Teitl Casgliad: Cambrian news and Merionethshire standard

Sefydliad: Llyfrgell Genedlaethol Cymru

Hawliau: Mae hawlfraint yr adnodd hwn yn eiddo i Cambrian News Ltd.

Gwylio manylion cyfan

Cyntaf Cynt Llun 2 o 8 Nesaf Olaf
Full Screen
17 erthygl ar y dudalen hon
Advertising

J. G Williams, COACH Ie. MOTOR CARRIAGE WORKS, Chalybeate St, Aberystwyth High-class Repairs in all departments. Private Address Tel. No. 74. 27, Chalybeate-street. v414 THE GREAT WELSH REMEDY RELIEF FROM COUGH IN 5 MINUTES. T\ F'°r Coughs, for Colds, for UaVieS S Asthma, for Bronchitis, for Hoarseness, for Influenza, for Coughs, for Sore Throat. ^JU. Most Soothing, Warms the I^OUgU Chest, Dissolvesthe Phlegm For Singers, for Public Speakers. By Chemists II, evervwhere, 1/3, and 3/ Mixture ;ost4ge 3d. Proprietor HUGH DAVIES, Chemist, MACHYNLLETH. MOLRAT The Poison for MOLES. Put Earthworms in a pot and sprinkle the Powder over them, then place in the path of the Moles. In Packets, 1/6 each. Proprietor HUGH DAVIES, Chemist, MACHYNLLETH. Aberystwyth Agents: Wynne & Sons. Chemists. FAIRBOURNE, S.O. THE NEW SEASIDE RESORT. Merionethshire, N. Wales. Y nysfaig Hall Hotel. n OPPOSITE BARMOUTH. Attractions—Sea Bathing, Boating. Golf, Tennis and Croquet, Easy Ascent to CADER IDRIS. Bolt Lfoks close to the Hotel. Trout FUhinz (^kM and MreamsV Good Sea Fishiufr—Bass, Plaice, Mackerel, etc. Good Rough Shooting and Wild Fowling free. BOARDING TERMS from 42s. PER WEEK. Accommodation for Motorists. Terms-Saturday to Monday, 18a inclusive. ltfaernmo-Horuby, Fairbourne. Jfi40 HARRY a. HORNBY, Proprietor. 1 SPECIAL IIJIPAIIWA SHOW OF 1.ADIES AND GENTS FOOTWEAR FOR PRESENT SEASON. INSPECT WINDOWS FORr QUALITY AND STYLE* LADIES FITTING ROOM. Repairs on the Premises. Anybody's Boots Repaired CAM. AT D, WILLIAMS, Cambria Boot Stores. Aberystwyth. 9 flj PIRSONAL ATTENTION. B 206th Itar of the O !M FIRE OFFICE %Jr A m FOUNDED 1710. THE OLDEST INSURANCE OFFICE III 1 HE WORLD. ¡ fksfai Jsom PolicT d*t«d 17'ib Insurances effected on the following risks: FIRE DAMAGE. Resultant Loss of Rent and Profits. Employers' Liability & I Personal Accident. Workmen's Compensa- Sickness & Disease. tion, including Fidelity Guarantee, Accidents to Burglary. Domestic Servants Plate Glass, Domestic Servants Plate Glass. LOCAL AGENTS- ABERYSTWYTH Mr HUGH HUGHES Aberayron Mr Thos. Pugh, Paris House Bala Mr R. L. Jones Mount Place Mr J. R. Jordan Cardigan Mr D. Thoinas Davies Dolgelley Mr Thomas P. Jones-Parry 11 Mr J. Haydn Morris, N. & S. Wales Bank Llandyssul Mr J. R. Harris Llanon. Mr John Thomas Lampeter Mr Wm. Davies, 28, Bryn „ Mr H. W. Howell Uanbyther Mr D. Thomas, Blaenhirbant Newquay Mr D. Meredith Jones, Sarnau Mr J. Nicholas Talsarn Mr Llewelyn Davies Towuy M Mr E. H. Daniel. J *979 I I STEAM LAUNDRY | ABNV«TVTT«, j| B. JONES I T>EOS to inform his numerous Customer* « that owing to the increase of business W he has put dovrn additional „ It' NEW AND MODERN MACHINERY B to enable him to execute all orders with £ promptneo8S and despatch, and hopes to a ■till merit yoar esteemed patronage and K AND PUBLIC INSTITUTIONS 1 SPECIALLY CATERED FOB- fl BHISTS AND COLLARS A SPSOIALI5 T. K Aii Goada Cslia-iiod axsd Delivered frree Of B Charge. fl Send a Postcard and the Ysn will eal». B Particulars »ad Prices on applicatten. Sj. Charge. fl Send a Postcard and the Ysn will eal». B Particulars »ad Prices on applicatten. Sj. mmmmmmmsmamm Under Distinguished Patronage 1 ESTABLISHED 1900. | T'D J. LEVENSON Begs to draw the attention of the Residents and Visitors to the Up-to-date Commodious Hairdressing Saloon Adjoining his HIGH-CLASS TOBACCO ESTABLISHMENT, TERRACE ROAD, First-Class Attists employed and prompt attention given, 9 by the use of things which experience has proved to be valuable and helpful || to humanity. All are liable, in a greater or lesser degree, to the same Sg troubles, and even the strongest person will suffer occasionally from ailments due to an irregular action ot the digestive organs. Whenever EVERYONE BENEFITS :Z you are troubled with sick headache-biliousuess-constipation-pains in the back, accompanied by want of tone, it is safe to conclude that the £ stomach is deranged, the bowels out of order and the liver sluggish. You gg can, however, correct any irregularity of these organs and restore 33 yourself to good health *5 BY TAKING J the required doses of Beecham's'Pills. Taken as directed this famous i$j medicine will eliminate the excess of bile, regulate the liver and cleanse ffl, the kidneys. The feeling of lightness and brightness experienced after the elimination of impurities from the body is a convincing proof of the efficacy of Beecham's Pills. There is no other household remedy just Qg as good. The people who remain the healthiest take BEECH M'S PILLS! g: Sold everywhere in Boxes. JB Y. "Y. Mr. JAMES REES, Dental Surgery, 30. ALEXANDRA RD., ABERYSTWYTH. (Same Streot as Railway Station) ATTENDS PERSONALLY. TREGAFON, 1st and last Tuesdays In each mouth. LAMPETEr, 2nd and 4th Fridays in each minth. LLANRHYSTYD, 3rd Wedoesday. hours 10 to 11-30 aim. Also 1st. 2nd, 3rd and 4th Fridays in each month, hours 10 to 11 a.m. LLANON,3rd Wednesday, 11-30 to 1. Also lilt, 2nd, 3rd and 4th Fridays in each month,houra 11 to 12. ABERAYRON, 3rd Wednesday, hours 1-30 to 3-30. Also 1st, 2nd. 3rd and 4th Fridays in each month, at Ban Davies, Hairdresser, Alban Square, or by appointment, hours 12 to 1. LLANARTH, let and 3rd Fridays in each month NEW QU A Y, 1st and 3rd Fridays in each moath. MACHYNLLETH.Ist, 2nd and 4th Wednesdays in each month, at Mrs Trevor Jones, Arosfa, Railway Terrace. I Scientific Sight-Testing and Frame Fitting Qualified Sight Testing Optician. k- W. MIAXLJOHES, M.P.S Pharmaceutical Chemist Fellow of the Worshipful Company f Spectacle Makers, and of the Institute o Ophthalmic Opticians. 33, TERRACE RD., ABERYSTWYTH GUINEA GOLD WEDDING RINGS AT E. J. MORGAN, Jeweller and Watchmaker, TERRACE ROAD, ABERYSTWYTB Handsome present Riven with every Wedding Rinlt. y42 — at works Manchester — 1*7 Q T~ The quintessence of I J comfortable, economical, reliable motoring service. FORD, the Universal Car. Agents-The Merioneth Motor Co., Telephone, No. 2. Lion Garage, Dolgelley.

