Teitl Casgliad: Cambrian news and Merionethshire standard

Sefydliad: Llyfrgell Genedlaethol Cymru

Hawliau: Mae hawlfraint yr adnodd hwn yn eiddo i Cambrian News Ltd.

Gwylio manylion cyfan

Cyntaf Cynt Llun 2 o 8 Nesaf Olaf
Full Screen
15 erthygl ar y dudalen hon
Advertising

I ==j j AT MILL PRICES. ANY LENGTH CUT. SENT CASHIAGE PAID. Sent post free on approval, to any lady or gentleman, patterns of Ail-wcol Manufactures, comprising SCOTCH TSfEi33 V5S71HGS MANTLE CLOTHS SUIT: x as ?lankels RUGS TROUSERINGS SHIRTiKGS BLANKETS SHEETiHG OVERCOATINGS DRESSES KJHTTlStG YARNS, &c. Own wool made up into any kind of 13 woollen goods and Colquhoun s pat- |g £ ^y £ gjj^Bl terns. Write for particulars now. AGENC'ES Full or spare time agents ("either sex) ap- 7" IfV pointed generous commission). J. Williams, -COACH & MOTOR CARRIAGE WORKS, Chalybeate St., Aberystwyth High-class Repairs in all departments. Private Address Tel. No. 74. 27, Chalybeate-street. v414 Hugh Davies's Cough Mixture. I t5 No MORB Difficulty of Breathing. No MORE Distressing Crughs, No Moss Sisspless Nighta. fiaghDaviess Cougb Mixture. TEE Safe Remedy. THE Soothing Mixture THE Pleasant Medicine. For crdisary Coaghs, Colds, and Difficulty of Braaiuiag, DAVIBS'S COUGH Mixrtras naver taila to give immediate relie'f, and in the most obaUnatfJ oases has proved to bii a certain acd opaedy ours. Sold by Chemists everywhere, 1/1! & 2/9. HUGH DAVIES, Chemist, MACHYNLLETH. er Children's Congh, Wboopfng Ooagh, etc.. it will be found invaluable. x471 11:8:88-.4 FAIRBOURNE, S.O. THE NEW SEASIDE RESORT. Merionethshire, N. Wales- Y nysfaig Hall Hotel. OPPOSITE BARMOUTH. Attraotlons—Sea Bathing, Boating, Golf, Tennla and Croquet, Buy Ascent to CADER IDRIS. Soil lilsWalose to the Hotel. Trout FUbinjc (Lakes and BtriJiui"). Good Sea fishing—Basa, Plaice, Mackerel, etc. Good Rough Shooting and Wild Fowling free. BOARDING TERMS from 42a. PER WEEK. Accommodation for Motorics. Terms—Saturday to Monday, 18a inclusive. feisgrams-Hornby, Fairbourne. 1294 HARRY fl. HORNBY, Proprietor. r, .1 SPECIAL I NAM= if SHOW OF LADIES AND GENTS j j FOOTWEAR j | FOR PRESENT SEASON. j IINSPECT WINDOWS FORr j I QUALITY AND STYLE* I | LADIES FITTING ROOM. 9 I Repairs on the Premises. 51 I Anybody's Boots Repaired 8 {CALX, AT! 1 | D, WILLIAMS. 1 j Oimbria Boot Stores. Aberystwyth. 1 J PERSONAL ATTBSTIOX. |J | LADIES FITTING ROOM. 9 I Repairs on the Premises. 51 I Anybody's Boots Repaired 8 {CALX, AT! 1 | D, WILLIAMS. 1 j Oimbria Boot Stores. Aberystwyth. 1 J PERSONAL ATTBSTIOX. |J "'1!ai.s £125 — at works Manchester — TT' T3 I "The quintessence of I J comfortable, economical, reliable motoring service. FORD, the Universal Car. Agents—The Merioneth Motor Co., Telephone, No. 2. Lion Garage, Dolgelley. 206th gear of the SUN F,RE 0FFieE FOUNDED 1710. THE OLDEST INSURANCE OFFICE ——— nt "I KE WORLD. 1f77 lct Copidj toom Policy d&ted 1* Insurances effected on the followina: risks FIRE DAMAGE. Resultant Loss of Rent and Profits. Employers' Liability & Workmen's Compensa- tion, including Accidents to Domestic Servants Personal Accident. Sickness & Disease. Fidelity Guarantee. Burglary. Plate Glass. LOCAL AGENTS- ABERYSTWYTH Mr HUGH HUGHES Aberayron Mr Thos. Pugh, Paris House Bala Mr R. L. Jones Mount Place -■• Mr J. R. Jordan Cardigan Mr D. Thomas Davies Dolgelley Mr Thomas P. Jones-Parry n ••• J. Haydn Morris, r N.&S. Wales Bank Llandyssul Mr J. R. Harris Llanon. Mr John Thomas Lampeter Mr Wm. Davies, 23, Bryn „ Road Mr H. W. Howell Llanbyther Mr D. Thomas, Blaenhirbant Newquay Mr D. Meredith Jones Sarnau Mr J. Nicholas Talsarn Mr Llewelyn Davies Towuy Mi' E. H. Daniel. x979 I STEAK LAUNDRY | &3u;aTwna, gj 5 b. ~JONES I i to itsforia his numaroua Onytorasrs J that owing to the iucre&se of business$Sr f bf; hs.R put down additional wg J NEW AND MODERN MACHINERY IK J to enable him to exeeuto &U orders with 95 | preOJptne8B8 and ririspitch, and -hopes to QG i-riu ruerit youv eateoiaoc! patronagu and XL W, HOTELS AND FUBL'O INSTITUTIONS J§[ GFE SPECIALLY CATERED FQR. GGF Sfe 8&mT3 AKD COLLARS A 3PttOlALK:T. teg S3 AU Goods Collsoied and Delivered lriee of SS fit Bend a Postoard and the V«n will caSI. ffi K Partibtilara and Prises on «pplloatiec. K ORR .t U¡r.. :S .2't!J.=&'À.i IEVERYONE BENEFITS 11 bv nhe use of things which experience has proved to b<-j valuable and heipful j «g to humanity. All arc liable, in a greater or lesser degree, to the same «g[ J m troubles, and even the strongest person will suffer occasionally from ailments due so an irregular action ot the digestive organs. Whenever fcB you are troubled with sieic headache—biliousness—constipation—pains in M the back, accompanied by want of tone, it is safe to conclude that the 9 stomach is deranged, the bowels out, of order and the liver sluggish. You Sj can, however, correct any irregularity of these organs aud restore S5 i yourself to good health jSffi I BY TAKING J the required doses of Bsecharn's Pills. Taken as direcfed this famous II mediciue will eliminate the excess of bile, regulate the liver and cleanse « the kidneys. The feeling of lightness and brightness experienced after the elimination of impurities from the body is a convincing proof of the £ > a> efficacy of Beecham's Pills. There is no other household remedy, just as good. The people who remain the healthiest take fcS J r I BEECH AM S PILLsf S Sold everywhere in Boxes price ljl {56 Pills) and 2/9 (168 Pills). i if ESTABLISHED-1882. DAVID WILLIAMS, Builder and Undertaker, 12, Prospect Street, Aberystwyth. EXPRIUOKD WOBKMKN EMPLOYZD. iSatimabes gSvesi far every description of work Ill III! Ill IS I I IT 'II nil III1, ¡¡::PJ8Dr:.I¥i'!I:I.

