Teitl Casgliad: Cambrian news and Merionethshire standard

Sefydliad: Llyfrgell Genedlaethol Cymru

Hawliau: Mae hawlfraint yr adnodd hwn yn eiddo i Cambrian News Ltd.

Gwylio manylion cyfan

Cyntaf Cynt Llun 8 o 8
Full Screen
11 erthygl ar y dudalen hon
av aub oton the Coast

av aub §oton the Coast. [Selected]. NOTICES TO CORJtESP ON DEN T S. "RFADER.It does not follow that the verses I publish are written the week I publish them. I want to say all that I think, and I find that the best way to think clearly is to try and put my thoughts into words. I do not appraise the value of what I write. I cannot afford to lose money by printing books which would not sell, to say nothing of the worry of it. I am too old to have my way to make in the world. I like to write. "IiABOUKER."—I do not believe that the bulk of Doverty is caused by the rich refusing to the poor their proper share of property. The best way to try to understand great questions is to see how they work out in families and small communities. In every family there is almost sure to be one member who suceeds tetter than the others, and almost as surely there are some members who would, if trey could live upon the others. It is not the unfairness of the well-to-do mem- bers of a family that keeps the others poor, nor is it the virtues of the thrift- less ones that keep them poor. There is a great deal of utter rubbish talked of the injustice of the rich towards the poor, and more still about the Tight of the poor to a share of the world's wealth U G.L.T.I neither explain myself nor defend myself. Why should J P Do not be troubled on my behalf. "Teacher."—You must be content to work. I, too, am a teacher, but I have learnt not to depend upon re- sults. Have great courage and great faith. "To"wyn."—And then what? It was Wordsworth who said: J he ancient spirit ia not dead Old times, thought I, are breathing there Preua was I that my country bred Such strength, a dignity so fair. There is no occasion for despair. The best is yet to be. NO MA TTER THEN. What matter will it make to me When I am lying in my grave, That you who are my enemy Then say that I was good and brave? What matter will it make to me When hate has done its bitter worst, That you should grieve in agony Because my life was made accurst? What matter will it make to me When I from earth have passed away Beyond your reach eternally What you in praise or blame may say ? V No, no, it will not matter then (It does not matter greatly now) When from my fingers drops the pen What you may say, or when, ur how. j OBSERVATIONS. The man who turns his back upon the humbleness of his own early life robs him- self of his greatest claim to the regard and reverence of his fellows. I Men in all ages have attributed mean- ness and cruelty to their gods that they themselves would have been ashamed of. Pain has this advantage. It gives con- sciousness, without which there can be no real life. Men forget that those traits which they admire in the lives of the greatest and noblest are most easy of imitation. There are truths which have verified themselves slowly through generations of experience. These truths are enshrined in the maxims and proverbs of every land, but it is the firm belief of the ignorant that these are not truths but fables. There is scarcely a liiir or a coward anywhere who does not believe that truth and courage are the best for everybody but himself. The man who has cause to be dissatisfied with himself can find no real satisfaction in anything he has or does. He who chooses his friends because they are of his own rank in life must expect to lose them if adversity comes upon him. To win the good will of those about us we must regard their opinions and prejudices more carefully than our own. The law awards punishments, not in pro- portion to the moral guilt of the offenders, but according to the injury inflicted upon society, and so it comes to pass that It is a greater offence to trespass in search of game than to assault a woman or a child. The nobleness of any service lies not in the service, but in the spirit in which it is rendered. To do useful work in lonely, obscure places, is the greatest honour that any true man can achieve, and to do it cheerfully and without stint or grudge is proof of nobility. The liberator has always greater diffi- culty in convincing the oppressed than the oppressors that their time has come. DEATH ROBS AND MAKES GIFTS. I too have stood near open graves, Dumb as the coffined dead Whose final word was said; I also know how the heart craves That death's sad decree Shall not final be. To leave outside our loved ones there Seems like unkind neglect Until we recollect That they have passed beyond our care And are still our own: Life, not love, has flown. 'Tis hard to walk life's ways alone In stillness which death brings, And its bewilderings. What shall for all our loss atone Till we start anew With fresh goals in view ? Death brings us to a silent world In which new voices wake And sweeter music make Because love's shining Bag is furled, And we are made to feel That what wounds can heal. While death loosens, yet it bind, And by an open grave The timid heart grows bravo And the weak will new impulse finds: Death that smites uplifts: Death robs and makes gifts. Death takes the form. The spirit lives, And with us will abide Through all that may betide Of good or ill. The future gives Promise of new bliss, So Life and Death kiss THE EISTEDDFOD. There is always somebody who wants to organize the eisteddfod. There could not be a greater mistake. The "lory of the eisteddfod is its freedom from organiza- tions and its consequent power to give full and frank expression to the wit and humour and poetry of Wales. I have been a Welshman far longer than most of the people in the Principality, but it is nothing for some youth of eighteen to tell me that I do not understand as well as he does the spirit of his countrymen! Perhaps not, but I understand the para- sites who live on the eisteddfod as certain other parasites live on human and other beings. I am very fond of the eisteddfod, but I would no more organize it than I would organize the birds of the air, or the flowers of the field, or the clouds in the sky. The eisteddfod is the spontaneous liter- ary, musical, and poetic expression of the j common people, and the more organized the I expression the less it will be spontaneous. 'T^f course I quite see that somebody could get a living out of the organized eisteddfod and others could get honour. 1 Freedom and variety and spontaneity are I what the eisteddfod must retain or it will I die off and not be as wide as Wales. What the organizers are always aiming at II is exclusion—concentration. The wise seek for inclusion and diffusion, but the small man is afraid of being lost sight of in the whole nation INDIFFERENCE. I do not ask that work of mine should laat, And with my name be coupled through all time; What matters, when this life I !ive is past, How I aspired or how I sought to climb ? Men such as I am-live in every age— A-a glad as I am—are as strong and weak; Thoy try to write on history's fading page And wish they might some truth immortal speak. And so they fritter on to waiting graves, Or lie unburied on earth's pulseless breast. The truly wise! He neither frets nor raves That only death can give him perfect rest. THE END. He was very old. A candle guttered low in the socket. A young man sat at his bedside. The old man spoke. When I was a child I waited for the fairies to come, and for God to speak to I me out of heaven, but the fairies never came and God never spoke to me. When I was a young man I wanted to do some noble deed and to make some great sacrifice, but only commonplace work came in my way, and my sacrifices were all small and apparently of no account. When I was middle aged I found that fame and pleasure and success and wealth were not mine, and could not be mine. Nothing remarkable had happened to me during all my life which had been so full of longing. I had missed great successes, I great joys, great failures. J "Now I am old, and they say that this is the end. I know it ia the end, and the great things never come to me. They came to others, but not to me. Only two great things ever came to me, a great sorrow that even all the years have hardly dimmed and a great love that was harder to bear than the sorrow. And this—this is the end." Then the candle flared up and guttered out. The young man stood at the bed- side and said, Yes, this iR the end." And the world paid no heed. MY READERS. And so you think I have expressed your mind In just the words that you yourself could use. Well, I am glad that you should ever find In what I write an echo of your views. I do not know that we have ever Dljt, So when these echoes cease you'll soon forget; Still, I am glad I write vhat you hsve said, For that is how I earn my daily bread. And if that bread with tears lie wet and salt, Whoever is to blame you're not at fault. You pay your penny and your duty's done, Nor need you ask how I your penny won. That's my concern-part of the writer's task, To print what others think, nor questions ask. But I may mention in a casual way That I have now little more to say, The day is almost spent, the night draws near When I from off the scene shall disappear; But let me tell you now before I go, You only like to read what you already know. ONE BY ONE. We die: then after us shall follow one by one All those who knew and loved us till not one is left. This is the tale from age to age and on and on; We first of friends bereaved, then friwnds of us bereft. The Coast. J.G.