THE etlh tarincro atttt Friday March 17th 1916

THE etlh tarincro, atttt Friday, March 17th, 1916. CARDIGAN, Saturday Turkeys were bought in for lld per lb, geese and ducks Hid per lb and fowls 9d. Batter in lamps, Is old per lb, in lib rolls la 3d. Poultry (retail)- ducks and geese Is per lb, fowls lOd and lid per lb, Eggs 2d eaoh. CARMARTHEN BUTTER, Saturday — Prices at the weekly market here to-day were again abnormally high. Quotations-Buttet in pats, Is 8d, and in casks, is 6d to Is 7d per lb. Eggs 6 for la poultry -chickens Is 6d per lb, fowls Is Id, and geese la 2d cheese 5d per lb, and Caerphilly cheese Is potatoes, 4s 61 per cwt. LLANDILO PROVISION, Saturday. — Butter in lbs, Is 6d to Is 8d in tubll. Is 6d to Is 7d. Eggs. 6 and 7 for Is. Welsh cheese, 6d. Fowls. Is 2d per lb ducks, Is 2d per lb. Rabbits, lOd to lid each. NEWCASTLE EMLYN, Friday. There NU a large attendance, and business was brisk. Butter-small supply, selling well at following prices, viz—in unaalted lumps for faobory blending Is Oid, ditto in oasks salted far retail purpsses Is and Is Od per lb, ditto In pound rolls Is 2d per lb eggs, 7 for Is Welsh oheese, 6d to 5 £ d par lb rabbits, 6d to 1d each. OSWESTRY CORN MARKET, Wednes- day.—New whits wheat, 89 2d to 81 4d per 75 Ibll new red wheat, S, 21 te 8. 4d per 75 The new oats, 19a Od to *>e 20a Od per 200 The malting barley, 328 to 34! per 280 lbs. OSWERTRY OKJNiiKAL MAKKJfiT, Wed. sesday-Fowls, 41 6d to 58 6d per oonple looks, 68 Od to 7s Od per oouple rabbits, la to Is 8d per oonple; butter, Is 7d to Is 8d per lb eggs, 6 and 7 for Is potatoes, Is 2d per score The tomatoes, 5d to 6d per lb oabbages, Id to 2d each apples, Is to 28 6d per hundred carrots, Id per bunch. BIRMINGHAM, CATTLE, Tuesday. A moderate supply of beasts and sheep, with a quiet demand-Helefords, Sid shorthorns, 9d wether sheep, lid ewes and rims, 8d to 18Jd per lb. Fair tliow of pigs,- and steady ttade- reported-bacon pigs, 14s 6d small pigs, 15s to 15s 6d sows, 13,i 6d to 13s 9d per aoore. LON DOW PKGVl810NS,;Menday. Messrs Samuel Page & Sen report :-Butbor firmly held Siberian. 99s to 136a Australian, 140a to 148s New Zealand, 144s to 152* Argentine, 13Sst to 144s. Baoon-Irieh and Danish firm on small supplies. Canadian in good demand Irish quoted 96s to 105B Danish and iswedish, 96a to 105a Canadian, 88s to 93j. Hams continues quiet -American long cut quoted 88s to 92s, and do short cut 86s to SSs. Lard ^steady American pails quoted 62a Od to 62ti 3d, do boxes 60a 6d to 61s Cheese firm-Ca-nadian quoted 95s to 988 and New Zealand 93s to 959 Eggs are in fair demand—Irish quoted 15s to 15s 61 Daniah, 16s 6d Egyptian, 10s 6il, LONDON DEAD MEAT, Monday.-Good tuppUea and trade quiet, though prices are rather firmer English beef, 3a 8d to ia Od Soetch aides, 4a Od to 4s 2d shorts, la eel to 4" IUd; extreme, Be Ocl Deptford and '.Jvtsrpvo'i kiiioa, 3s 6d to 3e 8d refrigerated clsdquarter—bast, 3s 2d to 3s fid de seconds, Ild te 3s 4d do fsrequarters, 2a 3d to 2a 4d oUgsntba chilled hindquarters, 2a lOd be Is 4d forequarters, 2a 3d to 28 5d. Mntton — Scetoh wethers, 4a 4d te 48 3d litto lega, 4a 8d to 58 Od do swea, 28 8d 2* 3, Od EngHah wethers, 4a Od to is 4d I do swoo, 2.. Sd to 3a Od; Dutch sheep, 38 8d ts 4a Od Scotch lamb, 58 4d to Sa Od English lambs, 4a 4d te 58 Od veal, in 8d to 00 8d extreme, 5a 8d English pork, to 4d to 41 84 ) Dutch d9, 4a fid to 4b lOd per 8 bl,

