Teitl Casgliad: Cambrian news and Merionethshire standard

Sefydliad: Llyfrgell Genedlaethol Cymru

Hawliau: Mae hawlfraint yr adnodd hwn yn eiddo i Cambrian News Ltd.

Gwylio manylion cyfan

Cyntaf Cynt Llun 8 o 8
Full Screen
9 erthygl ar y dudalen hon
Rp anil bJn the Coast

Rp anil ()bJn the Coast [Selected], THE INDIVIDUAL'S INSIGNIFjCANGE. Nothing causes me more amusement than the sense of importance which indi- viduals manifest, often most grotesquely, I do not strongly object to manifestations of individual importance when they are not accompanied by irritating acts of pre- sumption, as they too often are, but they always amuse me. Satirists, ancient and modern, have made us well acquainted with the conse- quential person who puts on airs, but I do not want to deal with that side of the subject. The king who acts as if he were God; the commoner who plays at being king; the servant who apes his master are all well known, and I could add nothing to what has been well said a thousand times in every age and every language. What I am impressed with—and I only write about it because my friends are in- terested in that which impresses me-is the insignificance of the individual; not the individual human be'ng only, or even -chiefly, but the individual creature, using the word in its widest meaning. The individual living thing, whether it be man, or bird, or beast, or tree, or plant, or flower is of no apparent conse- quence. The individual moment, or event, or nation, or world seems to be equally insignificant. The sun looks down at the sea. In- visible vapour rises and passes inland to the hills. The vapour falls as rain. One individual drop! What is it? The drop goes back to the sea, and again it is sun- kissed. Once more it falls as rain and again reaches the sea. The rain drop is part of the sea. It is of no significance as an individual drop, but as part of the sea ah, I will stop there. The individual leaf in the forest. Last year—next year. Thousands of years ago —thousands of years to come: always countless myriads of individual leaves. What of them? The individual leaf is nothing that all the other leaves were not, and that all the other leaves will not be. I The individual human being, I think I hear you say, is not like the individual drop of water or like the individual leaf. Per- haps not. I do not. venture to decide, but I have lived a long time and I look at the hundreds of millions of Asia and the hundreds of millions of other parts of the worid. I try to measure how we estimate the individuals who are net ourselves, and I see that we do not estimate them as if they were of consequence. Kings slay them; natural events slay them. We use them up in thousands of ways. They pass -away as the leaves pass away and as the rain drops. The ebb and flow of human life, and of all other life, is ceaseless, and npwhere can I find that the individual is of import- ance. In a short time I shall drift away like a leaf in autumn and be merged like a rain drop. I know this quite well, and I am not unhappy about it, any more than I am unhappy because I am not a king, or a millionaire, or a genius, or because I was not born a thousand years ago. I have accepted my individual insignifi- cance as very few of my friends appear to have accepted their individual insignifi- cance, and the acceptance does not hurt, but gives revelations. Of course I could carve my name in some sort of fashion on a gate post, or on an Egyptian pyramid for that matter, but what then? How little we know of the individuals who caused the pyramids to be built, or of the countless hordes who built them. They came and were part of a great national life. They and the national life passed away, and the cities in which they lived were buried under the slowly- accumulating dust of ages. It is impossible, if you think, not to reaAize that individual is insignificant. I have thought of the obscure natives of China, India, Africa—human beings whose lives we think we are justified in using up as freely as we use up leaves or drops of water. I am not of greater significance than the least of these. You think you are. Very well, I have no quarrel with you. Read your New Testament with your eyes open before you finally decide. In the light of my own insignificance I look at this life and al! that it means as far as I can see and comprehend, and the -outlook is greater and grander and more awful than the consequential creatures who count themselves somewhat could imagine. I do not want to save the world accord- ing to any theory of mine. I see that those engaged in saving it in mall fold ways get only their trouble for their pains. God knows how to save his own worlds, and will take care of them. But you say that I am engaged in trying to save the world. What I have learnt is that the only ills that human beings can cure are the ills that they themselves have made. I am one-an individual. There is much quite near to me that I do not know. in the foregoing lines I tell you how one little aspect of life impresses me. Take it and compare it with your own impression, and do not be afraid to think. You will never be condemned for thinking. Try not to be afraid, and remember that the drifting leaf that flies before the wind cannot be lost-i-, never lost-that the drop of rain goes back at last t,o the sea from which it came, and is no more lost when it returns than it was before it was sun-kissed. I am not afraid of my individual in- significance, nor do I resent it. The place prepared for me long ages past is good enough for me, and, you know, there are worse things in the world than the un- expressed love you have for me who read these words. Perhaps you would say something of this sort if you were writing here in my place as somebody, one day, will be writing. [Next week another side of the subject will he dealt with.] THE TVORLD IS BIGHT. I never doubt the world is right Though I may fail to understand, When men in language dull and trite Profess to show God's guiding hand. "Tis man, not God, I feel is wrong: Man wants to make the world anew; But it is God, not man, that's strong; 'Tis man who takes the narrow view. God knows me. I am not ashamed To own I am his handiwork, And not by God shall I he blamed For all I neither made nor shirk. 0, yes, in God I put my faith, Made strong by what I see and know. Nor fear His anger or His scath, Nor shun the way He bids me go. I have not sought to fathom Him, Or His intentions to declare; He looms above me vague and dim, And I can see him everywhere. I was through all the ages past, I shall be through all future time, No matter where my lot be cast, In starry worlds, or ooze, or slyne. t I am. That is enough for me, The way about me oft is dark No matter what is still to be, I hear God's voices call me. Hark! The Coasts

