Struggling along the road for about two miles we went to an old barn shattered by German shells (Jack Johnoson's) Here we stopped for rest. The whole of the company came into that barn and dropped on the straw falling to sleep w.ith our packs still on. There we lay until daybreak next day. To cut a long story short since then we have suff- ered from rain flooding every part of our trenches. Three days and nights we were standing in three feet of water, soaked to the skin, shivering and the frost making ice on us. Once i volunteered to do patroi for three nights. The ram pouied down r as I walked in the slippery mud a tew yards from the enemy s trench. All the uine the buhecs were singing past my ears and sheds making iunes in tne earth all around me. i was curling up to dodge-trie powerful lights bursting iu the sky and dlunniiating a large aiea or the lighting ground. Nevertnt^ess, I did my duty by Keeping a strong look out and my ears wide open hearing nothing but reports 01 those terrible guns and rifles. I kept goimr until suddenly 1 heard a groan and a thuu. Turning round sharply 1 saw my pal lying in the* amid. Then a terrible feeling came over me as I could not get a murmur from him. While I was wondering what to do and trying to pick up my friend, there came some comrades to relieve us. 1 was speechless but they could see what was the matter and carried him into the trench where 1 found out that he was dead, and struggling along with a sprained ankle helped to bury the body a few hours later in a field some hundred yards away from where he dropped. Nothing made me feel so queer as that, not even tne sights after an attack when we have made the Germans fly from our pointed steel. They did not coax us with their Christmas truce. We were too well awake. Christmas was my happiest time in the firing line. I thought the enemy was giving up, but they are sJll dragging on." WELSH RELIEF FUNDS. A representative conference was con- vened on Friday at Carnarvon by Mrs. Lloyd George, acting for the Chancellor, to discuss the best way of distributing the funds that had been collected by the Welsh- men in America for alleviating distress in Wales during the war. Mrs. Lloyd George took the chair, and announced that up to the present sums amounting to £1,500 had collected in America and forwarded to the Chancellor. The conference decided that Mrs. Lloyd George, Messrs. Joseph Davies (Cardiff) R. Silyn Roberts, and J. 0wain Evans should act as an executive to administrate the funds; that district or parish committees should appeal for assistance through their secretaries to the Executive, and that Mr. J. Owain Evans should act as secretary. On the motion of Sir John Roberts, it was resolved that this fund should be reserved for cases which cannot be dealt with under the regulations of the Prince of Wales's Fund. THE WELSH HOSPITAL. Important developments are taking place at the Welsh Hospital now; established at Netlev. A deputation headed by the Earl of Plymouth recently waited on Sir Alfred Keogh, director general of the army medical service, to discuss the future activities of the Hospital, as it was con- sidered that the people of Wales would wish that their Hospital, which was accepted by the War Office for the expeditionary force should proceed overseas as soon as possible. As the military situa- tion, however, does not at the moment permit of it, and in view of the urgent necessity in the immediate future for more beds for wounded soldiers in this country, it was decided, at the request of the Director General, to double the accommoda- tion at the Netley Hospital bv adding another 100 beds. ° The funds placed at the disposal of the hospital by the generosity of the Welsh people are ample for its present purpose; but in view of the extension now being made, and of the unknown duration of the war. the subscription list remains open, and subscriptions can be sent to Sir W. James Thomas, hon treasurer, at 47, Principality Buildings, Cardiff, £250 being regarded as heretofore as the sum neces- sary to endow a bed to be named after the donor, while all sums, however small, will be gratefully received. The Hospital is doing excellent work at Netley, where its buildings and equipment are the admiration of all visitors, and are being taken as a model for similar war hospitals. An account of its technical work has already appeared in the pages of the "Lancet" from the pen of the Commanding Officer. The Matron (Miss Evans, matron of the Aberystwyth Hospital), and her capable staff of nursing sisters, render splendid service to the wounded "Tommies," whose letters of gratitude are many. The wards have a beauty, spaciousness, and brightness which strike all who visit them, and Wales may well be proud of its national hospital. A special immediate appeal is made to Wales for gifts of linen and clothing for the further 100 beds. The details of requirements will be seen in our advertise- ment columns to-day. Or in place of gifts in kind £2 may be given to equip a bed. i.e., to furnish the bare bedstead with everything which is required for the patient. It is hoped that by March 1st, when the extra buildings will be ready, all the necessary bed equipment will be provided. The Welsh Hospital was the first volun- tary hospital to be offered and accepted by the War Office, and the Com- mittee feels that. in this great war, Wales will continue to be foremost in aiding the wounded and stricken. WELSH PRISONERS IX GERMANY. A letter which has passed the German Censor contains the passage given below. The words in brackets (which did not, of course, appear in the letter as written) are the English equivalents of the Welsh word immediately preceding. The latter was written in English throughout except the Welsh words, which the German Censor took to be the names of other English prisoners. The passage reads :—" You will be glad to hear news of old friends. Mr. Rwyd (food) is very bad here. Mr. Bara (bread) is very much darker than when you saw him, and is quite hard. I never "see Mr. Gig (meat), and Mr. Ynu-nyn (butter) but seldom he was very bad indeed the last few, times I met him. I used at first to meet Mr. Llaeth (milk) every day, but he has not been here now for some time. LETTER FROM CANADA. Mr. D. J Davies writing from 78, Morley-avenue, Winnipeg, on January 22nd, says—Sir,—I wish to congratulate you on having been made a knight by the King's request. I have read vour paper continuously "for five years, the time I have been in Canada or to be more correct this is the beginning of my fifth year. As regards your paper my opinion is t.hat you have done a great deal through its columns for Wales and the Welsh people, and un- doubtedly you deserved the distim tlion. My reason for writing to you is to let you know t.hat the young men of Whales who live in Winnipeg have responded to the call to arms in a T fine manner. I notice in your pape the names of those enlisted at home. I am sorry that I cannot go rounr.l to get the names of each of these young men and the regiment they are attached to but I can state that out of the congregation of hardly 300 people, includ- ing children, I know of twenty young men who have enlisted for the second contin- gent and four for the third contingent. I am proud to state that I have enlisted in the 1.8th Battery. 5th Brigade. Can- adian Field Artillery as gunner. I had three years service under Major Mathias in the second battery when they were volunteers. I feel proud to know "that the boys of the Cardiganshire- Battery have answered the call so well. I have no idea when the second contingent will leave here but we are all anxious to raove from here, as the severity of the winter prevents- our training. I hone when we reach England that I may be able to pay a visit to the old home. I notice in the British papers a ^reafc deal about the physique of the first contribution of Canada. I* own assure you, sir, what I know myself, that