ABERYSTWYTH

ABERYSTWYTH .Promotion.—Lieutenant and Adjutant George H. Cookson has been gazetted tem- porary captain in the Welsh Divisional Ammunition Column Nursing.—Nurse A. J. Evans, Myrddin House, sister-in-law of Councillor Rhys Jones, has volunteered for imperial ser- vice with the Red Cross and left on Satur- day to commence duty at the Southern General Hospital, Bristol. A hearty send-off was given to her by friends and Red Cross nurses. She is the first mem- ber of the local detachment to leave. Music.—M. Laoureux, pianist to the Royal Court of Belgium and instructor of music to the Royal Prince and Princess, writing of "The Storm," composed by Mr. David Jenkins, Mus. tlac., says "The Storm interested me very much both from the dramatic point of view and also by the details which reveal a profound musician. The vocal parts are very well written and have a full musical ring. It is a great and powerful work." National Insurance.-The National In- surance Commission (England) has estab- lished a new department for the independ- ent investigation of all complaints by the audit staff of inefficient management on the part of approved societies. Mr Walter P. Wright, of Reading, who was grnnd master of the Manchester Unity of Odd- fellows at Aberystwyth, has been appointed chief of the new department. Mr Wri ght, who is well known among the leaders of friendly society movement, is admitted to be one of the best-informed authorities in the friendly society movement, is admitted to be country on the administration of national insurance. The" Heatlruaster.At the Coliseum next Monday, August 16th, Mr. Dudley Stuart will present his principal London Company for three nights with the West End success "The Headmaster," which had such a successful run at the Playhouse, London. Very human, delightfully fresh, full of laugh- ter, and cleverly oonstructe-d is "The Headmaster." "The Headmaster" is full of defica te, touches, smart dialogue, and amusing situations, and appeals to the highest intelligence. The company is an excellent one and includles Mr. James Harcourt who plays the title rola in a humorous manner and when occasion arises, as it does in the last act, proves himself to be not wanting in emotion. Funeral. The funeral of Mr. B. W. Ball, newsagent, took place on Saturday at the Cemetery. The chief mourners were Mrs Ball. widow; Master Leslie, Ball, son; Mr N. E. Ball, brother. Twick- enham, London; Mr Edgehi'Il, father-in- law; Miss Edgehill, aunt. Thp officiating I minister was the Rev Griffith Parry, Llanbadarn, at the house and cemetery. Messrs. T. Rees, J. Pritchard, D. Phillips, and E. Ellis, lino operators at the "Cam- brian News" works, where Mr Ball had been employed, acted as bearers. Wreaths were sent by the widow and son: Mr Napier E. Ball and sisters; Miss Edgehill and Madam Seir; Mr Weller; Messrs Sandford, Towel's, and Cooper; Mr and Mrs Fa.1 owes, Terrace-road; Mr and Mrs Jones, Lerry House; Misses Lizzie and Gladys Jones, liar House; Mr and Mrs C. Meehan; Master Albert Warrington; Nurse Evans, Trinity-road; Mr and Mrs Jones, Alexandra-road; Mr. Mason, Blaendolau; Mrs Hughes and Mrs Jones, Cambrian-square; Mr and Mrs R. P. Roberts; staff at "Cambrian News; flowers by Miss Griffiths, North-parade; Mrs Diamond, Mrs Hughes, Mrs Daley, Misses Elsie, Edna, and Daisy Jenkins, Mrs Wil- liams, Dyffryn Paith; Mr and Mrs A. W. iss, oss; Mr and Mrs Davies, Hotel Metropole. Mrs. Ball wishes to thank those who sent messages of condolence, wreaths, and flowers. i St. David's Club.-ne estimate tendered by Mr. David Williams, builder, Prospect- street, has been accepted for re-building St. David's Club premises, Little Dark- gate-street, which were recently destroyed by fire. Lecture.—The Rev. F. H. Benson, of the Central Mission, Birmingham, lectured on! Monday evening at the Wesley Church on "The stuff that dreams are made of." Principal Prys presided over a large attendance. Corporation Accounts.— Mj\ H. A. Southerns, chartered accountant, Gresham Chambers, Wolverhampton, has been appointed to audit the accounts of the Corporation and to prepare in connection with the accounts an aggregate capita", account. Comforts Fund.—The sixth contribution of the special constables drill class on Tues- day evening amounted to 6s. 6d. which, with E7 14s. Id already acknowledged by Regimental Sergeant Major Fear makes a total of L8 'Os. 7d. The object of the fund is to send cigarettes and comforts to Aber- y'stwyth men on active service abroad. Obituary.—The death occurred on Tues- day evening of Mr. Charles Marvin Northey, at the home of his sisters, 40, North-parade. He was the youngest son of the late Captain and Mrs. Northey and was thirty-four years of age. For the past fourteen years he was engaged at the L. and P. Bank, Newport. He was taken ill in November and had been staying latterly at his sisters' home. He is sur- vived by a wife and child, two brothers, and three sisters, with whom much sym- pathy is felt. The funeral" will take place on Saturday afternoon at two o'clock at the Oemeterv. I Cisteddfcdsjfe.—,The pritze for the bteet sketches of British butterflies in colour, limited to pupils of County Schools under eighteen, was awarded at Bangor National Eisteddfod to Master Norman Williams, of Aberystwyth County School, son of Mr. W. L. Williams, lately of Gwylfa, Bryn-road, and now of Abertillery. The successful competitor's master was Mr. Dan R. Jones, the art master. Another former pupil of Mr. Jones (Mr. George McLean, Portmadoc, brother of Mr. J. 0. MoLean, organist at Tabernacle Chapel), was awarded the prize for the best drawings of town-planning for a town of 5,000 inhabitants. Patriotic Concert.—The Eecond of the series of sacred concerts in aid of the war funds to be administered by the War Service Committee was held on Sunday evening at the Pavilion. The programme was contributed by the Misses Mable Parry, Rachel Jones Annie Jones, and Blodwen Jones, and Mr. 