THE I 11 iirwcrs adtc I Friday Sept 3rd 1915 j

THE 11 Friday, Sept 3rd, 1915, CARDIGAN, Saturday Turfceys were aonght in for lld p.;r lb, gease and duckd llid par Ib and fowsa yd. Butter in loop's la 01>:1 par la, iu lib roila li 3d. Poultry I.-ritaiii lacks and geese Is per lb, fowls lOd and lid par lb, Eggs 2d each. CARMARTHEN BUTTER, Saturday—The demand for cask butter continues goixi. Pnc-s remained firm 1ft to Is 3d per I:), frt-eh patti Is 3d to Is 4d per lb. Eggs eA«i<^r st fLom 17s 6d to 20s per 120. Market closed LLANDILO PROVISIONS, Saturday. Butter in lbs, Is 2\1 to Is 4d; do In tubs, Is 21 ggga, 5anJ 6 fu:h. VVelsf. jhsese, 6(1 to Od per lb Uaerpbiiiv ditto, 9d per Ib Cheddar, 9dper !b. Fowls, lOd per lb. NEWCASTLE EMLYN, Fr-,diy. There vas a larga attendauco, and bus'iie^s was 3i-isk. Butt eappiy, soiling weU at fallowing prices, viz—la uusalwsd luxiis for laotorj blending la Od, ditto in o^sko aaited 'or retail purposes la And 14 Od per lb, ditto in pound roils Is 2d p"r lb tli(gli. 7 for Is yvelgh cbe°a?, 5d to õd tar lb rabbits, 6d to Jd each. 0SWF.STRY COKN •viARKSI. VYsdcai iay. Whi'je wheat, h SIto 98 10..1 per 'i5 -is; red, 9a 8! is 9 lOd old otts, 19 Od :« 200 dd per 200 lba Do-* oit!Rz 20s Gd to 218 Od per 200 lhs: maltsnp, barley. 24a to 25sOd per 80 lba; grinding barley, 1(1;, QiÍ t > 208 ;er 280 lbs. 08WE*rRY GKKKKAL MARK.ST, -W. ;p d Aesday—Fowls, 43 6d to ih 61 por 00up]9 liioks, 411 6J to 8s lid p'or conpse r^boi^ It to la 8d got coupi-'j; biitior, Is 21 i, li 3 ¡>r lb fgS) Is 41 pr deziu PcU1,-<"> (aew), 21-i per 1b; to»air.toci, 41 p-r rhubarb, 2d per bundle cabbages. Id to 2,1 f.&ah apples, 2d to 5d per in cirrote, Id to 2d per bunch.; Bn¡,MINÜliA. CATTLE, Tuesday. — Not many beasts or sheep otieriug. and d->i»and quiet. ISeEf, 7d to 9-id veal, 9:1 t, 101; inatton 101 to la Id larni), la Id to Is 2d par lb. Pigs -ic,ce and trade active—bacon pigs and small pigs, 14* 61 sows, 12* 31 ier SJDre, LONvON FROVI3iON!S,(ftleba».y. Moaer* .^mnel Page & Son roport — is in steady dem-ind—Danish quoted 142s lo 144s Siberian, 130s to 140s lecticii, 1303 c 14J.,< Dutnh, 120a to 140s Irish, 150-3 to 14As atral4an, 131, go 140s, unsalted 108i; iosland. 102t to 108a, uosalted t lIb; Arg< n- iine, 102e to 106s and unsaltsd lOSs, Baooc steady—Irifh qnotsd 96s to 100» L'a -lah and Svediah, 94a to 100* Dutch, 94s to 93-1 Rusolaa, 9d 3d 96s Canadian, 94r. to 98 aaais inactive—Amatioan long c- t .jiio'.e J 70- :e 80-f BhcVt out, 6411 to 67s. Lard in snlv iimited dem«Raioh !*•>. «d «- as 10