ABERYSTWYTH

ABERYSTWYTH Angling.—On Wednesday afternoon the members of the Angling Association re- stocked Frongoch pond with 1,500 brown and Lochleven trout. Property.—At the Lion Hotel, on Friday afternoon, Messrs Daniel I. Rees and Evans offered for sale 27, Bridge-street, Walton and Glencairn. North-parade. The three houses were withdrawn. C.E.T.S. At the weekly meeting of St Michael s branch of the Society Dr Jones Powell gave an interesting and instruc- tive lecture on "The Bible." The lecture was illustrated by lantern slides shown by Mr. Panchen. Ladies Coif.—In the ladies monthly com- petition, on Saturday. March llth, there was a tie. The scores were as follows: Mrs. Sylvanus Edwards, gross 99, handi- cap, 14; nett 85; and Miss Sumner, 121, 56, 85. In the re-play, on Monday, March 13th, Mrs. Edwards was the winner. No Change.-Salem Chapel took a vote of the members on Sunday night on the desirability of proceeding to the election of additional deacons. The requisite two- thirds majority for proceeding further not being obtained, the proposal fell through. It was the second occasion for the church to signify its confidence in the present diaconate. I Obituary.—The death occurred early on Wednesday morning of Mrs Jane Wil- liams, wife of Mr David Williams. Albion Inn, at the age of sixty-seven years, after an illness of twelve months. Mrs Williams was a native of the town, her grandfather having built the house in which she had lived for the past thirty-four years. She leaves four children. The funeral takes place on Saturday morning. A Veteran Minister.-The Rev. John Evans, Abermeurig, who was announced to preach at Salem Chapel last Sunday, was unable to keep his engagement be- cause of ill-health. The rev. gentle men is now in his eighty-sixth year and is one of the oldest ordained ministers of the Connexion. Up to a recent period he has, been able to keep his engagements almost without a break. He has a daughter living in Aberystwyth (Mrs Hugh Hughes, Bodarfor). War Appointment.—Mr H. Browning Button, distr ct agent for the Cambrian Railways in Birmingham for many years is retiring from the position temporarily with the Company's permission to enable him to take up an important position in Birmingham under the Ministry of Muni- tions. Mr Button was resident on the Cambrian coast for many years before leaving for Birm ngham in 1902 to open the Cambrian Company's publicity office in that city and his many friends in this district are pleased to hear of his success. An Extra Spurt.—At the weekly sessions on Wednesday before John Evans (mayor), and Peter Jones, Esqrs., Evan Davies, Cyncnfawr, Llanfihangel-y-Greuddyn, was charged with having ridden a bicycle without light. P.C. Richards, Llanbadarn, gave evidence Itht, he was on duty at Penparke on Thursday n:ght when defend- ant passed him. The constable shouted to him to stop; but defendant bent over the p handle bars and made an extra spurt. Failing to get hold of hos coat the con- stable ran after defendant for twenty-five yards. Defendant became unsteady and fell off the machine. When asked for an explanation, defendant said "I have nothing to say. You have got me now." He wished to settle the matter then. The lamp he had was cold.—Defendant said he did not know that the constable shouted to him.—A fine of 5s. was imposed. Lecture.—At St. Paul's Wesleyan School- room on Wednesday evening, Mr S. G. Rudler gave a lecture on Why Germany declared "War." Mr Arthur Jones L.C. and M. Bank, presided over a large atten- dance. Mr Rudler dealt with the subject in an exhaustive and interesting manner. The lecture was illustrated by eighty- seven lantern slides a large number of which depicted scenes of devastation and of wanton destruction wrought by the Germans in Belgium and in Northern France. There was also an excellent slide of Aberystwyth College and of two detachments of the College O.T.C. The lanternist was Mr E. T. Lewis, Great Darkgate-street. The Chairman proposed a. cordial vote of thanks to the lecturer for the excellent work he has done in delivering lectures in Aberystwyth and the neighbourhood. Mr. 1). G. Parry seconded the proposition and it was carried with cheers. The Chairman was thanked on the motion of the Rev. Alfred Jones. A collection was taken in aid of R.S.M. Fear's comforts fund and, insluuing a donation by tne Chairman it amounted to two guineas. Roil of Honouir.N-irs Rea, White Horse Hotel, Terrace-load, has received intima- tion of the death on March 7th of her grandson, Clorporad John Rea. Morgan, from wounds received the previous day in France. He was the son of Mr and Mrs Morgan, 26, Russell-road, Wavertree, Liverpool, and was tw-entyix years lof age. Before the outbreak of war he was in Canada and came over in October in one of the contingents. Having been in training on Salisbury Plain he was drafted to France three weeks ago. He had fre- quently visited Aberystwyth and was well known among the young people of the town and the news of his death was received by them with great sorrow. His mother has had a, sympathetic message from the Commanding Officer, saying how much Corporal Morgan had endeared himself to the officers and men of the regiment by his suipy smiles and manly ways. By a sad •amincidence Mrs Rea 'received by the •amincidence Mrs Rea 'received by the same post intelligence of a nephew killed in action, namely, Sergt. Frederick Austin, of Manchester. He belonged to the Artillery and, though comparatively young, being twenty-two years of age only, he had been promoted sergeant and was in charge of three guns when he was shot by a sniper. He had a promising career, having; Served in the Palatine Rank and was also hon. secretary of the Boy Scouts Association. Mrs Rea has several nephews in the fighting lin. Much sympathy is flelt with her in the family bereavements. wIm Sua.