Teitl Casgliad: Cambrian news and Merionethshire standard

Sefydliad: Llyfrgell Genedlaethol Cymru

Hawliau: Mae hawlfraint yr adnodd hwn yn eiddo i Cambrian News Ltd.

Gwylio manylion cyfan

Cyntaf Cynt Llun 4 o 8 Nesaf Olaf
Full Screen
6 erthygl ar y dudalen hon
Advertising

PIER PAVILION, ABERYSTWYTH Agents COOKE BROS. & ROBERTS, Auctioneers, Aberystwyth. On FRIDAY, 13th, at 8 p.m SATURDAY, 14th, at 3 & 8 p.m. FRED ROPER'S successful Novelty Concert Party. MONDAY, August 16th and during the Week N. Thorpe-Mayne and Miss Beryl Hamilton -AND THEIR SPECIALLY SELECTED London Repertoire Company. Monday, Wedneaday & Saturday-" ARMS AND THE MAN. Tuesday and Friday-" DOORMATS." Thursday-" DON." Usual Times and Prices. ROYAL PIBR PAVILION ABERYSTWYTH. AgentsCOOKK BROS. & ROBERTS, Auctioneers, Aberystwyth, SUNDAY NEXT. AUGUST 15th, A GRAND SACRED CONCERT will be given by Well-known and Popular Artistes, amongst whom are Miss L1LLIE SELDEN Miss SOPHIE ROWLANDS (Violinist) (Soprano) Miss MAUDE FERENS Mr. HARRY LIVESAY (Contralto) (Baritone) Doors open at 7-45. Commence at 8-15 p m Popular Prices of Admission 3d.; 6d.; and Ij- (Reserved). 1/- Seats booked in advance at the Pier Box Office. Manager-C. SCOTT-HALL. ELYSIAN GROVE and Sylvan Palace, ABERYSTWYTH. Manager MR. ALEC VALGHAN Programme for Week commencing August At 3 and 7-30 Daily, Wet or Fine. The Royal Dandies" In their refined Vaudeville Entertainments Twice Daily. At, 3 and 7-30. Six Special Gala Nights. THIS WEEK. MONDAY, August 9th—A Sentimental Sing- ing Contest for a Silver Cup. TUE, SDAY-A'Fanev Dress 'Ball. Prizes for the prettiest Costume and a prize for the funniest. WEDNESDAY—Comic Singing for UNCLE KELL Y'S PIG. THURSDAY—Comic Singing on a Barrel. FRIDAY—" Go as you Please" Competition. SATURDAY—Singing for Joey's Goose. Valuable Prizes will be given each Evening. Admission to the Grove: Mornings, 2d. After- noons and Evenings. 3d., including Entertain- ment. Special Gala Nights, 6d. Dancing every Evening after performances, The butterfly has wings of gold, the firefly wings of flame, the little flea has none at all but it gets there just the same. "-Ellison's Mottoes. CASTLE GROUNDS Three Times Daify- Wet or Fine. 1.1.. 3 AND 7-30 MH. J. W. ELLISON'S Entertainers with Constant Change of Programme. Second Season and better than ever. TO-MORROW EVENING Grand "Rustic" Night EVERYTHING NEW, SPECIAL SCENERY, PRETTY COSTUMES, CATCHY SONGS, ROLLICKING DANCES. NEW REVLETTE, SIR" HEVERTON." Seats may be booked for any Performance without extra charge. Chocolates, books of words and photos of the Entertainers may be purchased on the grounds. Prizes are given away in connection with Woman's Life," Tit-Bits," etc., etc. -0- WEDNESDAY NEXT (August 18th) Afternoon at 3. Wet or Fine. Evening at 8 BENEFIT TO GEORGE DELAMERE (Manager and producer) AND ARTHUR CARLTON (Principal Comedian) "POOR THING! IR by kind permission of Mr J. W. Ellison. Prices this