Teitl Casgliad: Cambrian news and Merionethshire standard

Sefydliad: Llyfrgell Genedlaethol Cymru

Hawliau: Mae hawlfraint yr adnodd hwn yn eiddo i Cambrian News Ltd.

Gwylio manylion cyfan

Cyntaf Cynt Llun 3 o 8 Nesaf Olaf
Full Screen
9 erthygl ar y dudalen hon
Advertising

THE NATION'S NEED now calls on YOU to save! You can do it by always buyfcig MAYPOLE MARGARINE The one Food not advanced in pricc, and British-made from choicest Nuts and Milk. One Quality Only SB J DOX^BLTjl The Very Beat JS WEIGHT* Tgn" P0E 1-lb. The only Perfect substitute for Butter. MAYPOLE TEA. The « Why Very ■ ■ ■ ■ pay Best A more? MAYPOLE DAIRY Co. LTD' THE LARGEST RETAILERS.. LOCAL ADDRESS: 22, GREAT DARKGATE ST, ABERYSTWYTH. z877

1 Facts and Fancies

1 Facts and Fancies. Nurse: Yes, we kept you alive, for three weeks on milk punches and brandy. Patient: Just my luck; and I was uncon- scious all the time. Tom.: "Hello, Jones, you seem puzzled. Thinking of the future?" Jones: "No. To-morrow's the wife's birthday and I'm thinking of the present." "What is the most aggravating; thing iu married life r" asked Dorothy. "Some- times," said the bachelor friend, "it's the husband and sometimes the wife." Lady: You say the dog has a long pedigree? Dealer: Yes, marm, 'e 'as. One of 'is ancestors chewed off th' corner of th' Magny Charty, an' another of 'em bit a hole in good King Halfred. Yes, marm. "Beware, my son, of loose methods. Do you know how they generally end?" "No, sir; how?" "In tight places." "Jack, Dolly told me the most exciting secret and made me swear never to tell a living soul." "\Ve], hurry up with it. I'm late for the office now." Mrs New-Wed: "Dear me, those eggs are very small/' Grocer: "They are indeed, mum, and I'm sure I don't know why. Mrs New-Wed: "Oh, I dare say it is because you took them out of the nest too soon." "Auntie, did you ever get a proposal,' "Once, dear. A gentleman asked me to marry him over the telephone, but he had the wrong number." "Pardon, Madame, does the smoke of my cigar inconvenience you?" "Yes, Monsieur, it does." "Then, Madame, to oblige you I will smoke my pipe." Lady: How much are these chickens? Market Man Four shillings each. Did you raise them yourself?" "Oh, yes. They were three shillings and sixpence yesterday." How's this for a mean man? He gives his little boy a penny for going to bed without his supper. After the little bov has gone to bed he sneaks upstairs and steels it out of his pocket. When the little boy comes down in the morning he makes him go without breakfast for losing it. Visitor (sampling stout with evident appreciation): Really, this: is> splendid stuff. They say it is both meat and drink. Workman (interrupting): Sure, an' it's roight ye are, sor, an' if ye take plenty av it it'll foind ye lodgings, too." Wilfred (returning from the picture show): "Mamma, we saw a picture of the eaiiy Christians, and lions devouring them." Litttfe Edae (very sympathetic- ally): "Yes, and there was one poor lion that didn't have a bit." Pedlar I have a most valuable book to sell, madam; it te.ls one how to do any- thing. Lady (sarcastically): Does it tell one how to get rid of a, pestering pedlar? Pedllar (promptly) Oh, yes, madam: Buy something from him. New Foreman (to manager): "I've just caught that man Jones hanging about smoking during working hours, so I gave him his four days' wages and told him to clear off." Manager: "Good heavens, man! That fellow was only looking for a job!" "I tell you," said one man to another as they emerged from the dimly-lighted corridor of a concert-hall, "I envy that fellow who was singing." "Envy him I" echoed the other. "Why, his voice was about the poorest I ever heard." "It's net his voice L envy, man," was the reply. "It's his tremendous courage." A girl about six years old was visiting friends. During the conversation one of them remarked: "I hear you have a new litt/e sister." "Yes," answered the little girl, "just two weeks old." "Did you want it to be a- little girl? asked the friend. "No; I wanted it to be a boy," she replied, "but it came, while I was at school." The burglar had been sent to prison for a long term of penal servitude. Onp day, after a visit from the chaplain, he began to read the Bible. He happened to open it at Lamentations and read steadily through from the first verse of the first chapter to the last verse of the last chap- ter. When the chaplain happened to look at the Biblp, afterwards he noticed that the burglar had contrived to scribble in the margin of the last chapter of Lamentations. Buck up, (Jeremiah!"