YSBYTTY YSTWYTH

YSBYTTY YSTWYTH. Cbituary.—The death of Mr Will lam Lewis, Llety Hvwel, occurred on Friday morning, March 3rd. He had not been in his usual health for some weeks, but had been confined to the house for nine days only. Most of his friends had no apprehension of anything serious in his iiiness. He was a native of the place and had never been away, having bpent practically all his life in the village. His parents were the late David anj Sarah Lewis, Nanteos. who were members of two well-known families in the district. Thc-y were connected in many ways with the public, social, an^ religious life of the district for many years. Deceased's grandfather on his paternal side was Hugh Lewis, Maesybeudv, who may be described as one of the founders of the Sunday School in the parish. Mr Williams, of Penygraig, headmaster of Ystrld Meurig School, and vicar of Ysbytty, started a Sunday School at a place called Tyngilfach, near Hendrefelen, and Hugh Lewis was one of the two teachers appointed by him. That was the first Sunday School in the locality. Deceased's grandfather on his maternal side was Ishmael Ishmael. Pant- mawr. who was the first schoolmaster in the parish. He kept a school at the old Church of Ysbytty Ystwyth, and pro: bably he and his seminary were also under the wing of Mr Williams, the vicar. It may be interesting to note that one of his pupils was the late Miss Margaret Thomas better kiictwn "Pegi Cil'mcddu." Ishmael Ishmael was also a keen musician and his descendants as well as those of Hugh Lewis, Maesybeudv, have done yeoman service to the cause of music in all its aspects. They are still some of the chief factors in keeping the spirit of song alive. Will/am Lewis was ja weL!read man and delighted in the treatment of a "pwnc." Though a staunch Churchman his favourite preacher was the late Dr Griffith Parry Aberystwyth. He had a strong bent for mechanics and many years ago took to clock cleaning and repairing as a hobby, in which lie obtained a great deal of proficiency. For the greater part of his life lie had worked at the Lisburne Mines, and was considered one of the best miners in the district. Between seven and eight years of age he and a cousin were poking lead from the tips at Logelasand were paid threepence a day for their labour. At the age of ten lH' went underground and there he spent mo.;t of his remaining working days. Though he died comparatively young, yet his was a long life for a lead miner, especially considering that he went under- ground at so early an age. The average life of the miners is about fifty years. It is astonishing that so little attention is paid to this matter with all the talk con- cerning the welfare and comfort of the working man and the sacredness of life and its proiongat'on. Notwithstanding that he spent most of his time under- ground. he was particularly fond of out- I door life and was a keen all-round sports- man and a worthy son of Nimrod. Of all the sports in connection with fur, fin, and feather, the branch he excelled in was fishing. He was a man who would delight the liOcTrt of Izaak Walton and one that could be regarded as an embodiment- of his book, "The Compleat Angler." On all pisca torial matters lie was the authoritv par excellence in the district. When standing on the watpr's edge with a keen eye he would scrutinise the animated Lfe on the face of the water and would select an artificial fly that would entice the most shy and suspicious fish to take a bite. Often after others had thrown their lines until the.r arms would ache and concluded that they might as well try their luck in a icaci naine. pool, or thp Dead Sea, he would cast his line and land his fish with clock- work regularity. In those things he re- sembled his n, that popular Hports- man. Mr. William Phillips. The Unicorn Aberystwyth. Handicapped through loss of education in early life, he nevertheless possessed knowledge of a wide range of lli'bj.eets. Few could equal him in his knowledge of local history and tradition and notable events of the past, Inter- ment took place the following Tuesday at Ysbytty \stwyfth 'Churchyard. Au lln- usually large number of neople attended from the surrounding districts. Thp Revs fleorge Jones. B.A., W. M. Williams, H.A., "Ystrad MeuriV; Noah Jones Eglwys- newvdd. and E. T. Davies. St. li go, officiated at the house and church. De- ceased leaves a widow and four children.