—Questions arising under the will of the lace Mrs Lucy Vaughan Cooper, of 14, .Viarine-terrace, Aberyst- wyth, came for determination before Mr •Justice \ounger in the Chancery Division on Tuesday on a summons taken out by Mr William John Cooper, husband, and executor of her wdl. Defendants were Miss Eliza Vaughan Rees and Miss Hannah Vaughan IRees, whose address was given as the Joint Counties Asylum, Carmar- then; Miss Mary Vaughan Rees, 14, Marine-terrace, Aberystwyth; and Mrs Gertrude Annie TonRins, of Brimfield Court, Herefordshire. Mr Griffith Jones (instructed by Messrs Watkins, Pullen, and Ellis, agents for Mr Hugh Hughes, Aberystwyth), appeared for plaintiff; Mr Adams for the first two defendants, and Mr Robertson for the other two, both counsel being instructed by Messrs Bell, Brodrick, and Gray. Mr Griffith Jones explained that the first question to be determined was whether a bequest to plaintiff under the will, which was dated April 9th, 1914, was good, notwithstanding the absence of the list mentioned in the will as being attached. The bequest was:— u I give the whole of the furniture and effects in the warehouse in Bradley's yard Great Darkgate-street, Aberystwyth and all the household furniture, china, silver, and glass belonging to me at 14, Marine- terrace, unto my husband absolutely." Assuming that the bequest was good, the j next question was whether it covered testatrix's one-third share in the silver, j china, and glass forming substantially the stock-in-trade of the business of old china and bric-a-brae dealers carried on at 14, Marine-terrace, and what steps plaintiff should take as executor to obtain her share and to wind up the partnership that had existed between deceased and the defen- dants. With regard to the first question, the testatrix had died before she had time to attach the list of articles referred to. His Lordship held that the bequest was good, notwithstanding the absence of the list, and that the gift of the property in Bradley's yard was confined to household furniture and effects belonging to the testatrix. Mr Griffith Jones said the stock- in-trade of the business in Marine-terrace was worth about k2,COD. His Lordship suggested that the parties should make a! trip to Aberystwyth and point out the articles they claimed, and that the owner- ship shculd be determined by the Regis-! trar of the local County Court. The articles could then be sold. Mr Adams should endeavour to obtain the permission cf the Master in Lunacy to this proceed- ing. That was agreed to. Mr Griffith Jones said the executor desired to get rid of the mortgage of £ 1,000 on the house. i I Requisites.—The Surgical Requisites Association desire to gratefully acknow- ledge the following :-Mrs, D. C. Roberts, Ll Is.; Mrs. Io-xclate, 5s.; Mrs. E. H. James, 7s. 6d.; Mrs. Evan Evans, 5s.; Mrs Davies, Ffosrhydygaled, 5s.; and Mrs. Wynne, 5s. Amount previously acknow- ledged, ijtiS 13s. 5d. Personal.-There were several photo- I graphs of the Countess of Lisburne in the Society papers after St. David's Day and the selling of Welsh .lags by her Ladyship at Harrods. The photo in the "Tatler" shews Lady Lisburne pinning a Welsh flag on to the coat uniform of General Paget and the large photo in the" Lady" shews her ladyship in her own drawing room. Her ladyship is making excellent progress in her Welsh studies, under the direction of Dr. Austin Jenkins. Death in America.—The death occurred suddenly on Monday, February 7th, at 11, ¡ Ruth-street. Mount Washington, of Mr. I John Price, for many years engine driver on the Cambrian Railways. He left Aber- ystwyth about thirty-five years ago and was in his seventy-fourth year. For a number of years he had been in the employ of the P. C. C. and St. L. Railway Com- I pany, and at the time of his death was employed by the Jones and Laughlin Steel Company. Two sons, Alexander and I Albert J. Price, and two daughters, Miss Irene Price and Mrs Clarence Argall, sur- vive. Promotion for an Aberystwyth Man.- Mr John H. P. Evans, only son of Mr and Mrs L. P. Evans, of Havil-street, Camberwell, has been promoted to the rank of leading signalman on H.M.S. "Africa" and has been the recipient of many hearty congratulations. Mr Evans, who is a native of Aberystwyth, is a prom- inent member of the Welsh Calvinistic Chapel, Falmouth-road. Southwark, and, quite apart from the good wishes that have been extended to him, he has re- ceived many presents from friends of his parents who are well known in South London and tare held in the highest esteem. Competitive Meeting.—At the Presby- terian Church, on Wednesday evening, a competitive meeting was held under the directorship of Mr. Edward Williams, chief constable. The secretary was Miss Whit- taker, Kingsmead, Custom House-street, who was assisted by Miss Griffiths, Queen's- road. The Rev. R. Hughes M.A., pastor, gave a short address in which he stated that Mr. H. Saycell was to take th-ei chair when he arrived; but Mr. Saycell declined the honour. The first item was a piano- forte soloi competition, in which the winner was Irene Ellis. For a recitation for children under seven, W. M. Ellis was awarded the prize. A letter to a soldier was sent in by Miss Nellie Benbaw and Mair, and the prize was divided between them. Solo for children under twelve: The Adjudicator (Mr. T. Williams), awarded the prize to Mary Thomas. Reci_ tation: 1, Elinor Bennett, and 2, Gertie Jones. A prize for a St. David's Day address at a school in Wales was won by Miss Whittaker, who refunded the money. Solo for girls under sixteen Ida Phillips. A letter applying for a situation in a bank: 1. Alwyn Jones • 2, Percy Jenkins. Recitation for boys ana girls over ten and under sixteen: 1, Ida Phillips; 2, Irene Ellis; 3, Alwyn Jones. A day with the Girl Guides: Gladys Samuel. Solo for boys and girls under eight: Edward Ellis. The translation priz-e was won by Miss Bess Jones. Elinor (Bennet won in a com- petition in drawing of an arm chair by children under twelve. For one pint of lemon jelly, suitable for an invalid: Mrs. Saycell, who returned all her prize money to the funds. Drawing of a group of three ordinary utensils: Percy Jenkins. Solo for boys under sixteen: Harry Hughes For a pencil drawing from a post- card of any view in the neighbourhood, the prize was divided! between! Mr. ;W. Ellis and Gordon Phillips. Recitation for those over sixteen: Miss Edwards, U.C.W. Crochet lace edging: Rhosniegr pattern: Mrs. Saycell. About two pounds of beef, pressed, glazed, and decorated: Mrs. Speller. Challenge solo for adults: Miss Edwards, U.C.W. Dish of lemon sponge: Mrs. Saycell. Impromptu speech Alwyn Jones. Unpunctuated reading: Gladys Samuel. General knowledge: Miss Griffiths. The adjudicators were the Rev. R.. Hughes, M.A., essays; Professor W. Jenkin Jones, M.A.. translation; Miss Mabel Williams, M.A., drawings; Mr. E. Chambers and Mr. W. Ellis, recications Mrs. W. Richards and sirs. Lewis Roberts, cookery; and Mr T. Williams and Mr. Arthur Jenkins, music. The Chairman (Mr. E. Williams) proposed a vote of thanks to all who had taken part, which was seconded by Mr. Speller, South- terrace, and Mr. Edwin Jones. Cae'rgog. The accompanists were Mrs Ellis, Little Darkgate-street, and Mr. Edwin Jones, Cae'rgog.