PENNAL

PENNAL. Priodas. Edrychid yn mlaen at dydd Mercher diwcddaf, pryd yr unwyd mewn piicdas Mr. John Evans, Ty Capel, Soar, sydd yn iii-i- yn Neheudir Cymru, gyda Miss Mary Evans, Tower-road. Cymerodd y seremcni le yn addoldy yr Annibynwyr. Gweiinyddvvyd gan y Parch. E. Wnion Evanis, Derwenlas. yn cael ei gynorthwyo gan y Parch. 0. Davies, gweinidog newydd yr eglwys. Wedi'r gwasanaeth aed i dy Mr. a Mrs. Evans. mam y wraig icuanc, lie yr oedd gwledd wcdi ei darparu, a chafwyd cwrdd ar dl hynv i ddymuno yn dda i'r par ieuanc, pa rai sydd wedi derbyn nifer luosog o anvhegion. Yn mysg y siaradwyr yr cedd y ddau weinidog ac adroddodd Winon* farddoniaeth i'r achlysur.

Advertising

mi too, 1 The Oldflst BiUpcsSing Ea'.abiishmen in ths Torre and DbirioJ John Lloyd & Sons 11 Town Oriars, Billposters and Distributors, Having bkci is.rc.esfe number of most pirominettt Pnotiag St.ationn In r-li,parts of AfciO'ystsvyth IIoDd Pistricfc, they are able -o take larga conSr&eta of evnry description 0"VER W S5TATJQNS IN TOWN A DIC,TFJ CT Gfficia- Biilpostare to the Town ana B Oenntjr Co.«n;sils,G. B Railway Co., the A.I.O., all the Ano- 1 tiooeers e! lihe Town Mid Dlntriot, %Dd B other pablio bodies. B Address—TRINITY RD, Abskystwyih. g