Advertising

THE QUESTION OF HEALTH. There is an old saving A stitch in time saves niue," and if upon the first symptoms of anythng being wrong with our health we were to resort to some simple but proper mean" of correcting the mischief, nine tenths of the suffering that invades our homes would be avoided. The body is a machine full of intricate and delicate mechanioism and when one part is im- peded it, gradually throws the whole out of gear unless it is quickly put right. A cold, a chill, a touch of indigestion or liver complaint, a pain in the loins or the little indist.retions to which in the hurry and turmoil of life we are all prone (such as eating too quickly, not taking sufficient rest, worrying too much over our troubles, etc., etc.), all tend to bring about a dead lock in some part of the human mechanicism or a weakening or slowing down of the whole. A good bracing tonic, one that will revitalise and will wind up all the mach- inery, will at such tmes work greater wonders than a long course of nauseous medicines. A dose of Ciwilym Evans' Quinine Bitters taken when you feel the least bit out of sorts is just that "stitch in time." The question of health is a matter, which is sure to concern us at one time or another, especially when Influenza is so prevalent as it is just now. so it is well to know what to take to ward off an attack of this most weakening disease, this ei>;demic, catarh, or cold of an aggravated kind to combat it whilst under its baleful influence, and particularly after an attack, for then the system is so lowered as to be liable to the most dangerous of complaints Gwilym I*.vans Quinine Bitters is acknow- ledged by all who have given it fair trial to bo the lwst specific remedv for dealing with Influenza in all its various stages, being a prpnaration skilfully prepared with Quinine and aceOnmanied with other blood purifving and enriching agents, suitable for the liver, digestion, and all those ail- ments requiring tonic strengthening and nerve increasing properties. It is invalu- able for those suffering with colds. pneumon a, or any aerious illness, or prostration caused hV sleeplessness, or worry of any kind. when the body has a general feeling of weakness and lassitude. Don't delay, hut try it now. Send for a copy of the pamphlet of testimonials, which carefully read and consider well, then buy r. bottle (sold in two sizes, 2s. 9d. and 4s. 6d.) at your nearest Chemist or Stores, hut when purchasing see that the 11ame "Gwilym Evans" is on the lahel, stamp and Iwttle, for without which none are genuine. Sole Proprietors—Quinine Bitters Manu- facturing Company, Limited, Llanellv, South Wales.

NEW QUAY

NEW QUAY. Khaki in the Pulpit.—The commencing of the evening service at Towyn Congre- gational Chapel by Private E. T. Davies, Maenygroes. seemed to have astonished some people. Though Mr Davies is a ministerial student from the visual point of view, it is unusual to have a soldier in the pulpit. But in the present crisis a moment's thought may make one look upon inconsistencies as to consistencies. The khaki denotes a person on active ser- vice and do we not still believe that actions speak louder than words? Wounded.—News has lately beenreceived that Lance Corporal T. Richards, Maesy- pwll, has been wounded in France. Urban Dist/ict CounCil.-Ilie Urban District Council, under the presidency of Mr J. Davies, J.P.. Cledlyn. met on Tuesday evening, March 7th. There were present Mr George Davies, vice-president, Capt. Thomas. J.P., Mr J. W. Thomas (clerk), Mr T. P. Timothy, Mr E. Evans, Tcwyn Farm; Capt. Davies. Araminta Mr E. Lewis. Soar, and Dr Griffiths. The latter read his med;cal report for the past year. It was decided to have the road roller immediately, and to continue the railings on the read down to the beach after the wall is completed. A letter was read by the Clerk on behalf of the Red Cross Society requesting 'the Councjil to aid them in supplying Aberayron Auxiliary Hosptal with beds and in maintaining them. The apprex mate cost of each bed per week will b? 14s. A public meeting was called on Wednesday night to devise the best means of obtaining the required weekly sum. Agricultural Society.-A meeting of the Agricultural Society was held at Towyn Grammar School on Thursday evening. There were present Mr J. Davies, J.P., Cledlyn. (chairman); Mr D. N. Jones, Brynywawr (clerk); Mr J. Davies, Neuadd; Mr ]>. O. Williams, Blodtfa; Mr Willie Jones, Cefnginlle; Mr Evans, Penrhyn; Mr R. Williams, Llwyndafydd; and Mr W. Evans, Pannau. As the previous agricultural show had been the means of collecting a sum of about R.84 for the Red Cross fund, it was unanimously decided to hold a show next August. Mr John Thomas. Frolldolad, was appointed chair- man of the Executive Committee; Mr James Griffiths, Cofngwyddil, vice-chair- man, and Mr D. X. Jones, secretary, Further matters of minor importance were left over to be dealt with by the next committee at Cross Inn in April. Wedding.—On Sunday a pretty wedding was solemnised at Willesden Green C.M. Church, London, by the Rev J. Thickens between Mr J. lErnrrys Davies, chief engineer of the s.s. "Cassin," second son of the late Caot. Davies, and of Mrs Davies, Gomer House, a.nd Miss May Elsie Tis-omas, second daughter of the late Capt. Thomas, Angorfa, Fishguard. The bride was given away by Mr Jordan Jones. Weiiiblell. The best man was Mi- Arthur Pritchard, Weston-super-Mare. The Samaritans. "-The members of the Tutorial Troupe are now diligently preparing for a concert in aid of procur- ing uniforms for those local nurses who have been registered for immediate ser- vice at Aberayron Hospital. The managers cf the Council School are to be thanked for their help in lending that Schoolroom for the cause. The wounded are expected to arrive during the present month. t mf )rms must therefore be ordered and the Tutorials are awake to the fact that tre nurses have to pay for their own uniforms. Nc,tes.- Thc estimated amount of cement dill required for the wall is two tons. The ropulat;on of New Quay for the past yoar was 1.180. The calculated are, of the urban district is 279 acres. Football.Oii Saturday the Tutorial football team played the Aberayron County ^m on their own grounds. The farmer teani included nine Welshmen, one Creek, and one Belgian all under military ¡!f: The score was five to two against the Tutorial.