SWYDDFFYNON

SWYDDFFYNON Death.- We regret to record the death and funeral of Miss Rachel Daniel, Ynysy. bout. She was the daughter of the late Mr. Evan Daniel, Ynysybont, and had been ailing for some years. The funeral took place on March 4th at i strad Meurig. The service was conducted by the Rev J. M. Williams and the Rev. G D. Jones. There was a large and representative funeral.

LAMPETERI

LAMPETER. Tea.—The children of Soar Sunday School were treated to a tea on Wednes- day afternoon and had a little concert afterwards. The annual tea party for all the Sunday School scholars was done away with this year owing to the war.

County Appeal Tribunal

County Appeal Tribunal. The fiist meeting of the County Appeal Tribunal was held at Lampeter on Wed- nesday when there were present Messrs Jchn Jones, Cwmere; Lima Jones, Aber- ayron; D. C. Roberts, Aberystwyth; Evan Evans, Aberystwyth; H. M. Vaughan, Llangoedmore; R. J. R. Loxdale, Oastle Hill; Joseph Evans, Llanfairfawr; R. S. Rowland, The Garth; R. R. Nancarrow, Pontrhydygroes. A letter was read from Sir Lawrence Jenkins regretting his'in- ability to be present and stating that he was engaged at the Privy Council and would be so engaged for about a month. Mr John Jones, as chairman of the County Council, took the chair pro tem. The first business on the agenda was the appointment of Chairman. Mr D. C. Roberts proposed Mr John Jones as chairman. The Rev John Williams stated that as Sir Lawrence Jenkins could not be present he would second the proposition. Mr H. M. Vaughan said that inasmuch as Sir Lawrence Jenkins was one of the most distinguished judges in the Empire, he would propose him as Chairman. Mr R. S. Rowland seconded that pro- position. On a vcte, Mr John Jones was appointed by five votes to four. Mr Evan Evans, clerk to the County Council, was appointed clerk. There were eighteen appeals to be con- sidered. Mr J. H. Davies was present on behalf of the Board of Agriculture, The first case was that of a carpenter and wheelwright who claimed exemption on the ground that he was the sole support of his widowed mother. His employer, a contractor, also applied on his behalf as indispensable to him. He stated that he had a contract on hand which had to be finished by July under penalties. He could not get carpenters. His two sons were in the army. Mr J. Emrvs Jones, Lampeter, appeared for appellant. The decision of the local tribunal was reversed and the man was granted two months exemption. Thomas Jones, Troedyrhiwcymmer, Llanddewibrefi, appealed against the decision of the local tribunal disallowing the claim of his two sons—one a shepherd and another a horseman. Mr J. Emrys Jones appeared for application. It was stated that the farm was 1,461 acres in extent and that 2,000 sheep were kept. There were four sons on the farm. One! was over military age and one other had obtained an exemption. In reply to Mr J. H. Davies, it was stated that the lambing nnd shearing season was a very busy one. The decision of the local tribunal was con- firmed. ) An egg merchant appealed on the ground that he was the sole support of an nged father, an invalid, and a mother. He was an attested man, but produced two certificates of ill-health. The decision was confirmed. A farmer from Llangeitho appealed for his son who was a cowman. The farm consisted of 110 acres and was a difficult one to work. He had three sons at home, but if that man was taken he would not be able to carry on the farm. Applicant J was sixty-three years of age. His wife was an invalid and one daughter had to attend to her. The other daughter was also an invalid. In reply to Colonel Brewer, applicant said that one son was working on another farm and had been there six years. He had five sons alto- gether and none of them was doing any- thing for his country. The decision of the local tribunal was confirmed. A postman and hotel assistant claimed exemption. He was not present on account of ill-health. He stated in his ) appeal form that he carried the mail and helped in the hotel, the Mabws Arms, and had about ten acres of land. He did all the secretarial duties of the hotel. The case of a tailor at Tregaron was referred back to the local tribunal, the applicant stating that he had not received notice of the local tribunal and knew nothing of it until it was over. An agricultural carpenter and builder, twenty-one years of age, appealed on the ground that he was the sole support of his widowed mother. He presented a petition signed by twenty-six farmers in the neighbourhood, saying that his services were required. Decision of the local tribunal confirmed. A person from Ystrad Meurig appealed on the ground of ill-health. He produced a certificate from Dr Morgan, Pontrhydy- grces. Mr William Davies, solicitor, Aberystwyth, who appeared for applicant, stated that he had a brother in the army and nothing would give applicant greater pleasure than to also serve if he was able. On it being stated that he could go before a medical board, Mr Lima Jones stated that a local doctor would be much better able to deal with a case of that kind as he knew the history of the patient. The Rev John Williams—He ought to be examined at home. Mr D. C. Roberts—It is such a waste of money and time to send cases of this kind to Newport. Mr William Davies-It would be no credit to Colonel Brewer to fill the ranks with the likes of this man. Applicant stated that he was not fit to travel to Newport. He had lived for ten months on milk. He had never done any- thing in his life owing to ill-health. The case was adjourned, arrangements to be made in the meantime to have applicant examined in the county. In the case of a grocer from Pontrhyd- fendigaid, Mr William Davies stated that applicant, acting on his advice, had joined the forces. A student at St. David's College School applied for postponement until June as he was sitting the matriculation examination of St. David's College and intended going into the ministry. The decision of the local tribunal was confirmed. A farmer from Llangeitho, for whom Mr J. Emrys Jones appeared, appealed on the ground that he was indispensable to the farm. He and his brother farmed 103 acres, thirty acres under plough, and he vv/as in charge- 14 an bil engine and machinery. His father farmed another farm and had a son at home. He had one brother in the army. His father's farm was three quarters of a mile away. He had been in the Yeomanry. His father had seven sons—four only at home. Decision of the local tribunal confirmed. A tailor from Llangybi appealed as a conscientious objector and on the grounds that he was deaf in the right ear. There was difficulty in getting the applicant to understand what was asked him. The de- cision of the tribunal was confirmed subject to the man being examined. A farm labourer from Ystrad Meurig appealed as indispensable on the farm and on the ground of physical unfitness. The farm was eighteen acres, six acres being ploughed. His father was a letter carrier. His mother was delicate and a brother was subject to fits. He could not see any- thing with his right eye and very little with the left. John Rees, C.M., Pont- rhydfendigaid, said he knew applicant from boyhood. He was always a puny, effeminate child. He could learn nothing in school. The decision of the local tribunal was confirmed. Mr W. Davies appeared for applicant. The next case was adjourned, applicant not appealing. In the case of a theological student and teacher from Swyddffynon, it was stated I by Mr W. Davies, that he had agreed with Colonel Brewer that the applicant should join a non-combatant service. A farmer from Bronant, farming twenty acres, appealed. He had three acres of ploughed land. He had his mother and sister dependent upon h,m. The farm could not he carried on without him. The applicant was put through a searching cross-examination by Colonel Brewer. Mr John Davies, Rhydlwyd, corroborated applicant's statement. In reply to. Col. Brewer, he stated that applicant had told him he was willing to go after the sowing. He was given an extension to the end of March. Mr W. Davies appeared for appli- cant. The last case was adjourned on the application of Colonel Brewer. Mr W. Davies appeared for applicant and stated that he was ready to go on. All the appeals were from the Tregaron District Tribunal.