MR LLOYD GEORGE AT THE EISTEDDFOD

MR. LLOYD GEORGE AT THE EISTEDDFOD. An Appeal to Aberystwyth. In accordance with his practice for some years, Mr Lloyd George attended the National Eisteddfod on Thursday at Ban- gor. and presided over the ceremony of chairing the bard. Accompanied by Mrs Lloyd George and Miss Megan Lloyd George, he travelled specially from London, and on his arrival received a welcome from an audience numbering between 8,000 and 10,000. In the name of "ten thousand Welsh- men," the meeting passed a resolution con- veying an expression of unchangeable loyalty to the throne and unalterable constancy to the allied cause in days of stress and strain. Mr Lloyd George, who was received with prolonged cheers, accompanied by the pl.aying of "For he's a jolly good fellow" by the R<,yul Marine Band, ,said—" Dear Fellow-countrymen,—However great being a Welshman may be, lie must have a day at the eisteddfod. 1 am only a. bit of a Welshman in an office in London-Caugh- ter)—and I have escaped from it for one day of Welsh song, and since coming here I have done a little business. The first thing I had was a letter handed to me by the Conductor of the Eisteddfod. I opened it, and found it to be a letter from a man who had been singing here and had not succeeded in the competition. Now he is asking me if there is a vacancy for him in the Munitions Office in London- (loud .laughter)—and as there will be more lexers than winners in tihe eisteddfod; I how to go back to London with a, good- sized army of helpers to supply munitions of war for the allies. (Laughter and cheers.) I am told that there are thirty- one bards here; but we shall have to release Dr Parry Williams (the crowned and chaired bard) until next time. (Renewed laughter.) You have had from the resolution submitted to you some idea of the circumstances under which we meet to-dav. No eisteddfod was ever held under such a cloud. It is, indeed, a terrible time. I am frankly glad that you are holding the eisteddfod this year. I did not relish the idea of the Wash muse being placed in an interment camp with barbed wire to keep her from getting out till the end of the war. (Laughter and cheers.) She is not an alien enemy, but a native of the hills. (Hear, hear.) She is not a German spy. but a bonny lass from the Wefsh glens, and I am delighted that you have set her free once more. (Loud cheers.) I have come here from the work of war' in order to hear the harp of the bards above the shriek of the shell. (Cheers.) I observe that you have omitted to ask the old eisteddfod question, "Is it peace?" What is the good of asking it? Everywhere sounds of war trumpets rend the air from sea to sea. The land of Britain trembles in the march of myriads preparing for war. East and west and north and south you hear the ring of the hammers and the whistle of the steel lathes fashioning weapons of war. On quiet nights from my cottage in Surrey I can hear the sound of the cannon fired in anger on the ruddied fiofd-s of death in France. H know wifih horror the work that is going on, and as I hear it the old prayer of the Gorsedd comes to my lips "0 Iesu, nad gamwaith" (0 Jesus, pre- vent wrong). Is there peace? No. Why not? Because a,n unclean spirit has possessed the rulers of a great nation. (Hear, hear.) Now and again in the history of the world its people have had to fight in order to win, sometimes in order to retain, those elementary rights which lift nuan above the beasts of the field justice, liberty, righteousness. (Hear, hear.) If right is worsted in his conflict, civilisation will be put baek for generations. If right triumphs, mankind takes a long leap forward on the road to progress. This is one of those periods. I am proud to know Wales has flung its whole, strength into the struggle for humanity. (Cheers.) We have a great army already in the battlefield. We have a still greater army ready and eager to support their comrades in the field. (Cheers.) There was a. time when it seemed as if the military spirit of Wales had vanished into the mists of the past. Some of llS thought that the religious revivals of the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries had broken the fighting spirit of our race. But no real religion has ever yet broken a nation's spirit. It disciplines its strength; it elevates its purpose. Such a nation does not dissipate its power in envious anger and rage against its neighbours, but when justice is menaced that nation becomes more formidable than ever. (Hear, hear.) There was a time in the past .200 years or more when we could hardly summon the material for three regiments to the flag; to-day you have 100,000 men who have rallied to the flag from the hills and valleys of their native land. (Loud cheers.) t We have a greater army from Wales alone thrun Wellington commanded at Waterloo (hear, hear) and they are just as good men, every one of them. (Cheers.) And they have not ceased coming yet. More and more men are still gathering into the camping grounds. As they learn in the remotest hovels that liberty is in danger they come along to defend her against the violence of the oppressor. (Cheers.) Our Welsh martial spirit was not dead. It was not even slumbering. It was simply hiding in its caves among the hills until the call came from above. (Cheers.) War after war swept past it without rousing its old energies. At last it has come forth fully armed for battle and mightier than ever. The resolution rcmirels me of the pre- sentation by the King, of the colours to the Welsh Guards the other day in the gardens of Buckingham Palace. That was a g'orious spectacle. (Hear. hear.) While I was looking at those standing in the heavy showers of hail I could not help thinking that if it had been a shower of shrapnel burlets they