LLANGWYRYFON

LLANGWYRYFON. Visits H0JTi3. — Lieutenant E. D. T. Jenkins, M.A., son of the Rev. D. Jenkins, i- eat, of the parish, paid a short visit to his home at the end of last week. For several years Lieut. Jenkins occupied the post of leeturer in classics at the University College of Wales, Aberystwyth, and for some time before his departure to join the army also acted as warden of the Men's Hostel. Since he obtained a commission in the King's Own Yorkshire Light In- fantry he has been pursuing his military studies at Oxford, where his regiment has been under training during the winter months.—.Lance-corporal Isaac Davies. Mcond son of Mr. Thomas Davits. Gwa-t- caeau, was at homo on leave for a to- days during the past week. Corporal, Davies, who for many years was employed as a grocer's assistant at Pentre Ystrad, Glamorganshire, joined the Worcestershire Regiment last November, and is now in training on Salisbury Plain

BORTH

BORTH. Will.—The Hev Thomas Lloyd Lewis Williams, of the Rectory, Newtown, rector of C'orwen, 1897-1901, Welsh exam- ining chaplain to' the Bishop of St. Asaph from 1897, and canon and precentor of St. Asaph Cathedral from 1901, who died on December 4th, left estate of the gross value of £ 1,363 15:1., of which LI,126 17s. 4d. is net personalty. Probate of his will has been granted to his sister (Mrs Mar- garetta Thomas, of Llanfihangel Geneu'r- glyn). Promotion. A rare example of rapid military promotion won by young officers is provided in the case of two sons of Mr A. Civil Wright, J.P., of Brandwood House, Birmingham, and of Fronygog, Borth, who have both been serving in France since March, 1915. Lieut. Keith. Cecil Wright, who is nineteen years only, has been promoted to the rank of captain, and his brother Capt. J. A. Cecil Wright, of the South Midland Brigade Army Ser- vice Corps (T.F.), has received his majority at the age of twenty-nine.

BONTGOCH

BONTGOCH Shesp DDg Trials.A meeting of persons interested in the Bontgoch sheep dog trials was held at Elerch National School on Friday when it was decided to postpone thp trials this year on account of the war and to vote the balance in hand to the Red CYoss Hospital at Aberystwyth.

NEWCASTLE EMLYN

NEWCASTLE EMLYN. Lambing.Mr Evan Rees of Nant- gwilan Farm, Penrhiwpal, is to be con- gratulated on his good luck. On Tuesday morning of last week having occasion to isit his sheep on the mountain, he found To his surprise that two sheep had given birth to eight lambs. All are alive and doing well. Mart.—Messrs Lloyd and Thomas held another successful mart on Friday, and as on former occasions, the supply of cattle was abundant and buyers were plentiful. Fat cattle realised excellent prices.

Advertising

mmwmm ji 1, it j 717 MA il iiiJt ill M CURES §K i|C0UGHS&C0IJ)Sl |jjj|j Invaluable in the Nursery Bfijl 1 3 and 3 |||| OF all C iIJ: AND STORES. BB.tW -L

i Prudential Assurance Coy

i Prudential Assurance Coy. t As was naturally to be expected, the I report and accounts of the Prudential Assurance Coy., Ltd., to some extent re- flect the unusual conditions which the nations had to face in 1915, though the office in all main respects made greater: progress than for many years past. In order to realise what these huge transac- tions really mean it is necessary to com- pare the totals with those reported for previous years. In 1914—the first year of hostilities—the Prudent:al issued 65,751 policies, assuring £ 6,318,843 at annual premiums amounting to -C424,W and a small sum in the form of single premiums; while in the preceding period of peace and preparation the totals were 71,359, £ 6.849,224, and £ 425,717 plus £10,&55 re- ceived in single sums. The Company last year had a gross income from premiums nnd investments of £ 17.042,COO. and from revenue and accumulated funds it was able to place no less than £ 11,850 000 at the d'spo?al of the Government for war seivice. It took up £ 3,000,000 of the 41 per cent. war loan. and comparatively e,irly-long before the idea of the general "mobilisation" of American securities for Government use for exchange purposes was suggested—transferred the whole of iis holdings of these securities to a value of upwaids cf a,250,000, to'the Government, an action which drew a warm acknow- ledgment from the Chancellor of the Ex- chequer, who wrote as follows, under date August 4th:—"I have to thank the Pru- dent nl Assurance Company on behalf of His Majesty's Government for the patriotic spirit they have shown in placing the whole of their American securities at the disposal of the Treasury at a fair and reasonable fr>Kioe. The 'transact?o«i .has bn' of considerable assistance in facilit- ating exchange operatons and the greatest credit is due to the Company for Its prompt action." The Companv took the value of these American securities in Treasury bills, and altogether it now holds upwards of £ 13,100.000 in British Govern- ment securities (war loan and Treasury bills). Referring to the salient items of the valuation report, it may be noted that the stringent basis adopted in the previous yenr was again emoloved, nd that in the crdinnrv branch the surplus, including £f}3,T4 brought forward, was out n which the directors have added £ 600,CC0 to the investments reserve fund (raising it to -CI,600, ), while in addi- tion £ 700,000 has been set aside as a special contingency fund and L219,331 has been carried forward. In the industrial branch the number of policies issued was 2,112,784, assuring a maximum sum of £ 35,112,816, compared with 2,059,284. assuring £32,¿91,598, in the previous year. The number of policies current on De- cember 31st last was 20,859,887, as against 20,035,010 twelve months earlier—an in- crease cf 774,877. These policies assured, exclusive of bonuses, a maximum sum of £ 276,402,255, while the premiums received during 1915 amounted to £ 8,506,053, against £ 8,176,2-02 previously, revealing an increase of £ 328,861, following one of £ 301,746 for 1914. The claims amounted to £ 3,938,596, of which £ 425,499 was paid out under 25,379 war claims, £ 276,721 con- sisted of bonus additions and £ 148,302 appertained to the obligations under maturing endowment assurances. An im- portant and gratifying feature of the business transacted is the marked increase in the issue of policies effected under the monthly premium option tables. At the end of the year. 447,091 of these policies were in force, assuring -C13,262,613, the .mnual income derived therefrom amount- ng to £ 759,690. The public appreciation evidenced by the growth from 325,323 policies for £ 9,637,660 current at the end oft 1914 is well deserved and gives promise of an increasing supersession of weekly collections by monthly payments, thereby produc ng a beneficial effect on the ex- pense ratio and enabling the assured to obtain a larger return for his outlay. No fewer than 9,221 of the Prudential's staff arc cither serving with the colours or have been rejected for service—1,305 from the indoor staff and 7,916 from the outdoor staff. The public see that by entrusting their money to the Prudential they are getting the insurance which they so much tatne. At the same time and with the same money the Prudential is helping the country to secure the" saver bullets" it needs. The country and the Government, therefore, have confidence in the Prudential. The Chairman of the Com- pany is serving oil a Government Commit- tee to consider possibilit es of economy in army expenditure: the General Manager is serving on a Government Committee connected with economy in National In- surance; the Actuary has served on a Government Committee dealing with popularising war loans among the working classes; and the Secretary is the manager of the Government's scheme for mobilising millions of pounds worth of American securities so that the rate of the American exchange shall be maintained. All these officers are serving the Government at its spec at invitation without fee or expectation of reward. No oher Company in the country has received so signal an honour or such a mark of esteem. The following is a statement of the war claims paid by the Company to February 29th ;Xavy 4.316 lives, amount £ 113,722; army 30,755 lives, amount £ 635.249: civilians 651 lives, amount C22,3111, total 35,723 lives, amount £ 771,362. Locally, the work of the Company during the past year has been more successful than ever, the superintendent being Mr E. P. Cox.