day only, Afternoon (all parts) 6d Evening 2/-(first four rows); 1/- and a few at 6d* Plan of seats always ready and no charge is made for booking. Coliseum, Aberystwyth. Manager Jenkin Humphreys. THURSDAY, FRIDAY, SATURDAY, AUGUST 12th, 13th and 14th. The Event of the Season. Enormous Attraction KETTH KENNETH r~ ^Presents his own Company including Miss BETTY FAIRFAX, The well-known Actress, IN London's Greatest Laughing Success, Baby Mine By MARGARBT MAYO. From the Vaudeville Theatre, London. By arrangement with William A. Brady, of New York, U.S.A. Prices 2/6, 2,1., 1/6, 1/ Gallery 6d. Doors open 7-30. Commence at 8. Barly Doors 7-15 3d. extra. b349 COLISEUM, Aberystwyth. Manager Jenkin Humphreys. Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday, AUGUST 16th, 17th, and 18th. MR DUDLEY STUART Presents CYRIL MAUDE'S GREAT SUCCESS TEE.EI HEADMASTER A Delightful English Comedy in 4 Acts. n y By W. T. Coleby and Edward Knoblaugh. part Author of "Milestones," "Kisruet," and My Lady's Dress." Direct from the Playhouse, London, where it ran six months to crowded Houses. The London Daily Telegraph says an Entertainment irresistible." As Played by Royal Command before the King and Queen at Balmoral Castie. FOR TIMES AND PRICES SEE BILLS b313" Meetings, Entertainments, CINEMA, Market Street. THE f-^REMIER MIOTURE j- ALACE. UP-TO-DATE FEATURES in Every Programme. The Gaumont War GraDhic, etc., etc. Daily at 3, 6-30 & 8-30. Prices-3d., 6d., 8d., and If. WESLEY CHURCH, Aberystwyth. Saturday Next, August 14th. rrof. Firmin Swinnen The great Belgian Organist of ANTWKRP CATHEDRAL who has attracted and charmed great crowds all over te country, will give an REOITAL. ARTHUR STEURBAUT, The brilliant Belgian Baritone, will sing. Chair will be taken at 8 p.m. by ARTHUR JONES, Esq. Sunday Next, August 15th. At 6 30 p.m. Popular Patriotic Service, Rev. E. HORROUKS HOWARD of Liverpool, on "WITH CHRIST ON THE BATTLEFIELD" At 8 p.m. Musical Service. At the Organ, Prof Swinnen. Vocal Solos, Arthur Steurbaut AT THE TABERNACLE, Powell Street. Monday Next, Aug., 16th, at 8 p.m. Grand Patriotic Domonstration. Chairman: HIS WORSHIP THE MAYOR (Edwin Morris, Esq. J.P.) Prof. FIRMIN SWINNEN, M. ARTHUR STEURBAUT. Rev. E. HORROCKS HOWARD Relating Prof. Swinnen's experiences during the bombardment of Antwerp and after. Collections for Belgian Relief.. "Cam brian News Stationery Stores FOR USEFUL & ORNAMENTAL PRESENTS OF ALL KINDS. Try these Stores. FANCY GOODS DEPARTMENT. Attache Cases. Ladies and Gent's Dressing Cases. Ladies' Handbags, Dorothy, Vanity, Devonshire, etc. Purses from 6d. upwards. Pocket Books, Letter Cases, Writing Cases and Desks. Silver and Gold Pencils. Shaving and Dressing Mirrors Manicure Sets. Cigar and Cigarette Cases in Siivei and Leather. Workbaskets, Werkboxes, Ladies' Companions. Glove and Handkerchief Case3. Collar Boxes, Military Hiir Brusiieg. Scissors and Pen Knives. Watch Wristlets, Music Cases