WELSH ANCJENT MONUMENTS

WELSH ANCJENT MONUMENTS. The war has had its effect even on the work of a body so far removed from modern evente as the Royal Commission on Ancieiit Monuments in Wales and Monmouthshire. Ocmmenting on the Commission's continuance of the insp?c-j tion of the monuments of Pembrokeshire, t¡he sixth report, that for last year, remarks that much of the county lied within the military protected area, and the necessary restrictions on the move- ment and occupations of civilians nave slightly retarded the progress of the work of the Comn.issicn." During the year the Commission issued a volume on the ancient/ monuments c £ Denbighshire, practically completed that dealing with thoso of Carmarthenshire, and completed the inspection of the monuments of Merionethshire. They also finished the task of examining tho tithe .schedules and maps of the entire Principality. The latter undertaking involved the examination of hundreds or documents, many containing several thousands of place-names, mainly of fields, the discovery of the position of the field cr site on the tithe map, and the location of the field or site on the modern 6in. Ordnance sheet. The Commissioners declare that there can be no two opinions regarding the importance of farm and field names to the Welsh archaeologist. The facu that the Welsh place-names are being rapidly re-placed by English names, so that the local lore which is often enshrined in the former is in danger of being lost, was in itself a, suflicicn reason for the under- taking. The results have more than justified the decision. There is hardly a parish, certainly not one of the ancient parishes, of t'he Principality where the schedule of field names has' not yielded some valuable results. Scores of small, but in some cases important, antiquities would have passed unrecorded had it not bean for the ckio to their presence given by the place-name. Continuing their policy of visiting the principal monuments, the Commissioners made special tours of inspection tio the counties of Merioneth and Pembroke during the year. They are convinced that the visits had considerable effect in quickening the interest of residents and in promoting the growth of local opinion in favour of the preservation not merely of the large and notable monuments, but of those smaller and less imposir.v: remains | which are always in danger of removal j or destruction.

Advertising

When I say soap I mean-Fairy soap. The best and goes furthest THOMAS IUDLBT A 00. LTD., tHEWCASTLK-OIT TYNX I