Local and District

Local and District. I" The death took place on Monday, after several weeks' illness, at the age of seventv-one years,, of Mr Edward Green, The Moors, Welshpool, one of the best- known and most successful breeders, ex- hibitors, and judges of shire horses in the country. He was the pioneer of the famous shire horse breeding industry in Montgomeryshire. He possessed over a score of championship cups and medals won at the Iloyal, the London Horse Show, and the leading district shows at which he had been as familiar as a judge as an ex- hibitor. He had bred numerous horses that had made prices running into four figures and horses from the Moors stud had become well known in the United States and the Argentine. Among his best-known stock was "Moors Regent," which thrice won at the Royal, "Moors Zealot," which won the Prince of Wales's Championship cup. and "Moors Countess" and "Moors Victor a." Mr Green was a magistrate for Montgomeryshire, a former member cf the County Council, ex-president of the Welshpool Farmers Union, and a leading member of manv agricultural bodies. With reference to the announcement of the award of distinguished conduct medals in the honours supplements to the "London Gazette," dated January 14th and March 2nd, 1916, the following are the acts of gallantry for which the decorations have been awarded to the Merioneth and Mont- gomery Battalion of the Royal Welsh Fiisili(Irs: Lance-corporal G. H. Hihhott. for conspicuous gallantry and devotOn on August 10th 1915, at Suvla Bay, as a stretcher-bearer, carrying wounded out of action under very heavy fire; Acting-corporal G. 11. Francis, for conspicuous gallantry on August 10th. 1915, at Suda Bay, when he carried water to the wounded under heavy fire and at great personal risk; Sergt. A. E. Wilson, for conspicuous gallantry on August 10th, 1915. at Suvla, when he carried a message at great personal risk and under a heavy fire. On August 11th he organised, on his own initiative, the defence of a post, and held it until relieved. The Right Hon. Sir John Rhys, prin- cipal of Jesus Collego, Oxford, professor of Celtic at the University, who died on December 17th at the of seventy-five years. Mt property of the value of £ 14.483, the net personalty being £ 14,234. Probate of the will, dated October 1st. 1911, is granted to tlie Public Trustee. The testator bequeathed his bust by Sir William Goscornbe John to the National Librarv of Wales at Aberystwyth his books not selected by his daughters to the University College at Aberystwyth, and, the residue of his property upon various trusts for his two daughters. Mvfnnwy and OlAi-en. and their issue (if any). with remainder to Jesus College, Oxford, for the promotion of Celtic study ond research. to be called the "Rhys Fund." i 1