Bibles, Prayer and Hymn Books. Poets and Birthday Books. We are the Sole Agents for the Royal Worcester, Ruskin, Wedgwood and Doulton China. Cambrian News Stores, I TERRACE ROAD, I ABERYSTWYTH. l I S. N. COOKE'S Summer Sale —COMMENCES ON- Thursday, August 12th, 1915, Yi Special Bargains -IN ALL- Departments For real economy in War Time," Ladies will find this Sale an exceptional opportunity for purchasing at prices that cannot be equalled again during the present War. S. N. COOKE, 12, Pier Street, Aberystwyth N.B.—See next week's Cambrian News" for detailed list. u 6 41 I ONE HUNDRED YEARS AGO J nations that are now fighting side by side were at death grips. ONE HUNDRED YEARS AGO motor cars, aeroplanes, submarines, machine guns, wireless installations, telephones, type- writers, sewing machines, talking machines, f and a hundred and one other articles which we t now look upon wich indifference had not been even thought of. 1 ONE HUNDRED YEARS AGO this business was founded with the idea of supplying fine quality bread, cakes and confec- r tionery, and its reputation has been maintained ( right throughout the years that have passed. Hundreds of names on our books at the moment are the names of descendants of those who dealt r with the firm in the earlier days, the slogan has t been passed down from generation to generation, You'll get satisfaction if you deal with Owen," and now it comes to your turn to consider i whether you will let m have your patronage t also. We can assure you of one thing, no firm is more anxious to give you satisfaction than we ( are, no firm has a greater reputation to main. tain, no firm is more alive to the needs of the inhabitants of Aberystwyth. Do try us, please, we are sure you will be pleised. 1 OWEN The High Class Baker and Confectioner, 19, 21, NORTH PARADE, ABERYSTWYTH. STEAM SAW MILLS, ABERYSTWYTH R. ROBERTS and SONS, TIMB R AND SLATE MERCHANTS. EVERY DESCRIPTION OF JOINERY DONE QUICKLY AND CHEAPLY. CARS' and BOATS' SAILS made on the Premises; also all kinds of SACKS, COAL BAGS, &a, ESTIMATES GIVEN. JOBBING DONE: FELLOES, FOR OART WHEELS, TRAPS, AND OTHER VEHICLES. PETER JONES' Briton Slate Works I ii^ CAMBRIAN STREET, ABERYSTWYTH. Plain andEnamelled Slate Chimn-u Pieces, and every descrittbron ol monumental workMn Slate, Ilarble, and Granite. Best Coal at lowest Prices. Coke also supplied. I.. illm_ MEMBER OF 1 0 ,). I I 4z 11", 11 W; ".1 11 mi I L7, 0 WATKINS, PLUMBER AND DECORATOR, 7, Custom House Street. Workshop-Sea View Place. STORES for MANTLES, GLOBES, SHADES, Etc., of all kinds and at all prices. Also ELECTRIC LAMPS. 8a, TERRACE ROAD. NOTICE TO SUBSCRIBERS. To avoid any misunderstanding and dejay subscribes when ordering the cffain$iiaa f4ws should state whether the Northern or Southern edition is required. The Njkfthejn edition mainly contains news noj$h oftbe Dovey and the Southern edition equth of the Dovey. Advertisements are inserted in both editions.