would have stood it just as undismayed. (Cheers.) Welsh courage has manifested itself in this war as it was never before shown in the his- tory of Wates. When Miagna Charta v. as wrested from a tyrannical King there was a Welsh contingent amongst the forces that achieved that victory for Eng- lish freedom, and there are Welsh names among the signatories of that potent docu- ment. When the charter of European liberty is drawn up after this war the charter that will settle the fate, of man- kind on many continents for ages to come- it will be a source of pride to us that our little country contributed such a large and efficient contingent to the army that I established a new charter for human liberty. (Cheers.) I have no doubt, that. however loner victory will tarry, it wi:l ultimately come. (Loud cheers.) We may have to wait for the dawn. The eastern sky is dark and lowering. The stars have been clouded over. I regard that stormy hor- izon with anxiety, but with no dread. (Cheers.) To-day I can see the colour of a new hope beginning to empurple the sky. The enemy in their victorious march know not what they are doing. Let them beware, for they are unshackling Russia. (Cheers.) With their monster artiF.ery they are shattering rusty bars that fet- tered the strength of' the people of Russia. (Loud cheers.) You can see them shaking their powerful limbs free from the stifling debris and preparing for the conflict with a new spirit. (Cheers.) I repeat, the enemy know not what they are achieving for the apparent victim. Austria and Prussia are doing for Russia to-day what their military ancestors effected just as unwittingly for France. They are hammering a sword that wilF; destroy them and are freeing a great nation to wield it with a more potest stroke and a mightier sweep than it ever yet commanded. (Loud cheers.) For us we must fight on, or for ever sink as a people into impotent obscurity. Britain has another task. It is becoming clearer, and our own share of it is becoming greater as the months roll past. It is to sec that the suffering and the loss shadl not be in vain. (Cheers.) The fields of Europe are being rent by the ploughshares of war. The verdure of the old civilisation is vanishing in the desolating upheaval of the conflict. Let us see to it that wheat and not tares are sown in the Moedinir soil, and "in due season we shall reap if lvc-, faint not." (Cheers.) Mr. Lloyd George madn an unexpected appearance at the annual meeting of the National Eisteddfod Association in the evening;, when the Rev Elfet Lewis pro- posed a resolution expressing- appreciation of the courage shown by Bangor in hold- in'g the Fisteddfod under such unprece- dented difficulties, expressing regret at the absence- of special railway facilities. and asking a1! lovers of thP Eisteddfod to assist the Bangor Committee to bear » any burden wihicli might faG on the Com- mittee. Mr.. W. R. Owen, London, sec- onded the resolution. i Speaking to the resolution, Mr Lloyd'] George said be hoped that part of the resolution referring to the absence of rail- way facilities vvou.'d be omitted. He wished the meeting to understand that it the llaihrays had made- a mistake the: responsibility rested not on the railway companies, but on the Government, which imposed the restrictions as part of its policy. The Government had taken over the control of railways and, having done so, desired to cut down, as far as possible the need to call on railway men. There were other public gatherings than the Eisteddfod in England. There were horse racing and footba.1 matches, and if they granted railway facilities in the one. why should they refuse them in the ctaer? Of covirse, they in Wales p '.aced the Eistedd- fod iia different category to horse racing a-id football, but people in England wou'd liaa-diy appreciate the difference between providing popular entertainments, fitted to the taste and genius of the. Welsh peep e, and providing; what the ordinary Em'-ishman would like to have. Tlie Government could hardly act as judge to determine which public amusement shoiud or should not be granted special railway facilities. Had they granted spccal facilities to the Eisteddfod, it would have been at once set down to "Lloyd George's personal p.edi- lection for the land of song and amuse- ments." (Laughter.) The policy cf the Government was clear and simple. They did not wish to grant facilities which would have the effect of drawing men away from work. (Cheers.) It might be desirable to have- excursion facilities in times of peace, but certainly it was not desirable during time cf war. They did not want the excursion spirit during the national crisis. There had not been a sing e excursion in Germany since the beginning of the war, while in France every man and every child was uti'.ised for war purposes. To talk of excursions in England, while Russia and Franee were situated as they now woi'p, would be to leave an undesirable feeing in the minds of our Allies. (Applause.) They must have no excursions and no excursion spirit. The- Government wanted men to make shells and net to run excursion trains. They cut down the ordinary train service where possible. That was why they cut down the restaurant and sleeping cars on the railways. If they ran those trains they must employ or the repair of railways, engines, and rolling stock men who could be better employed in making shells. (Applause.) Having said that, he would say further that there was no need to put aside the Eisteddfcd. They wanted to hear the harp and the muse in the night of national trial as weQ as in the day of its joy. "Business as usual" should be the mottoe for the Welsh muse. They might not, perhaps, hold the eisteddfod for a full four days' programme during war time. A two days' programme might be