The Cradle of the Human Race

The Cradle of the Human Race. Mr Edmund Gaudier, the Prit-sh preso representative in Mesopotamia writes re- specting the operat, oiii of the British rorCe oil the Tigris— We hav e entered the oldest country in the world. \Ve arrived at iiusrah (sixty- seven miles from the sea) on December 31st, and the same n.ght we transhipped into two patidie steamers. These vessels are taking us upstream to Ali Gherbi, the point where we concentrate for the advance. Qurnah where we anchored in the morning, is the reputed site of the Garden of Eden. For evidence we were shown the Tree of the Knowledge of Good and Evil. Here the old channel of the Euphrates joins the Tigris. 'rile date groves wh.ch stretch for some four mlies upstream are the last outpost of fertility. Afte: this one enters a treeless waste of swamp and desert, but one is seldom out of sight of herds of donkeys and cattle and flocks of sheep. The dwellers in the reed and mud huts run along the boat, clamouring for back- sheesh and scrambling for coppers thrown them by the troops. Upstream the Biblical tradition holds. The second night we moored by Ezra's Tomb, a domed shrine silhouetted among the palms in the clear starlight. One could not help moral- ising upon the new lap we were pursuing in the continuity cf h story when one heard a Lowlander or Perth point out the scribe's resting place to his mate as "Yon corner hoos." Navigation above Ezra's Tomb unt] one reaches Amara. where the stream widens, becomes slow and difficult. One passes the Narrows and the Devil's Elbow, and the r:ver tw.sts and turns. The physical features of the country are familiar to our Indian troops. The villages resemble those of the Punjaub on the north-west frontier. Qualat Sal-h might be a quarter of Dera. Ishmail Khan. The same sloping mud walls enclosing the haveli or court- yard, with ithe cow-dung cakes fbr fuel plastered against them to dry in the sun, and scooped wooden drain-pipes projecting from a roof. For vegetation the date palm, with an occasional mulberry or willow, fed by irrigation channels. A few of the houses are of sun-dried brick, but there is an entire absence of ornamenta- tion, save in the two-storeved buildings of the merchants and officials cn the river front where the woodwork is latticed and I fretted. Some of the R ver Am Arabs are hand- some, and have a certain hawklike dignity and grace of carriage. For headgear they wear the kefieli and aagal. The kefieh, a chequered cotton cloth generally of a blue and white pattern, is kept in its place by the aagal, a double plait of goat's hair or wool. In the cold months the yashmak is let down under the chin covering the ears. In the hot weather it is drawn up and tied round the crown of the head. THE CONTEMPTUOUS SEPOY. tied round the crown of the head. THE CONTEMPTUOUS SEPOY. Many of the children have brown or chestnut hair. The women are fair, and go about unveiled. I was talking to an Afridi in the Punjabi Regiment, and asked hm if this was not unusual in a Mussulman people. He explained, with an eloquently moderated scorn, that they were not true Mahomedans, but only Shiahs The Indian Sepoy regards both the country and its inhabitants m equal con- tempt. "Do you know anything of the;r language," I asked. He smiled. "I know enough to tell them to fetch water and to clear out," he said, "that is sufficient for such a people," and he laughed a laugh which implicitly embraced the sahib's con- tempt with his own. He was certainly a masterly and composing figure, and his six foot three and breadth in proportion, and his spotless accoutrements were well set off by the rabble on the bank. As for the climate, he declared the Pun- jaub a health resort compared to Mesopo- tamia. But that is always the Sepoy's way, more even so than the sahibs. He will disparage the place where he is stationed, preferring his own sterile plot of ca rtli. Amara, thirtv-one miles up stream from Qalat-Salih. is the most considerable town between Busrah and Bagdad. It is now teeming with tribesmen and all the flotsam and jetsam which follows in the wake of the war. The British flag flies over the Turkish banks, and the wounded British Tommy, seated on his bench in his blue hospital suit, surveys the Tighie with the same complacencv as he has watched the waters of the Nile, Some, or Thames. The bazaar is spacious and stone-roofed. some 35ft. in height, as in Bagdad, and the crafts are localised, as in all the cities of the East. At every turning from the main thoroughfare the street names are inscribed in English besides the Arabic- characters. There is an opportunity here for an imaginative touch, but one finds a nomenclature which is truly Brit;sli. The Sook-al-casareen of the Arabs has become plain "Butcher's-street," the Sookial- ikhaibareen, Baiter's-itftreet." "Sapper- street," "Pontoon-street." "Soap-street," proclaim the needs of the hour as if the scribe of Hamn al Rasehid had never existed. Every fifty yards or so there is an Arab cafe, where the denizens of tho bazaar, hooded in their kefieh. squat on high-backed wcoden benches. Some play dominoes, ethers sit and gaze into vacancy. These dark taverns are as crowded as tea- shops in Piccadilly after a matinee. But there is more diversity of type, for Amara )K a thoroughfare. It is here ith/it the caravan route from Dizful, in Persia, meets the Tigris, and the town is the head- qua iters of the Sabaeans. If one were not in. uniform the cafe would be a good point of vantage from which to Trat-oh the crowd outside. A group of Kurds passes in the street in the high bulbous hats of rcugli felt, their smooth locks hanging free and clipped about their ears like the M^hsuda. or Powindahs of Afghanistan. Two of these rough mountaineers meet and embrace and I salute each other with alternate kisses on each cheek. A Jew in his Turkish fez, bound round with a kefieh, is proclaiming to an Arab policeman, now a servant of the British raj, that he has been robbed of a piece of silver. He repeats his tnk with solemn gestures, which might be an accompaniment to a recital of the book of Jeremiah. A pale, scholarly-looking Persian from Dizful is appraising a skein of wool at the opposite stall. A wild-eyed Bakhtiari glances nervously into the cafe and hurries on. In the meanwhile Amara is a mere rinple in the Mesopotamian backwater. Ahead of us, 150 miles up the river, is the Turk. We are pushing on our paddlehox to be ;n time for the advance, and curse our luck that we had to lie ux> at Amara to coal. And now this morning We find we have in tow half a down boats olung'ng in our wake, which will hold ns back the best nart of another day.—Press Associa- tion War Spec'al.

DEVILS BRIDGE

DEVILS BRIDGE. Stock Improvement.-A meeting of the Devil's Bridge and District Bull Club was held in the Council School on Friday. Mr 'J. G. Morris Davies, Pwllpe ran, presided and there was a. good attendance of members. The Chairman gave an account of the purchase of the new bull and of the advantageous sale of the old one. The meeting considered the new purchase a satisfactory one. The fact of its coming from the Royal farm stock-having been bred on one of King George's farms—added t0 the satisfaction and the price of sixty guineas was not grudged in present cir- cumstances. Mr Morris Davies had at- tended the sale and arranged the purchase without charging the Society anything for his services. The meeting very warmly I thanked him for his valuable help. To moot all extra cost, it was readily agreed to raise both the subscript'ons and the fees. All the officers were re-elected—Mr J. G. Morris Davies, president; Mr T. Lewis Jones, Rheidol Homo. secretary, and Mr Morgan Morgan, Tynrhvd, custodian.

LLANGEITHO

LLANGEITHO. Home on Leave.—After five months serv:ce in Flanders, the Rev Capt. G. T. j Davies, Yedw, has been home for the I usual few days leave. He seemed none the worse for his experiences and said there wvs nothing too good lie could say about the spirit and determination of our soldiers. There is no thought of finishing the war until the enemy has been thoroughly and absolutely beaten. Capt. Davies is serving as chaplain to the 75th Infantry Brigade.