the Cltambriau fjUutf Friday Aug 13th 1915

the Cltambriau fjUutf Friday, Aug 13th, 1915. PERSONAL THRIFT AND NATIONAL EXTRAVA- GANCE. I THERE is a consensus of thought at the present time that the immediate tuture will demand the exercise of the greatest thrift and economy in all classes of society and by all local and national public bodies. The wars of the past twenty years—even the pro- tracted and costly war in South Africa —did not seriously affect the pockets of the people. Trade was good and commerce unrestricted and the balance between imports and exports remained steadily in Great Britain's favour. The result was that, like Jeshurun, the people waxed fat and forgot the rock I from which they were hewn. Indeed, quotations from the Ok! Testament, originally applied to the Jews, are singularly appropriate to the situation as it existed in Great Britain before the outbreak of the present war, for human nature remains the same in all ( ages. "They have provoked me to anger with their vanities I will provoke them to anger with a foolish z;1 nation. For a fire is kindled in mine anger and shall burn the lowest unto heIl and shall consume the earth with her increase and set on fire the founda- tions of mountains.. The sword without and terror within shall destroy both the young man and the virgin; the suckling also with the man of grey hairs." In the searching of hearts caused by the war and its terrible losses in life and international wealth, apart from moral and religious considera- tions, the need for thrift in all classes and departments of life ;8 now being prominently enforced by the Govern- ment, by the Press, and by all people in a position enabling them to influence public opinion. But thrift is rather a habit than a virtue which can be planted and made to grow to maturity in a day. It is more an instinctive habit, built up by generations of home training and example than the produce of school tuition or education. Some people naturally acquire the habit of thrift and w:il manage to make both ends meet with a bit over in what seems to be almost impossible conditions. Others, again, in the best conditions can never make both ends meet; and, what is more unfortunate, cannot or will not acquire the thrift habit, so that when means decrease they will either get into debt if thev can get credit or deprive themselves and their families of the ordinary necessities of life or throw themselves on to charitable or public funds for relief. Others still can never be made to look beyond the present and, if income or earnings are more than adequate at the current moment, will go on living up to that income or earnings, though a time may be imminent when either m'ght be re- duced or altogether cease. At the present stage of the war when the Government is spending three millions a dav and when money is being distri- buted broadcast throughout the king- dom in allowances to the families of men engaged in warfare and largely in wages for the manufacture of un- remunerative material, the difficulty in inculcating thrift in the masses will mainly lie in the direction of enforcing the facts that a time will arrive when the wages and allowances will cease and when the nation will have to foot an enormous war bill as well as to make good to foreign nations the debit balance between exports and imports. Mr. Lloyd George in a recent speech observed that he more feared the potato-bread spirit of the women of Germany than all the bullets of the German army. That was a wise and far-seeing observation. So far that spirit does not generally exist in Great ritain and the difficulty presents itself of how best to inculcate that spirit in all classes of people in the British Isles Various ways of economy have been suggested and in some instances have been already adopted—particularly in the prevention of waste in food stuffs which prevail in some of the poorest houses and is rampant in the houses of the rich-in informing people of the nutritive values of the cheaper kinds of food and how best to prepare them for the table—in knocking- off luxuries which have to be imported from abroad and have to be paid for in the case where the balance of exchange is against this country by the exportation of gold sterling, to the ultimate impov. erishment of the inhabitants. If, however, means can be devised for in- culcating the potato-bread spirit into the generality of the people of Great Britain and especially among house- wives who are the administrators in every household, it would be unnecess_ ary to lay down any hard and fast lines, for if the spirit existed it would soon find expression in administration. In a broader sense, there is need for the potato-bread spirit in municipal and county bodies. Farmers have never been so well off through the war de- mand for farm produce and that prosperity is reflected in the receipts of tradesmen and others who supply farmers with implements, goods, or service; but the time will come when that demand will cease and with it will appear a reduced spending capacity in the people. It therefore behoves local, municipal, and county authorities to economise in every possible direction. We are aware that the Local Govern- ment Board has restricted public loans to absolutely-necessary purposes only; but we think the Government can go much further and deal with its own enormous expenditure and clear out its own Augean stable of national extra- vagance. For instance, the adminis- trative expenses of the Local Govern- ment Board, which now enforces economy on local authorities bv with- holding sanction to loans, for igii were estimated at the exorbitant figure of ^271,849. That estimate and the estimates of other Government departments suggest great possibilities of economy and entrenchment. No doubt the War Office has been severely pressed and has had to deal witn an emergency never before presented to the War Office of any nation in the world; but the fact that it recently refused to purchase a motor traction engine at £600 and preferred to hire it at a cost of over shows the need of economy in that department which, if practised, would reduce the heavy daily expenditure now occasioned by the war. The payment of members of Parliament is undoubtedly right in principle and was one of the points in the People's Charter; but the fact that the Government pays £8,000 a year to people called whips to see that the members attend to their duties for which they are paid a total of ^268,000 is onlv one of hundreds of ways in which the Government itself can economise and so set a good example to all the people of the kingdom in meeting con- ditions of stringency which will assuredly result from the war in the immediate future