sufficient, but by a.11 means let them hold the National Eisteddfod next year. Let them keep the old institution alive. They must not lock up the Welsh muse. Let her rather be free to wander as before over the hills and dates of the Principality. (Applause.) Let them simplify the Eisteddfod. Let them hold it next year, even if the war were not then over. He did not say it would not be over, but they would do welil to be pre- pared. The war must be prosecuted until the enemy was utterly defeated (pro- longed applause)—but let them exercise thrift and economy in connection with the Eisteddfod. Let it lead the simple life until the war was over. He hoped Aber- ystwyth would not grow faint-hearted, but would emulate the courage shown by Bangor. They need not have a pavilion to hold 10,000 people. That was only an innovation of recent years. The Eistedd- fod did not need a. great tabernacle for its existence. It had lived in tents for forty years in the wilderness, and might yet live happily in them in ease of neces- sity, but he urged them, appea.ed to them, not to Leave Wales for another two years without an Eisteddfod. (Applause.) Give the- Eisteddfod a change of air in Aberyst- wyth from the great towns to the rural counties until the clouds rolled by, and he promised them. pledged himself there and then to the promise, that if they kept tlie old institution alive during war time, we too will make our tabernacle with yen." Every gocd insti- tution which lived through the war woui'd come forth when peace was declared puri- fied as by fire. (AppHause.) Mr Lleweilvn Williams, K.C., M.P., said that was the best speech he had ever heard from Mr Lloyd George. He earn- estly commended it to the, consideration of the Aberystwyth Committee. The resolution, after the deletion, at Mr Lloyd George's suggestion, of the reference to the railways, was unanimously adopted. Professor Edward Edwards, speaking on behalf of the Aberystwyth Committee, said he and his co-delegates were not empowered to pledge themselves to the holding of the Eisteddfod next vear, but felt sure the Committee would give the fullest consideration to what Mr. Llbyd George had said. Mr. J. H. Davies, Aberystwyth. said the important speech of Mr. Lloyd George altered the whole outlook at Aberystwyth. H€. felt that the pledge Mr Lloyd George had given was given on behalf of others as well as himself, and meant much more than appeared on the surface. He felt confident Aberystwyth would hold the festival next year. (Appilause.) Mr Llewellyn Williams, K.C., M.P., proposed that the Aberystwyth Committee should he asked to reconsider the matter and to send a delegate to meet the Gorsedd and. Fisteddfo^d' Association at an early, date, with suggestions if necessary for a curtailed programme. That was carried without opposition. That was carried without opposition. A strong delegation from Birkenhead invited the Eisteddfod to that town the year after it was held at Aberystwyth. The, invitation was accepted. v Mr Llewelyn Williams was elected chairman of the National Eisteddfod Association in succession to the late Sir Marchant Williams, and Mr John Hinds, M.P' treasurer. Mr W. R. Owen, LonL. don, was elected on the Executive Coun- cil. Mr. Lloyd George and party arrived at the Eisteddfod in time to witness the ceremony of chairing the bard. The prize was £ 20. and an oak chair for the best ode not exceeding 600 lines, entitled "Eryri." There were four competitors, probably the cwe3t number of contestants for many years. Thirty competed for the crown poem the previous day. The adjudicators were Professor John Morris Jones, Mr T. Gwynn Jones, and the Rev J. J. Williams. Professor Morris Jones, who was accompanied on the platform by Mr Glwynn Jones, delivered the adjudica- tion. He said he and his colleagues were disappointed with tlw small number of competitors, but attributed it in part to the fact that" the subjeict had probably been exhausted in recent years. More- over, three of the poems were mere imitations of the ode "Gwlad y Brvniau" of Mr Gwynn Jones. The adjudicators agreed, however, that thp poen bearing the name of "Rhuddwyn Llwyd" was fully worthy of the prize. The name of the winning poet was called, and a youthful: figure appeared standing among the aud- ience at the back of the pavilion. Much interest was aroused when it became known that the successful bard was Dr. J. H. Parry Williams, of Rhyd-ddu, at the base of Snowdon, who is on the staff of the University College at Aberystwyth, who won the Eisteddfodic crown on Wed- nesdav, and who also won the crown and chair at Wrexham National Eisteddfod in 1912. The successful ode was- severely criticised by Professor Morris Jones who declared there wat] enly one stanza in the composition worthy of being read from the platform. Mr L'loyd George at night attended the Eisteddfod concert, and later left for Criccieth, where he remained a few days. The presiding Archdruid (Cadvan) was greeted with rounds of applause when he declared that were he within recruiting age he wculd l}el one of the first to enlist, as he could not shelter behind braver men, when women were outraged and chfdren murdered by barbarous Germans. The largest gathering of the week was assembled in the T>avi';ion. A burst of nnplause greeted Brigadier-general Owen Thomas, thr. morning president, as he came forward tn deliver the presidential address. He spoke in AVd-s h, and quickly roused his fellow-countrymen to a pitch of patriotic fervour that should have borne fruit outside the pavilion, where recruit- ing officers were busy. H.n said he was there as a warm-hearted Welshman, to whom the success of his country and na.tion was dear. Still, it was difficult for him to dissociate himself from the message with which his uniform and