'lom Pickering. M. Marcel Laoureux, pianist to the Bel- gian royal family, by special re- quest, played Chopin's Nocturne and Ballad. The Ladies' Choir, conducted by Madame Barbicr, also took part, and a brief address on war and Christian life was given by the Rev. W G. Jenkins, Norwich, who preached on Sunday at the English' Congregational Church. t Theatrical.-The success of three eon- tinents "Baby Mine" will be presented at the Coliseum, for three nights this week, This farce creates one continuous laugh from start to finish. It had, a long run in London, New York, Paris, etc, ana is still running all over the world. On a recent tour the company had the honour of appearing before the Prince of Wales and Prince Albert. The plot is original so that the audience can never tell what willI happen next. The company is pre- sented by Mr. Keith Kenneth, who will be remembered for his wordless perform- ance at Ofympia, London, as the "King" in "The Miracle," and also as the passion- ate young lover in "Three Weeks," and many other weS'known parts. Miss Betty Fairfax, who plays the part of Zcie" has already shown herself to be in the f, ont iank of star artistes by her p r- formance of "Fanny" in "Hindle Wakes," "Peggy" in "Brewster's Millions," "Alice Fau'kner" in "Sherlock Holmes" and many other prominent parts. Weedon Grossmith's part of "Jimmy Jinks" will be in the capable hands of Mr Raymond Caudv, who is well-known to London and provinciaf audiences. Dinner Table Ccilections.-To help to meet the heavy expenditure of the Y.M.C.A. in its work for the brave men of the navy and army a unique scheme has been started this week. The national ex- penditure on tnis work is over £ 40,COO a month, and though the work is now operative in over 1,000 different training cetres, including, France, Belgium, Egypt, Africa, and the Dardanelles, re- quests for fresh centres pour in daily, so that the expenditure is likely to increase. The boon which the I.M.C.A. facilities confer on the troops is so universally recog- nized that the Y.M.C.A. faces the huge expenditure with confidence, knowing that the charitableness of the British public will generously respond to so important and necessary a work. This week circulars are being sent to boarding houses, asking that a special letter shall be read simul- taneouslv at all the dinner tables on a given day and collections taken in aid of the Y.M.C.A. funds. In this area the scheme is in the hands of Mr. J. GIan Griffiths, the local organizer and financial secretary, who directed the Y.M.C.A. pro- grammes in the town during the winter when over 10,000 soldiers were in training. Rechabites Conference. -The High Mov- able Conference of the Independent Order of Rechabites wa3 resumed at Bradford on Thursday, when Mr. William David, of Llanelly, was elected high chief ruler. Mr David was this year's grand templar of Wales. He has been chairman of Carmar_ then County Council and Llanelly Urban Council, and is a magistrate for the county. A report on national insurance matters, showing an increase of nearly '24,000 members in two years, and that t543,000 had been received from the Com- missioners, was approved. It was decided to meet in 1917 at Aberystwyth, the con- ference to commence on August Bank Holiday. Bro. Daniel Thomas, who with Bro. Paith Morgan represented the Mid- Wales district, proposed that the biennial conference should be held at Aberystwyth in 1917, and alluded to the presence of Alderman 0. M. Williams, deputy mayor, and Councillor Barclay Jenkins as a depu- tation on behalf of the Corporation. The High Chief Ruler asked for the opinion of the Conference as to whether the deputa- tion should be heard and a large preponder. ance of the delegates voted in favour, with the result that the proposal made in favour of holding the conference at Bristol was withdrawn and Aberystwyth was unani- mously and enthusiastically selected. It is expected that the number of delegates will be from 400 to 500 and the conference will occupy three days. Castle Crounds. Many have been turned away from this popular place of entertainment despite the facilities offered for booking without extra charge. The programmes are varied and there is always something new to amuse old and young alike. This (Friday) evening will be set apart for a special rustic night when the programme will include oXd English songs and dances and conclude with a new revuette entitled Sir Hever- ton." The Castle Pavil.-ion is cosy on cold and wet nights and cool in hot weather. Next Wednesday afternoon and evening (August 18th) Messrs Delamere and Carl- ton will hold their benefit by courtesy of Mr J. W. Ellison, who is ever ready to appreciate good servants. A particularly strong programme is being arranged with a starting novelty. The prices during the afternoon will be sixpence all through and in the evening 2s. (first four rows), Is., with a few at sixpence. No charge is made for booking. Mr. Delamere. who is manager and producer for Mr Ellison, is a popufar man in the party. He possesses a sympathetic baritone voice and is a hard worker in his proprietor's interests. He has been associated with most of the best touring parties and has produced several pantomimes for Mr Charles Elder- ten. He received excellent training with Mr Will Catlin as a. pierrot. When not in pantomime or concert work he, appears with his wife (Miss Ethel Deane) as the "De'dees." Arthur Carlton, who is now fulfilling his second engagement as prin- cipal comedian to the Entertainers, has crammed a vast amount of work into his thirtv-five odd years. He has had seven London pantomimes, toured in drama, played everything in the dramatic world from pathos to bibulous old men, is we111- known in the Midlands as the "Pitliv Pattering Dame," and "Maudie" at the Alexandra Theatre two years ago. This Christmas he has been retained by Mr. Peter Davey to play "Widow Twankey" in "Alladin" at the Theatre Royal, Ports- mouth. He has already fulfilled five engagements with Mr Davey. He made his bow to Aberystwyth audiences in the summer of 1904 at the Grove with Mr. Charlie Otone, another member of the Entertainers. Three Sons Lost.