London ToDay Other Impressions

London To-Day Other Impressions. in. It was a Sunday morning. There was a, wet grip in the air when one first stepped out of doors. The mist was not a fog, nor a drizzle. It was a veil that helped to make it Sundae. na. The Rouses were asleep. It was a rest- ful sleep, after a week of toil and noise. The aspect of the streets conduced to give an optimistic quality to broad general- izations. It was early morning and I felt the same sense of intangible proprietorship as in walking along Portland Place. There was not a human being just then in Chancery Lane So far as the eye could see. From the particular turret from which the soul was looking, and no mundane object interposed all London was mine. It was a temper of pure expectancy open to strange influences from memory and the under soul. It visualized the unseen. The films of memory became exposed to a warm sun- light which brought into being exquisite pictures of perfect joy scenes. I There is the ancient gateway of Lincoln's Inn. There the Lord Chancellors of old days held their Courts. Probably this gave its name to Chancery Lane. The chapel was built by Inigo Jones. Welshmen should be congratulated upon finding a home from home in South- ampton Buildings. By the way, Isaac Walton must have carried on a business near the Bingham. The man who loomed large, a couple of hundred vards ahead, coming round the corner from Fetter Lane might have been Hwfa Mon. It is true that Tom Paine, the revolu- tionary and de:stical writer, resided at Fetter Lane and John Drvden and Thomas Otway. Thomas Goodwin, too, might have preached in the Independent Chapel there which was built in 1732; but for all time, to me. Fetter Lane belongs to Hwfa. Mon. In what queer places did the Non- conformists of the eighteenth century plant their chapels, quiet nooks, where the moss of centuries had gathered. The Poultry, Fetter Lane, Jewin-street Ml Now we have followed the glaring hotels into the front-at Holborn. Charing Cross and elsewhere. I know of a man who once, in groping for a chapel in Charing Cross-road stepped into a public bar and on another occasion into a Roman Catholic Chapel. Christianity, for some time, has entered into competition for prominence and dis- play and the public eye with theatres, huge hotels, and cinemas. Nay, the theatres are becoming more modest. I wonder whether it is the right way? Most likelv it will be beaten in the running by the world, the flesh, and the devil. l Each by itself can do much. The Joint 4 Stock Company are past masters ever since "The Temptation in the Wilderness." There they failed, but that was an ex- ceptional event. Here is St. Clement Danes. In Saxon times the Strand was the haunt of the Danes. There is a legend that Harold the Dane and some of his followers were buried there. St. Clement was the seaman's patron saint. It was no difficulty, on that morning, to trip over the ages as one crosses the river by stepping stones, and consequently no time was consumed in getting back to Christopher Wren designing the body of the Church as it stands to-day. The pulpit is a. matchless work from the hands of Grinling Gfibbons. But here come Samuel Johnson and James Boswell. They are going to worship there. It is Good Friday, 1781. Said Johnson, on that occasion to an old fellow-collegian whom he accidentally met there, It is the best place we can meet in, except Heaven." And skipping the centuries once more, who can help lingering a moment longer, for was it not here that Master Robert Ccil," the first Earl of Salisbury, was baptised (June 6th, 1563?) Why was it that Charles Lamb, who lived close by, accompanied by C. K. Chesterton should have intruded just then ? I was in no mood to talk to Chesterton, for he had said the truth about the Welsh people just recently, and there is nothing that hurts like the truth. This is what he had said—"The Germans, like the Welsh, can sing per- fectly serious songs perfectly seriously in chorus; can with clear eyes and clear voices join together in words of innocent and beautiful personal passion, for a false maiden or a dead child." The nearest one can get to defining the poetic temper of Englishmen is to say that they couldn't do that even for beer. As I wanted to spend my Sunday with Welsh friends and attend at a Welsh Chapel it was time