MR LLOYD GEORGE AT THE EISTEDDFOD

office were associated. (Cheers.) Though it was in the atmosphere of peace that the eisteddfod thrived best, they were now distulbed by the thunder and light- ning of war, and \Velsh warricrs were more numerous than We feh vocalists and military officers more frequent than bards.. He fondly desired to see a Welsh army befitting its name with Welsh blood coursing through its veins, the Welsh language dancing on its lips, and Welsh p.tuc.k and vim as a soul to the whole. The Welsh army was the concep- tion of the greatest WeislilTian of the a_c--(che,er,s )-aild many of its chief officers—the great majority of^ those in its lower official ranks-—were WeHsh. He did not demand conscription, but would; give much to see the young men of Wales fired with true enthusiasm for their country and kingdom. What, for instance, would it be for the Eisteddfod to offer prizes for competition among sold- iers in military exercises? As long as the object aimed at and achieved was for the moral and practical develop- ment those factors which encour- aged the spirit of patriotism and loyalty to the throne and country, the scope of the Eisteddfod programme could never be tco wide. (Hear, hear.) Twenty wounded soldiers—Australians staying at Bodlondeb, Bangor, entered the pavilion amid loud cheers, which were repeated when Penar exp ained who they were. Elfed, who has himself two sons serving their country, spoke eloquently at the Gorsedd of the good destined to come out of the disturbing elements which now overwhelmed humanity. 'Fresh problems would arise, and Wales must make up its mind to so,-Ae, them. There was no one present who did not hate war, but he l egtaa-ded the awakening which the war had brought about in their young men as one cf the most promising signs that the future of the nation was to be brighter than its past in any stage in its history. of the disturbing elements which now overwhelmed humanity. Fresh problems would arise, and Wales must make up its mind to sG-.Ve them. There was no one pi-esenfc who did not hate war, but he l egtaa-ded the awakening which the war had brought about in their young men as one cf the most promising signs that the future of the nation was to be brighter than its past in any stage in its history. (Cheers.) The fire which had been spread- ing devastation in France and the Dardan- elles was also the fire which was to purify and consecrate the life of Wales; but unless they remained true to the traditions j of their forefathers there was a danger of | the purifying effects of the fire being more pronounced in Russia and France. I On the Munitions Minister's arrival, Oadfan addressed him in. extempore verse, of which the following is a striking specimen :— Buost gavyr i ddwyn ein beichiau, Teflaist o ,-c-.w ar y tomiau, I Llifa gras dros dy wefusai Fr dy fri, Lloyd George. Nis gall byddin Prydain fiwydro, Nis gail rhvchdryll ddal i danio, Nis 1-(B:1 magnel bara i mo, Hobot ti, Lloyd George. Mr Lloyd George joined heartijly in the j delighted laugh of the crowd at this hit at this work as Munition Minister. There was only one competitor in the 'cello competition, the test piece set being the, sccond movement in Goltermann's Concerto in A minor. Major Miller, who adjudicated, spok", highly of the young lady's ability, of whom, lie said he real- ised at once that* the player and her instrument were one. He unhesitatingly awarded the prize to Miss Peggy Williams, Llanybyther, Cardiganshire. Other awards included :— Prize of t25 for a Welsh drama to Miss Eileen Hughes. London, who won- a similar prize at Rhyl. Captain Cyril Jenkins was awarded the £ 10 prize, for the best part song for mixed voices. Competitions for the blind—hand- knitted men's stockings and ladies' gloves: Mary Ann Williams, Portmadoc. Sketches of British butterflies in colour (for pupils in secondary schoo's. age limit .10 eighteen): Norman Williams, County School, Aberystwyth. Pillow lace cellar: Kate Wililianis, Car- narvon. Cocoa fibre brush mat: J. M. Roberts, Upper Llandwrog. Small dog basket: Owen Williams, Criccieth. Plan of garden city on any site in Wales for 5,000 inhabitants, with provi- sions for factories, etc., and showing k railway connections: Geotge McLean, I '0 Portmadoc. Penillion singing (North Wales style): Prize divided between Caradop Davies, Blaenau Festiniog, and Llyfni Hughes, Penvgroes. Baritone solo: R. 0. Jones, Tonvpandy. Pedal harp solo: Freda Holland, Bir- kenhead. Six sketches illustrating a nature ramble in autumn (confined to pupi.s in elementary schools): Evan G. Owen, Waen Fawr. Henllan, Cardiganshire. Sir Keiii-y Lewisi announced that the deficit on the Eisteddfod would be £ 986, on a commencing liability of £ 2,750. A telegram was received from the King in reply to the loyal resolution passed on Thursday, stating that The assurance which it contains of the united and enthus- iastic support of the Welsh nation in these critical days strengthens his Majesty's unswerving conviction that victory will he ultimately secured to the I Empire and our Allies." The message was received with loud cheers. A letter from: Lord Penrhyn was also read in reply to a resolution of condolence sent to him. ===__====