THE IMPOTENCE OF PUBLIC BODIES

THE IMPOTENCE OF PUBLIC BODIES. THE report of Tregaron Rural District Council is one of those straws which shows the current of public life and is eloquent of the impotence of public bodies to deal with work they are supposed to perform. At Tuesday's Rural Council meeting, Mr Timothy Evans proposed that a grant of should be made for the erection of a public convenience at Tregaron estimated to cost £30. The matter had been considered by a Committee who reported in favour of the grant. The Council at the previous meeting adopted the Committee's recommenda. tion, and Mr. Timothy Evans then gave notice that he would formally propose a grant in aid of the project. Unfortunately, the proposer, on find- ing that opposition manifested itself, seemed to lose faith in his own pro- posal "and felt inclined to propose that "another committee should be appointed to reconsider the whole 'question." That hesitation on the part of the leader strengthened position of the opposition and the dis- cussion degenerated into the compila- tion of a catalogue of objections, legal, technical, and financial, with the result that at the end of a long discursive dis- cussion the matter was left in a more hopelessly befogged condition than it was in at the start. We refer to this matter not because of its own intrins;c importance, but as indicative of the conditions that obtain in public affairs at Tregaron and elsewhere—conditions that tend more than anything else to paralyse public life. Tregaron Rural Council is no worse than other rural and urban councils in its record for doing nothing and doing it very well. Its impotence is indicated by the way it has been playing" with the question of Tregaron water supply for the past thirty years and by its successful fool- ing of the Local Government Board. Its inactivity in that matter has given the Council a position among authori- ties purposely in default and among those afflicted with a chronic indis- position to carry out urgent adminis- trative duties. But to a lesser or greater degree the malady that afflicts Tregaron Rural Council is also symptomatic of the condition of other councils. The result is that public health is endangered and conditions that ought to be made impossible if the authorities concerned could be infected with a more serious sense of their public responsibilities is continued. The authorities are not lacking in medical officers, sanitary inspectors, and surveyors who regularly present reports on village survivals, unhealthv houses, inimical conditions. These reports are received and discussed in a perfunctory manner and either dropped out of sight altogether or decently interred by reference to a com- mittee- Only those who are brought I. into immediate contact with local authorities can realize fully how diffi- cult is the path of progress what barbed-wire trenches of self-interest and indifference and fear of rates have to be taken by assault and what con- sistent and persistent efforts are neces- sary to secure even a modicum of achievement how ambitious projects are whittled down to secure the support of the member who poses as the special providence of the ratepayers' pockets. He is generally much in evidence in all public bodies but finds greater scope for his talent on rural than on urban councils because the driving force of outside public opinion is unfortunately less insistent and responsive to the claims of progress in rural districts than in urban districts. The war and the calls for economy in expenditure and the difficulty in securing sanction for loans for public works have been veritable godsends to public bodies who in normal conditions only carry out necessary works when compelled by outside forces to do so. The ratepayers of Tregaron Union need feel no alarm at the prospect of their repre. sentatives launching out into any ex- travagant schemes of public improve- ments. The dead weight of astute scotchers of reforms is too strong and powerful an element in its composition to admit of break-neck progress. The remark is equally applicable to scores of similar councils in Wales and probably to councils over the border, for the vis inertia? is widespread. The millennium of rural development is not yet in sight. The cry of the reformer is still, as it always has been and probably ever will be, but the voice of one crying in the wilderness-