to quit such company and get back by way of Chancery Lane to Holborn. And what a, matchless luxury it was to walk along the centre of Holborn—the very middle of the street—without a taxi or omnibus in sight! At t'mes there were no more than half a dozen people in sight and one could take a. quarter of a mile of the street in at one glance. What Hwfa Mon was to Fetter Lane; that is, what Joseph Parker used to be to Holborn-but latterly in the second case my allegiance has been divided somewhat. Next door to the City Temple is St. Andrew's, which teems with daylight ghosts. This church is considerably below the level of the street. But it was there as far back as the year 971. It is the largest of Wren's Parish Churches. Judge Jeffreys, who had more music than grace in its soul, chose its organ in 1688. Of course, it has long, except in some parts, given place to a better one. Charles Lamb attended a wedding here as best man to Hazlitt. More charming yet the thought. Benjamin Disraeli was here, at the age of twelve years, baptised into the Christian faith on the 31st July, 1817. After that it is only a tame thing to remember that Addington. prime minister, 1801-4, and Richard Savage were bapt;sed in this Church. But there is a tragic interest in the entry in the register that Thomas Chatterton had ended his misery by taking poison in Brooke-street, Holborn, and that his remains were interred in the burial ground of the workhouse in Shoe Lane- a genius of seventeen years. And here is the City Temple. On the 22nd June, 1890, at the eleven o'clock ser- vice his text was Because there are no changes, they know not God." "Mighty" was our joint comment on that wonderful Sunday, and m/ghtier in prayer than in lr's sermon. There was a placard, a rather common- place placard hung on to the railing, in front of the Chapel—announcing that the Revs M. P. Morgan of Blaenanerch and B. M. Hughes of P'embrey. would nreach at the City Temple on St. David's Day. The placard metamorphosised soul and spirit. The atmosphere of a Cyfarfod Mi sol was magically produced. Just the ar to breathe as I looked on to the duties of the day. To mention that this Chapel cost £ 70 0C0 is only a third-rate fact concern- ing its great record. The town is certainly entrancing where- ever one goes. Even opposite the rather dingy barracks up Kensington way. there lies Holland Park, and that recalls the personality of Lord Holland, so. highly extolled bv Lord Macaulay, and of Charles James Fox, the ^brilliant man of the world and debater; and of Addison, who spent an unsatis- factory spell of married life with his wife, the Countess of Warwick, at Holland House, and who resorted to a tavern close by as a means of escape from matrimonial infelicity. Hendon was as miserable as a wet day could make it. The flying, like all great devices, dis- appointed on the side of simplicity. One might think that a biplane could be as easily constructed as children made kites forty years ago and that to go up into the clouds in an airship was as simple a matter as to go in a boat on the sea. It would take another chapter to write of the other great experiences which only London can produce and this must be the last. But there should be a word concerning the Victoria Gardens. My companion ejaculated at the end of a magnificent performance of Gounod's "Faust/' "I could listen to this every night for 100 years. One may gaze at the monument of Robert Burns in the Gardens on tho Embankment without ever tiring of it. I The poet is seated, pen in hand. He is about, it would apoear transferring his I inspirations to paper. From every angle I of observation the effect is equally im- pressive. Every statue in these gardens makes the s'ghtseer glad, for the men are great II benefactors—Robert Raikes, the founder of Sunday Schools; Henry Fawcett. the blind Postmaster-General; W. Fl. Foster, the author of the Elementary Education Act (1870): Sir Wilfred Lawson, the tem- perance reformer; and, last and not least a bust of Sir Arthur Sullivan, with a broken Ivre close by, and a score of one of the Gilbert and Sullivan operas in his hand. ljp there, at the Savoy Theatre, sixteen years ago. two of us laughed joyously as we Fstened to all the exquisite music and fun of the "Pirates of Penzance," and my thoughts to Heaven now wing that wav. J.M.H.