LAMPETER

LAMPETER. Property. At the Royal Oak Hotel, on Saturday. Mr D. I ilees, auctioneer, offered for sale the freehold farm of Pontfaen, Ceilan, containing twenty- two acres, dwelling house, and out- buildings. It was sold to Mr Evan Jones, Geliiddewi, Pencarreg, for £ 1,660. ROM of Honour.—The death of Private Haulyn Davies, 8th Battalion. Royal Welsh Fusiliers, has occurred at the Dardanelles'. He was the pidetst son of Mr D. T. Davies, solicitor, and brother to Mr Terwyn Davies and Mrs Ithwen Hughes. He was thirty-two years of age, and leaves a widow and three child- ren. He had lived for some years at G-cllyfor, near Ruthin. Appointment of Justices Clark.—There were three candidates for the position of clerk to the justices on Friday, Messrs. J. Ernest Lloyd, J. Emrys Jones, and Arnold Walters Davies. Before pro- ceeding with the voting, Mr J. Emrys Jones objected to the ex-Mayor (Mr William Jonos) having a vote.—The ex- Mayor said he thought he had a vote: but as the candidates seemed to agreo II that he had not lie would abstain.—The Lord Lieutenant announced that Lieut. Arnold W. Davies had in the final voting received six votes and Mr. Emrys Jones two. The newly-appointed clerk is the second son of the late Mr David Davies, J.P., for many years chairman of Lam- peter Beard of Guardians. He was educated at Llandovery College and Jesus College, Oxford, where he gradu- ated M.A., and was articled to his uncle (Mr. Thomas Walters, Carmarthen). He qualified in 1909 and opened a practice at Lampeter in the following year. He served for many years with the Car- marthenshire sectien. of the Royal Engin- eers and rejoined a few months age, when he obtained a commission. He has appointed Mr Emrys Jones to act for him in hi3 absence. PETTY SESSIONS, Friday, August 27th.— Before the Lord Lieutenant (in the chair), W. Inglis. Jones, A R. T. Jones, Roderick Evans, Llew. O. Davies, Walter Davies (mayor), D. Robert Jones, William Jones (ex- mayor), Joseph Evans, Esqrs. New Justice. Mr. Llew O. Davies, Talsarn, took the oaths and his seat as a justice by virtue of his office of chairman j of Lampeter Rural District Council Refusing to Quit.—D.C.C. David Wil- linms charged William Morgan, Pant- fallen, Tregaron, with having been drunk and refusing to quit the White Hart Inn on the 16th of August.-P.Cl. Owen said lie was called in to the White Hart and saw defendant and 'ainother man drunk and refusing to quit. He requested them to go out, but, they would not do so. He then turned defendant out. Reea Morgan Jones, Brynglas House, Tre- garon. was charged with a similar offence j committed in the same place at the same time. P.C'. Jenkins said, in company with P.C. OweQa he was called to the White Hart where he saw the defendant drunk and very quarrelsome. He would not leave and witness ejected him by force.—Each defendant was fined 10s. j Drunk and Disorderly.—John Hayman. Rlaenaugwencg, Llanwenog, was charged by D.C.C. Williams with having been drunk and disorderly at Lampeter on the: 16th August — P.C. Owen proved the case and defendant was fined 10s. Wilful Damage.—The defendant in the previous case was also charged by Mr. Evan Davies, King's Head Inn, with > having committed wilful damage to a window on the 16th August.—Prosecute; said the defendant was drunk in his house and he had' to turn him out After going outride he struck his fist through a window which cost 7s. 6d. to mend.— Defendant was fined 10s. and ordered to pay the damage. Game Trespass. — Thomas Webster Bellamy, Highmead Cottage, Llanwenog, charged Gomer James, Llwyncelyn, Groves End, Gorseinon, with having trespassed in search of game at Bwlch- mawr, Llanwenog, on the 3rd August. He preferred a similar charge against Richard Brenton. of Myrtle Grove, Gors- einon, committed on the same day at the rsaime plade. —ACol. Davies-Evans did not sit during the hearing of these cases Complainant said he was on Abertegan Farm on the 3rd of August about a quarter to six when he saw the defend- ants with two dogs searching the fields. He afterwards saw them at Bwlchbychan. They then came back to Bnlehmawr and searched the briars. He saw the dogs after the rabbits several times. When challenged the defendants said they had been given permission by the landlord cf the public house where they were staying. Witness told them that the landlord had nothing to do with itl and that he would report them. They then offered him money to settle the case. Defendants wove fined 12s. 6d each, til-ie Chairman (Mr. Inglis Jones) remarking that tlicv should go aitd hunt the Germans instead of hunting on other people's land.

PENMOKFA

PENMOKFA. Munitions Appointment. -Nlr D. Owen Evans, who has been appointed chairman of the Munitions Tribunal for Wales, is a barrister of the Middle Temple and a well-known London Welshman, who has from time to time identified himself with Welsh movements in the Metropolis. About forty years of age. he received his early education at Llandovery College, subsequently proceeding to King's Col- lege to complete his training for the civil service. He decided to go in for the law, and was called to the bar ten years ago:. He is the .son of Mr David Evans, farmer, Penmorfa, Cardiganshire. He has taken an active interest in political work and has be-en mentioned as prospec- tive Liberal candidate for more than one Welsh constituency. It was in recogni- tion of his services in connection wilth land reform in Wales that he was elected rt^enetary ItOI ft.he Committee which was appointed to inquire into land tenure in the Principality. After the Committee had completed its work Mr. Evans pro- pared the draft, which was later embodied in the publication known as the Welsh Land ReporU He I also published a volume en old-age pensions. Ho is a deacon of Clapton Junction Welsh Metit-odist Chapel and takes an active interest in the affairs of that. denomina- tion,

Advertising

GREAT SALE OF HORSES. On Tuesday and Wednesday, Septem- ber 28th and 29th. the opening sale wil." I be held at the Mid-Wales Horse Reposi- tory, Newtown (Mont.), which is desci-ihed as the largest and best-appointed in Wales. Prizes amounting tot:135 including, five silver cups wiiU be offered for competition. Entry forms and all particulars may be obtained from the joi^it pjioiirietorte. Messrs Hall, Whter- idge. and Owen, auctioneers, Shrews- bury, and Messrs. Cooke Bros, and Roberts, auctioneers, Newtown (also at Aberystwyth, Towyn, and Llanidloes). Printing. Bookbinding, and Lithograph- ing; at the Shortest Notice at the Cambrian News" Works, Aberystwyth.