—Two brothers of the young man Preece of the Hereford Regi- ment who died while in training at Aber- ystwyth have lost their lives in the war. Lifeboat.—Monday was lifeboat day and street collections were made in aid of the Aberystwyth branch of the institution. The amount collected was L43. The life- boat was launched in the evening and an exhibiton of life-saving given off the Pier head. By permission of the Manager half the Pier tolls were added to tne proceeds. The boat was launched under the superin- tendence of Captain Doughton, the local secretary of the Lifeboat institution. Obituary.—The death of Mrs. A. Jones, widow of Mr. Thomas Jones, shipbuilder, formerly of the Marine-terrace, occurred at her residence, Quebec Villa, Llanbadarn-road', on Sunday morning, at the age of seventy-two years. Mrs. Jones had been ailing for the past six months. She leaves one son, Mr. John Jenikin Jones, of Newport, and a daughter, Mrs. James, widow of Mr. James:, solicitor, Aberystwyth. The funeral, which was private, took place at the Cemetery yesterday (Thursday) morning. The Weather.—The weather during the past week has been very unsettled. There have been long periods of sunshine h. but the wind continuing in the south or south-west masses of clouds were blown in from over the Atlantic, generally after sunset, and rain fell daily. The barometer continued low. On Wednes- day there was an improvement in the afternoon which was continued yesterday morning, the weather being delightful. Hay is still out on some fields in the, dis- trict and the corn harvest has com- menced. Pier Paviiion.-Oi-i Friday and Saturday Fred Roper's successful concert party will give entertainments at the Pier Pavilion, particulars of which will be found in an advertisement. On Monday and during the week N. Thorpe-Mayne and Miss Beryl Hamilton and their specially-selected Repertoire Company will produce Arms and the Man," "Doormats," and "Don." On Sunday evening, at 8-15, a sacred con- cert will be given in the Pavilion, when Miss Maude Kerens, Miss Sophie Rowlands and Mr. Harry Livesay will sing and Miss Lillie Selden give violin solos unarity concert.-Un Sunday evening at the Promenade Extension Shelter, another open-air concert was given in aid of the Infirmary by the Aberystwyth Juvenile Choir, conducted by Mr. William Jenkins. A large crowd assembled to hear the Welsh hymns and tunes sung by the I choir. Solos were also sung by Miss Gwladys Hilton, soprano. The singing was greatly appreciated. A recitation was given by Mr. D. C. Thomas, National Eisteddfod prize-winner. The collection amounted to JB5 4s. 7^d. Mr. Charles Clements was the accompanist. Valuable assistance was given by Mr J. G. Lewis, Mill-street, and Mr Robert Ellis, Rheidol- terrace. The secretarial duties are carried out by Mr. E. Jenkins, Princess- street. Etysian Crove.—The entertainments at the Elysian Grove are as successful as ever. A splendid array of talent is provided by Mr. Nelson Barrett with his imperson- ations; Mr. James McKenzie and Little Cliff, comedians; Miss Nellie Leslie, chorus comedienne; Miss Zelda Moritz, in songs and dances; Miss Quennie d Massey, ballad singer; Mr. Jack Ennis in songs and acrobatic dances; Mr. Eugene Byron, coon singer and dancer; and Mr. Jack Purcell presiding at the piano. The patrons are delighted 'with the varied programmes and the perform- ances of the artistes. Credit is due to Mr McKenzie for the completeness of, the entertainments which are given in the Grove in fine weather and in the Sylvan Palace when, wet. Swings and see-saws are provided free for children. Boy Scouts.—This week the local detach- ment of Boy Scouts, numbering thirty and under the command of Mr. Emile Evans, acting scoutmaster, are camping at the Devil's Bridge. Though the weather has been unfavourable the boys have madrj good use 10£ iheir time and h-c blen able to make route marches daily. On Wednesday when the weather was more favourable they marched to Eglwysnewydd and thence to Hafod where the troop was inspected by Mr. Waddingham. Capt. and Mrs. E'myss, and Mr H. S. Holmes. Mr Waddingham expressed himself pleased with the appearance and efficiency of the troop. He has kindly supplied the boys with a quantity of vegetables, rabbits, and meat. There is no tririjli in the rumour that one of the boys was taken home on Sunday evening owing to an accident which necessitated seven stitches in the back. The boy suffered from a slight cold which he had contracted before going to camp. Thanks tc the satisfactory quality of the tents provided, the interiors were perfectly dry notwithstanding the rain. Presentation.