Advertising

Meetings, Entertainments, FROG L.AJY.1:.ATION", -4- DARKENED STREETS. AND WHEREAS, it has become known to us that by the darkening of our streets and the lessened opportunities for outdoor recreation, the nation is turning to those indoor entertainments which offer most for the money, and that fit in most closely with the spirit of the day. The need is met by Mr. Cheetham's Cosy CINEMA in Market Street, where bright and entertaining pro- grammes help to counteract the gloom occas- ioned by war and worry. Caerleon House, ABERYSTWYTH. COLLEGIATE SCHOOL FOR GI KLS. ALSO KINDERGARTEN. RECOGNISED. Principals: Miss RICKS, B.A. -and Mrs RUSSELL DAVIS. PUPILS PREPARED. for London and Welsh Matriculation, Cambridge Local, Associated Board of Royail Academy of Music and Royal College of Music, Trinity College and other examinations. Physical Training, Hockey and Tennis. Mr. George A. Harding, DENTAL SURGERY, 41, MARINE TERRACE, Aberystwyth. Attends 1st and 3rd Wednesdays in each month at Mrs. Jones. Prospect House, 7, Portland-place, Aberayron. UNIVERSITY COLLmE OF WALEb ABERYSTWYTH (One of the Constituent Colleges of the University of Wales). President: am JOHN WILLIAMS, Bart., M.D. D.Sc., G.C.V.O. Principal: T. F. ROBERTS, M.A. (Oxon), LL.D (Viet.) rpHE FORTY-FIFTH SESSION be- -*• gins on October 4th, 1916. A number of Entrance Scholarships and Exhibitions, open to both male ana female | candidates above the age of 16 years, are offered for competition on Tuesday, Sep. tember 19th, 1916, and the following days. Students are prepared for Degrees in Arts, Science (including the Applied Science of Agriculture), Law, and Music. Sessional Compositifon Foo-In Arts, 2121; in Science. JB16. Registration Fee, Ll. Men students reside in registered lodgings in the town, or at the Men's Hostel; Warden, H. H. Paine, M.A., B.Sc Women students reside in the Alexandra Hall of Residence for Women; Warden. Miss C. P, Tremain, B.A. For full par- ticu'lars respecting the General Arts and Science Departments, the Law, Agricul ture, Elementary and Secondary Training Departments, the Department of Instru mental Music, and the Hostels, apply to J. H. DAVIES M.A., Registrar Barmouth and District. Walter Lloyd Jones, Auctioneer and Values QALES of Property, Furniture, and Farm Stock conducted on Moderate Terms and Promptly Cashed. For terms, etc., apply the Auctioneer, King Edward Street, or Mr John Roberts, Ripon House. 42, TERRACE ROAD THE Shop for all kirdfi of BOOTS AND SHOBf At the Lowest1 Possible Fricf REPAIRS promptly Rood neatly dor the premipefj with the bftst. bark.t\i\ Le-viiher