Government and Farmers

Government and Farmers. ] Tiie first of a scries of meetings on the important question of the measures to be taken with a view to increasing our nat- ional rood production took place last week m a Committee-room of the House of Lords. The Earl of Selborne, president of •the Board of Agriculture and 1: iskeries, de- iivered a sneecu on the subject to a re- presentative gathering of men who are authorities on agricultural subjects. In tha course of his speech Lord Sol- borne said: The situation in which we find ourselves is going to demanu from us— from every class of our community—a greater and a greater sacraioe. The fin- ancial strain on us is going to be very great indeed, and there is going to ha demand for many more men rcr the army. I do not care what the system is in this respect, whether it be voluntary or com- pulsory, many more men have got to go ror tho army. and from agriculture among other industries. The agricultural labourer has done his part nobly in this war and do not let us forget that It is no new experi- ence for him. He has played his part in aii our past wars, and in time of peace it is not an exaggeration to say that a propor- tion of the defence of the country out ol all" comparison to their numbers has fallen on the agricultural labourers drawn from the west, south, and east of England in re- gard to service in both the navy and the army. But the response has been very un- equal over the country. In some districts Villages and farms have been practically denuded of their young men; but in others hardly any men have gone, and therefore \\i,a.c I forecast is gome to happen in this next farming year is this: that the men will be taken and have to go from those districts and those farms whence they have not hitherto gone. i hope those farms which have been nearly denuded will not be further denuded. At any rate. I have done, and I shall do, my best to take care that nowhere are what I call the most skilled class of agricultural labourers taken What I shall aim at—and Lord Kitchener has been very sympathetic whenever I have conversed with him on the subject—is to leave your own foremen, stockmen, carters., and shepherds. But if these are left you, in many cases the rest of the work, done at all. will have to be done by women or by men who' have not hitherto been engaged in agriculture. An Advisory Agricultural Committee, of which Sir Ailwyn Fellowes is the chairman, has been summoned from time to time to advise the Board of Agri- culture on any particular question on which advice is required at the moment. For instance, when I have had to deal with live stock orders, on both occasions I have consulted that Committee. I thought that something more was required, and that it was advisable to appoint a committee with special reference to how the food produc- tion of the country should be maintained and if possible increased during the war. That is not a committee which will sit per- manently during the war like Sir Ailwyn Fellowes's Committee. fit will make its re. port and then be dissolved. Lord Milner accepted the chairmanship of the Com- mittee, and again 1 think I may claim that che membership was as representative and as strong as it could be made. That Com- mittee has not yet in its final report, but it has sent in an interim report which will shortly be made public. It was ex- clusively concerned with the question of wheat growing and, subject to a paragraph which stated that the Government alone could say whether on a given occasion a ivell measure was advisable—subject to that condition, it recommended that the iurmers should be offered a HOS a quarter guarantee on wheat, to commence from after next harvest; that is to say, the guarantee would begin to run after the harvest of 1916 and would run to the harvest of 1920. That recommendation was accompanied by a very careful considera- t:on set forth on the highest autnority of what the effect of such a guarantee might lie supposed to be. It made recommenda. tions tor the machinery to set the guar- outee in order and to ensure tnat the con- ditions laid down in respect of the guar- antee should be fulfilled, iug report also dealt with such important questions as re- strictive covenants and witn the rate of wgeas of the agricultural labourer. Nov,, tnose recommendations can only be con- sideiea in what I will call their war aspect. If those recommendations had been made before the war they would have evoked great party controversy and we should all have had our own opinion about them, and the same will be true, though in a wholly uilierent sense, after the war. I have no hesitation in expressing my personal opinion that after the war the whole ques_ tion of our agricultural and econorn;c policy—of the food production at home — will have to be revised in the light of our submarine experience. The navy has the submarine menace well in hand and I am not afraid of the Germans being able to interrupt our sea communications during the course of this war. though they may be periodically disturbed. After the war we shall have to consider what developments of submarine navigation and construction there may be; and unless some naval answer to the submarine should be forth- coming, which has not yet been forth- coming. 1 again express my personal opinion that we shall have to revise and review our agricultural and economic posi- tion in the light of our experience. But the question we have to consider at present is simply and solely a war question, is this. or is this not, a wise guarantee to give at the present time, in view of the great im- portance of increasing our home production of all sorts, but not least or food. in view of the financial position, in view of the drain of men for the army, and otlv matters? What is of very great import- ance as bearing on this question was formation which reached us after that r port had been received and before it h considered. Shortly after it had been received the agricultural returns for 1915 came to hand—first of all seventy-five per cent of them, then ninety per c-ent., and the final figuies will, I hope, i>e ready for publication in a few days. In addition to that, we had the final reports on the Canadian and Australian harvests. The ugures which I am about to give are the agricultural returns for 1915 compared with those of 1913. I take 1913 because you will find the Milner Oranmittee in their interim report made the same comparison for the reason that the figures of increase would not be so great in comparison with 1914, when the upward tendency had already commenced. As co:v.red then then with 1913. there are at tne present moment 5C0.C00 more acres of wheat under cultivation, or an increase of nearly thirty per cent. The increase in. cattle is 384,000 and the increase in sheep 450,COD. There is very little importance to be attached to the figures of the increase of sheep, because, as you know, we reached a very low point two or three years ago, and this is only a partial recovery, but the figures of cattle constitute an absolute record. In view of these remarkable figures disclosed by the agricultural re- turns, in view of the fact that it was borne in upon us as the history of the struggle in Europe developed, that the call of agricultural labourers to the colours would be very heavy in the coming year in view of the difficulties with which the farmer would thereby be confronted, in view of the superabundant harvests in Canada and Australia, and in view of the great financial stringency which we foresaw would prevail after the war, the Government decidcd that, they would nut incur the additional finan- cial liability involved in the guarantee. I venture to say this to the farmer—that we shall have to help each other more than ever has been necessary in past years during the coming year with our machin- ery and with our labour. The farmer is going to have great difficulties about labour, and he is not very ready as a rule to turn to new sources of labour. There have been a great number of women will- ing to volunteer their services and very few farmers have availed themselves of those services. There has also been a con siderable amount of volunteer labour offered; but again many farmers have not availed themselves of these volunteers. I think I shall be able to show from the example of farmers who have used women and unskilled voluntary labour ,during the past few weeks that a great deal can be done by such means under the direction of the farmer himself. Though the Labour Ex- change has been anxious to help him. there has been no contact between tnc Exchange and the farmer. Lord Kitchener, under certain restrictions, was willing to put mili- tary labour at the disposal of the farmer, and that labour has been used to a con- siderable extent, though in varying degree in different parts of the country. But I do not think anything like as much use has been made of it is might have been. Therefore while the farmer will have great difficulty in the matter of labour there are J