—At the Railway Station on Wednesday of last week a presentation was made to Mr. Harold Sheraton, who was for over forty years manager of Smith's Bookstall, and to Mrs. Sheraton by the railway staff as a token of their esteem and appreciation. The presents took the form of a dress suit case to Mr. Sheraton and a silver knife case to Mrs. Sheraton. In making the presentation, Mr. T. K. Vaughan, the stationmaster, spoke in eulogistic terms of the good qualities which Mr. Sheraton possessed. During the past twelve months he had found Mr. Sheraton a genial and courteous official, always ready and eager to co- operate with any movement for the wel- fare of railwaymen. They regarded him as one of the Station staff and in his retirement all had lost a good friend. They felt sure that his successor, Mr W. E. Eivans, wculd follow his example and prove as worthy a friend and colleague. Mr. Sheraton feelintg'y responded and thanked the railwayman for the gifts and for the kindnesses he had received from them. He would cherish happy recollections of the time he had spent at the Bookstall. Celsbrated Belgian Organist. --During the week-end. August 14-16tn, the brilliant Belgian organist of Antwerp Cathedral will give three recitals in Aberystwyth—two in Wesley Church. The first recital will be given on Saturday, at eight, when Mr. Arthur Jones will preside, and there will be a special patriotic service on Sunday night, to be conducted by the Rev. E. Horrocks Howard, of Liverpool. A patriotic demonstration will also be given at Taber- nacle Chapel, Powell-street, on Monday, at which the chair will be taken by the Mayor (Alderman Edwin Morris). Prof. Swmnen is a refugee from his own country. Those who have heard his playing and wit- nessed his technique can hardly do less than acknowledge that in brilliance at least his place, must be in the front rank of the greatest organists. His capacity of the very best of the instrument is nothing less than wonderful, and tne results he obtains from instruments entirely inade- quate for the selections played are amazing The object of the recital is to renew the Belgian relief funds, which unless augmented will soon be insufficient for their purpose. It is impossible to overstate the need of a people who but for friendly help would be utterly desolate, homeless, and starving, and who in any case have lost all their material wealth. It is hoped that everyone attending the recitals and demon- stration, which will have as an additional attraction the singing of Steurbaut, a bari- tone of great reputation, will do their utmost to make the visit the occasion of raising a substantial sum for the relief funds. PETTY SESSIONS, Wednesday, August 11th. —Before Edwin Morris, mayor; and Peter Jones, Esqrs (Sunday Trading.—The four usual trades, men were fined the usual 5s. Motor Cycling.—David Jones, Towyn, was charged with having been drunk in charge of a motor cycle on Monday, August 2nd.—P.C. A. H. Jones proved the case and said he was on duty on Trefechan Bridge when he saw defendant trying to drive a motor cycle. He fell on top of the cycle when attempting to mount it. When told he was not in a fit state to drive the cycle, he said You are a liar" and again proceeded to mount. The Constable caught hold of him by the wrist and defendant said Beware what you are do- ing. You do not know who I am." The Constable answered "It does not matter who you are. The law makes no distinc- tion of class." Through the intervention of a friend, he was not locked up. When asked for his name and address, he said "You talk to me in a. gentlemanly way."— A fine of £1 was imposed, the Mayor say- ing that the public safety must not be endangered in that wav. ,I v. Too Far Away.—John Stephen Jones Llangawsai, was charged with having allowed his horse and carriage at such a distance as not to be under proper control in North-parade on August 5th.— P.C. D. T. Richards proved the case and defendant, who admitted the offence, was fined 5s. Bread Selling.—George Fellowes, Castle Stores; Anne Evans, South-road; and Alice Lloyd James, 13, Cambrian-place, were summoned by P.C. Jos,eph Jones, inspector of weights and measures, for selling bread j otherwise than by weight on August 4th.— In the case against Fellowes, P.C. J. Richards said Miss Griffiths, the assistant, supplied him with a fourpenny loaf with- out weighing it. He went outside and called the Inspector in, handed him the loaf, and repeated what transpired between him and Miss Griffiths. Fourpence was the current price of a two-pound loaf that day.—The Inspector said the loaf weighed a pound and fifteen ounces. Miss Griffiths had no explanation to give as to the weight, but said that she had instruc- tions to weigh the bread and that the price of a two-pound loaf was 4^d., and of a four-pound loaf 9d. At her request Ii he weighed five other loaves and found them correct, each turning the scale at two pounds.—Ques- tioned by Mr. Fellowes, the In- spector said Miss Griffiths did not say thac she usually weighed tne bread every day, but did not have time to ilo so that day. She was busy at the time.—Mr. Fellowes said one ounce in six loaves was not much of a deficiency. The loaf was weighed the previous night. He admitted that there was a conviction against him in March.— In the second case, the Inspector said defendant supplied him with a fourpenny loaf without being weighed. The loaf was an ounce and half light.—Defendant said she did not bake bread, but bought ft. She did not have time to weigh the bread that morning as she was busy and cus- tomers took the loaves when they were 'I brought in.-In the case against Mrs. James, P.C. J. Richards said he was sup- plied with a fourpenny loaf without being weighed. The Inspector weighed the loaf and it was an ounce light. Mrs. James told him it was not her fault, but the baker's. Nine other loaves were weighed and all were light, the deficienoy ranging from an ounce and half to two and quarter ounces.—The three defendants were fined 10s. each. Application for Possession.—Mr. Ivor Evans (of Messrs. Roberts and Evans) applied on behalf ot Messrs. D. Roberts and Sons, The Brewery, to recover posses- sion of 18, Cambrian-street, held on a monthly tenancy by Mr. and Mrs. James Thomas. Mr Ireni-y Roberts gave e rj(ience that Mr. Thomas came to see him st week and explained that he gave money to his wife to pay the rent weekly. He thought the rent was paid weekly until he had the notice to quit.-The application was granted, possession to be obtained in twenty-one days.