Family Notices

girths, ^tarriagee,. anb Heath* -.J' BIRTHS. Davies-On March 15th, at 98, Gloucester Road, Regents Park, London, to Mr and Mrs W. P. Davies, a son. William.-At the Presbyerian Manse, Parkstou, South Dakota, U S.A., to Rev. and Mrs Ll Bnines Williams (formerly of Trefecea College), a daughter. c453 MARRIACES. Davies—Thomas-.—March 12th, at Willes.. den Green C.M. Church, London, by the Rev. J. Thickens. Mr. J. Emrys Davies, second son of the late Captain Davies and of Mrs. Davies, Gomer House, New Quay, to Miss May Elsie Thomas, second daughter of the late Captain Thomas, Angorfa, Fishguard. Jones—Lloyd—March llth, at Maengwyn C.M. Chapel, Machynlleth, Mr Edward Jones, Tymawr, Esgairgeiliog, and Miss Catherine Lizzie Lloyd, Plas, Rhiwgwr- eiddyn. Bees- Jon es-March llth, at Soar Chapel, Lampeter, Private David Rees, A.S C., LIanftiio, and Miss Sarah Mary Jones, only daughter of Mr and Mrs John Herbert Jones, Brynawel, Cwinanne, Lampeter. DEATHS. Buckley-March llth, Mr Edward Buckley, Glanygors Bungalow, Ynyslas, and late of the Vietoria Inn, Aberystwyth, aged 67. Davies.—Last Monday, Mrs. Mary Ann Davies, 1, Bridge-street, Llanon, at the age of eighty-four years. Isaac—Marcn 5th, Miss Annie E. Isaac, daughter of Mr D. Isaac, Penygraig, Taliesin. Isaac.—March 5th, at Beili Farm, Myd- roilyn, Mr Jacob Isaac. Jones,—March 13Lh, Captain Humphrey Jones, The Cliffe, Criccieth. Lewis.—On Wednesday, March 8th, -Mr. John Lewis, London House, Llanon, at the age of 92 years Lewis.—March 3rd Mr. William Lewis, Llety Hywel. Yshytty Ystwyth. Puh-March 10th, Master Pugh, son of Mr William Pugh, tailor, Taliesin. Roberts-Mai-eli 9th, Miss Mary Jane Roberts, Croydon House, Machynlleth. Robei-ta.-M,srch 13ih, Mrs H. G. Roberts, Derwen, Morfa Nevin, Pwllheli. Roberts.—Last week, Mr 'John Roberts, 98, Manod-road, Blaenau Festiniog, aged 26. Williains-Last week, at Abercynou, Mr Williams, late of Braichgoch-terrace, Con is, Williams-March loth, Mrs Jane Williams, wife of Mr David Williams, Albion Inn, Aberystwyth, aged 67. Williams.—At 22, Alderley-avenue, Bir- kenhead Mrs Catherine Williams, wife of the late Mr Hugh Williams, draper, Portmadoc, aged 76, DIED FROM WOUNDS IN FRANCE. [ Morgan.—March 7th, of wounds received the previous day, Corporal John Rea Morgan, Canadian Expeditionary Force, dearly-loved son of Thomas and Catherine Morgan, 26, Russell-road, Wavertree, Liverpool, and grandson of Mrs. Rea, Terrace-road, Aberystwytn. c462 IN MEMORIAM, In ever loving memory of our dear father, Capt. James James (Waterloo), who passed away March 16th, 1911. Five years have passed and still we miss him, Deep within our hearts entwined Lives the memory of dear father, Ever loving, true and kind. Mother, Kitty, and Annie. c450 ACKNOWLEDGMENTS. Miss Nell Howell-Hughes desires to thank all friends who so kindly sympathized with her in the recent great loss of her Mother, the late Mrs John Hughes, Glasfryn, Aber- dovey. c452 Dr. R. D. Evans, Llys Meddyg, Blaenau Festiniog, and family desire to return their sincere thanks for the kind words of sympathy conveyed to them personally and in letters and telegrams from friends in this country and in Canada, and from various Eublio bodies and churches, in their sad ereavement in the death of Lieutenant David Owen Evans, killed in action in France. c445 Mrs Hughes and family, 4, Cambrian-place, return thanks for kind enquiries and sympathy in their recent bereavement. c471 Printed by the proprietors. The "Cambrian News," Aberystwyth, Ltd., and Published by them in Terrace-road, Aberystwyth, in the County of Cardigan; at Ll. Edwards, Stationer, High-street, Bala; and John Evans and nephew, Stationers, Glany. mor House. Barmouth, in the County of Merioneth; and at David Lloyd's Portmadoc, in the County of Carnarvon- Friday, March 17, 1916. 5

Advertising

ISTOTIOE. Fo R. CYDE & H. G. PICKFORD, —— PHOTOGRAPHERS, .M> BOTH OF PIER STREET, having entered into partnership, the STUDIOS of both will be amalgamated, and the business carried on at 22 & 24, Pier Street, Aberystwyth, under the personal direction of Mr. Piokford. By the new arrangement it is confidently hoped that with increased facilities, together with every attention to individual sitteri, satisfaction will be assured. c407 ROBERTS' I T ABLE ALE ¡ 3 14ra per Doz, Imperial Pint. Supplied in Screw-Stoppered Bottles. ;.{ I A. wholesome Ale, strongly recommended for family use, BOTTLED BY i Dd. ROBERTS & SONS, Ltd., j BREWERS, ? _A_IB E RYSTWYTH- t720 | t 4' !• J- The Latest Creations IN mmow alas smi MILLINERY Costumes AND Blouses 0 Now Showing IN OUR WINDOWS. THOMAS ELLIS & CO., Terrace Road, Aberystwyth. PHONE 61. O-WEN OWEN is an easy name to remember. A "N. We should like you to remember it whenever yon V? y I have an order to place for Cakes, Confectionery, or Catering. You will then assure yourself ot that Satisfaction which you are entitled. f K u It is our one aim in business to cater for our If I K customers in a better way than they have ever been II ) 4 V-f J catered for before. That we have already rea ched a I I I 1 high standard is evidenced by the fact that many J j. t 1 awards for Bread Making have been received. n f A good way to sample our Dainties is by paying a I\ 1 visit to our Tea Rooms. Will you do so the next 1 ? V" "l time you are having Tea out ? I L ( ( PT" Our Home-made Sweets, particularly our I—J r y Chocolates, are just the thing for sending to LS V_ friends at the Front. owsw s (D. W. TEVIOTDALE), High-class Baker, Confectioner and Caterer, 19/21, NORTH PARADE, ABERYSTWYTH.