Advertising

f Puritan Happy Homes, No. 4. Drawn by E. Oakdale. )'' 4 "7 OF e" t In the Miner's Home where cleanliness is a- golden virtue, Puritan Soap has always been an ever-welcome guest. Alike here and in thousands of other happy homes Puritan Soap is welcomed and loved because it is so gentle in use —so tender to the clothes, so pleasant to the hands that use it. Puritan Soap is gentle because it contains olive oil-sweet olive oil of nature's own giving. It is the olive oil in Puritan Soap which saves the clothes S'h ar Ik' from wash-day wear and tear, and makes them, like itself, sweet, pure and fragrant. That is why so many housewives say quite truly that Puritan Soap saves its cost every week in the clothes it saves. Will you order Puritan Soap from your grocer, oilman or stores 1 It is sold in several sizes: a size for every need. I I I PURITAN SOAP is used in Britain's happiest homes J; Made by Christr. Thomas & Broe., Ltd., Bristol, Soapmakers since 1745. ggg

TO OUR READERS

TO OUR READERS. THE "CAMBRIAN NEWS" CAN BE OBTAINED IN THE FOLLOWING TOWNS. Cardiff.—Messrs. Ernest Joyce and Co. 37, Wo&fcgate-street; Messrs. W.H. Smith and Son, Strand House, Penarth-road; Wyman and Sons, Cymru House, St. Mary-street. Swansea. Messrs. W. H. Smith and Son, Railway BookstaJl; Mr. George Wil- liams, Alexandra-road; Messrs. Wymani and Sons, 69, High-street. Merthyr Tydfil.—Messrs. Wyman and Sons. Railway Bookstall; Mr. D. Bowen, 109, High-street. Dowla-is.—Mr. W. James, Tlie Printing House, North-firreet. Senghf,ii,ith.N,lr. D. Williams. 158, Commercial-street.. Forth.—Mr. A. Fudge, stationer: Mr. W. R. Thomas, 36, Pontypridd-road. Ynysybwl.—Mr. D. Rogers. newsagent. Blaenclydach.—Mrs. A. Bevan. 151, Court-street. Ferndale.—Mr. J. T Burrell. 67. Dyf- ryn-s>;reet. Tylorstown.— Mr. Charles Powell, news- agent. Pontygwaith.—Mr. TlieoDhilus Thomas, Stationers Hall- Treorchy. Mr. G. R. Protheroe, 207, High-street, and Mr. Evan Evans. 214, Park-road; Luther J. Morgan, 114. Bute- reet. Tonvpandy.—Messrs. J. Howell and Co., Briwnent House. Maerdy.-Mi-. E. E. Jeremiah. 60. Maerdy-road. Clydach Vale.—Mr. T. C. Davies. stationer. Ynyshir. Mr. D. B. Davies, Recheb Houso. Aberdare. Mr L. Thomas, 8, Burn- street, Cwmamman. Caerau.—Mr. Griffith Thomas, 11 and 12, Caerau-road. Pentre (Rhondda Valley). — Mr. D. C. Morgan, Pbst Office, Llewellyn-street. Treherbert.—Mr. David Evans, 26, Bute-sftreet. Carmarthen. Mr. W. J. Lewis, 28," Richmond-terrace; Mr. C. H. Carpenter, newsagent; Messrs. W. H. Smith and SonJ 3, Queen-street also at London. — Messrs. W. H. Everett and Son, 11. St. Bride-tfreet, Ludgate Cii •cus Messrs, W. H. Smith and Son, 186. Strand; Mr. Evan Morris. 120, Theobalds-read, Holborn. Liverpool.—Messrs. Conlan and Co.. 5, r Crosshall-street; Messrs. W. H. Smith and Son, 61, Dale-street. Chester.—Messrs. W. H. Smith and Son, 7, Boughtoni. Birkenhead.—Mr. Thomas Swift, news- agent, 21-23, Bridge-street. I Shrewsbury.—Messrs. W. H. Smith and Son. 21, Castle-street. Birmingham.—Messrs. Wyman and Sons, Bookstall, Snowhill. I