The National Register

The National Register. The arrangements for compiling the national register have been completed. In Aberystwyth the arrangements were made under the supervision of the Deputy Town Clerk (Mr. John Evans). The town, has been divided into twenty-one districts, and the enumerators, all of whom are voluntary workers, commenced distri- buting the forms on Monday, They are: Mr. Isaac Thomas, Penparke; Mr and Mrs D. Pugh Evans, Register House, Dinas-terrace; Messrs. H. W. Stephen- son, Ha.zlewood, Trinity-road; E. Felix, Rhosygarth, Elm Tree-avenue; Thomas Williams, Minafon, Elm Tree-avenue; E. J. Jenkins, Bridge-street; R. Maelor Thomas, Afallon, Loveden-road; J. E. Jones, North-parade; T. L. Old, Bron- ceirio, North-road; Prof. W. Jenkyn Jones, Bodalwyn, North-road; W. T. Williams, The Laurels, St. David's-road; J. C. McLean, Aubrey House, Queen's-road; James Williams, Queens- ville, Queen's-road; the Rev. Joseph Edwards, Elm Tree-avenue; Captain David James, Rose Villa, Llanbadarn-road; Messrs. W. P. Elwy Jones, Elwyfa, Ban:adl-road; David Samuel, Ardwyn; Enoch Davies, Clwydfa, Trefor-road; the Rev R. J. Rees, Rhos, North-road; and Miss C. E. Hughes, Ellesmere, Edgehill- road.

DOLGELLEY

DOLGELLEY. Aerial. -Lieutenant A. R. Cox, son of Mr Alex R. Cox, Tanllan, who joined the Royal Flying Corps a little over three months ago, has been appointed aero in- structor. Mr Cox is only eighteen years of age. URBAN COUNCIL, Tuesday, August 10th.— Present: Councillors W. Alien (chair- man), A. E. Hughes, R. C. Evans, H. Parry Jones, J. Jones Williams, Edward Evans, E. E. Jones Mr. R. Barnett, clerk; Mr. R. Edwards, surveyor; and /Mr. Edward R. Jones, rate collector. Tool Shed. The contract of Mr. Thomas Hughes, Springfield-street, for the erection of a new tool shed in Caemarian was accepted. Alleged Breach of Byelaws. It was resolved to invite Mr. J. Miles Williams, Glannant, to the next Council meeting to show cause why he converted a shed into a dwelling house as alleged in contravention of the byelaws. Link with the Past. Mr. J. Charles Hughes, solicitor, wrote stating that having purchased the stocks used for the punishment of delinquents in "the good old days," he desired to present it to the town as an interesting relic.—The offer was gratefully accepted. Financial. Mr. R. C. Evans presented the report of the Finance Committee including payment of £ 120 on account of the gas bill (which is to be checked by Mr E. E. Jones). There was an overdraft at the bank of £335 18s. 4d. Arrears. In reply to a query, the Rate Collector said that JB4 12s. 6d. was outstanding from last year. Surveyor's Report. The Surveyor reported that owing to the weather being unfavourable, it was im- possible to proceed with tar-spraying. The tar ordered on June 25th had been received on Monday, the delay being entirely due to the exceptional demand made by the Government upon the railways. The lab- ourer engaged for the spraying had been employed m cleaning and repairing the roads.-The report was adopted. Barbed Wire Danger. The Surveyor further reported that three barbed wires had been fixed along the road leading to Fronallt, and the Clerk was instructed to write to the responsible party pointing out the liability incurred. Horse's Expensive Lpkeep. Remarks were made by Mr. J. Jones Williams and Mr A. B. Hughes respecting an expenditure of P,15 2s 9d for bran and oats for the horse in little o-v er six months, which worked out at the rate of 10s. per week for oats. Public Lighting. A sub-committee, consisting of Messrs. J. Jones Williams, E. E. Jones, and M. Parry Jones having been convened, Mr. Jones Williams, on their behalf, suggested that the Gas Company be asked to quote for the lighting of fifteen lamps in the dis- trict during the winter months instead of seventy-nine as heretofore and to put out the ""lights at ten instead of at eleven o'clock nightly.—Discussion was deferred pending a quotation from the Gas Com- pany. Proposed Billeting of Troops. Mr E. E. Jones stated that the sub- committee were considering the ways and means of getting soldiers to be billeted in the town during the winter months if the Council's offer is accepted. Registration. At the conclusion of the meeting the nat- ional registration carels were distributed among the voluntary workers.