Government and Farmers

Various sources from which labour may be drawn. In the coming year the f armer may have great difficulties in the matter of supplies—machinery, feeding stuffs, and fertilizers. I cannot foresee to what ex- tgni these things may present difficulties to him; but in my judgment in many cases there will be difficulty. Again, from time to time the Board of Agriculture will issue live stock orders. What I have felt is that there is need for much better co- ordination and organisation. Here you have in London the Board of Agriculture which may be able to give considerable assistance and is anxious to devote the whole of its services to the farmer com- munity in the coming year. But it has no machinery to get into contact with the in- dividual tarmer, and such bodies as I have described have either not been constituted for the purpose of acting as a link be- tween the Board of Agriculture and the farmer, or they have been so constituted that they have no staff in act in any sense in an executive manner. Therefore I pro- pose to adopt the valuable recommenda- tion made in the interim report of Lord Mihier's Committee. That is that the county councils should be asked to act as a link between the Board of Agriculture and the farmer. What I am going to ask 'tnem to do is to establish in each county a | sub-committee or one of their committees, if there is such a committee adapted for the purpose, to deal with the whole county, and then to appoint in the smaller areas of the county committees which will be in con- tinuous correspondence with us. It will be for them to decide whether it shall be the petty sessional divisions or the rural dis- trict councils. I know from my experience that county councils are over-worked bodies and that under ordinary circumstances they would be extremely loth to take upon themselves any fresh duties; but I would submit to them that the present occasion is exceptional. What I asu them to do is a patriotic duty, and there is really no other body which can fill the gap. and the Treasury are prepared to grant a subven- tion towards any expenses to which they may be put. How do I think that such a, body will be able to do the Board of Agri- culture work ? They will be in contact for the first time with the individual farmer. The individual farmer will have a local body, not a distant body, composed of people who are his personal friends and neighbours, and to whom he can go about his difficulties, whether abcut labour, mili- tary requisitions, live stock orders, supplies of machinery, fertilisers, or foodstuffs. The county council will advise and direct a smaller committee. The county council will be able to focus the difficulties of the tanners, to classify them. very often by advice aud assistance, to remove them and, where this is not possible, to come to the Board of Agriculture. The Board of Agri. cultuie will have a definite, responsible body to deal with in each county instead of fruitlessly endeavouring to keep in contact With each farmer, and the officers of the Board of Agriculture who arc scattered throughout the country will, of course, do all they possible can to act also as links between the different farming communities, the county councils, and the jx>ard of Agri- culture. It may happen that as we gain experience through the county councils there will be certain clear indications as to whether the Government can give material assistance to the farmers in their diffi- culties. All I can say about that is, that if a case is made out I shall do my best to press it. I can make no promise about finan- cial assistance, much as I desire it, because everything must be governed in this war ''v the financial stringency which is going to bear down upon us in tne form of taxa- tion. The first claim on the Exchequer must he that of the army and navy. I have concealed from you that I think the posi- tion of the farmer in the coming year is going to be one of very great difficulty. I thought it much better to tell the farmers frankly what was going to be the call on the agricultural labourers and not to con- ceal it from them. I think the record of the farmers in the year that is now closing has been a very fine one. The difficulties will be greater in the coming year, but thev have been great enough in this year, and that in this year the farmers hm-e"hcc¿1 able to add 500,000 acres of wheat land and to keep their stocks up to the pitch I have described is. I think, a wonderful record. But there are rivals to the British farmer, If you talk to anyone who has naid a visit to the fighting line in Flanders and in France. I am sure he will tell you that the thing that struck him most was the state j of the cultivation of the land right up tn and within the zone of fire. a cultivation never surpassed in the history of France or Belgium, a cultivation carried on bv old men, wo.nen. and children. When I was there I never saw an able-bodied man in a field. Now. surely what has been done in France and Belgium can ne done in j England and "W ales. Even with these un- foreseen difficulties, and these increasing difficulties, I apenl to the farmer to do even better in the coming year than he has done in the past year. Wh