Advertising

Ii1 ..a.« I ROBERTS' I S V y M FJ? irF irF \TABLE AhE I Per ^oz« ImPer^l -Pint. M SuPP^ed. in Screw-Stoppered Bottles, s A. wholesome Ale, strongly recommended for faaiilv use, 1 BOTTLED BY j DA ROBERTS & SONS, Ltd., j I BREWERS, I 1 ABEBTSTWTTH- »'90 I I' ',A- Ia l JRlT 1915 Models 1915 I 0 I I 11 I I No. 8998. GGG No. 8998. A Charming Model Z5 in French Grey or White Contil. I 4/6 per pJir. No 9004. A Dainty Model in White or Grey Batiste, trimmed Silk Embroidery. 5/11 per pair. No. 9004. Thomas Ellis & Co., Terrace Road, 'PHONE, 6i Aberystwyth.

No title

the second contribution will be of much better mettle, as fine-looking men are re- jected, and examinations are severe. I have no objection to you, in putting my name in the paper, to show that Abery.Jt- wvth responds even in Canada. I am nephew of Henry Davies, boatman. Cus- tom House-street—David John Davies. gunner, D Sub-Section, 18th Battery, 5th Brigade Canadian Field Artillery. We are now stationed at Winnipeg; how long for I am not. able to say. Trusting you will through your paper just form a little paragraph out of my badly- written letter, as my object is to encourage others who are slow in making their mimV up. I think it is everv single man's duty, as our future depends on the outcome. Here we work amongst all classes of for- eigners and when one can see for himself how pleased these foreigners are to live under our noble flag and hear them relate the ways of their own land, I can assure you that before you would be ruled in the same way you would fight to the end. An Aisteddfod will be held here on Feb- ruary 17th, and if i am here I shall let you have the programme and results to the best of my ability.