Advertising

j Paris House, DOLGELLEY. U3VXQUB OPPORTUNITY From July 24th to August 7th, ALL THAT REMAINS OF Summer Purchases WILL BE OFFERED AT j _4a_ I 0 OE PRIOES. ASTOUNDING REDUCTIONS IN EVERY DEPARTMENT. MEREDITH- NOW OPEN. The Cambrian News" CIRCULATING LIBRARY, 38, Terrace Road, I ABERYSTWYTH Subscription Terms on applcatioa, UP-TO-DATE NOVELS, V-;4 j MUSIC ■—-■■ Mr. J.Chas.McLean, F.R.C.O (Formerly pupi of Sir Walter Parratt ana bir Frederick Bridge, etc., at the Royawollege of Music, London), Lessons in Organ, Piano, Singing & Theory m a S?C ABer»0VE Y, and MACHYJifLLE^ nsited during the week 3, Queen's Terrace, Aberystwyth. j,339 Mr. Charles Panchen, c A5.. Onanist and Choirmaster, o Michael s Parish Church, Aberystrwyth Hon Local Examiner (Scholarship) R.C.M. receives pupils for SINGING, ORGAN, PIANOFORTE, FLUTE & HARMONY. 20, New Streety Aberystwyth. Next Term begins on May 3rd, 1915. Arthur C. Edwards, MUS. BAC. (Oxon.), F.R.C.O., Organist and Choirmaster of Holy Trinity Church Somttfane Deputy Organist of Llandaff Cathedral gives lessons in ORGAN, PIANOFORTE, SINGING (Ladies or Boys' voices), and all branches of Musical theory. Pupils prepared for Examinations For terms apply at Clyde House, Queen's- road, Aberystwyth. ry Mr. Edwards is arrang-ing to visit Lampeter on Wednesdays. j98 EDUCATION. PRIVATE TUITION. A/TR. POPE (M.A. Cambridge; formerly Open Classical Scholar of Sidney Sussex College, and Assistant Master at Shrewsbury School) takes a few boys to pre- pare for the Public Schools. Address—18, South Marine Terrace, b233 Aberystwyth. MEITHRINFA, rrcparatory School for Boys, NORTH ROAD, ABERYSTWYTB. Principal Miss TROTTER. Boarders received. Prospectus on application. Next Term begins May 5th, 1915. BARMOUTH. COUNTY SCHOOL, BARMOUTH. Headmaster EDMUND D. JONES, M.A. Staff: JOHN LLOYD, M.A. W. A. BEDDOWS, B.Sc. W. B. WILLIAMS, B.Sc. Miss L. M. M. ADAM, M.A. (Senior Mistress). Miss MARY DAVIES, B.A. Visiting Teachers in Dcawing aud Painting Cookery, Shorthand, and Music. Prospectuses, etc., on application to R. LLEWELYN OWEN, Clerk. DOLGELLEY. The County School, DOLGELLEY. (The Dolgel!ey Grammar School) Dr. Ellis' Endowment, A.D. 1665. Boarding & Day School for Boys Excellent General Education and Training provided. with special preparation for the Universities, the Cavil service, and Commerce. Boarders received at the Headmaster's House. For Prospectus, Fees, etc., apply to the Headmaster I Dr. Williams' School, I .DOLGELLEY. Endowed High School for Girls. (Boarders and Day Pupils). Preparation for the Central Welsh Boald, Oxford Local Examinations, London and Welsh Matriculation and University Scholar- ships. There are three leaving Examinations ten- able at places of Higher Education, which are awarded annually upon the result of the year's work. The Buildings and Grounds are excellently adapted to secure the health and comfort of the girls. A large new wing was erected in 1910 to meet the demand for increased accommodation. TENNIS. HOCKEY. NETBALL. BADMINTON. Á Fees :-Boarding, 1:26 per annum Tuition, ib. For Prospectus, apply to the Headmistress or to D. Oswald Davies, Solicitor, Dolgelley. Clerk to the Governors. t, TOWYN. Towyn County School rpHE SCHOOL BUILDINGS are large and —- commodious and include the ordinary Class Rooms, Music Rooms, excellently- equipped Chemical and Physical Laboratories, Science Lecture Room, Workshop, Kitchen, and Laundry. The Headmaster's House is specially arranged for the accommodation of Boarders, also arrangements are made with one of the Masters tor the accommodation of Girl Boarders Pupils are prepared for the Universities, I Profession and Commercial life. SUCCESSES DURING 1911. I London Inter B.Sc. London Matriculation mmm 4 Wales Matriculation 6 College of Preceptors, Medical Prel. 2 Central Welsh Board. Honours Certificate j Higher Certificate 1 Senior Certificate 11 Junior Certificate 19 Pitman's Shorthand, Advanced Grade 1 Pitman's Elementary j Associated Board of R.A.M. and R.C.M. Higher Division 1 Lower Division 3 Trinity College of London. Junior Division 3 Preparatory 2 Rendel Exhibition, L10. County Exhibi- tion, XIO. Entrance Scholarship into Cardiff University, X15. During the last thirteen years, scholarships to the value of X3,645 have been gained by pupils direct from the School. For Prospectus, Boarding Fees, etc., apply to the Headmaster, or to E. J. EVANS, Towyn. Clerk to the Govemer