Advertising

Jane's Wisdom. Ir She had nothing nice for dinner when he called to name the day. But sister Jane is 'kitchen-wise,' and I knew what card to play, | With BIRD'S Crystal Jelly Powder and some water boiling- hot, i She had "Jelly in a Jiffy," and I ensured the nuptial knot. I 93i rdå II Crystal Jelly c Po wde, r Gives you "Jelly in a Jiffy." No tiresome stirring. Dissolves instantly! Note well the delightful perfume when you pour on the hot water. It recalls the fresh ripe fruits whose flavor I you get only in these gem-like Jellies made with BIRD'S CRYSTAL JELLY POWDER. Fullest range of favourite flavors. Buy a packet to-day. 11 All Grocers know BIRD'S is best. I I B |f//

Advertising

1 Paralysed Baby Complete Cure of Infantile Paralysis by Dr. Cassell's Tablets. Mrs. Anderson, 12, Rippend,en-st.. Byker Bank, Newcastle-on- Tyne, says: My baby was only a few weeks old when he beg-an to lose power, first of his arms and then of his less. I was told it wis infantile paralysis, and that it would be years be-fore lu- could get over it. Ordinary medicine did no good, and baby got more /ill 5^. 

No title

with amazement on the fact that in a year of absolutely unparalleled difficulties the British farmer not only maintained but increased his production of food. But you must be willing to welcome the assistance of those whose assistance you have not been accustomed to use. After all, it is better to get in the harvest with unskilled h bour than not to get it in at all, and if we all endeavour to help each other and to utilise all those sources of assistance which cur in- genuity can find, then I believe that the feat which I have asked you to perform can be performed. All I can say is that the whole service of the Board of Agriculture and of the skilled and most zealous staff cf the Department over which I have the honour to preside will be at your service. (Cheers).

ABERAYRON

ABERAYRON. Special Police Court.—On Friday, before John M. Howell, Esq., Private 1). Wil- liams, Penrhos, Mydroilyn, of the Welsh Itegiment, was brought up in custody charged with absenting himselt without leave and was ordered to be detained to await an escort. PETTY SESSIONS, Friday, August 27th.—- Before John M. Howell and John J. Davies, Esqrs. Alleged Theft. John Richards, fish- monger and chip potato merchant, and Elizabeth Kichards, his sister, of Waun- ffilbro, Pen bryn, were charged with having stolen a quilt, valued at 10s. from Brynsynod, Llanarth, on the 24th August -P.C. Oliver said that on tho 24th August he received informatitm from Mary Jones, Brynsynod, who resides in a house on the roadside near Synod Inn, that) she had lost a quilt which had been put out to dry during Monday night. He made enquiries and found that accused passed that way between 12 p.m on Mon- day night and one a.m. on Tuesday morn, ing. Subsequently with P.C. Jones. Brynhoffnant, he visited the accused's home and found the quilt in the garden of the accused. Neither of the accused was at, home. He found them at New Quay, and took them into custody on the charge of having stolen the quilt. Mary Jones, Brynsynod, wife of liees Jones, of the same address said she identified the quilt produced as being hers. She had put it out to dry on gorse bush in the middle of a field near her house, which was fifty yards from the road. on Monday night; the 23rd, August. She washed it on Monday and on Monday night it was too wet to take in, Therefore she left it out cvennightf. She identified the quilt as being; her; It would not have beon easy to see the quilt from the road.— John Emrys Jones of Coedybrvn. teacher, who was home on his holidays at Coedy- hliyn, nyar LVynjsynod. said' hat about two o'clock on Tuesday morning he heard singing and the sound of horses' hoofs proceeding from the direction of New Quay. The sounds ceased. Later he again heard the sound of hoofs. He rose from bed and looking through the window saw two persons passing in a pony trap. He did not identify them. Both accused denied the charges.—Elizabeth Richards said they were selling chips at New Quay during. Monday. They started for home ahout. one a.m., Tuesday morning. They were passing Brynsynod and saw the quilt on the roadside, about forty yards away from Brynsyncd, picked it up, and took it with them.—Cross examined by Sergeant Thomas: She bad been at New Quay on the Tuesday. Wed- nesday, and Thursday; but she did not report anything to Sergeant James that they had found a quilt. John Richards, the brother, corroborated his sister's evidence and s ud he did not report the matter to Sergeant James because he did not think it was necessary to do so. He expected t>» hear that some one had miassed a quilt as he was passing every day.—Sergeant Thomas. cross-r-xa mined with a. view of showing that he had stopped on the road for some lime, as implied in, the evidence of Mr Emrys JoileF.-Tlie Bench gave the accused the benefit of the doubt and intimated that they should have reported the finding of the quilt to the police.—The B ncb commented the police for their prompt action in the matter.