CRICCIETH

CRICCIETH. Summer School Entertained —The Welsh Summer School in session at Pwllheli visited Criccieth on Monday afternoon. The weather was delightfully fine. The mem- bers, to the number of seventy-two, visited Llanystumdwy and called at the cottage where Mr. Lloyd George was born and at the school where he learnt his three "R's." Returning to Criccieth, they inspected the Castle and were afterward entertained to tea by Mrs. William ueorge at Seion Schoolroom. After tea Mr. William George gave an historical account of Cric- cieth Castle. A vote of thanks was accorded Mr. and Mrs. William George on the proposition of the Rev. Dyfnallt Owen, seconded by Mr. S. J. Evans, Llangefni, and Professor J. E. Lloyd, Bangor. A vote of thanks was, on the proposition of Mr E. R. Davies, also given Mr. O. T. Williams, chairman of Oriccieth Council, for arrang- ing free admission to the Castle Grounds. t

THE WAR

THE WAR. On the western front during the past week the British gained a mile and enlarged the area of operations at La Hooge and the French forces in the Argonne continue to inflict losses on the enemy. In the east the Russians have evacuated Warsaw and Praga on the Vistula and are retiring to another defensive line, fighting stubborn rear- guard actions in thar retirement. The aim of the Austro-German forces was to encircle the Russiani army in the Warsaw triangle, but that aim up to the present has been frustrated. In the Riga district the progress of the Germans has been checked. It is stated that the Germans are now sending a large force against the Serbians. After their occupation of Warsaw the, Germans, through the King of Denmark, offered to make a separate peace with Russia; but Russia. true to her compact with the Allies, rejected! the pro- posal with the observation that Russia wanted victory and not peace. Desperate fighting continues between the Italian and Austrian armies on the Austrian frontier and the Italians, in spite of great physicall and miltary difficulties, are making slow but sure progress. On the GallipoliPeninsula the British and French expeditionary force continue its slow but steady advance in the face of brave and stubborn Turkish opposition. It has been unofficially reported that Italy intends helping to force the Dardanelles with men and warships. The Turks are said to be getting short of. ammunition, Roumania refusing to allow supplies to be sent through to Turkey from Germany. They are arso said to be losing heart in consequence of the great losses inflicted on them by the Allies. A further allied force has been landed at the junction of the Peninsula with the main land on the Gulf of Saros which, if successful, would cut off the Turks on the Gaillipcli Penin- sula. The Turks are therefore said to be strongly fortifying Constantinople and to be determined to there make a stand to the last man. Though the Turkish army is officered bv Germans the Allies bear testi- mony to the facts that the Turk is a brave and clean fighter and that he is sorry to have to fight against his old allies, but does not relish being turned' ba

Welsh Gallantry at the Front

Welsh Gallantry at the Front. Two special supplements of the "London Gazette" were issued on inursday night, including the following mentioned in dispatches :-2nd Battalion South Wales Borderers: Brevet-Colonel H. U. Casson, C.M.G., Captain T. C. Greenway, 8206 Sergeant S. D. Dean, 186oi Private H. Clent, 9929 Private X" J. Hendy, 9600 Private T. Millward, 9121 Private A. R. Spinks. A supplement to the "London Gazette" on Thursday states that the King has approved the award of the Distinguished Conduct Medal to the undermentioned, among others, for acts of gallantry and devotion to duty whilst serving with the Expeditionary Forces in Lranc-e and Flanders, the Dardanelles, and Turkey in Asia:— Private J. Allen, 1st Royal Welsh Fusiliers, for conspicuous gallantry on May 16th at Festubert, when. in company with a sergeant-major and two other men, he volunteered to assist in bombing down a German trench, 500 yaras of which they captured, with. 102 prisoners, '^including three officers. Private G. Brooks, 1st Royal Welsh Fusiliers, for gallant conduct and ability on May 16th, at Festubert, when in charge of a machine gun, which he worked with great accuracy under a very heavy fire, putting a German machine gun out of action. Subsequently he was able to bring his gun out of action under a heavy shell liie. Sergeant J. Butler, 1st Royal Welsh Fusiliers, for conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty on May 16th at Festu- bert. Though wounded before the assault was made, he advanced with his machine gun, brought it into action, and continued to tire it though he was again wounded. He showed the greatest courage and re- source throughout the operations. Acting-sergeant M. Capelin, 1st Royal Welsh Fusiliers, for conspicuous gallantry on May 16th at Festubert, when, though wounded in the face early in the action, he continued to lead his men under heavy fire, remaining with his company until the evening. Private W. Cliilwell, 1st Royal Welsh Fusiliers, for conspicuous gallantry on May 16th, at Festubert, when he was the first to volunteer on four separate occasions for duty of the greatest danger. Later in the same day he volunteered to attack a house seventy yards away, two other volunteers with him being killed. He gave a fine example of courage and devotion to duty. Lance-corporal J. F. Condrey, 1st Royal Welsh Fusiliers, for great bravery and devotion to duty on the 16th-18th May, at y Festubert, when acting as a stretcher- bearer. While bringing in wounded under a heavy fire he was himself wounded, and although he could no longer carry in men he continued to go out and dress the wounded under fire until exhausted. Sergeant-major R. Evans, 1st Royal Welsh Fusiliers, for conspicuous gallantry and ability on November 7th, 1914 at Zillebeke, in conainuing to lead his men in a charge on the enemy's position when all the officers and senior non-commissioned officers had been killed or wounded. The charge was successful, and with the aid of another regiment three maxim guns were captured. Acting-sergeant R. M. Watchorn, 3rd Welsh Field Ambulance, R.A.M.C. (T.F.), for gallant conduct and devotion to duty on May 13th near Ypres. He was in the Wittepoort Farm, on the Ypres-Menin road, which was being used as divisional collecting post for wounded. The farm, road, and neighbourhood being under heavy shell fire, he rode four miles on a motor cycle to bring up dressings for wounded and. returning, continued to assist in dressing them. Lance-corporal W. J. Welsh, 1st Royal Welsh Fusiliers, for gallant conduct and great bravery on the 16th-lbth of May, at Festubert, as a stretcher-bearer. He brought in a large number of wounded single-handed, having previously bandaged many serious cases.