Correspondence

Correspondence. HONOUR TO WHOM HONOUR IS DUE. Sin,—Having read in Saturday s paper the account of the service battalions which came to the aid of the Territorials on August 10th in Gallipoli, it seems only fair .;Cl relate some of the doings of Territorials not mentioned in despatches. On August 9th, at Suvla Bay, the 5th and 6th Battalions of the Royal Welsh Fusiliers (531^1 Division) went over and beyond Hill 70 about 500 yards, but had to retire owing to lack of reinforcements, leaving them gallant dead to mark the place of their advancement. I venture to write these few words lest the deeds of brave men should sink into oblivion. The Herefords are also a, battalion to whom all honour is due.-Yours, etc., CYmraes. BEER AND FOOD. Sir.-Your issue of the 3rd March con- tains a report of the proceedings at a temperance conference at Clriccieth in which statements were made as to an alleged waste of food. etc., to the nation entailed by the manufacture of beer. A moment's consideration win show that from a national economic point of view, beer compares favourably with, say, tea, coffee, or cocoa. In the first place, by the increase in the beer duty from 7s. 9d. to 23s. per barrel, the be-er drinkers .of this country have paid a special war tax of over which the cocoa drinkers have escaped. In considering where economies can be effected it is necessary to remember that drink is as necessary as food, and no advantage is to be gained by tlying to force the public to drink one beverage in preference to another. An- other point is that the whole of the cocoa imports amounting to over £ 6,000,COO sterling, comes mostly from outside the British Emp;o, while beer is brewed in this country and a portion only of the raw material comes from abroad. Beer has a definite food value, while tea and i coffee possess no food value and the food value of cocoa certainly does not exceed that of beer. Another verv important point to bear in mind is the immense im- portance of the by-products of brewing. The barley, after it has been used for brewing, is utilised for feeding pigs and cattle and the price of meat and milk would rise immediately if that food was not available. Yeast is obtained from the malt. It contains high food properties and it is now being used both in valuable extracts for human food and in a dried form as food for pigs and cattle. We cannot use tea leaves or coffee grounds for any such purpose and they have no value whatever except as beverages. If we look at the matter from the point of vie, of national economy, much greater savings could be effected bv restricting the importation of tea, coffee, and cocoa than by restricting the importation of barley, as the following fomres showing the value of imports in 1915 will show:—- Barley. £ 4,889.316: cocoa, £ 6,023,958; coffee and tea, £ 19,529,347. Total for tea, cfjiffee, oiid cocoa £ 25,553,305. In con- clusioon, it may be noted that the im- portation of barley has been reduced I without the intervention of the Govern- ment, as the following will show :—Barley imports for 1913, 22,439,248 cwts.; exports, 11,758 cwts., and for 1915, 12,290,485 cwts. imports and 284,865 cwts. exports.-Yours faithfully, ALFRED PARRY. "THE EXPRESSION OF OPINION." Sm,- The following is in reply to Mr. D. Morgan, Powell-street, wnose letter was published last week :— Dear Dewi, give over your blarney. I'm tired of reading your gusli; your quixotic notions and foibles make all venr old-time- friends to blush. Whatever has come o'er you lately ? lou used to be like other men; but now with your growling and siiariiiig you re more like a bear in its den. You brand us as lovers of t bloodshed and yourself a pacifist keen but In warfare with pen and inkpot you're the ink thirstiest being I've seen. One day you re the champion of poachers and assail the powers that be" because they object to those gentry having their sport and gante free. Th-an you attack the professor be- cause he differs from you as to how we should treat those croakers who follow and share your view. At la.st you have found a hero, Phil Snowden, the Blackburn M.P., a paragon of all the virtues. A most wonderful man is lie, a leader most wise and sagacious, an orator second to none, a demigod worthy of worship by all who love Wilhelm, the Hun. But I'm glad I'm not of the coterie that follow such leaders' as Phil who vilify their own compatriots and deify mad Ka is-er Bill. Whatever the faults of our country and they have not always been slight/this time we have proof and con- viction that we fight for Justice and Right. So hang Phillip Snowden's sophistries, and all who endorse his views, too when the German is murdering wholesale it is not timfe to tfilk, but to do Of course, this old world is not perfect but then that is no reason win* we should fly at each other's windpipes whene'er we can't see eye to eye. You mustn't get riled if we differ and hold contra views to you, lad; but we're all convinced that a German is the essence of all that is bad no matter how whitp you may paint hm, or his virtues ( ?) try to extol. In spite of your pseans of laudation, he's a Hun in spirit and soul. Dewi anmvyl, tyrd yn' ol, paid a bod yn wirion gad syniadau gau a ffol i annoeth- ach ddynion. Tyr'd o'r byd • hagfarnllvd bach lie 'rwyt yn trigo. i fwynhau'r awyr- gylch iach mae gwladgarwyr ytiddo.- Yours etc., "Mwyn Firaglatj'r Mot?."

Advertising

-°- °" When I say soap I mean-Fairy soap. The best and goes furthest TROXAS XIDLKT 00. LTD., KEVCASTLX-OX WYNIL ARM CAMBRIAN ♦ RAILWAYS ANNOUNCEMENTS. r- British Industries and the War. Manufacturers and Investors contemplating the Establishment of New Industries as a result 3 of the War, are invited to communicate with The Cambrian Railways, Co., Who have a large number of convenient and suitable O SITES TO OFFER With anAbundant Supply of Water for Generating Motive Power, admirably adapted for the erection of Works, Factories, Warehouses, and other Industrial Undertakings. n The Company are prepared to assist in the establishment of such works by entering into arrangements for siding connections to be 0 C5 n made with the railway, and will be pleased to tobtain and furnish information as to suitable sites, siding facilities, rates for conveyance, &c. Applications should be made to :— S. WILLIAMSON, Oswestry, January, 1916. General Manager. NOW OPEN. The Cambrian News" oil CiRCULATINC m LIBRARY, ""JI" 38, Terrace Road, ABERYSTWYTH I I Subscription Terms on application, I ¡ UP-TO-DATE NOVELS, ¡ l