TO OUR READERS THE CAMBRIAN NEWS CAN BE OBTAINED IN THE FOLLOWING TOWNS

TO OUR READERS. THE "CAMBRIAN NEWS" CAN BE OBTAINED IN THE FOLLOWING TOWNS. Cardiff .-Mess i-s. Ernest Joyce and Co., 37, Westgate-street; Messrs. W. H. Smith and Son, Strand House, Peharth-road; Wyman and Sons, Cymru House, St. Mary-street. Swansea.—Messrs. W. H. Smith and Son, Railway Bookstall: Mr. George Williams,, Alexandra-road; Messrs. Wyman and Sons, 69, High-street. Merthyr Tydfil Messrs. Wyman and Sons, Railway Bookstall; Mr. D. Bowen, 109, High-street. Dowlais..—Mr. W. James. The Printing House, North-street. Senghenith.—Mr. D. Williams, 133, Com- mereial-street. Porth Mr. A. Fudge, stationer; Mr. W. R. Thomas, 36, Pontypridd-road. Ynysybwl.—-Mr. D. Rogers, newsagent. Blaenclydach.—Mrs. A. Be van, 151, Court-street. Ferndale.—Mr. J. T. Burrell 67. Dyf- fryn-street. Tylorstown.—Mr. Charles Powell, news- agent Pontygwaith.—Mr. Theoohilus Thomas, Stationers Hall. Treorchy.—Mr. G. R. Protheroe, 207, High-street, and Mr. Evan Evans. 214, Park-road; Luther J. Morgan, 114, Bute- street Tonypandy.—Messrs. J. Howell and Co., Briwnent House. -)I,-Prdy.-A-lr. E. E. 60, Maerdv-road Clydaci) Vah-Mr. T. C. Davies, stationer. Ynyshir.—Mr. D. B. Davies. Reeheb House. Aberdare Mr. L. Thomas, 8, Burn. .street, Cwnnrnmnn. Caerau—Mr. Grifnth Thomas, 11 and 33 Caerau-road. Pentre (Rhondda Valley).—Mr. D. C. Morgan. Post Office, Llewellyn-street. Treherbert.—Mr. David Evans, 26. Bute- street. Carmarthen. — Mr. W. J. Lewis. 28, Richmond-terrace; Mr. C. -iT. Carpenter, newsagent; Messrs. W. H. Smith and Son 3. Queen-streot: also at London. Mosr.s. W. H. Everett find Son, 11. St. Bride-street, Ludgnte Circus; Messrs. W. H. Smith and Son, 186. Strand Mr. Evan Morris, 120. Theobalds-road, Holborn. Liverpool.—Messrs. Conlan and Co., 5. Orosshall-street; Messrs. W. H. Smith and Son, 61, Dale-street. Chester Messrs. W. H. Smith and Son, 7, Bough ton. Birkenhead.—Mr. Thomas Swift, News- agent, 21-23, Bridge-street. Shrewsbury.—Messrs. W. H. Smith and Son, 21, Castle-street. Birmingham. Messrs. Wyman and Sans, Bookstall, Snowhill. J

Advertising

CAMBRIAN I RAILWAYS ANNOUNCEMENTS. Discontinuance of Trains, The undermentioned Trains, viz :— 12 25 p.m. Whitchurch to Aberystwyth, 12-10 p.m. Aberystwyth to Whitchurch, 3-10 p.m. Dovey Junction to Barmouth, will run on MONDAYS and SATURDAYS only until September 13th. THE 4-5 p.m. Train from Barmouth to Pwllheli will run on MONDAYS, FRIDAYS and SA.LURDAYS ONLY. until September 6th. THIRD CLASS ORDINARY NH 0 go Return Tickets ARE NOW ISSUED BETWEEN Certain Cambrian Stations, in order to avoid, the inconvenience of re-booking. *MBT**TIP—ML. TO mi 00*4 11 -W ABER YS TWYTH should not fail to take a Trip over the Narrow Gauge Railway to DEVIL'S BRIDGE Through the Beautiful Rheidol Valley. n Convenient Trains. HETURN FARE 2/- OPEN CARS. Sunday Afternoon Train leaving ABERYSTWYTH at 2-15 RETURNING FROM DEVILS BRIDGE at 5-15. Combined Rail and Coach am and Motor Tours From ABERYSTWYTH. Tour including Dinas Mawddwy and Dolgelley, Fare 7/- lour to Talyllwn Lake and Back via Mach- ynlleth and Corns. Fare 5/6 Circular Tour embracing Corris. Talyllyn Lake, Dolgelley, and Barmdllth. Fare 616 See Rail and Coach Tour Programme. Facilities for Tourists on the Cambrian Coast. Until further notice HOLIDAY CONTRACT TICKETS will be issued upon production of the return halves of tourists and ordinary tickets, as under No. 1. 7s. for a Week, 3rd class. INCLUDING ABERYSTWYTH MACHYNLLETH DOLGELLEY and BARMOUTH No. 2. 7s. for a Week, 3rd clats INCLUDING DOLGELLEY BARMOUTH and PWLLHELI N o, 3. Including the wholp Coast Line between Aberystwyth, Machynlleth, Aberdovev, Dolgelley, Barmouth, and Pwhheii For One Week. For a Fortnight. 1st class I 3rd class 1st class I 3rd class 21/6 j 10/6 32/6 | 17/6 Available for an unlimited number of journeys. Further particulars can be obtained at the Stations, or to Mr Herbert* Williams, Superintendent of the Lice. S, WILLIAMSON, j C, westry, August, 1915. General Manager. ^^—i — 'Cambrian News' Stores, TERRACE ROAD, BOOKBINDING, BOOKBINDING, in all Styles at Moderate Charges, BOOKS REPAIRED. TRY THE "CAMBRIAN NEWS'' Bookbinding Department, Terrace Road, Aberystwyth. k k A