Family Notices

firth*, fftarriages. anb tathi-, BIRTHS. Jones.—August 12th, to Mr and Mrs Evan Lloyd Jones, 5, William-Etreet, Aber- ystwyth, a daughter. MARRIAGES. Joiies-Gi-iiffths. -August 10th, by licence, at the Register Office, Machynlleth, Mr John Evan Jones, Henhafod, Ponterwyd, and Miss Susanah Griffiths, Hyddgen, U wchygai reg. Jones—Jones. August 7th, at Calfaria Baptist Chapel, Blaenau Festiniog, Mr Griffith Meurig Jones, Gwynfryn, Tan- ygrisiau, and Miss Mary Ann Jones, daughter cf Mr. and Mrs. J. Jones, Minffordd, O'akeley-square, Blaenau Festiniog. Jones—Thomas.—On Saturday, August 7th, at the Register Office, Aberayron, before Mr. John M. Howell, registrar, Evan Thomas Jones, Felinfeinog, Dihewid, and Elizabeth Thomas, Sii-i-au- gwynion, Llanarth. Reed—Edmunds.—'Last week, at Soar Wesleyan Church, Talsarnau, Mer., Mr. Percy Reed, of the Stock Exchange, London, and Miss Jennie Edmunds, second daughter of Mr. and Mrs. E. J. Edmunds, Plas Uchaf, Talsarnau. Thomas—Davies.—August 4th, at Llan-

Family Notices

o-ybi Parish Church, T. Llewelyn Thomas, second son of Mr. James Thomas, Bank, Pencader, and head- master of Penparke National School, to Nurse E. V Davies, formerly of Aber- ystwyth, daughter of Mr Timothy Davies, late of Derry Lodge, Bettws. Williarns-Price.-August 7th, at Capelybryn, Cwrtnewydd, Mr Evie Williams, Lam peter, and Miss Mary Price, Southend^ Cwrtnewydd. DEATHS. I)avi,-s.-August 8th, Miss Mary Ann Davies eldest daughter of Mr. and Mrs. David t>avies, butcher, Penlon, Talybont, aged 38. Field.-August 7th, Mrs Jean Field, Pilot Houses, Borth-y-Kest, ajjed 60. Griffith.—August 10th, lo, avenue, Portmadoc, wife of Mr John Griintn, sailmaker, aged 64. Jones.—August 8th, Mr William Jones, 6, James-street, Talybont, aged 64. Jones. August 11th, Mr. Evan Jones, Moelifor Farm, Llanrhystyd, aged seventy-seven. Morris—August 7th, Mrs. Morris, wife of Alderman M. R. Morris, Trawsfynydd, aged forty-one. Morris—At Caerphilly. South TV ales, Mr. John Morris, late of 125, Manod-road, Blaenau Festiniog. Northey.—August 10th, at 40. North-parade, Aberystwyth, Mr Charles Marvin Northey, 34 years.. Parry.—August 8th, Mr Ellis Parry, son of Mr H. Parry, quarryman, Cornhlll, Port- madoc, aged 27.

Advertising

I ROBERTS' idM am TABLE ALE 0^^ per Doz. Imperial Pint. Supplied in Screw-Stoppered Bottles. J A. wholesome Ale, strongly recommended for family use. BOTTLED BY Dd. ROBERTS & SONS, Ltd., BREWERS, ABERYSTWYTH. t720 SMART AUTUMN MILLINERY NO W SRa WING. t? Buy Early to Secure Best Value. I Thomas Ellis & Co. Terrace Road, Aberystwyth. TEL. 61. i Information for Tourists. _°_ j Tourists to the Welsh Coast should not forget to take a Trip I over the far-famed FESTINIOG RAILWAY. I Twelve Miles Ride along the Mountain Side, j From which they will see j The Most Enchanting Scenery io I North Wales. -j »^ Every Week-Day until September 30th, 1915, TOURIST TICKETS are issued from Cambrian Watering nommumagog-Places to Tanybwlch & Blaenau Festiniog (via Minffordd) as under:- RETURN FARES. From TO TANYBWLCH. TO BLAENAU FESTIN^ 3ld Class. 1st Class. 3rd Class. 1st Class. Barmouth ••• 3/9 «/J s Harlech f | l\°0 gas?: *13 7/1 Tickets are issued by any Train having a through connection and available for | return any day within Six Months. CYNFAEL WATERFALLS, FESTINIOG A Conveyance will leave Blaenau Festiniog on the arrival of the train due the re 12 noon and run through Festiniog to Cynfael Waterfalls and back every n 0 Week-Day. Return Fare 1/6. F. G. CRICK, Traffic Manager Portmadoc, b62*" July, 1915.

Advertising

J!r •' 'S. ( 42, TERRACE ROAP, ABERYSTWYTH, THE Shop for all kinds of BOOTS AND SH At the Lowest Possible Prices. REPAIRS promptly and neatly the premises with the best bar-k-to Leather. Printed by J. (ftbaon, uut ^0 him in Terrace-road, Aberystwyth, County of Cardigan; at LI. fob* Stationer, High-street, Bala; and Brans and nephew, Stationer*, w House, Barmouth, in the Merioneth; and at David Hoy"* madoo, in the Ovosty of Cbnun Friday, Aug. 13, 1915