EDITORIAL NOTES

EDITORIAL NOTES. The begging nuisance is not less annoy- ing because it has respectable sanction or patriotic purpose. In Methodist circles the union of the theological colleges continues to he dis- cussed and it is realised that the time is opportune to attain the object. The amalgamation of the colleges will have economical and educational advantages, in addition to the promotion of religious thought and progress. -'< Mr. Balfour, as first lord of the Admir_ alty, broke a well-kept silence last week by demonstrating clearly and in a statesman- like way the value of the British Navy. His statements were tike a douche of cold water on the pessimists who forget the marvels that have been accomplished and are dubious of everything except disasters. Dr. Parry illiams, a lecturer on the staff of the Univeisity College of Wales at Aberystwyth, has twice won tlie bardic chair and crown at the National Eistedd- fod. The achievement was as remarkable ps it was unprecedented, and an indica- tion of the modern trend of uniting academic distinctions with poetic ability. Mr. Lloyd George is admired and praised by all. It is among his own people, how- ever, that he is best known and appreci- ated, and it is among them that he finds his delight. His visit to the Eisteddfod was as a silver lining to a dark cloud and his speech, full of vivacity and bardic spontaneity, was a balm to the weak and despondent, inspiring eo'irage and enthusiasm. If only out of regard for Mr. Lloyd George. Aberystwyth will do well to re- spond nobly to his appeal to hold the Eisteddfod next year. The financial diffi- culties can be reduced and overcome by simplifying the organisation and dispensing with expensive trimmings. As an expres- sion of national feeling, the value of the gathering will be enhanced by its sim- plicity. Of all the curious words to which the war has given origin. Anzac is not the least interesting and peculiar. The word has its significance in the Dardanelles operations and, to save any puzzling as to its meaning, it may he said to be a tribute to the skill and daring of the Australian and New Zealand Army Corps. If the manufacture of words continues, a war dictionary may be necessary. There is trouble again in Aberdovey about having a resident medical man and it has been decided to lay the matter be- fore the Insurance Commissioners. It is stated that the Government is seriously concerned regarding the supply of doctors for the army and the civil population. One remedy suggested is to obtain a supply of doctors from America, against which Germany will probably send a note of pro- test. The residents of Aberdovey, how- ever, need not be kept waiting. An interesting report has been pub- lished 011 the progress of agricultural edu- cation in Merionethshire wheiv* the results of the courses held at local centres seem to have been so satisfaetory that ttere is a demand for continuation 011 a larger scale. In view of the industrial depress- ion, it is particularly desirable that Mer- ionethshire, having fallen into line with the other counties in connection with the work done through the Agricultural De- partment of Aberystwyth College, should continue to advance and intensify the in- terests of agriculture. The prosecutions for not obscuring lights in coast towns have helpeq to remove a great deal of indifference and neglect on the part of housekeepers and visitors. The trouble given to the police is unreasonable, but is often their own fault in giving re- peated warnings instead of taking proceed- ings after one or two warnings. As in other matters, prosecution seems the only effective method of securing compliance with local and national requirements, and there should be no squeamishness in taking proceedings against persons who are too indifferent to their own and other people's protection to put themselves to the slightest trouble. An inspiring message of hope and encouragement from the President of the Republic was read to the French Parlia- ment last week. There is unanimity, patience and firmness in the public mind. Germany in her pride, as the President remarked, thought France frivolous, im- pressionable, unsteady, and incapable of persevlerance in design or tenacity in effiort; but the French people will not allow themselves to be disturbed hy lying reports, by noisy pacific protestations of enemy manifestoes, or by the sweet and treacherous words whispered in the ears of neutrals. Another significant remark was that the only peace the Republic can accept is that which will guarantee the safety of Europe, "which will permit us to "breathe, to live, to work." In the maintenance of that spirit and of the ideals of liberty and justice lie the strength and confidence of the Allies to outlast the organised preparations and re- sources of the enemy. It has been decided, to hold the next conference of the Independent Order of Rechabites in Aberystwyth in 1917. When the King presented colours last week to the Welsh Guards the Battalion Glee Singers sang "Ton y Bo tel." The King will no doubt be now anxious to hear Sospa n Fach." The King has conferred 011 the Welsh Guards the honour, of becoming colonel-in- chief of the regiment. By honouring the regiment the King has also honoured Wales and acknowledged the loyalty of the Welsh people. The "Western1 Mail" announces that some enterprising Japanese have started making toys a,t Cardiff. The toys will probably be sold as Welsh toys from the Metropolis of China. Will they be made to wear Welsh hats or pigtails? Pauperism in England and Wales con- tinues to diminish. An official list states that the number of indoor and outdoor paupers on June 20th was 584,580, the smallest number on record. Now is the time to close unnecessary workhouses, and especially to give an impetus to the move- ment in Montgomeryshire. Two men