Family Notices

irths, (iflarriagea, anb Heaths BIRTHS. Davies-Februai-y 8th, at 6. Glanrafon-terrace, the wife of Mr J. E Davies, of a son. Jones-February 5th, to Mr and Mrs J. Lumley Jones, 29, North-parade, Aber- ystwyth, a daughter. Williams—Februsry 9th, the wife of Captain David R. Williams, Penihiwilan, New Quay, of a son. MARRIACES. Davies Thomas Fbrullry 10th, at the Register Office, Lampeter, Mr Daniel Davies, Bryn Farm, Llanllwni, and Miss H. Thomas, Nautltendre, Llanllwni. James Rogers February 5th, at Shiloh Chapel, Lampeter, Mr Tom Ivor James, Ivy Motor Works, and Miss Agnes Rogers, St. Thomas-street. Pocock Lewortby February 10th, at the Register Office, Lampeter, Private William Pocock. Maeslin Cottage, and Miss Annie Leworthy. Royal Oak, Cellan. Simpson—Ed wards-On the 6th February, at St. Paul's Church, Knightsbridge, London, by the Rev F. Leith Boyd, vicar, Mr Wm. Simpson, eldest son of Mr Thomas Simpson, Walton, Liverpool, to Miss Mary Elizabeth Edwald, only daughter of the late Mr David Edwards an Mrs Edwards, East- wood, Aberystwyth. a319 DEATHS. Benbow-On January 24th, Florence Annie Benbow, child of Mr and Mrs Richard Benbow, 7, Penglaise-terrace, Aberystwyth, aged 10 months. Benbow-February 5th, Mr Richard Benbow, grocer, Aberystwyth, aged 40. Edwards-On February 9ch, in London, Mrs Edwards, Criccieih, sister of Mrs Owain Evans, 8, Marine-terrace. Evans—On February 2nd, Uapt. Evan Evans, Towyn, New Quay, aged 80 years. Gray—On February 1st, Mrs M. J. Gray, wife of Mr John Gray, New Row, Devil's Bridge, aged 75 years. Griffith-At Queensland, Australia, Mr John Owen Griffith, eldest son of Mr and Mrs J. S. Griffith, Railway Hotel, Criccieth, in his 25th year. Jones—On February 8th, Mr John Jones, White Lion, Lampeter, aged 70 years. Jones—On January 29th, afe Calais, France, Leonora Agnes, youngest daughter of the late Mr John Jones, Rose Cottage, Llan- elltyd, Dolgeliey. Morgiin-On February 9th, Mrs Morgan, Claremorit, New Quay, aged 83 years. Morgan—On February 1st. Mrs Mary Mor- gan, Penrhyncoch, aged 77 years. Owen—On February 5th. at 35 Bargery-road, Catford, S E., Agnes Mary Chicheley, wife of Thomas Owen, and younger daughter of the late Henry Stevens, Middle Temple, Chancery Bar. Thomas—On February 10th. Mr Abraham Thomas, relieving officer for the Llnndysilto division of Aberayron Union, aged 42 years Richards—February 9th, MissEdi ii I Morolwg, Buarth, AberysLwyth, aged 29 years. IN MEMORIAM. Huut-In loving birthday lemeralir; nee of our dear Elsie, who passed from tina life December 15 th, 1911. And with the morn those angel faces smile, Which we have loved long since, and lost awhile. a333 ACKNOWLEDGMENT. Misses E. and K. Morgan desire to tender sincere thanks to the friends who kindly expressed sympathy:with them on the occasion of the deash of their dear mother. Coopers Hotel, AberyatWyth. a314

Advertising

ABERYSTW YTH INFIRMARY. W A N T E D, immediately, fully-trained Staff nurse Welsh-speaking preferred. Salary 130 per annum and indoor uniform.— Applications, stating age, experience, etc., with copies of two recent testimonials, to be sent at once to the Matron. a.342 W ANTED, good General, for March 1st, for Tadwortli, Surrey.-Apply, Miss H. Southcote. a343 Cardiganshire Reserve Battery R.F.A. RECRU ITS From CARDIGANSHIRE are now wanted to form this Battery. Apply to-Ser-t.-Major D. W ELLS, Drill Ball, a216 Aberystwyth. MAKE YOUR OWN MARMALADE WITH PALERMO BITTERS. G. WILKINSON, 8, North Parade, Aberystwyth. a341 James Morgan, FRUITERER AND FLORIST, FISHMONGER AND POULTERER, ¡ 11, Tier Street, Aberystwyth, EGGS. EGGS. Bought in any quantity for Cash. ¡ MOBTON* 142, TERRACE ROAD, I ABERYSTWYTR, THE Shop for all kinds of BOOTS AND SHOES I Ac the Lowest Possible Prices REPAIRS promptly and c-,eatly done on the premises with the beat bark-banned TfMtthov. Printed by J. Gibson, and Published hy h'im in Terraoe-road, Aberystwyth, in the > County of Cardigan; at LI. Edwards, Stationer, High-street, Bala; and John Evans and nephew, Statiohers, Glanymor j House, Barmouth, in the CVmnty of j Merioneth and at David Lloyd's P«V v nadoo, in th* Omwtjr afCWNrtMb Friday, February 13th, 1915.