who. declined to assist in the compilation of the national register with- out payment have been censured by Aber- ayron Board of 'Guardians. There are exceptions to every rule and sometimes they are not worth the notice taken of them. Private Henry May, V.C., who was re- ceived by Glasgow Corporation, remarked that there were thousands of deeds similar to his done on the field of battle, but they had passed unnoticed. Brave deeds on the battlefield, as in other spheres of life, are none the less valuable because they are not recognized. Modesty and bravery are kindred virtues. General Sir Henry Mackinnon considers that no sport is more beneficial to the army than boxing. He says that it brings out the best qualities of the soldier and teaches self-control in difficult conditions, as well as the love of fair play. Boxing is evidently an art which is necessary for the British soldier to teach Germans, in com- parison with whom the unspeakable Turk is a gentleman. TV Festilliog Urban Council decided to com- pile a roll of honour containing the names of local men who have volunteered to serve their country in the fighting lines, with a view at the end of the war of placing a permanent memorial of the fallen in the Square. That is an idea which can with advantage be followed by every town and hamlet in the Principality. Judging by a report of its Council meeting, Montgomery must be a delectable spot—for pigs. It was said that a sow and her brood roamed about its historic streets 011 Sundays, while styes containing a colony of pigs are situated close to dwel_ ling houses. Pig-breeding is a profitable and necessary industry, but that is no reason why the health and comfort of a community should be endangered. Dr. Richard Jones, medical officer, had the pleasant duty of reporting to Festiniog Council that the death-rate for June was 5.2 per 1,000. There were no deaths from zymotic diseases and no deaths of infants registered. The report was most favour- able. The forethought and enterprise of the Council in recent years has been amply repaid by these favourable results. Rates may be a bit higher, but a low death-rate and less illness more than compensate for j higher rates. Attention was again called at the last meeting of the Town Council to the waste of water in Lampeter. By an expenditure of £3,000 an additional supply has been provided to increase the pressure three- fold. Alderman D. F. Lloyd stated that the leakages had also increased three-fold, which means that the expenditure has been nullified through the negligence and waste, fulness of householders. The Town Council might as well realize that stronger action than verbal appeals and warnings is neces- sary to prevent the waste. « Germany is now in possession of im- portant parts of Belgium, northern France, and Russian Poland. By tremendous efforts she has secured favourable positions and is obviously anxious to secure peace while she holds those advantages. It is also obvious that the circumstances are not those in which the Allies are prepared to arrange or accept peace, and any move- ment or propaganda in that direction deserves to be regarded with suspicion. Peace is out of the question until Germany is reduced to a position in which she will bring forth the fruits of repentance. At last week's meeting of Merioneth Education Committee the salaries of teachers were increased, but complaints were made of inequalities and it was evi- dent that the teachers feel a grievance. Unfortunately, it is an awkward time to face increased expenditure of public money; but in no sense is it a practice of economy to imperil the efficiency of the I schools by allowing the best and most suit- able teachers to leave. The fact that higher salaries have to be paid newly- appointed teachers emphasises the desir- ability of adopting a scale which will oper- ate fairly and adequately. One of the prime lessons of the war is the importance of making education a more practical and direct factor in national life. For that purpose the efficiency and adaptability of teachers form the first consideration. The Bowling Green at Aberystwyth is an undoubted asset to Aberystwyth as a pleasure resort, and its success is a tribute to the Management Committee. The smoke from the railway engines standing on the adjoining line seriously detracts from the pleasure of the game. Last week when over fifty players were engaged in a series of contests and were accom- panied by their lady friends in light sum- mer costumes, clouds of black smoke were sent for long periods from stationary engines across the Green and were so thick as to blot out the landscape as far away as the National Library. We feel sure that it is only necessary to call attention to the matter to secure a remedy for what is at present a great nuisance not only to bowlers but to users, of Plas Crug-avenue and to residents in Llanbadarn-road. It has been pointed out that at the battle of Waterloo the effective range of cannon was less than two-thirds of a mile and, as solid iron balls were used, the destructive effect of artillery fire was con- fined to the individual or building Tiit. One round from a modern field gun firing a three-inch shell will do more material damage and cause more casualties than twelve hOUl., firing with the form of can- non used in 1815. The advance made in scientific warfare is not confined to firing, but embraces all forms of fighting. Prac- tically all the incidents recorded for several i days recently have been connected with mining and aviation operations below and above the surface. Naval tactics are also to a large extent restricted to dirigibles and aeroplanes abov3 the sea and to sub- marines and torpedoes below. If another great war will unfortunately disturb the world in the next century the frightfulness of modern methods will bear 110 compari- son.

The National Register

The National Register. The number of registration forms issued Etrg^nd and Wales approaches o0,000J(xX). Jsot that there are anything like that number of persons between niteetn and sixty-five years of age in the country, but the demand for forms has been immeasurably larger in many places than had been expected. Registration day is next Sunday. The forms will be collected by the enumerators during the following week, and the work of tabulating the returns will be done locally. Two months has been mentioned as the time that will probably be needed for complet- ing this task, but the officials of the Local Government Board hope that the Registrar-General will have the digested particulars in his hands well before that period has expired. The central authori- ties, relying as they did to a large extent on voluntary labour, have been pleasantly surprised at the splendid way in which volunteers have come forward. The nine questions which everv person of the specified age has to answer are as follows:—(1) Age last birthday. (2) If born abroad and not British, state nation- ality. (3) State whether single, married widow, or widower. (4) How many child- ren' are dependent on you? Under fifteen years? Over fifteen years? (5) How many other persons are dependent on you, excluding emplovees? Wholly dependent? Partially dependent? (6) Profession or occupation. State fully the particular kind of work done and the material worked or dealt in (if any). (7) Name. business, and business address of employer. (8) Are you employed for or under any Government Department p Say "Yes" or ikNo" or "Do. not know." (3) Are you skilled in any work other than that upon which you are at present employed, and, if so, what ? Are you able and willing to undertake such work ? In a communication as to how to fill up the form the Registrar General states:— Keep your form fofl questions neat aJJkl clean. Do not tear or spoil it, and, if possible, avoid creasing or folding it. Write the answers plainly in the spaces provided. Write your surname at the- head of the form in large letters. They are. easier to read. If you have doubts as to how to answer any question, the enumerator who leaves the forms at vourr house. and collects them will help. you if you ask him. If a form has not been left for you at the place where you sleep, on- Sunday night you should obtain- one on Monday and fill it up as soon as possible. If ou are travelling on Sunday night, and have not received a form before startuxg you should obtain one and fill it up at the place where you arrive on Monday morning. If you have received your form,, don't leave it behind you. If you leave home after receiving form, but before 35th August, take it with you and hand it when filled up to the enumerator who calls at the address where you are temporarily- stopping. The same applies if you are returning home after a temporary absence. You are asked to give your per- manent postal address. By this is meant the address where you can usually be found and to which letters to you can be sent. If you are an employee "living in (e.g., a domestic servant or shop assistant) give your place of work and residence as your permanent postal address. In answering the- fourth question you should put down the number of child- ren .who actually rely on you wholly or partially fOr their food and lodging, or the money to pay for it. If you are a married woman and your husband supports the home and the children from his income or earnings, you should', nevertheless, put down the same reply as your husband. If you are a married man, it is not intended that you should put down your wife amongst other dependents. If you sup- port your father or mother, brother or sister, or other relative, and are, in fact, providing him (or her) with food and lodg- ing or the money for it, then he (or she) is dependent on you (wholly or partially as the case may be), and the number of such dependents" must be stated. Notice carefully that persons in your employment to whom you pay wages (e.g., your ser- vants) are not to be entered under column (5). The sixth question is most important. In answering be careful to state as exactly as. you can just what it ;s that you do for your living. Thus for example do not sav (e.g) "Merchant." but say "Rubbe.r- merchant," "Tea-merchant," etc.; "Dealer," but say "Clothes-dealer" or Ships store-dealer," etc.; "Farm hand," but "Cowman" or "Carter on or ^^VfS^TOan)> etc.; "Labourer," but say Bricklayer's Labourer" or "Agricul- tural labourer," etc. "Mechanic," but say "Millwright" or "Brass-moulder," etc. Above all, your answer should always show the material you work in, if any. If you are engaged in two or more distinct occu- pations, you should state first that by which your living is mainly earned. If at the moment out of employment you should still record your usual occupation. In regard to the seventh question you should only give your employer's name, business and business address if yon are employed by him in his business (e.g. factory, workshop, shop, office, etc.), or in connection with it (e.g., as an agent or traveller or driver of a van or cart, etc.). If you are not employed at all write "None". If you are employed as a domestic servant or a gaYdener or a coach- man or a gamekeeper in a private house or grounds, you need only to write your master's name, adding his private address if you do not live in his house. In answering the eighth question, those people who are working directly under and getting their pay from a Government department will have. no difficulty. But some will be doing work which may or may not bo for a Government department—they may not know. In that case the answer should be "Do not know." A moment's thought, however, should decide the answer for- most people—"Yes" or "No." Thus you should say" Yes" if you are engaged on a piece of work, e.g., munitions work for a private firm which is executing a Govern- ment contract. You should not sav Yes'' if you are (e.g.) a clerk in a firm which occasionally gets a contract- for a supply of (say) cocoa for the Navy, or if you are employed by a district council or other local authority. lie specially careful over the ninth question. Unless you possess practical skill in some craft 'or class of work outside your present occupation or employment your answer should be "No." Skill in any sort of work requiring special training should be put down, whether persons doing such work are usually called "skilled workmen" or not. Thus, for example, skill in milking should be put down as well as skill in riveting. If you have changed your occupation you should enter here the kind of work which you were formerly trained to do if you are still able to do it. It is not easy to state here all the kinds of work in which the offer of your skill would be useful, but among the most important are the various kinds of engineerinig and metal work; woodwork; agriculture mining, sick nursing, leather- work, hosiery manufacture. If you really do not know whether your "skill is of the kind for which there is a demand, you should put down your offer; but remem- ber that there is no discredit to those who answer" None." If, in fact, you have no real skill in work of a kind likely to be useful oujtjs'die your own occupa- tion that is the right answer. After you have been registered you will receive a certificate, which you must sign and keep ciarefully. I>o not fdrget that if you change your address and leave your home (otherwise than temporarily) you must send your certificate to the clerk of the council of the district where your new home is), with your new address written on the back. The simplest way is to hand the certificate in at the post-office nearest your new home.

Advertising

How To Reduce Your Meat Bill! Make delicious and nutritious puddings with apples, figs, dates, golden syrup, jam, etc., and Shredded ATORA Beef Suet. Always ready for use and saves all the trouble of chopping. Ask your grocer for it; refuse substitutes. k